Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics

 

 

Total visitors: 4,472  since 20-12-06

 

VOLUME 43

ISSN: 0301-1208

NUMBER 6

DECEMBER 2006

CODEN: IJBBBQ

 

CONTENTS

 

Minireview

 

Non-enzymatic glycation of proteins: A cause for complications in diabetes

337

        R B Nawale, V K Mourya* and S B Bhise

 

 

 

Papers

 

Overexpression of a recombinant g-glutamyltranspeptidase from Escherichia coli  Novablue

345

        Ya-Feng Yao, Yih-Ming Weng, Hui-Yu Hu and Long-Liu Lin*

 

 

 

Mechanism of inhibition of Ca2+-transport activity of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase by anisodamine

351

        Yuhong Pang, Xiaozhu Li, Sanbo Qin, Hongjie Zhang* and Jianwen Chen*

 

 

 

3D-QSAR of histone deacetylase inhibitors as anticancer agents by genetic function approximation

360

        Nilesh K Wagh, Hemantkumar S Deokar, Dhanshri C Juvale, Shivajirao S Kadam, and Vithal M Kulkarni*

 

 

 

A new fragmentation rearrangement of the N-terminal protected amino acids using ESI-MS/MS

372

        Zhen-Tai Zhu, Yan-Mei Li*, Yan-Ting Guo, Ming Sun, Yu-Fen Zhao

 

 

 

Biosynthesis of protease from Lactobacillus paracasei: Kinetic analysis of fermentation parameters

377

        Ikram-ul-Haq and Hamid Mukhtar*

 

 

 

Facultative alkalophilic bacteria from mangrove soil with varying buffering capacity and H+ conductance

382

        P Kannan, S Ignacimuthu* and M Gabriel Paulraj

 

 

 

Notes

 

Acute effects of a partially purified fraction from garlic on plasma glucose and cholesterol levels in rats: Putative involvement of nitric oxide

386

        Mokni Mehrzia, Limam Ferid, Amri Mohamed and Aouani Ezzedine*

 

 

 

Purification of l-asparaginase from a bacteria Erwinia carotovora and effect of a dihydropyrimidine derivative on some of its kinetic parameters

391

        V P Kamble, R Srinivasa Rao, Prita S Borkar, C N Khobragade* and B S Dawane

 

 

 

Meeting Report (TRendys 2006)

395

 

 

Annual Author Index

397

 

 

Annual Subject Index

399

 

 

List of Referees

409

 

 

Instructions to Authors

413

 

 

——————

*Author for correspondence

 

AUTHOR INDEX

 

Bhise S B

337

Borkar P S

391

Chen J

351

Dawane B S

391

Deokar H S

360

Ezzedine A

386

Ferid L

386

Guo Y-T

372

Haq I

377

Hu H-Y

345

Ignacimuthu S

382

Juvale D C

360

Kadam S S

360

Kamble V P

391

Kannan P

382

Khobragade C N

391

Kulkarni V M

360

Li X

351

Li Y-M

372

Lin L-L

345

Mehrzia M

386

Mohamed A

386

Mourya V K

337

Mukhtar H

377

Nawale R B

337

Pang Y

351

Paulraj M G

382

Qin S

351

Rao R S

391

Sun M

372

Wagh N K

360

Weng Y-M

345

Yao Y-F

345

Zhang H

351

Zhao Y-F

372

Zhu Z-T

372


 

  

 

Minireview

Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics

Vol. 43, December 2006, pp. 337-344

 

 

Non-enzymatic glycation of proteins: A cause for complications in diabetes

R B Nawale, V K Mourya# and S B Bhise*

Govt. College of Pharmacy, Osmanpura, Aurangabad 431 005, India

*Govt. College of Pharmacy, Vidyanagar, Karad, Satara 415 124, India

Received 29 May 2006; revised 20 November 2006

Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common non-communicable diseases, and is the fifth leading cause of death in most of the developed countries. It can affect nearly every organ and system in the body and may result in blindness, end stage renal disease, lower extremity amputation and increase risk of stroke, ischaemic heart diseases and peripheral vascular disease. Hyperglycemia in diabetes causes non-enzymatic glycation of free amino groups of proteins (of lysine residues) and leads to their structural and functional changes, resulting in complications of the diabetes. Glycation of proteins starts with formation of Shiff’s base, followed by intermolecular rearrangement and conversion into Amadori products. When large amounts of Amadori products are formed, they undergo cross linkage to form a heterogeneous group of protein-bound moieties, termed as advanced glycated end products (AGEs). Rate of these reactions are quite slow and only proteins with large amounts of lysine residues undergo glycation with significant amounts of AGEs. The formation of AGEs is a irreversible process, causing structural and functional changes in protein leading to various complications in diabetes like nephropathy, retinopathy, neuropathy and angiopathy. The present review discusses about role of glycation in various complications of diabetes.

Keywords: Diabetes, Glycated protein, Advanced glycated end products, Diabetic retinopathy, Diabetic neuropathy, Diabetic nephropathy, Diabetic angiopathy

 

# E-mail: vkmourya_pharmacy@yahoo.com

 

 

Papers

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics 

Vol. 43, December 2006, pp. 345-350

 

 

 

 

Overexpression of a recombinant g-glutamyltranspeptidase from

Escherichia coli Novablue

 

Ya-Feng Yao1, Yih-Ming Weng1, Hui-Yu Hu 2 and Long-Liu Lin3,*

1Graduate Institute of Food Science, National Chiayi University, 300 University Road, 60083 Chiayi, Taiwan

2Department of Food and Nutrition, Hungkuang University, Taichung 433, Taiwan

3Department of Applied Chemistry, National Chiayi University, 300 University Road, 60083 Chiayi, Taiwan

Received 23 May 2006; revised 03 October 2006

A truncated Escherichia coli Novablue g-glutamyltranspeptidase (EcGGT) gene, lacking the first 48-bp coding sequence for part of the signal sequence, was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and cloned into expression vector pQE-30 to generate pQE-EcGGT. The maximum production of His6-tagged enzyme by E. coli M15 (pQE-EcGGT) was achieved with 0.1 mM IPTG induction for 12 h at 20°C. The overexpressed enzyme was purified to homogeneity by nickel-chelate chromatography to a specific transpeptidase activity of 4.25 U/mg protein and a final yield of 83%. The molecular masses of the subunits of the purified enzyme were determined to be 41 and 21 kDa respectively by SDS-PAGE, indicating the precursor EcGGT still undergoes the post-translational processing even in the truncation of signal sequence. His6-tagged EcGGT migrated relative to the molecular mass of approximately 120 kDa and its heterodimeric structure was confirmed by a native-PAGE gel.

KeywordsEscherichia coli, g-Glutamyltranspeptidase, Signal sequence, Overexpression, Nickel-chelate chromatography

*E-mail: llin@mail.ncyu.edu.tw


 

 

Indian Journal of Biochemistry & BiophysicsVol. 43, December 2006, pp. 351-359

 

 

 

 

Mechanism of inhibition of Ca2+-transport activity of sarcoplasmic reticulum
Ca2+-ATPase by anisodamine

Yuhong Pang, Xiaozhu Li, Sanbo Qin, Hongjie Zhang* and Jianwen Chen*

Institute of Biophysics, Academy Sinica, 15 Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101, China

Received 09 June 2006; revised 13 November 2006

The mechanism of inhibition of Ca2+-transport activity of rabbit sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) by anisodamine (a drug isolated from a medicinal herb Hyoscyamus niger L) was investigated by using ANS (1-anilino-8-naphthalenesulfonate) fluorescence probe, intrinsic fluorescence quenching and Ca2+-transport activity assays. The number of ANS binding sites for apo Ca2+-ATPase was determined as 8, using a multiple-identical binding site model. Both anisodamine and Ca2+ at millimolar level enhanced the ANS binding fluorescence intensities. Only anisodamine increased the number of ANS molecules bound by SERCA from 8 to 14. The dissociation constants of ANS to the enzyme without any ligand, with 30 mM anisodamine and with 15 mM Ca2+ were found to be 53.0 mM, 85.0 mM and 50.1 mM, respectively. Both anisodamine and Ca2+ enhanced the ANS binding fluorescenc with apparent dissociation constants of 7.6 mM and 2.3 mM, respectively, at a constant concentration of the enzyme. Binding of anisodamine significantly decreased the binding capacity of Ca2+ with the dissociation constant of 9.5 mM, but binding of Ca2+ had no obvious effect on binding of anisodamine. Intrinsic fluorescence quenching and Ca2+-transport activity assays gave the dissociation constants of anisodamine to SERCA as 9.7 and 5.4 mM, respectively, which were consistent with those obtained from ANS-binding fluorescence changes during titration of SERCA with anisodamine and anisodamine + 15 mM Ca2+, respectively. The results suggest that anisodamine regulates Ca2+-transport activity of the enzyme, by stabilizing the trans-membrane domain in an expanded, inactive conformation, at least at its annular ring region.

Keywords: Anisodamine, Sarcoplasmic reticulum, Ca2+-ATPase, Ca2+-transport activity, ANS binding fluorescence, Conformational change

E.mail: hjzhang@sun5.ibp.ac.cn

 

 

 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics

Vol. 43, December 2006, pp. 360-371

 

 

 

3D-QSAR of histone deacetylase inhibitors as anticancer agents by genetic function approximation

 

Nilesh K Wagh, Hemantkumar S Deokar, Dhanshri C Juvale, Shivajirao S Kadam and Vithal M Kulkarni*

Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Poona College of Pharmacy, Bharati Vidyapeeth Deemed University,
Erandwane, Pune 411 038, India

Received 08 June 2006; revised 31 August 2006

Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play a critical role in gene transcription and are implicated in cancer therapy and other diseases. Inhibitors of HDACs induce cell differentiation and suppress cell proliferation in the tumor cells. Although many such inhibitors have been designed and synthesized, but selective inhibitors for HDAC isoforms are lacking. Various hydroxamic acid analogues have been reported as HDAC inhibitors. Here, we report a three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) study performed using genetic function approximation (GFA) for this class of molecules. QSAR models were generated using a training set of 39 molecules and the predictive ability of final model was assessed using a test set of 17 molecules. The internal consistency of the final QSAR model was 0.712 and showed good external predictivity of 0.585. The results of the present QSAR study indicated that molecular shape analysis (MSA), thermodynamic and structural descriptors are important for inhibition of HDACs.

Keywords: 3D-QSAR; Genetic function approximation, Anticancer agents, Histone deacetylases, Hydroxamic acid analogues, Physico-chemical descriptors

*E-mail: vivivips5@gmail.com

 

Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics

Vol. 43, December 2006, pp. 372-376

 

 

A new fragmentation rearrangement of the N-terminal protected

amino acids using ESI-MS/MS

 

Zhen-Tai Zhu, Yan-Mei Li*, Yan-Ting Guo, Ming Sun and Yu-Fen Zhao

The Key Laboratory of Bioorganic Phosphorus Chemistry & Chemical Biology (Ministry of Education),
Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, P. R. China

Received 23 February 2006; revised 12 November 2006

A novel fragmentation rearrangement reaction with a carboxyl oxygen negative charge migration was observed in the N-terminal protected amino acids including Fmoc-protected phosphoserine, phosphothroenine, and phosphotyrosine and their analogues using the electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS). The possible mechanism of a five-membered ring transition state was proposed and supported by the further experiments. It was found that the tendency of the rearrangement was determined by the blocking status of its C-terminal and the reaction was proved to be independent of the N-terminal and side-chain protecting groups of the amino acids.

Keywords: Terminal-protected amino acids, ESI-MS/MS, Electronic migration, Rearrangement

*E mail: liym@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

 

Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics

Vol. 43, December 2006, pp. 377-381

 

 

Biosynthesis of protease from Lactobacillus paracasei: Kinetic analysis of fermentation parameters

Ikram-ul-Haq and Hamid Mukhtar*

Institute of Industrial Biotechnology, G.C. University, Lahore 54000, Pakistan

Received 31 May 2006; revised 21 November 2006

Fifteen strains of Lactobacillus species, isolated from different samples of curd were screened for their ability to produce more extracellular protease. The proteolytic activities of these strains based on casein hydrolysis showed a variation of 1.26-5.80 U ml-1, with Lactobacillus IH8 showing the maximum activity and was identified as L. paracasei. Different cultural conditions for enhanced production of protease by L. paracasei were optimized. The optimal conditions for production of the enzyme were an incubation temperature of 35°C and a medium pH of 6.0. The maximum proteolytic activity of L. paracasei (7.28 Uml-1) was achieved after 48 h of cultivation. The kinetic parameters such as product yield (Yp/x), growth yield (Yx/s), specific product yield (qp) and specific growth yield (qs) coefficients also revealed that the values of experimental results were kinetically significant.

Keywords: Protease, Lactobacillus, Kinetics, Medium pH, Incubation temperature

*E-mail: hamidwaseer@yahoo.com

 

Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics

Vol. 43, December 2006, pp. 382-385

 

Facultative alkalophilic bacteria from mangrove soil with varying buffering capacity and H+ conductance

P Kannan, S Ignacimuthu* and M Gabriel Paulraj

Entomology Research Institute, Loyola College, Chennai 600 034, India

Received 19 May 2006; revised 20 September 2006

Facultative alkalophilic bacteria Planococcus sp. (EMGA-26), Bacillus sp. (EMGA-29) and Corynebacterium spp. (EMGA-33 and 130) were isolated from mangrove soil samples. Neutrophiles were predominant than alkalophiles. Buffering capacity and membrane H+ conductance were investigated for the strains grown in PPYG medium at pH 10.5 using acid pulse technique. Bacillus sp. showed higher buffering capacity than Planococcus sp. and Corynebacterium spp.  Buffering capacity was two-fold higher in Corynebacterium sp. EMGA-33 than in EMGA-130. The membrane H+ conductance was high in Bacillus sp. and was directly proportional to the buffering capacity values. The Bacillus sp. (EMGA-29) had higher cell membrane adaptability in high pH environment than the Planococcus sp. and Corynebacterium spp.

Keywords: Facultative alkalophile, Buffering capacity, H+ conductance, Planococcus, Bacillus, Corynebacterium

*E-mail: eri_lc@hotmail.com

 

                             

 

       Notes

 

Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics

Vol. 43, December 2006, pp 386-390

 

 

Acute effects of a partially purified fraction from garlic on plasma glucose and cholesterol levels in rats: Putative involvement of
nitric oxide

Mokni Mehrzia1, Limam Ferid2, Amri Mohamed1 and Aouani Ezzedine1*

1Laboratoire de Physiologie de la Nutrition, Facultι des Sciences de Tunis, Campus Universitaire El Manar II, 2092 Tunis, Tunisia

 

2Laboratoire Interactions Lιgumineuses-Microorganismes, Centre de Biotechnologie, Technopole Bordj Cιdria, Tunisia

Received 03 August 2006; revised 15 November 2006

Garlic has been extensively used as a medicinal plant. Most of its numerous beneficial effects such as antioxidant, antibacterial, antitumoral involve sulfur-derived amino acids. In the present work, we reevaluated the acute effects of aqueous extract of garlic on plasma glucose and cholesterol levels in normal rats. Control (vehicle H2O) or garlic extract-treated group at 100-120 mg protein/kg body wt were intraperitoneally injected (IP) and glucose, cholesterol, insulin and nitric oxide metabolites levels were determined after a short-term duration of 6 h. We confirmed that garlic contained an active fraction, exerting both glucose and cholesterol-lowering activity. The glucose-lowering effect was triggered by an increase in insulinemia. Preliminary study indicated that the active agent was different from S-allyl-cysteine-sulfoxide, the active principle implicated in hypoglycaemic and hypolipidemic effects of garlic or arginine. The mechanism of action seemed to involve nitric oxide (NO), which increased time and dose-dependently. The garlic effects were abolished by diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI = 1 mg/kg body wt), a specific inhibitor of NO production, suggesting the involvement of constitutive nitric oxide synthase.

Keywords:   Garlic, Rat, Glucose, Cholesterol, Insulinemia, Nitric oxide.

*E-mail: ezzedine_aouani@yahoo.fr

 

Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics

Vol. 43, December 2006, pp.  391-394

 

Purification of l-asparaginase from a bacteria Erwinia carotovora and effect of a dihydropyrimidine derivative on some of its kinetic parameters

 

V P Kamble1, R Srinivasa Rao1, Prita S Borkar1,
C N Khobragade1* and B S Dawane2

1School of Life Sciences, Biotechnology Research Laboratory, Swami Ramanand Teerth Marathwada University,
Nanded (MS) 431 606

2Department of Chemistry, Yeshwant Mahavidyalaya,
Nanded (MS) 431 606

Received 19 August 2006; revised 17 November 2006

l-Asparaginase shows antileukemic activity and is generally administered in the body in combination with other anticancer drugs like pyrimidine derivatives. In the present study, L-asparaginase was purified from a bacteria Erwinia carotovora and the effect of a dihydropyrimidine derivative (1-amino-6-methyl-4-phenyl-2-thioxo, 1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyrimidine-5-carboxylic acid methyl ester) was studied on the kinetic parameters Km and Vmax of the enzyme using l-asparagine as substrate. The enzyme had optimum activity at pH 8.6 and temperature 35°C, both in the absence and presence of pyrimidine derivative and substrate saturation concentration at 6 mg/ml. For the enzymatic reaction in the absence and presence (1 to 3 mg/ml) of dihydropyrimidine derivative, Km values were 7.14, 5.26, 4.0, and 5.22 M, and Vmax values were 0.05, 0.035, 0.027 and 0.021 mg/ml/min, respectively. The kinetic values suggested that activity of enzyme was enhanced in the presence of dihydropyrimidine derivative.

KeywordsErwinia carotovora, l-Asparaginase activity, Dihydropyrimidine derivative

*Email: cnkhobragade@rediffmail.com

 

 

Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics

Vol. 43, December 2006, pp. 395-396

 

TRendys Meeting Report 2006


The thirteenth meeting of TRendys in Biochemistry, a forum to discuss frontier areas and emerging concepts in biochemistry, was held at National Institute of Nutrition (NIN), Hyderabad during August 18-19, 2006. Dr. M Raghunath, Deputy Director, NIN, convener of the meeting, welcomed the gathering comprising eminent scientists, research scholars and students. Prof. Kalluri Subba Rao, National Convener, TRendys in Biochemistry briefed the genesis of TRendys and gave the highlights of the TRendys past meetings. Prof. T Ramasarma, who originally conceived this type of meetings, traced the growth of the TRendys over the years and mentioned how scientists in the country are bogged down with lots of administrative responsibilities, travel, membership in various committees, etc. and how that is equated with the growth of the scientist!

 Padmasri Dr. Seyed E Hasnain, Vice Chancellor, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad, in his oration talk “Tracing Human Ancestry Using Viruses and Other Commensals ” traced the origin and migration of human ancestors using virus and other commensals. He outlined the problems of human origins and migrations and the difficulties associated with such studies, and listed various tools such as archaeological, linguistic and genetic markers to trace human ancestry. He also briefed about the utility of mutations, micro-satellites and haplotype analysis for individual population, forensic and archaeological applications, based on the length of the micro-satellites. In the second part of this talk, dealt upon the construction of phylogenetic trees, their uses and various algorithms used for computations. Citing suitable examples, he emphasized that viruses and commensals co-existing across the time scale can be used conveniently to trace the human migration. In recognition of his thought-provoking oration lecture, Dr. Hasnain was felicitated and presented with a silver plaque by Dr. B Sesikeran the Director, NIN, the host Institution,.

 

 Prof. T Ramasarma (Center for DNA Finger-printing and Diagnostics, Hyderabad), in his talk “Give an Enzyme a Name: You will not Know its True Functions” shared some of his experiences with superoxide dismutase (SOD), an enzyme that catalyzes dismutation of superoxide radicals (O2·- + O2·- + 2H+ O2 + H2O2). Based on his experiences, he observed that SOD could catalyze the reverse reaction leading to production of superoxide radical in the presence of vanadate and other metal ions. He shared the difficulties encountered in convincing the reviewers of various journals about the reverse reaction of SOD. He emphasized, “because we already settled to a name for a given protein, which in itself describes certain specific function, this leads to a biased approach”. He pointed out that it is being increasingly recognized that many proteins are multi-functional, and their function depends on the cellular demand and conditions at the given period.

 

 Dr. Raghu Kalluri, Harvard Medical School, USA, spoke on “From an Experiment to a Drug” as a part of the “Spikes and Flashes” session introduced at this meeting. He emphasized the importance of thinking towards a clinical problem while doing basic research. He shared that basic research is exciting and rewarding in terms of publications, yet one should constantly focus on the clinical utility of the work. Therefore, he urged the group to work on existing health problems leading to development of drugs.

 

 Dr. M N V Prasad, University of Hyderabad, spoke (Spikes and Flashes) on “Healing Plants that Accumulate and Hyper accumulate Toxic Trace Elements: Risk or Remedies for Traditional Systems of Medicine”. He presented data on heavy metal content of various plants, herbs that are commonly used as food and medicine. He expressed his concern on the high concentrations of toxic metal ions in many commonly used plants have, particularly when cultivated in industrial areas. He cautioned that green leafy vegetables like spinach and amaranth are being grown in unhygienic and polluted areas, which have high concentrations of toxic metals, and hence pose potential health risks.

 

 Prof. V Sitaramam, University of Pune, in his talk on “Plant Yield: What to Measure” highlighted the lack of early markers for measuring the yield of a plant, despite its routine use in selecting seed varieties. He added that plant growth patterns, branching patterns etc. are not of much use in measuring the yield. He concluded that measuring oxygen consumption of an early seedling would correlate with its growth and possible productivity.

 

 Prof. J Shobhanaditya, Osmania University Hyderabad, in his talk (Spikes and Flashes) on “Cellular Functions of Ubiquitin” explained the ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation mechanisms. He provided a diagrammatic representation of various proteins and enzymes involved in protein degradation, and role of proteasomes in protein processing.

 

 Dr. Amitabh Chattopadhyay, Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Hyderabad spoke about the “ Bloch Hypothesis and the Evolution of Cholesterol: How Essential is Cholesterol”. He dealt upon about the weird nature of cholesterol and its importance in metabolism and focused on biosynthesis of cholesterol and elucidated the Bloch and Kandutsch pathways. He also highlighted the clinical manifestations of defective cholesterol biosynthesis (Smith-Lemlie Syndrome), where there is a increased formation of 7-dehydrocholesterol, rather than cholesterol, due to an apparent block in 7-delta reductase. The possible replacement of cholesterol with desmosterol in in vitro models was also discussed.

 

 Dr. Bhanuprakash Reddy, National Institute of Nutrition, Hyderabad speaking on “Nutrition Research in the Era of Omics and Beyond” stressed the importance of understanding the molecular mechanisms and network of alterations rather than single molecules, either due to supplementation or deficiency of nutrients, particularly micronutrients. He outlined the various frontier areas of nutrition research being carried out at NIN, Hyderabad. He stressed that research should continue on maternal under-nutrition and its consequences, role of dietary factors on degenerative diseases, bio-availability screening methods, diabetes and obesity research as these complications are directly linked to the nutrition.

 

 Prof. Sohan Modak (IGIB, Delhi) on his talk on “Multiparametric Consensus Molecular Phylogenetic Trees in 3-D” explained various ways of constructing the phylogenetic trees, based on phenotypic and genotypic markers. Some of the problems associated with statistical methodologies being used for constructing phylogenetic trees were highlighted. Examples were presented to demonstrate that same data would give different results, depending on the algorithms used. Finally, he presented his recent work on constructing 3-D models with and without roots. He emphasized that this kind of visualization increases the clarity of the data and is easy to understand and interpret.

 

 Prof. Kalluri Subba Rao, University of Hyderabad, in his talk (Spikes and Flashes) on “Unusual Paths to Discovery: The Story of Lamin A” discussed about ‘Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome’ (HGPS), a genetic disorder characterized by rapid aging and death during second decade. He explained the story of an American doctor couple, with a son afflicted with this genetic disorder, their unprecedented struggle to wake up the scientific community of that country, and finally succeeding in identifying that a large deletion in the lamin A gene as possible locus. He emphasized that a special kind of scientific culture and scientific temper are needed for achieving such successes.

 

 Dr. K P Mohankumar, IICB, Kolkata speaking
on “The Aging Mitochondria” explained that mito­chondrial genes are not inherited by the same mechanism as nuclear genes. At fertilization of an egg by a sperm, the egg nucleus and sperm nucleus each contribute equally to the genetic make-up of the zygote nucleus. In contrast, the mitochondria, and therefore the mitochondrial DNA, usually comes from the egg only. He presented evidences to indicate that sperm's mitochondria enters the egg, but are destroyed and do not contribute their genes to the embryo.

 

 

 

M Raghunath*, B Sridhar and P Raghu

National Institute of Nutrition

Hyderabad 500007

*E-mail:manchalar@yahoo.com


 

 

 

ANNOUNCEMENT

 

33rd Indian Immunology Society Conference

(28th–31st  January 2007, AIIMS, New Delhi)

 

 

The Indian Immunology Society proudly announces its “33rd Indian Immunology Society Conference” on “Molecular and Clinical Immunology in Health and Disease” being organized by the Department of Biochemistry, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi, during 28—31 January 2007 at Jawaharlal Nehru Auditorium, AIIMS, New Delhi. The conference coincides with the Golden Jubilee celebrations of AIIMS. The CME program on current trends in immunology, scheduled for the evening of inaugural day would provide an excellent opportunity to students to directly interact with distinguished scientists and experts in the field.

The conference would have six symposia encompassing a variety of topics viz. current concepts in immunology and approaches to immunological research, and tools and techniques used in research and clinical immunology laboratories. Invited talks include the following topics:

 

Congress Secretariat:

Prof. D N Rao                                                                                                 

Organizing Secretary                                                                                             

Department of Biochemistry

All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar

New Delhi-110029, India

Tel: 91-11-26593545 (O); 26195609 (R); Fax: 26588641, 9868592706 (M)

Email: immunocon33@rediffmail.com

Website: http://wwwaiims.ac.in; http://www.indianimmunology.org

 

Annual Author Index

 

 

Adhya M

94

Advani S H

7

Ahmad R

217

Al-Ayed M S

186

Ali I A F

312

Angayarkanni N

275

Antony B

182

Archunan G

319

Banavali S D

7

Bandyopadhyay S

7

Bhatia V S

41

Bhise S B

337

Borkar P S

391

Chainy G B N

37

Chandra A

244

Chatterjee B P

94

Chatterjee Mary

299

Chatterjee Mitali

7

Chatterjee N

233

Chen J

351

Chi Z

143, 289

Chiou S-Y

52

Dalai M K

105

Das S K

306

Dasgupta D

148

Datta S

254

Dawane B S

391

Daxiang S

88

Deokar H S

360

Dikshit M

69

Dixit R

15

Dixit S

15

Emerole G O

20

Ensari Y

123

Ezzedine A

386

Farombi E O

20

Fatima R A

312

Ferid L

386

Gakhar S

15

Gao L

289

Garg A

82

Garg P

98

Ghirardi M L

201

Ghosh P K

25

Girigowda K

295

Guo Y-T

372

Gupta A K

32

Gupta S

254

Gupta Y K

69

Guruprasad K N

41

Haq I

377

Hasnain A

217

He S

143

Hoque M

167

Hu H-Y

345

Husain E

312

Ignacimuthu S

382

Joshi N

323

Joshi P

323

Juvale D C

360

Kadam S S

360

Kamble V P

391

Kannan P

382

Kaskhedikar S G

32

Katoch S S

160

Kaur K

267

Khobragade C N

391

Kόηόkkaya B

251

Kulkarni V M

360

Kumar N

226

Kumar S

226

Lai G-W

52

Lakshmi S

275

Leonard J T

105

Li X

351

Li Y-M

372

Liang L

289

Lin G

52

Lin L-L

345

Lin L-Y

52

Ma L

289

Mahmood A

267

Mahmood S

267

Mandal C

7

Mehrzia M

386

Meng C X

284

Mishra S

25

Misra N

173

Mitra C K

137

Mohamed A

386

Mohanty B P

247

Mohanty P

37

Moulik S P

254

Mourya V K

337

Mukhtar H

377

Mulimani V H

295

Nagarajan S

233

Nair C N

7

Naseem I

312

Nawale R B

337

OmPraba G

154

Onyema O O

20

Onyeze G O

20

Oommen O V

119

Φztόrk G

251

Pal S

7

Palaniswami M S

182

Pang Y

351

Patel A

25

Patel S

69

Paulraj M G

382

Ponmanickam P

319

Prasad O

173

Pundir C S

98

Qin S

284, 351

Ramakrishnan S

275

Rani K

98

Rao R S

391

Rekha T S

137

Roy K

105

Sanyal S K

254

Saxena A K

32

Saxena M

32

Selvanayagam S

211

Selvi R

275

Sharma S

82, 160

Sharma U

323

Sil P C

299

Singh M P

69

Singh P

167, 226

Singha B

94

Sinha L

173

Soni L K

32

Sreejith P

119

Su Z-L

284

Subudhi U

37

Sulochana K N

275

Sumathi S

148

Sun M

372

Sundal S

160

Thippeswamy S

295

Tolan V

123

Tyagi A

244

Ukoha A I

20

Vasudevan D M

306

Velmurugan D

154, 211

Vernwal S K

239

Wagh N K

360

Wakode S R

32

Wei W

284

Weng Y-M

345

Wenhua R

88

Yadav K D S

48, 239

Yadav M

48

Yadav R S S

239

Yadav S

41

Yalηıntepe L

251

Yamane T

211

Yang G

88

Yao S

143

Yao Y-F

345

YashRoy R C

167

Zhang H

351

Zhang S

88

Zhao Y-F

372

Zhou K

88

Zhu Z-T

372


 

 

Annual Subject Index

 

 

A

 

Achatinin-H

 

for binding of 9-OAcSAa2-6GalNAc

7–14

ACORN

 

iterative, high throughput tool in structural            genomics

 

211–216

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)

 

in childhood

 

      l-asparaginase for management of

391

      9-OAcSA-specific antibody levels as index for diagnosis and longitudinal
monitoring of

 

 

7–14

b-Adrenoceptor (bAR) agonists

 

clenbuterol-induced skeletal muscle            hypertrophy, role of metabolic and            physiologic characteristics of fibres in            determination of response to

 

 

 

160–166

isoproterenol, role in attenuating muscle            atrophy under stress, study on rat
           skeletal muscle

 

 

82–87

Advanced glycated end products (AGEs)

337–344

Agglutinin

 

FCA, biotinylated, for recognition of bacteria

94–97

Air-breathing organ (ABO)

 

in teleosts, myofibrillar contractility and            m-ATPase of

 

217–225

Alcoholic liver disease (ALD)

 

silymarin from Silybium marianum as
           remedy for

 

306–311

Algae, green

 

Haematococcus pluvialis, carotenoid            hydroxylase gene promoter in,            characterization of

 

 

284–288

photosynthetic, hydrogen production by

201–210

Alkylamine glass beads

 

immobilization of 3a-HSD and diaphorase            onto, for determination of bile acid in            serum and bile

 

 

98–104

ALL. See Acute lymphoblastic leukemia

 

Allium sativum. See Garlic

 

Amino acid(s)

 

extraction and carrier-facilitated transport            through bulk liquid membrane, use of            synthetic noncyclic receptors in

 

 

323–326

homocysteine, in health and diseases,            biochemistry of

 

275–283

N-terminal protected, new fragmentation            rearrangement using ESI-MS/MS

 

372–376

Amlodipine besylate

 

CEase inhibition (in vitro) by, kinetics and            mechanism of

 

52–55

a-Amylase

 

activity, growth and plasmids amplification in            Bacillus subtilis, effect of endosulfan on

 

123–126

producing Bacillus spp. from dhal industry            waste, isolation and identification of

 

295–298

Anabas testudineus

 

antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid            peroxiation in, regulatory effect of tri-           iodothyronine on

 

 

119–122

Anisodamine

 

from Hyoscyamus niger, inhibition of Ca2+-           transport activity of SERCA by,            mechanism of

 

 

351–359

Anopheles stephens

 

c-type lysozyme from, identification and            characterization of

 

15–19

1-Anilino-8-naphthalenesulfonate. See ANS       fluorescence probe

ANS fluorescence probe

 

to study conformational change of SERCA

352

Antibacterial peptide

 

scolopendrin I from venom of Scolopendra            subspinipes mutilans, induction,            purification and characterization of

 

 

88–93

Antibodies

 

against 9-OAcSA in childhood ALL, markers            for initial diagnosis and longitudinal            monitoring of

 

 

7–14

Anticancer agents

 

HDAC inhibirtors as, 3D QSAR study using            GFA

 

360–371

Antileukemic activity

 

of l-asparaginase from Erwinia carotovora

391–394

Antimicrobial activity

 

of crude venom from Scolopendra subspinipes            mutilans against Gram +/- bacteria

 

90

Antioxidant(s)

 

C-phycocyanin from Lyngbya, Phormidium            and Spirulina spp.

 

25–31

enzyme activities in Anabas testudineus,            regulatory effect of tri-iodothyronine on

 

119–122

vitamin E

 

compared to Phyllanthus niruri aqueous      extract

 

299–305

effect on MSG-induced hepatotoxicity and      oxidative stress

 

20–24

Aquatic pollution

 

p53-like protein from Lamellidens corrianus            as biological indicator

 

247–250

l-Asparaginase

 

from Erwinia carotovora, purification, and            effect of dihydropyrimidine derivative on            some kinetic parameters of

 

 

391–394

Aspergillus terreus

 

ligninperoxidases from, enzymatic            characteristics of

 

48–51

Astaxanthin

 

biosynthesis in Haematococcus pluvialis, role            of carotenoid hydroxylase in:            characterization of respective gene            promoter from

 

 

 

284–288

 

 

B

 

Bacillus  spp.

 

from mangrove soil, buffering capacity and H+            conductance of

 

382–385

a-amylase producing, from dhal industry            waste, isolation and identification of

 

295–298

Bacillus subtilis

 

endosulfan on growth, a-amylase activity and            plasmids amplification in

 

123–126

Bacteria

 

facultative alkalophilic, from mangrove soil            with varying buffering capacity and H+            conductance

 

 

382–385

Gram-positive/Gram-negative, biotinylated            FCA for recognition of

 

94–97

Bakers' yeast

 

chromosome of, FFT study of long range            correlations in

 

137–142

Begomoviruses

182

Bemisia tabaci. See Whitefly

 

Benzodiazepine receptor (BzR)

 

PBR vs. CBR binding affinity, selectivity            requirements for: QSAR modeling of 2-           phenylimidazo[1,2-a]pyridine acetamides

 

 

105–118

Benzodiazepines

 

chlordiazepoxide and diazepam, CEase            inhibition by, kinetics and mechanism of

 

52–55

Bile acid

 

in serum and bile, determination using 3a-           HSD and diaphorase

 

98–104

Bile-salt activated lipase. See Cholesterol esterase

 

Biliary tract diseases

 

silymarin from Silybium marianum as
           remedy for

 

306–311

Biochemical characterization

 

of selected air-breathing teleosts

217–225

Boc-protected amino acids (BPAAs)

 

fragment ions observed in

373

Bone-matrix formation

 

and osteogenesis under magnetic field            stimulation in vivo: XRD, TEM and            SEM investigations

 

 

167–172

BOOK REVIEW

 

"Photosystem II. The Light-Driven Water:            Plastoquinone Oxidoreductase," 2005            (Eds: Wydrzynski & Satoh) Vol. 22,            Advances in Photosynthesis and            Respiration (AIPH), (Ser Ed: Govindjee)

 

 

 

 

56–58

Brij-30/Brij-92. See Surfactants

 

Brushite

226

Butoxamine

 

level for reversal of isoproterenol's            ameliorative effect on work stress-           induced skeletal muscle degeneration
           in rats

 

 

 

82–87

 

 

C

 

Caediolipin

 

hexagonal phase, induced by anisodamine

351

Calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals

 

casuative factor of urolithiasis, XRD, EDX            and SEM investigations of

 

226–232

Calculus. See Urolith

 

Cardiovascular disease (CVD)

 

and homocysteine

278

Cardiovascular drugs

 

CEase inhibition (in vitro) by, kinetics and            mechanisms of

 

52–55

Carotenoid hydroxylase

 

gene promoter in Haematococcus pluvialis,            characterization of

 

284–288

Cassava

 

pathogenesis-related proteins in, induced by            Bemisia tabaci feeding

 

182–185

Cassava mosaic disease (CMD)

182

Catalase (PDB-ID:1gwe)

 

interative ACORN with ARP/wARP and            REFMAC of

 

211–216

Catla catla

 

biochemical properties and adaptive diversity            of skeletal muscle myofibrils and myosin            of, correlation between

 

 

217–225

Ca2+-transport

 

activity of SERCA, inhibition by anisodamine,            mechanism of

 

351–359

CEase. See Cholesterol esterase

 

Cell line

 

K562 erythroleukemia cells, role of nitric            oxide during erythroid differentiation in

 

251–253

Centipedes

 

Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans,            scolopendrin I from venom of: induction,            purification and characterization of

 

 

88–93

Central benzodiazepine receptor (CBR)

 

vs. PBR, binding affinity of, selectivity            requirements for: QSAR modeling of 2-           phenylimidazo[1,2-a]pyridine            acetamides

 

 

 

105–118

Channa punctata

 

biochemical properties and adaptive diversity            of skeletal muscle myofibrils and            myosin of, correlation between

 

 

217–225

Childhood

 

ALL in

      l-asparaginase for management of

391

 

      9-OAcSA-specific antibody levels as index for diagnosis and longitudinal
monitoring of

7–14

Chitinase

 

in cassava, induced by Bemisia tabaci feeding

182–185

Chlordiazepoxide

 

CEase inhibition (in vitro) by, kinetics and            mechanism of

 

52–55

Cholesterol

 

acute effects of partially purified fraction from            garlic on

 

386–390

level in skeletal muscles and heart under            stress, effect of isoproterenol on

 

82–87

Cholesterol esterase (CEase)

 

inhibition, in vitro, by cardiovascular drugs,            kinetics and mechanisms of

 

52–55

Chromatography. See also RP-HPLC

 

nickel-chelate, for purification of            overexpressed g-glutamyltranspeptidase            from E. coli

 

 

345–350

Circular dichroism (CD)

 

far and near-UV, to study effect of            denaturants on structure and activity of            3-HBA-6-hydroxylase

 

 

148–153

Clarias batrachus

 

biochemical properties and adaptive diversity            of skeletal muscle myofibrils and            myosin of, correlation between

 

 

217–225

Clenbuterol

 

-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy, role of            metabolic and physiologic            characteristics of fibres in            determination of response to

 

 

 

160–166

Clostridium spp

 

diaphorase from, use in determination of bile            acid in serum and bile

 

98–104

Compactin

 

HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, use in            pharmacotherapy for hyperlipidemia

 

32

Congerin II (PDB-ID:1is3)

 

eel galectin, interative ACORN with            ARP/wARP and REFMAC of

 

211–216

Corynebacterium spp.

 

from mangrove soil, buffering capacity and H+            conductance of

 

382–385

Crystal structures

 

congerin II and catalase

 

interative ACORN with ARP/wARP and            REFMAC of

 

211–216

Cyanobacteria

 

C-phycocyanin from Lyngbya, Phormidium            and Spirulina spp., antioxidant
           potential of

 

 

25–31

l-Cysteine (l-cys)

 

Cyt c(III) reduction by, kinetics and            mechanism of

 

37–40

Cyt c(III). See Ferricytochrome c

 

 

 

D

 

Denaturants

 

effect on structure and activity of 3-HBA-6-           hydroxylase

 

148–153

Diabetes

 

complications due to non-enzymatic glycation            of proteins

 

337–344

type I, and homocysteine

278

Diabetic

 

angiopathy

342–343

nephropathy

341–342

neuropathy

340–341

retinopathy

339–340

Diaphorase

 

from Clostridium spp, use in determination of            bile acid in serum and bile

 

98–104

Diazepam

 

CEase inhibition (in vitro) by, kinetics and            mechanism of

 

52–55

Dielectrics

 

and phase transition, for study of bovine            albumin-liposomes interaction

 

186–189

Diethylene glycol

 

and its derivative receptors, use in extraction            and carrier-facilitated transport of            amino acids through bulk liquid   membrane

 

 

 

323–326

Differential display (DD)

 

use in isolation of stress responsive Psb A            gene from drought-tolerant Oryza            sativa genotype N22

 

 

244–246

Dioleoylphosphatidylcholine liposomes

 

hexagonal phase, induced by anisodamine

351

Dipalmitoylphosphatidyl acid (DPPA)

 

phase separation by anisodamine

351

DNA

 

polymorphism, exhibited by stress responsive            Psb A gene from drought-tolerant            Oryza sativa genotype N22

244–246

sequence, spectral representation,
           applications of

137

DsDNA viruses

 

genome sequences of

137–142

Drought tolerance

 

in wheat varieties HDR 77 and HD 2009

233–238

Drug delivery

 

plant oil derived micro-emulsion vehicles for

254–257

Drugs

 

cardiovascular, in vitro CEase inhibition by,            kinetics and mechanisms of

 

52–55

and toxicants, relevant            genes/proteins/pathways affected by

 

70

 

 

E

 

EcGGT gene

 

overexpression of

345–350

Ectopia lentis

 

as clinical symptom of homocystinuria type I

276–277

Eel galectin. See Congerin II

 

Electron microscopy

 

scanning (SEM)

 

and transmission (TEM), in vivo      investigation of bone-matrix formation      and osteogenesis under in vivo      magnetic field stimulation

 

 

 

167–172

ultrastructure investigations of urinary      calculi

 

226–232

Electrospray ionization tandem mass       spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS)

 

use in fragmentation rearrangement of N-     terminal protected amino acids

 

372–376

ELISA. See Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

 

Endosulfan

 

effect on growth, a-amylase activity and            plasmids amplification in Bacillus subtilis

 

123–126

Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy

 

for investigations of urinary calculi in            urolithiasis

 

226–232

Enkephalins

 

Leu5 and Met5, vibrational dynamics of            morphine in relation to

 

173–181

Enzyme kinetics

 

CEase inhibition (in vitro) by cardiovascular            drugs, kinetics and mechanisms of

 

52–55

Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay    (ELISA)

 

using biotinylated FCA and antibiotin-HRP            for study of lectin-bacteria interaction

 

94–97

BSM-ELISA, for monitoring clinical status of            ALL patients

 

7–14

Enzyme markers

 

of hepatocellular injury

21

Erwinia carotovora

 

l-asparaginase from, purification, and effect            of dihydropyrimidine derivative on kinetic            parameters of

 

 

391–394

Erythroid differentiation

 

in K562 erythroleukemia cells, nitric oxide            levels during

 

251–253

Erythroleukemia cell line

 

K562, nitric oxide levels during erythroid            differentiation in

 

251–253

Escherichia coli

 

recombinant g-glutamyltranspeptidase from            overexpression of

 

345–350

ESI-MS/MS. See Electrospray ionization tandem       mass spectrometry

 

 

 

F

 

Facultative alkalophilic bacteria

 

from mangrove soil with varying buffering            capacity and H+ conductance

 

382–385

Fast-Fourier Transformation (FFT)

 

study of 1/f correlations in viral genomes

137–142

FCA. See Ficus cunia agglutinin

 

Ferricytochrome c [Cyt c(III)]

 

reduction by GSH and L-cysteine, kinetics and            mechanism of

 

37–40

FFT. See Fast-Fourier Transformation

 

Ficus cunia agglutinin (FCA)

 

biotinylated, for recognition of bacteria

94–97

Flow cytometric analysis

 

detection of cell surface 9-OAcSGs by,            application in diagnosis of childhood ALL

 

7–14

Fluorescence

 

ANS binding fluorescence probe to study            conformational change of SERCA

 

351–359

Fluorescence spectroscopy

 

intrinsic, to study effect of denaturants on            structure and activity of 3-HBA-6-           hydroxylase

 

 

148–153

Fmoc-protected amino acids (FPAAs)

 

fragment ions observed in

373

Food flavours

 

MSG, hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress,            induced by, effect of vitamin E on

 

20–24

Fusarium oxysporum

 

ligninperoxidases from, enzymatic            characteristics of

 

48–51

 

 

G

 

Galectin, Eel. See Congerin II

 

Gallstone

 

patient with, bile acid determination in serum            and bile using 3a-HSD and diaphorase

 

98–104

Garlic

 

partially purified fraction from, acute effects            on plasma glucose and cholesterol            levels in rats: involvement of NO

 

 

386–390

Gene expression

 

recombinant g-glutamyltranspeptidase from E.            coli, overexpression of

 

345–350

regulation of

lactase expression and mechanism of   adult-type hypolactasia, as cause of   lactose intolerance

 

 

267–274

MAL1 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

143–147

Genetic function approximation (GFA)

 

use in 3D QSAR study of HDAC inhibitors

360–371

Genomics

 

and proteomics, contribution in understanding            role of modifying factors in Parkinson's            disease

 

 

69–81

a-2m Globulin

 

in rat preputial gland, identification by            MALDI-TOF analysis

 

319–322

b-1,3-Glucanase

 

in cassava, induced by Bemisia tabaci feeding

182–185

Glucose

 

plasma level, acute effects of garlic extract on

386–390

g-Glutamyltranspeptidase

 

recombinant, from E. coli, overexpression of

345–350

Glutaraldehyde coupling

 

immobilization of 3a-HSD and diaphorase on            alkylamine glass beads through

 

101

Glutathione (GSH)

 

Cyt c(III) reduction by, kinetics and            mechanism of

 

37–40

Glycation

 

non-enzymatic,of proteins: cause for            complications in diabetes

 

337–344

Glycol

 

di/tri/tetra-ethylene, and its derivative            receptors, use in extraction and carrier-           facilitated transport of amino acids through            bulk liquid membrane

 

 

 

323–326

Green algae

 

Haematococcus pluvialis, carotenoid            hydroxylase gene promoter in,            characterization of

 

 

284–288

photosynthetic, hydrogen production by

201–210

Guanidinium hydrochloride (Gu.HCl)

 

effect on structure and activity of 3-HBA-6-           hydroxylase

 

148–153

 

 

H

 

Haematococcus pluvialis

 

carotenoid hydroxylase gene promoter in,            characterization of

 

284–288

H+ conductance

 

and buffering capacityof facultative            alkalophilic bacteria from mangrove soil

 

382–385

HDACs. See Histone deacetylases

 

HDR 77/HD 2009

 

wheat varieties, relative binding of seed water            and seed coat membrane stability in

 

233–238

Heart

 

and skeletal muscles in rats under work stress,            cholesterol and triglyceride levels in,            isoproterenol's ameliorative effect on

 

 

82–87

Hemin

 

K562 erythroleukemia cells induced by, nitric            oxide levels during erythroid            differentiation in

 

 

251–253

Hepatocellular injury

 

enzyme markers of

21

Hepatotoxicity

 

and oxidative stress, MSG-induced, effect of            vitamin E on

 

20–24

High throughput techniques

 

ACORN with ARP/wARP and REFMAC for            high throughput structural genomics

 

211–216

Histone deacetylases (HDACs)

 

hydroxamic acid analogues as inhibitors of 3D            QSAR study using GFA

 

360–371

HMG-CoA. See Hydroxymethyl glutaryl       coenzyme A

 

Homocysteine (Hcy)

 

and cardiovascular disease

278

and diabetes type I

278

in health and diseases, biochemistry of

275–283

and Marfan syndrome

279

molecular mechanisms of

 

      oxidative stress

279

      protein homocysteinylation

279–281

      protein thiolation

279

and ocular complications

278–279

and smoking

279

and thrombotic diseases

278

Homocysteinemia

 

possible treatment for

281

Homocystinuria type I

 

clinical symptoms and manifestations

276–277

cystathionine-b-synthase deficiency            complictions

 

275–283

HSD. See Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase

 

Human group V secretory phospholipase A2       (hVPLA2)

 

QSAR analysis of indole analogues for            inhibition of

 

154–159

hVPLA2. See Human group V secretory       phospholipase A2

 

Hydrogen (H2) production

 

by photosynthetic green algae

201–210

Hydroxamic acid analogues

 

as inhibitors of HDACs 3D QSAR study using   GFA

 

360–371

Hydroxyapatite (HAP)

226

3-Hydroxybenzoate-6-hydroxylase

 

denaturants on structure and activity of

148–153

Hydroxymethyl glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-      CoA) reductase

 

inhibitors, condensed pyridine and pyrimidine            analogs as, pharmacophoric model of

 

32–36

3a-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3a-HSD)

 

from Pseudomonas testosteronei, use in            determination of bile acid in serum
           and bile

 

 

98–104

Hyoscyamus niger

 

anisodamine from, inhibition of Ca2+-           transport activity of SERCA by

 

351–359

Hypercholesterolemia

 

and NO metabolites in rats, correlation            between

 

386–390

Hyperglycaemia

 

in diabetes

337–344

and NO metabolites in rats, correlation            between

 

386–390

Hyperlipidemia

 

HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors for            pharmacotherapy for treatment of

32

Hypolactasia

 

adult-type, as molecular basis of lactose            intolerance

 

267–274

 

 

I

 

Immobilization

 

of 3a-HSD and diaphorase onto alkylamine            glass beads, for determination of bile            acid in serum and bile

 

 

98–104

Indole analogues

 

as hVPLA2 inhibitors, QSAR of

154–159

Industry waste

 

a-amylase producing Bacillus spp. from dhal            industry red gram waste, isolation and            identification of

 

 

295–298

Injury

 

hepatocellular, enzyme markers of

21

Inositol

 

on maltase activity and regulation of MAL1            expression in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

 

143–147

Insecticides

 

endosulfan, effect on growth, a-amylase            activity and plasmids amplification in            Bacillus subtilis

 

 

123–126

Insulinemia

 

measurement of

387–388

Isopropyl myristate

 

micro-emulsion vehicles derived from, for            drug delivery

 

254–257

Isoproterenol

 

role in attenuating muscle atrophy under            stress, study on rat skeletal muscle

 

82–87

 

 

K

 

K562 erythroleukemia cells

 

role of nitric oxide during erythroid            differentiation in

 

251–253

Kidney stone

 

XRD, EDX and SEM investigations of
           urinary calculi

 

226–232

 

 

L

 

Labeo rohita

 

biochemical properties and adaptive diversity            of skeletal muscle myofibrils and            myosin of, correlation between

 

 

217–225

Lactase-phlorizin hydrolase (LPH)

 

responsible for lactose intolerance

267–274

Lactic acid bacteria (LAB)

377

Lactobacillus paracasei

 

biosynthesis of protease from: kinetic analysis            of fermentation parameters

 

377–381

Lactose intolerance

 

hypolactasia as molecular basis of

267–274

Lamellidens corrianus

 

p53-like protein from

247–250

Lectin-bacteria interaction

 

ELISA using biotinylated FCA and antibiotin-           HRP for study of

 

94–97

Leu5 and Met5-enkephalins

 

vibrational dynamics of morphine in relation            to

 

173–181

Leukemia

 

ALL in childhood,  antibodies against 9-O-           acetylated sialic acids in

 

7–14

Ligninperoxidase(s)

 

from Penicillium citrinum, Fusarium            oxysporum and Aspergillus terreus,            enzymatic characteristics of

 

 

48–51

Lipocalins

319

Liposome-albumin system

 

biophysical studies on

186–189

Lipoyl dehydrogenase. See Diaphorase

 

Liquid membrane

 

bulk, extraction and carrier-facilitated            transport of amino acids through, use of            synthetic noncyclic receptors in

 

 

323–326

Liver diseases

 

aqueous extract of Phyllanthus niruri,            protective effect of

 

299–305

silymarin from Silybium marianum as remedy            for

 

306–311

Lovastatin

 

CEase inhibition (in vitro) by, kinetics and            mechanism of

 

52–55

Low-density lipoprotein (LDL)

 

plasma, lowering cholesterol levels by            cardiovascular drugs, kinetics and            mechanisms of

 

 

52–55

LPH. See Lactase-phlorizin hydrolase

 

Lyngbya sp.

 

C-phycocyanin from, antioxidant potential of

25–31

Lysozyme

 

c-type, from Anopheles stephens

15–19

 

 

M

 

Magnetic field

 

static, stimulating effect on microstructure and            mineralization of bone repair

 

167–172

MAL1

 

regulation of expression in            Schizosaccharomyces pombe

 

143–147

Malaria

 

Anopheles stephens, identification and            characterization of c-type lysozyme from

 

15–19

MALDI-TOF analysis

 

for identification of a-2m globulin in rat            preputial gland

 

319–322

Maltase activity

 

and regulation of MAL1 expression in            S. pombe, effect of inositol on

 

143–147

Mangrove soil

 

facultative alkalophilic bacteria from,            buffering capacity and H+ conductance of

 

382–385

Manihot esculenta. See Cassava

 

Marfan syndrome

 

and homocysteine

279

Mastacembalus armatus

 

biochemical properties and adaptive diversity            of skeletal muscle myofibrils and            myosin of, correlation between

 

 

217–225

Membrane transport

 

amino acids, extraction and carrier-facilitated            transport through bulk liquid            membrane, use of synthetic noncyclic            receptors in

 

 

 

323–326

H+ conductance, and buffering capacity of            facultative alkalophilic bacteria from            mangrove soil

 

 

382–385

Mental retardation. See Homocystinuria type I

 

Microarray

 

use in analyzing differential gene expression

73–74

Micro-emulsion vehicles

 

plant oil derived, for drug delivery

254–257

Milk intolerance

 

hypolactasia as molecular basis of

267–274

Milk thistle plant. See Silybium marianum

 

Molecular operating environment (MOE)

 

software, use in QSAR analysis of indole            analogues for hVPLA2 inhibition

154–159

Molecular shape analysis (MSA)

 

importantance in inhibition of HDACs

360–371

Monosodium glutamate (MSG)

 

-induced hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress in            rats, effect of vitamin E on

 

20–24

Morphine

 

vibrational dynamics in relation to Leu5 and            Met5-enkephalins

 

173–181

MSG. See Monosodium glutamate

 

Mutations

 

genetic, and SNP

74–77

Myofibrils and myosin

 

evolutionary modifications in ABO-           possessing teleosts

 

217–225

of skeletal muscles of air-breathing teleosts,            adaptive diversity and biochemical            properties, correlation between

 

 

217–225

 

 

N

 

Nickel-chelate chromatography

 

for purification of overexpressed g-glutamyl-           transpeptidase from E. coli

 

345–350

Nifedipine

 

CEase inhibition (in vitro) by, kinetics and            mechanism of

 

52–55

Nimesulide (NIM)

 

-induced oxidative stress, hepatoprotective            effect of aqueous extract of P. niruri on

 

299–305

Nitric oxide (NO)

 

acute effects of garlic extract on plasma            glucose and cholesterol levels in rats,            involvement of

 

 

386–390

role during erythroid differentiation in K562            cell line

 

251–253

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug    (NSAID)

 

nimesulide-induced oxidative stress,            hepatoprotective effect of aqueous            extract of P. niruri on

 

 

299–305

 

 

O

 

Octylglucoside (OG)

 

use in study of bovine albumin-liposomes            interaction

 

186–189

Opioid peptides. See Morphine

 

Oryza sativa L.

 

drought-tolerant genotype N22, isolation of            stress responsive Psb A gene from

 

244–246

Osteogenesis

 

and bone-matrix formation under magnetic            field stimulation in vivo: XRD, TEM            and SEM investigations

 

 

167–172

Osteoporosis

 

as clinical symptom of homocystinuria type I

276

Oxidative stress

 

caused by homocysteine

279

and hepatotoxicity

 

ethanol-induced, protective effects of      silymarin on

 

306–311

MSG-induced, effect of vitamin E on

20–24

NIM-induced, hepatoprotective effect of            aqueous extract from P. niruri

 

299–305

Oxyradical accumulation

 

and rapid deterioration of soybean seeds due            to field weathering

 

41–47

 

 

P

 

P53

 

-like protein from Lamellidens corrianus

247–250

Parkinson's disease (PD)

 

role of modifying factors in, genomics and            proteomics in understanding of

 

69–81

Penicillium citrinum

 

ligninperoxidases from, enzymatic            characteristics of

 

48–51

Peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR)

 

vs. CBR, binding affinity of, selectivity            requirements for: QSAR modeling of 2-           phenylimidazo[1,2-a]pyridine            acetamides

 

 

 

105–118

Peroxidase

 

in cassava, induced by Bemisia tabaci feeding

182–185

from Solanum melongena fruit juice,            purification of

 

239–243

Phase transition

 

and dielectrics, for study of bovine albumin-           liposomes interaction

 

186–189

2-Phenylimidazo[1,2-a]pyridine acetamides

 

selectivity requirements for PBR vs. CBR            binding affinity in, QSAR modeling for            exploration of

 

 

105–118

Pheromones

 

a-2m globulin in rat preputial gland, identified            by MALDI-TOF analysis

 

319–322

Phormidium sp.

 

C-phycocyanin from, antioxidant potential of

25–31

Phosphatidylinositol (PI)

 

biosynthesis in Schizosaccharomyces pombe,            effect of inositol on

 

143–147

Phospholipase A2

 

hVPLA2, QSAR analysis of indole analogues            for inhibition of

 

154–159

Photoproduction

 

of H2 by green algae

201–210

C-Phycocyanin (C-PC)

 

from Lyngbya, Phormidium and Spirulina            spp., antioxidant potential of

 

25–31

Phyllanthus niruri

 

aqueous extract from, hepatoprotective effect            on NIM-induced oxidative stress

 

299–305

Planococcus sp.

 

from mangrove soil, buffering capacity and H+            conductance of

 

382–385

Plant oils

 

micro-emulsion vehicles derived from, for            drug delivery

 

254–257

Plasma glucose

 

acute effects of partially purified fraction from            garlic on

 

386–390

Plasma low-density lipoprotein (PLDL)

 

cholesterol levels in, lowering by            cardiovascular drugs, kinetics and            mechanisms of

 

 

52–55

Plasmid amplification

 

growth and a-amylase activity in Bacillus            subtilis, effect of endosulfan on

 

123–126

Pollution

 

aquatic, p53-like protein from freshwater            bivalve Lamellidens corrianus as            biological indicator

 

 

247–250

Preputial gland

 

of rats, a-2m globulin from, identification by            MALDI-TOF analysis

 

319–322

n-Propanol

 

as substitute for veratryl alcohol for assaying            ligninperoxidase activities from fungal            strains

 

 

48–51

Protease

 

from Lactobacillus paracasei, biosynthesis of

377–381

Proteins

 

non-enzymatic glycation of: cause for            complications in diabetes

 

337–344

Proteomics

 

and genomics, contribution in understanding            role of modifying factors in Parkinson's            disease

 

 

69–81

Psb A gene

 

stress responsive, from rice, isolation using            differential display

 

244–246

Pseudomonas testosteronei

 

3a-HSD from, use in determination of bile            acid in serum and bile

 

98–104

Pyridine and pyrimidine

 

analogs, condensed, as HMG-CoA reductase            inhibitors, pharmacophoric model of

 

32–36

 

 

Q

 

QSAR. See Quantitative structure-activity       relationship

 

Quantitative structure-activity relationship       (QSAR)

 

indole analogues for hVPLA2 inhibition,            analysis using MOE software

 

154–159

3-D

 

on condensed pyridine and pyrimidine      analogs for HMG-CoA reductase      inhibitor activity, pharmacophoric      model of

 

 

32–36

study using GFA on HDAC inhibitors

360–371

modeling of 2-phenylimidazo[1,2-a]pyridine            acetamides using topological and            physicochemical descriptors for exploring            selectivity requirements PBR vs. CBR            binding affinity

 

 

 

 

105–118

 

 

R

 

Raman optical activity (ROA)

180

Rattus norvegicus

 

a-2m globulin in preputial gland of, identified            by MALDI-TOF analysis

 

319–322

Receptors

 

synthetic noncyclic, use in extraction and            carrier-facilitated transport of amino            acids through bulk liquid membrane

 

 

323–326

Recombinant g-glutamyltranspeptidase

 

from E. coli, overexpression of

345–350

Red gram waste

 

a-amylase producing Bacillus spp., isolation            and identification from

 

295–298

Renal calculi. See Urolithiasis

 

Reverse-phase high performance liquid       chromatography (RP-HPLC)

 

and cation-exchange chromatography for      isolation of scolopendrin I from venom      of S. s. mutilans

 

 

88–93

Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction       (RT-PCR)

 

determination of MAL1 expression by

144–146

Riboflavin (RF)

 

photoilluminated, alone or with-Cu(II)            combination, inactivation of trypsin by

 

312–318

Rice. See Oryza sativa

 

RP-HPLC. See Reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography

 

 

 

S

 

Saccharomyces cerevisiae

 

Chromosome of, FFT study of long range            correlations in

 

137–142

Saccharomycopsis fibuligera A11

 

trehalose-6-phosphate synthase from,            purification and characterization of

 

289–294

Sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase   (SERCA)

 

inhibition of Ca2+-transport activity by            anisodamine, mechanism of

 

351–359

Scanning electron microscopy (SEM)

 

ultrastructure investigations of urinary calculi

226–232

in vivo investigation of bone-matrix formation            and osteogenesis under magnetic field            stimulation

 

 

167–172

Schizosaccharomyces pombe

 

regulation of MAL1 expression in

143–147

Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans

 

scolopendrin I from venom of, induction,            purification and characterization of

 

88–93

Scolopendrin I

 

from venom of S. s. mutilans, induction,            purification and characterization of

 

88–93

Seed water binding

 

and seed coat membrane stability in wheat            varieties HDR 77/HD 2009

 

233–238

SEM. See Scanning electron microscopy

 

Sialoglycoconjugates, 9-O-acetylated (9-OacSGs)

 

antibodies against, use as markersfor initial            diagnosis and longitudinal monitoring of            ALL in childhood

 

 

7–14

Silybium marianum

 

hepatoprotective drug silymarin from, effect            on ethanol-induced oxidative stress

 

306–311

Silymarin

 

protective effects on ethanol-induced            oxidative stress in liver

 

306–311

Simvastatin

 

CEase inhibition (in vitro) by, kinetics and            mechanism of

 

52–55

Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)

 

and genetic mutations

74–77

Skeletal muscle hypertrophy

 

clenbuterol-induced, role of metabolic and            physiologic characteristics of fibres in            determination of response

 

 

160–166

Skeletal muscles

 

and heart in rats under work stress, cholesterol            and triglyceride levels in,            isoproterenol's ameliorative effect on

 

 

82–87

myofibrils and myosin of air-breathing            teleosts, adaptive diversity and            biochemical properties, correlation

 

                between

217–225

Smoking

 

and homocysteine

279

SNP. See Single nucleotide polymorphism

 

Sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS)

 

effect on structure and activity of 3-HBA-6-           hydroxylase

148–153

Solanum melongena

 

fruit juice, peroxidase from, purification of

239–243

Solubilization

 

application in biophysical studies on            liposomes-albumin system

186–189

Soybean seeds

 

oxyradical accumulation and rapid            deterioration due to field weathering

41–47

Spectrometry

 

ESI-MS/MS, use in fragmentation            rearrangement of N-terminal protected            amino acids

372–376

Spectroscopy

 

EDX, for investigations of urinary calculi in            urolithiasis

226–232

FTIR and FTRaman spectra, use in study of            vibrational dynamics of morphine in            relation to Leu5 and Met5-enkephalins

173–181

intrinsic fluorescence and far and near-UV-           CD, to study effect of denaturants on            structure and activity of 3-HBA-6-           hydroxylase

148–153

Sphericules

231

Spirulina spp.

 

C-phycocyanin from, antioxidant potential of

25–31

Stone formation

 

pathogenesis of

231

Stress

 

oxidative

 

caused by homocysteine

279

ethanol-induced, in liver, protective effects      of silymarin on

306–311

and MSG- induced hepatotoxicity, effect of vitamin E on

20–24

NIM-induced, hepatoprotective effect of      aqueous extract from P. niruri

299–305

skeletal muscle degeneration in rats due to      workstress, effect of isoproterenol on

82–87

Struvite

226

Surfactants

 

for preparation of micro-emulsion vehicles for            drug delivery

254–257

Synthetic noncyclic receptors

 

use in extraction and carrier-facilitated            transport of amino acids through bulk            liquid membrane

323–326

 

 

T

 

Teleosts

 

air-breathing, biochemical properties and            adaptive diversity of skeletal muscle            myofibrils and myosin of, correlation            between

217–225

TEM. See Electron microscopy

 

Thrombotic diseases

 

and homocysteine

278

Thyroid hormone

 

tri-iodothyronine, regulatory effect on            antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid            peroxiation in Anabas testudineus

119–122

Toxicants

 

and drugs, and relevant            genes/proteins/pathways affected by

70

Transcriptomics

73

Trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (Tps1)

 

from Saccharomycopsis fibuligera A11,            purification and characterization of

289–294

Triethylene glycol

 

use in extraction and carrier-facilitated            transport of amino acids through bulk            liquid membrane

323–326

Triglycerides

 

      level in skeletal muscles and heart under stress, effect of isoproterenol on

82–87

Tri-iodothyronine (T3)

 

regulatory effect on antioxidant enzyme            activities and lipid peroxiation in            Anabas testudineus

119–122

Triticum aestivum L. See Wheat

 

Trypsin

 

inactivation by photoilluminated riboflavin,            alone or with-Cu(II) combination

312–318

Tween-20. See Surfactants

 

 

 

U

 

Ultraviolet circular dichroism (UV-CD)

 

far and near, to study effect of denaturants on            structure and activity of 3-HBA-6-           hydroxylase

 

 

148–153

Urea

 

effect on structure and activity of 3-HBA-6-           hydroxylase, use of UV-CD and intrinsic            fluorescence spectroscopy in

148–153

Urey Bradley force field

 

and Wilson's GF matrix method, use in study            of dynamical behaviour of morphine in            relation to Leu5 and Met5-enkephalins

173–181

Urolithiasis

 

XRD, EDX and SEM investigations of urinary            calculi in

226–232

 

 

V

 

Vegetable oils

 

micro-emulsion vehicles derived from, for            drug delivery

254–257

Venom

 

of Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans,            scolopendrin I from, induction,            purification and characterization of

88–93

Veratryl alcohol

 

n-propanol as substitute for assaying            ligninperoxidase activities from fungal            strains

48–51

Vibrational dynamics

 

of morphine in relation to Leu5 and Met5-           enkephalins

173–181

Viral genomes

 

1/f correlations in: FFT study

137–142

Vitamins

 

B6 and B12, role in Hcy metabolism

277–278

E

 

antioxidant property of, compared to      P. niruri aqueous extract

299–305

effect on MSG-induced hepatotoxicity and      oxidative stress

20–24

 

 

W

 

Water-deficit stress

 

in Oryza sativa, Psb A expression in drought-           tolerant genotype N22

244–246

Weathering

 

field, oxyradical accumulation and rapid            deterioration of soybean seeds due to

41–47

Weddllite

226

Wheat seeds

 

equilibrated at different relative humidities,            water binding, seed coat permeability            and germination characteristics of

233–238

Whewellite

226

 

 

 

 

Whitefly
feeding in cassava, pathogenesis-related      proteins induced by

182–185

Wilson's GF matrix method

 

and Urey Bradley force field, for study of            dynamical behaviour of morphine in            relation to Leu5 and Met5-enkephalins

173–181

Work stress

 

induced skeletal muscle degeneration in rats,            isoproterenol's ameliorative effect on

82–87

 

 

X

 

X-ray diffraction (XRD)

 

investigations of urinary calculi

226–232

in vivo investigation of bone-matrix formation            and osteogenesis under magnetic field            stimulation in vivo

167–172

X-ray spectroscopy

 

energy dispersive (EDX), investigations of            urinary calculi in urolithiasis

226–232

 

 

Y

 

Yeast. See also specific strains

 

Saccharomycopsis fibuligera A11

 

trehalose-6-phosphate synthase from,            purification and characterization of

289–294

Schizosaccharomyces pombe,            phosphatidylinositol biosynthesis in,            effect of inositol on

143–147