Journal of Scientific & Industrial Research

VOLUME 68

NUMBER 12

DECEMBER 2009

CONTENTS

Review

993

Bio-absorbable polymers in implantation-An overview


S Nagarajan & B S R Reddy*

Industrial Chemistry Laboratory, Central Leather Research Institute, Chennai 600 020, India

Poly-α-hydroxy aliphatic esters are novel bio-absorbable polymers (BAPs), which are being used extensively as implantation products (orthopaedics, drug delivery, scaffolds and sutures). Polylactic acid (PLA), polyglycolic acid (PGA) and polydioxanone (PDO) are approved from food and drug administration agency (FDA) for human clinical uses. This review presents available synthetic routes for making bio-absorbable polymers, their properties and end use applications.

1010

D-Erythritol derivatives -versatile C4 chiral building blocks: Synthesis and applications



Sakkarapalayam M Mahalingam1,
Vijay S Satam2, Bijay K Mishra3 &
Hari N Pati3*


1
Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036, India

2Institute of Chemical Technology (ICT), Matunga, Mumbai 400 019, India

3Department of Chemistry, Sambalpur University, Jyoti Vihar 768 019, India

 

Among various synthetically important chiral building blocks, four carbon atom (C4) chiral building blocks bearing double and/or multiple functionalities are especially interesting because of their usefulness in synthesis of chiral pharmaceuticals, chiral agrochemicals, chiral polymers, natural products and chiral monosaccharides. This study reviews synthesis of D-erythritol derivatives as chiral C4 synthetic units and their important applications.

Management & Information Technology

1026

Modeling behaviour of congenital anomalies diagnosed through prenatal USG based on risk factors


Prasun Das1* & Aiswaryya Deep Ghosh

1Indian Statistical Institute, SQC & OR Division, 203, B T Road, Kolkata 108, India

2R G Kar Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata, India

 

This study presents teratogenic factors and their deleterious effect on embryogenesis (congenital anomalies) in various age groups of pregnant mothers. A classification rule is developed based on significant risk factors in identifying possibility of future anomalies in mothers based on statistically significant risk factors. Developed system is suggested to using for early detection of cases, as a screening procedure and other preventive investigations as necessary.

S & T and Industrial Research

1035

Relaxation of compressive residual stress. Part 1: Relaxation of stage I



Omar Suliman Zaroog1*, Aidy Ali1,2,
B B Sahari1,2 & Rizal Zahari3

 

 

1* Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering Department, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM, Serdang Selangor, Malaysia

2 Institute of Advanced Technology (ITMA), Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM, Serdang Selangor, Malaysia

3Aerospace Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia

In this study, 2024-T351 aluminum alloy specimens were shot peened into three shot peening intensities condition to induce compressive residual stresses (RSs). Fatigue test was performed for the first and second cyclic load. Initial RSs at initial condition and after first and second cycle of fatigue loading were measured using X-ray diffraction method. Relaxation for first cycle was found to reach over 40% of initial RS and it depended on load amplitude.

Text Box: Residual stress, MPa
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


1038

Rapid tooling of tyre tread ring mould using direct metal laser sintering




Jelena Milovanovic*, Milos Stojkovic, & Miroslav Trajanovic



Faculty of Mechanical Engineering Niš,
A. Medvedeva 14, 18000 Niš, Serbia

Paper outlines a feasibility study of using direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) for rapid tooling (RT) of tread ring of tyre vulcanization mould. Lead time and costs for rapid tooling with DMLS is acceptable for small mould segments (1/64 of tread ring). RT strategy that utilizes DMLS appeared to have significant advantages concerning lead time and costs as compared to conventional tooling of tyre mould including CNC-HSM engraving. Simplicity of tread ring tooling by DMLS makes new tyre development and test easier and faster.

1043

Involvement of some process variables in mass transfer kinetics of osmotic dehydration of mango slices and storage stability


V R Sagar* & P Suresh Kumar

Division of Post Harvest Technology, Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi 110 012, India

 

Osmotic dehydrated mango slices can be prepared from firm and ripe mango fruits after peeling and cutting of fruits into slices (2 cm thick) and dipping in a solution [sugar (600B) + KMS(0. 05%) + citric acid (0.1%)] for 6 h at 60°C. Optimum solid gain (12.3%), water loss (31.8%), mass reduction (19.4%) and sensory attributes in slices were recorded in 60°B sugar solution at 60°C. Osmotic drying considerably increased sugar content and reduced acidity without any significant change in colour, texture and original flavour of slices. Product was acceptable up to 6 months when it was stored in 200 g high density polyethylene (HDPE) bags at ambient temperature.

Energy and Environment

1049

Use of post flame metal-based and oxygenated additive combination for biodiesel-diesel blends



M Husnawan1,2*, H H Masjuki1, T M I Mahlia1, S Mekhilef1 & M G Saifullah1



1Energy Research Centre, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia



2Department of Mechanical Engineering, Syiah Kuala University, J l S Abd Rauf, No.7 Darussalam – Banda Aceh, Indonesia

 

This paper presents effects of using vegetable oil-based additive combined with metal-based additive on exhaust emissions of 4-stroke diesel engine fueled with biodiesel. Tests were conducted using biodiesel from palm blended with diesel, palm polyol and MgO as a post-flame additive. Palm-biodiesel blended fuel with and without additive generally produced less emission compared to ordinary diesel. Moreover, post flame additives was found successfully diminishing poisonous exhaust gases from diesel engine combustion, eliminating stringent environmental issues on atmospheric pollution.

1053

Field measurements of acoustic quality in university classrooms

Paulo Henrique Trombetta Zannin* & Andressa Maria Coelho Ferreira



Laboratório de Acústica Ambiental – Industrial e Conforto Acústico – Universidade Federal do Paraná, Departamento de Engenharia Mecânica, Centro Politécnico, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Bairro Jardim das Américas, Curitiba, Paraná, CEP: 81.531.990, Brasil

 

This paper evaluates acoustic quality of university classrooms in terms of acoustical parameters [external and internal equivalent sound pressure level, reverberation time(RT) and sound insulation of façades]. Only one classroom of BG building exhibited internal equivalent sound pressure level exceeding permissible value of 50 dB(A). RT values, measured in PC Building, were in 6 classrooms in accordance with recommended values from international standards. On the other hand, in BG building, RT measured in all classrooms exceeded established limits. Only completely occupied classrooms in BG building exhibited better acoustic quality in terms of RT as compared to partially occupied and empty classrooms.

1058

Energy efficient and environmentally sound technologies for small and medium scale textile cluster



R Velavan*, R Rudramoorthy &
S Balachandran




PSG College of Technology,
Coimbatore 641 004, India

 

Continuous and sustained growth of small and medium scale units in Indian textile garment sector has resulted in increased CO2 emission and effluent discharge. Analysis of processing units in Tirupur, India, has helped to identify some energy efficient and environmentally sound technology (E3ST) measures. This paper identifies potential for pollution reduction with selected E3STs.

Waste Treatment and Utilization

1063

A study on degradation of pesticide wastewater by TIO2 photocatalysis




R Rajeswari1 & S Kanmani2




Centre for Environmental Studies, Anna University, Chennai 600 025

Photocatalytic degradation of Carbendazim, a commercial grade pesticide, has been investigated. Optimum degradation (76%) of Carbendazim (40 mg/l) was observed in 60 min at pH 6 and catalyst concentration (1g/l). Degradation was lowered by the presence of carbonate and phosphate ions. Studies on real industrial wastewater revealed that removal of pesticide (99%) was faster and mineralization (76%) required longer duration. Formation of inorganic ions (ammonium and nitrate) proved fragmentation of pesticide and formation of intermediates.

1068

Influence of pH, temperature and cultural media on decolorization of synthetic dyes through spent substrate of different mushrooms



O.P. Ahlawat* & Rajender Singh




Directorate on Mushroom Research (ICAR), Chambaghat, Solan 173 213, India

Spent substrate of Agaricus bisporus, Pleurotus sajor-caju and Lentinula edodes was evaluated for decolourization of 4 different dyes under different cultural conditions (media, incubation temperature and medium pH). Potato dextrose broth media supported highest decolorization (90% of Rhodamine B and Methyl Violet 2B, 93% of Chicago Sky Blue 6B and 88% of Quinaldine Red) after 3 days of incubation with P. sajor-caju spent substrate. Optimum pH requirements were 7.0 and 10.0 for Rhodamine B and Methyl Violet 2B with spent substrate of L. edodes, while 4.0 and 7.0 with A. bisporus and P. sajor-caju. Spent substrate of A. bisporus supported highest decolorization of Rhodamine B (95-95%) and Methyl Violet 2B (91-100%), followed by L.edodes + P. sajor-caju. Temperatures of 25 and 35oC were most effective for decolorization of Rhodamine B (90%) and Methyl Violet 2B (97%) with spent substrate of A.bisporus alone.

Waste Treatment and Utilization

1075

Determination of biosorption conditions of Methyl Orange by Humicola fuscoatra



Tugba Subasioglu* & Isil Seyis Bilkay



Hacettepe University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biology 06532 Beytepe, Ankara, Turkey

This study presents effects of biomass concentration, dye concentration, agitation time, initial pH and temperature on dye (Methyl Orange) removal by dead fungal biomass of Humicola fuscoatra. Biosorption capacity was found dependent mainly on dye and adsorbent dosage. Highest adsorption efficiency was achieved with fungal biomass at 0.5g/l. Dye concentration (100 mg/l) was found optimum for maximum dye removal. At acidic pH (3-5) and 30 C, Methyl Orange biosorption increased significantly in first 6 h.

Author-Reader Platform

1078

Annual Author Index

1083

Annual Keyword Index

1090

Instructions to contributors

 
 

 

 

Author Index

 


Ahlawat O P

1068

Ali A

1035

 

 

Balachandran S

1058

Bilkay I S

1075

 

 

Das P

1026

 

 

Ferreira A M C

1053

 

 

Ghosh A D

1026

 

 

Husnawan M

1049

 

 

Kanmani S

1063

Kumar P S

1043

Mahalingam S M

1010

Mahlia T M I

1049

Masjuki H H

1049

Mekhilef S

1049

Milovanovic J

1038

Mishra B K

1010

 

 

 

Nagarajan S

993

 

 

Pati H N

1010

 

 

Rajeswari R

1063

Reddy B S R

993

Rudramoorthy R

1058

 

 

Sagar V R

1043

Sahari B B

1035

Saifullah M G

1049

Satam V S

1010

Singh R

1068

Stojkovic M

1038

Subasioglu T

1075

 

 

Trajanovic M

1038

 

 

Velavan R

1058

 

 

Zahari R

1035

Zannin P H T

1053

Zaroog O S

1035


 

 

Keyword Index

 


Acoustics quality

1053

Agaricus bisporus

1068

Apparent weighted sound reduction indices

1053

 

 

Bio-absorbable polymer

993

Biodiesel

1049

Biosorption

1075

 

 

Carbendazim

1063

Chiral C4 synthetic units

1010

Chiral pharmaceuticals

1010

Classification rule

1026

Classroom acoustics

1053

Congential anomalies

1026

 

 

D-Erythritol derivatives

1010

DMLS

1038

Dye

1075

Dye decolorization

1068

 

 

Emissions

1049

Energy Efficiency

1058

External equivalent sound pressure level

1053

 

 

GHG emission mitigation

1058

Humicola fuscoatra

1075

 

 

Industrial wastewater

1063

Internal equivalent sound pressure level

1053

 

 

Lentinula edodes

1068

 

 

Mango slices

1043

Mass reduction

1043

Metal-based additive

1049

Methyl Orange

1075

Mineralization

1063

Multivariate statistical analysis

1026

 

 

Natural products

1010

NEB

1043

 

 

Osmotic dehydration

1043

 

 

Palm oil

1049

Pleurutus sajor-caju

1068

Polyglycolic acid

993

Polylactic acid

993

Post-flame additive

1049

Prenatal USG

1026

 

 

Rapid prototyping

1038

Rapid tooling

1038

Residual stress

1035

Residual stress relaxation

1035

Resource conservation

1058

Reverberation time

1053

Risk factors

1026

 

 

Shot peening

1035

Solid gain

1043

Sound insulation

1053

Spent mushroom substrate

1068

Synthesis

1010

 

 

TiO2 photocatalysis

1063

Tyre mould

1038

 

 

University classrooms

1053

 

 

Water loss

1043

 

 

X-ray diffraction

1035