Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics

 

Total visitors: 3,556  since 23-02-07

 

VOLUME 44

CODEN : IJBBBQ

NUMBER 1

FEBRUARY 2007

ISSN : 0301-1208

 

CONTENTS

 

 

Papers

 

Postnatal regulation of glucocorticoid receptor in the liver of chicken

7

        Daniel Nongbri and R Sharma*

 

 

 

Parallel changes in fibronectin and α5β1 integrin in articular cartilage in type II collagen-induced arthritis

 

14

        S Sandya, M A Achan and P R Sudhakaran*

 

 

 

Studies on structural stability of thermophilic Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, ribosomes

19

        Kalavathi Yangala* and Tangirala Suryanarayana

 

 

 

Expression of a heat stable phytase from Aspergillus fumigatus in tobacco

        (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. NC89)

 

26

        Yan Wang, Xiaorong Gao, Qiao Su, Wei Wu and Lijia An*

 

 

 

UV-B induced changes in antioxidant enzymes and their isoforms in cucumber

        (Cucumis sativus L.) cotyledons

 

31

        Sunita Kataria*, Karishma Jain and K N Guruprasad

 

 

 

Kinetic properties and storage stability of catalase immobilized on to florisil

38

        Gul Ozyilmaz*, S Seyhan Tukel and Ozlem Alptekin

 

 

 

Conformation of an octapeptide fragment (2-9) of kaliocin-1 in DMSO-d6 by 1H NMR and restrained molecular dynamics

 

44

        P N Sunilkumar, C Sadasivan, K S Devaky and M Haridas*

 

 

 

Quantitative structure-activity relationship study of orally active cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors of derivatives of 3-phenoxypyran-4-one

 

50

        Manju Shekhawat, P Singh* and R Kumar

 

 

 

Notes

 

Extraction of bioactive principles from Mucuna pruriens seeds

56

        Laxminarain Misra* and Hildebert Wagner

 

 

 

Instructions to Authors

61

 

 

 

 

 

 

——————

*Author for correspondence

AUTHOR INDEX

 

 


Achan M A

14

Alptekin O

38

An L

26

Devaky K S

44

Gao X

26

Guruprasad K N

31

Haridas M

44

Jain K

31

Kataria S

31

Kumar R

50

Misra L

56

Nongbri D

7

 

Ozyilmaz G

38

Sadasivan C

44

Sandya S

14

Sharma R

7

Shekhawat M

50

Singh P

50

Su Q

26

Sudhakaran P R

14

Sunilkumar P N

44

Suryanarayana T

19

Tukel S S

38

Wang Y

26

Wagner H

56

Wu W

26

Yangala K

19


 

 


PAPERS

 

Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics

Vol. 44, February 2007, pp. 7-13

 

Postnatal regulation of glucocorticoid receptor in the liver of chicken

Daniel Nongbri and R Sharma*

 

Received 20 March 2006;  revised  4 December 2006

The specific binding of [3H]-dexamethasone to glucocoticoid receptor (GR) and activation of hormone-receptor (H-R) complexes from the liver of chicken at day 0, 5, 10, 30, 60 and 90 were investigated to find out GR regulation during postnatal development. Results showed that GR level (fmol/mg protein) reached a peak by day 5 of postnatal age and was significantly higher (+ 42%) than observed at day-0 (day of hatching), as evidenced also by protein blot experiments and Scatchard analysis of binding data. The GR concentration declined gradually up to day 30, and thereafter, no significant change was observed at day 60 and 90 of postnatal ages. The temperature and salt-dependent activation of GR showed no significant differences in 0 and 30-day old chicken, as determined by DNA-cellulose binding assay. However, nuclear binding of temperature and salt-activated GR complexes was significantly higher in 0-day old chicken. Cross-mixing experiments (wherein nuclei of day-0 were incubated with the H-R complexes of day-30 and vice-versa) revealed the role of nuclear specificity in higher binding of temperature and salt-activated H-R complexes at day-0 of postnatal age. DNase I extraction of nuclei bound to activated H-R complexes showed higher extractability at day-0 (70%), compared to day-30 (44%). Above findings suggested that changes in GR concentration as well as chromatin organization might play an important role in glucocorticoid-mediated responses during postnatal development of chicken.

Keywords: Glucocorticoid receptor, Postnatal ages, Liver, Chicken, Dexamethasone, Regulation.

E-mail: rsharma@nehu.ac.in

 

 

Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics

Vol. 44, February 2007, pp. 14-18

 

Parallel changes in fibronectin and α5β1 integrin in articular cartilage in type II collagen-induced arthritis

S Sandya, M A Achan and P R Sudhakaran*

 

Received 5 October 2006; revised 16 January 2007

Interactions of cells with extracellular matrix (ECM) are mediated through specific cell surface receptors, belonging to the integrin family of transmembrane proteins. Integrins have been shown to be involved in chondrocyte-matrix interactions in the cartilage. In this study, the status of a matrix glycoprotein fibronectin (FN) and its receptor α5β1 integrin in the articular cartilage in collagen type II-induced experimental arthritis in rats, as well as in synovial fluid from osteoarthritic patients was investigated. Experimental arthritis was induced by intradermal injection of type-II collagen (300 µg/100 g body wt) and Freund’s complete adjuvant. Saline-treated animals served as control. Clinical severity was indicated by increase in paw volume. Significant increase in the activities of lysosomal enzymes β-glucuronidase and β-hexosaminidase was observed in synovial effusate, serum and cartilage of arthritic animals, when compared to untreated control, indicating dysfunction of cartilage. Changes in FN and α5β1 integrin were studied by ELISA. A progressive increase was observed in the FN level in synovial effusate and cartilage of arthritic animals, when compared to untreated controls. FN levels were also significantly high in synovial fluid of osteoarthritic patients. A significant increase in the levels of α5β1 integrin was found in cartilage of arthritic rats. Parallel changes in FN and α5β1 integrin indicated that alterations in FN and α5β1 integrin in chondrocytes constituted one of the molecular mechanisms during progression of arthritis.

Keywords: Fibronectin, Integrins, Arthritis, Synovial fluid, Cell-matrix interaction

Email: prsbn@md4.vsnl.net.in

 

 

Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics

Vol. 44, February 2007, pp. 19-25

 

Studies on structural stability of thermophilic Sulfolobus acidocaldarius ribosomes

Kalavathi Yangala*+ and Tangirala Suryanarayana#

 

Received 5 April 2006; revised 21 November 2006

Structural stability of thermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius ribosomes, with respect their susceptibility to pancreatic RNase A and stability to temperature (ΔTm), on treatment with various stabilizing (polyamines) and destabilizing (sulfhydryl and intercalating) agents were studied and compared with mesophilic E. coli ribosomes, to understand the structural differences between thermophilic and mesophilic ribosomes. Thermophilic archaeal ribosomes and their subunits were 10-times less susceptible to pancreatic RNase A, compared to mesophilic ribosomes, showing the presence of strong and compact structural organization in them. Thermophilic ribosomes treated with destabilizing agents, such as sulfhydryl reagents [5,5’-Dithio-bis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid), N-ethylmaleimide and p-hydroxymercurybenzoate) and intercalating agents (ethidium bromide, EtBr) showed higher stability to RNase A, compared to similarly treated mesophilic ribosomes, indicating the unavailability of thiol-reactive groups and the presence of strong solvent inaccessible inner core. Higher stability of thermophilic ribosomes compared to mesophilic ribosomes to unfolding agents like urea further supported the presence of strong inner core particle. Thermophilic ribosomes treated with intercalating agents, such as EtBr were less susceptible to RNase A, though they bound to more reagent, showing the rigidity or resilience of their macromolecular structure to alterations caused by destabilizing agents. Overall, these results indicated that factors such as presence of strong solvent inaccessible inner core and rigidity of ribosome macromolecular structure contributed stability of thermophilic ribosomes to RNase A and other destabilizing agents, when compared to mesophilic ribosomes.

Keywords: Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, E. coli, RNase A, Archaeal ribosomes, Polyamines, Sulfhydryl reagents, Structural organization, Thermal stability

E-mail: Kalavathiy@yahoo.ca; tssl@uohyd.ernet.in

 

 

Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics

Vol. 44, February 2007, pp. 26-30

 

Expression of a heat stable phytase from Aspergillus fumigatus in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. NC89)

Yan Wang, Xiaorong Gao, Qiao Su, Wei Wu and Lijia An*

 

Received 19 March 2006; revised 18 January 2007

Aspergillus fumigatus contains a heat-stable phytase of great potential. To determine whether this phytase could be expressed in plants as a functional enzyme, we introduced the phytase gene from A. fumigatus (fphyA) in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. NC89) by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Phytase expression was controlled by the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter. Secretion of recombinant phytase (tfphyA) to the extracellular fluid was established by use of the signal sequence from tobacco calreticulin. Forty-one independent transgenic plants were generated. Single-copy line A was selected based on segregation of T1 seeds for kanamycin resistance, phytase expression and Southern blotting analysis for use in further study. After 4-weeks of plant growth, the phytase was accumulated in leaves up to 2.3% of total soluble protein. tfphyA was functional and shared similar profiles of pH, temperature and thermal stability to the same enzyme expressed in Pichia pastoris (pfphyA). The expressed enzyme had an apparent molecular mass of 63 kDa and showed maximum activity at pH 5.5, and temperature, 55°C. It had a high thermostability and retained 28.7% of the initial activity even after incubation at 90°C for 15 min. The above results showed that the thermostable A. fumigatus phytase could be expressed in tobacco as a functional enzyme and thus has the potential of overexpressing it in other crop plants also.

Keywords: Aspergillus fumigatus, Phytase gene, Cloning, Expression, Tobacco, Thermostability, Phytase production

E-mail: anlijia@gmail.com

 

 

Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics

Vol. 44, February 2007, pp. 31-37

 

UV-B induced changes in antioxidant enzymes and their isoforms in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) cotyledons

Sunita Kataria*, Karishma Jain and K N Guruprasad

 

Received 12 April 2006; revised 17 January 2007

To assess the role of antioxidant defense system on exposure to ultra-violet-B (UV-B) radiation, the activities of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbic acid peroxidase (APX), glutathione reductase (GR) and guaiacol peroxidase (GPX), as well as the level of antioxidants ascorbic acid (AA) and a-tocopherol were monitored in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. var long green) cotyledons. UV-B enhanced the activity of antioxidant enzymes as well as AA content, but decreased the level of a-tocopherol. Significant increase was observed in the activities of SOD and GPX. Analysis of isoforms of antioxidant enzymes by native-PAGE and activity staining revealed three isoforms of GPX in unexposed dark-grown cotyledons (control), and their intensity was enhanced by UV-B exposure. In addition, four new isoforms of GPX were observed in cotyledons after UV-B exposure. Although no new isoforms were observed for the other antioxidant enzymes, the activities of their existing isoforms were enhanced by UV-B.

Keywords: Ascorbic acid, Ascorbic acid peroxidase, Cucumber cotyledons, Guaiacol peroxidase, Glutathione reductase, Superoxide dismutase, a-Tocopherol, Ultraviolet-B

Email: sunitakataria@hotmail.com

 

 

Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics

Vol. 44, February 2007, pp. 38-43

 

Kinetic properties and storage stability of catalase immobilized on to florisil

Gul Ozyilmaz*,, S Seyhan Tukel and Ozlem Alptekin

 

Received 17 August 2006; revised 31 January 2007

The covalent immobilization of bovine liver catalase (CAT) on to florisil via glutaraldehyde was investigated. Optimum immobilization pH and temperature were determined as pH 6.0, 10°C respectively, while the amount of initial CAT per g of carrier and immobilization time was determined as 5 mg g-1 and 120 min, respectively. The Vmax values for free and immobilized CAT were found to be 1.7 × 105 and 2.0 × 104 μmol H2O2. min-1 mg protein-1, respectively, whereas KM values were 33.3 mM and 1722.0 mM respectively. Operational stability was determined by using a stirred batch-type column reactor. Immobilized CAT retained about 40% of its initial activity after 50 uses. It showed higher storage stability than free CAT at 4°C and 25şC. Its storage stability increased with increasing relative humidity (RH) from 0 to 20% of the medium. The highest storage stability was obtained in 20% RH, however, further increase in RH from 40 to 100% significantly decreased the storage stability.

Keywords: Catalase, Florisil, Covalent immobilization, Storage stability, Relative humidity

E-mail: gozyilmaz@gmail.com

 

 

Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics

Vol. 44, February 2007, pp. 44-49

 

Conformation of an octapeptide fragment (2-9) of kaliocin-1 in DMSO-d6 by 1H NMR and restrained molecular dynamics

P N Sunilkumar, C Sadasivan, K S Devaky and M Haridas*

 

Received 3 August 2006; revised 20 January 2007

Kaliocin-1, a 31-residue synthetic peptide (FFSASCVPGADKGQFPNLCRLCA GTGENKCA), which has shown the antimicrobial activity forms the 152-182 fragment of human lactoferrin (HLf). As the octapeptide FSASCVPG forms the 2-9 fragment of kaliocin-1, in the present study, its conformation in dimethyl sulfoxide-d6 (DMSO-d6) has been determined using two-dimensional (2D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy as well as restrained molecular dynamics. Sequence specific assignments of all the 1H resonances have been carried out using 2D correlation experiments (2D DQF-COSY, TOCSY and ROESY). In dimethyl sulfoxide-d6 at 25°C, the octapeptide adopts a predominantly extended backbone conformation. The calculated structure resembles closely with the reported structure of the corresponding fragment of HLf. The peptide also has sequence and structural similarity with the corresponding fragments of lactoferrins from other organisms.

Keywords:              Kaliocin-1, Nuclear magnetic resonance, Peptide conformation, Dimethyl sulfoxide-d6, Restrained molecular dynamics.

Email: mharidasm@rediffmail.com

 

 

Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics

Vol. 44, February 2007, pp. 50-55

 

Quantitative structure-activity relationship study of orally active cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors of derivatives of 3-phenoxypyran-4-one

Manju Shekhawat, P Singh* and R Kumar

 

Received 11 July 2006; revised 28 December 2006

The cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition activities of the derivatives of 3-phenoxypyran-4-one were analyzed through multiple-regression analysis (MRA). Appropriate physicochemical parameters, identified for the substitutents of phenyl ring, attached to 3-phenoxypyran-4-one moiety were quantitatively correlated with COX-2 and COX-1 inhibition activities of these compounds. The derived significant correlation equation for COX-2 inhibition suggested that the ortho-substituent with negative resonance parameter, the para-substituent with lower dipole moment and the meta-substituent having higher resonance parameter were advantageous for the activity. The derived correlation equation for COX-1 inhibition suggested the significance of resonance effect for ortho-substituents and electron-donating effect for para-substituent. A few potential congeners were also suggested for further synthesis.

Keywords: Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, 3-phenoxypyran-4-one derivatives, Quantitative structure-activity relationship

E-mail: psingh_sikar@rediffmail.com


NOTES

 

Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics

Vol. 44, February 2007, pp. 56-60

 

Extraction of bioactive principles from Mucuna pruriens seeds

Laxminarain Misra* and Hildebert Wagner

 

Received 5 May 2006; revised 22 December 2006

Mucuna pruriens (L.) DC. Syn. M. prurita Hook. (Papilionaceae) is used in male impotency, as aphrodisiac, in sexual debility, and as nervine tonic. It also possesses anti-parkinson property, possibly due to the presence of l-DOPA. In the present study, attempts were made to develop the suitable method(s) for extraction of l-DOPA/other active components from the seeds using different solvents. The various extracts were also screened for their neuroprotective and antioxidant activities. In addition, TLC and HPLC fingerprinting of the extracts for amino acid components were also developed for preliminary and sophisticated analysis. The l-DOPA could be obtained in good yield on extraction with EtOH-H2O mixture (1:1) using ascorbic acid as protector. Interestingly, n-propanol extract, which contained negligible amount of l-DOPA, had shown significant neuroprotective activity, suggesting that some components, other than l-DOPA, might also be responsible for anti-Parkinson property of seeds. The extract (MW-0100) containing mainly amino acids and water-ethanol extract (1:1) (MWEL-1299) showed promising antioxidant activity (EC50 = 2.5 mg) against DPPH radicals. MWEL-1299 also exhibited encouraging results against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP+) toxicity. The TLC fingerprinting may be used to authenticate the plant material in herbal industry.

Keywords:Mucuna pruriens (L.) DC. Syn. M. prurita Hook., Papilionaceae, l-DOPA, Extraction procedures, Antioxidant activity, Neuroprotective activity, Anti-Parkinson Activity.

E mail: laxmisra@hotmail.com

 

 

  

Indian Journal of Biochemistry and Biophysics

 

INSTRUCTIONS TO AUTHORS

 

The journal welcomes concise reports of original research in all areas of biochemistry and biophysics. Papers on nutrition or medical biochemistry will be considered only if they are of general biochemical interest.

 

Started in 1964 (as Indian Journal of Biochemistry), IJBB is a premier peer reviewed bimonthly R & D journal. It publishes original research articles in all areas of biochemistry and biophysics including:

·         Growth factors, hormones, enzymes, structure, regulation, intermediary metabolism, catalytic mechanisms, coenzymes, vitamins, trace elements

·         Membrane biochemistry, ion channels, signal transduction, cell-cell communication, transport, carrier proteins

·         Lipids, glycobiology

·         Immunochemistry, antigen-antibody binding, receptors, biomolecular recognition

·         Molecular basis of genetic diseases, disease processes, host-virus interactions, viral assembly and structure

·         Ageing, apoptosis, oncogenes

·         Neurochemistry

·         Drug targeting, delivery, drug design

·         Structure-function relationships of biomolecules, protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions, protein folding, mechanisms, conformational studies, computer simulation, novel DNA structures and their biological implications

·         Surface forces, micelles and microemulsions, colloids, electrical phenomena, etc. in biological systems

·         Toxicology, biochemical aspects

·         Plant and microbial biochemistry

 

With a wide circulation, IJBB is covered by many national and international abstracting/indexing services, such as: Anal Abstr, Anim Bread Abstr, Biol Abstr, Biotech Abstr, Chem Abstr, Curr Adv, Curr Cont, Excerp Med, Dairy Sci Abstr, Food Sci & Tech Abstr, Helminthol Abstr, Indian Sci Abstr, Medline/Pub Med, Nutr Abstr, Sci Cit Ind, Rev Appl Entomol, Rev Plant Path, Vet Bull, Trop Dis Bull, etc. Abstracts of papers published in IJBB are also available free online at Bioline as well as our website, http://www.niscair.res.in.

Papers on nutrition/agricultural/medical biochemistry shall be considered only if they are of general biochemical interest. Experts with extensive research experience may contribute ‘Minireviews’ in their specific subject areas.

 

SUBMISSION OF MANUSCRIPT

Hard copies of manuscripts (inclusive of illustrations) should be submitted in triplicate to the Editor, Indian Journal of Biochemistry and Biophysics, National Institute of Science Communication and Information Resources, Dr K S Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012. Submission of a manuscript to IJBB implies that it is original and not under consideration for publication elsewhere. Authors are requested to submit a declaration to this effect alongwith the manuscript. Ms may also be submitted through e-mail (to the editorial team with copies marked to all team members) as attachment in MS Word (version 6 onwards) or PDF files.

 

PREPARATION OF MANUSCRIPT

Manuscripts should be presented in as concise a form as possible and typewritten in double space on one side of the paper. Pages should be numbered consecutively, and the matter on Page 1 should be arranged in the following order: Title of the paper; Name(s) of Authors(s), Department(s) and Institution(s); Foot Note containing address of Author for correspondence with e-mail id, telephone no., FAX no. followed by list of Abbreviations used in text. A short running title derived from the original title may also be given. Page 2 should contain the Abstract. Rest of the matter may be arranged in the following order: Introduction; Materials and Methods; Results; Discussion; Acknowledgement; References. Abstract, Tables and Captions for Figures should be typed separately.

Title: The title should be such as to be useful in indexing and information retrieval. If a paper forms part of a series, a sub-title indicating the aspects of the work covered in the paper should be provided.

Abstract: The abstract, not exceeding 200 words, should indicate the scope and significant content of the paper, highlighting the principal findings and conclusions. Keywords are to be given beneath the abstract.

Introduction: The introductory part should bear no heading, should be brief and state precisely the objective in relation to the present status of knowledge in the field. Reviewing of the literature should be restricted to only essential background and the reason for the research undertaken.

Materials and Methods: The nomenclature, the sources of materials and the procedures should be clearly stated. New methods should be described in sufficient detail, but if the methods are already well known, a mere reference to them will do; deviations, if any, should, however, be given.

Results: Only such data as are essential for understanding the discussion and main conclusions emerging from the study should be included. The data should be arranged in a unified and coherent sequence for clarity and readability. The same data should not be presented in both tabular and graphic forms. Only such tables and figures as are necessary should be given. Lineweaver-Burk plots, pH curves, substrate and enzyme concentration curves, and gel filtration and gel electrophoresis calibration curves for molecular weights of enzymes will be published only if they are non-standard.

In studies dealing with experimental animals, tests of statistical significance should be identified and references used should be cited. Statements about the statistical significance of the results should be accompanied by indications of the level of significance, preferably provided in respective Tables and Figure legends.

Discussion: Long rambling discussion must be avoided. The discussion should deal with the interpretation of results without repeating information already presented under Results. It should relate the new findings to the known and include logical deductions. In some cases, however, it may be desirable to combine results and discussion in a single section.

Illustrations: The number of illustrations should be kept to the minimum and numbered consecutively in Arabic numerals.. Simple linear plots or linear double reciprocal plots that can be easily described in the text should be avoided. Extension of graphs beyond the last experimental point is permissible only while extrapolating.

Captions and legends to the Figures should be self-explanatory and typed on a separate sheet of paper. Line drawing should be either laser prints of computer generated illustrations or manually made in Indian ink on white drawing paper, and should be drawn to approximately twice the printed size. The drawings are reduced to the page (width, 175 mm) or column (width, 85 mm) size, and care should be taken that the size of letters, numerals, dots and symbols is relatively uniform and sufficiently large to permit this reduction.

Tables: Each table should have an explanatory title and should be numbered in Arabic numeral. It should have sufficient experimental details, usually in the form of a paragraph immediately following the title. Units of measurement should be abbreviated and placed below the headings. Negative results should be indicated as ‘Nil’ and absence of a datum by a dash. Presentation of results should be limited to the accuracy of the method employed.

Acknowledgement: Acknowledgement should be brief and for especial assistance only, not for providing encouragement and routine facilities et cetera.

References: Responsibility for the accuracy of bibliographic references rests with the author. Abstracts of papers presented at scientific meetings should be cited only after they appear in publications included in the Biological Abstracts. Such Abstracts may be cited in Foot Note. The Indian Journal of Biochemistry and Biophysics has accepted the recommendations of the Commission of Editors of Biochemical Journals of the International Union of Biochemistry, concerning presentation of reference lists. The recommended style is as follows:

 

Periodicals

Upadhyay S N & Chattoraj D K (1972) Indian J Biochem Biophys 9, 17-20

 

In case of Minireview, title of the papers may be included.

 

Books

Dixon M & Webb E C (1964) Enzymes, 2nd edn, pp. 565-567, Longmans Green, London

Bracket J (1967) in Comprehensive Biochemistry (Florkin M & Stotz E M, eds), Vol. 28, pp. 23-54, Elsevier, Amsterdam

Laidler K J & Bunting P S (1973) The Chemical Kinetics of Enzyme Action, 2nd edn, Vol. 2, Chapt. 4, pp. 255-278, Clarendon Press, Oxford

 

Reports, non-serial symposia & proceedings

Harding B W, Whysner J, Cheng S C & Ramseyar J (1970) Proceedings of the Third International Congress, Hormonal Steroids, Hamburg, September 1970, pp. 294-300

Technicon Autoanalyzer Methodology (1971) method file N-24, pp. 1-4

Iverson H O (1969) Homeostatic Regulators (Ciba Foundations Symposium), pp. 29-30, J & A Churchill Ltd, London

 

Thesis

Khan M A A (1988) Sclerotium rolfsii: Behaviour in culture and as pathogen, Ph. D. thesis, London University, London.

References should be cited in the text by number, and the reference list should be in the order of citation, not in alphabetical order. The first and last page numbers are to be included.

Unpublished work should normally be avoided. If necessary it may be mentioned in the text as, for example, (Pande, A B, unpublished data) but not listed in the references.

Reference to patent should include the names of patentees, the country of origin (underlined) and the patent number, the organization to which the patent has been assigned (within circular brackets), the date of acceptance of the patent and the reference to an abstracting periodical where available [e.g. Trepagnier J H, New surface finishings and coatings, US Pat 2463219 (to DuPont Inc, USA), 1 March 2000; Chem Abstr, 133 (2000), 7258].

Nomenclature and Units: Standard terminology for biochemical compounds and uniform units in biochemistry and molecular biology recommended by IUPAC-IUBMB joint committee should be used. (The website, http://www.chem.qmw.ac.uk/iubmb/
nomenclature
,
contains updates and links to internationally agreed recommendations of use to biochemists).

Enzyme Nomenclature: For enzymes, only the trivial names recommended by the IUB-IUPAC Commission on Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992 (Academic Press, 1250, Sixth Avenue, San Diego, California 92101- 4331, USA) should be used. In some cases, where the enzyme is the main subject of a paper, its code number and systematic name should also be stated at its first citation in the paper.

Spectrophotometric Data: While reporting spectrophotometric data, the relation between the symbols used must be indicated. It is suggested that the symbols and terminology adopted by IUPAC [(1970) {Pure Appl. Chem. 21, 1] may be adhered to. Beer’s law may be stated as

        A = - log10 T = elc

where A is the absorbance; T, the transmittance (= I/I0); e, the molar absorption coefficient; c, the concentration of the absorbing substances in moles per litre; and l, the length of the optical path in centimeters.

Molecular weight being ratio is a pure number without any unit. It should be expressed as the relative moleclular mass (Mr).

Molecular mass (m) in contrast, is not a ratio, and can be expressed in daltons (Da). Molecular mass is the mass of one molecule of a substance.

Abbreviations: Symbols and abbreviations should conform to the recommendation of the Commission on Biochemical Nomenclature (CBN) of IUPAC-IUB as approved by the Commission of Editors of Biochemical Journals. Non-standard abbreviation, when used, must be defined in a footnote to the first abbreviation. Generic terms (virus, protein etc.), short trivial names (folate, adenosine, glycerol etc.) and enzyme names should not be abbreviated. However, an accepted abbreviation for the substrate may be incorporated in the enzyme name (e.g. glucose-6-P dehydrogenase, ATPase, but glucose 6-phos
phatase, glutamate dehydrogenase). RNase, for ribonuclease, and DNase, for deoxyribonuclease, are permitted exceptions to this rule.

Authors are advised to see a recent issue of the journal to get familiar with the format and the practices adopted in respect of various elements of a paper.

 

Proofs and Reprints: Galley proofs are not sent to authors except to those who make specific request for the same. Authors should ensure that the data submitted for publication are error-free. Twenty five reprints, without cover, are supplied free of charges to the communicating author.

 


ANNOUNCEMENTS

 

 

 

 

 


TRendys in BIOCHEMISTRY

(A National Forum to Discuss with a Difference Frontier Areas and Emerging Concepts in
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology)

11th Annual Meeting (October 05-06, 2004)

 

  TRendys in biochemistry is an informal national forum devoted to promote discussions on newly emerging areas in the general field of biochemistry and molecular biology. This forum at national level was initiated on the basis of a unique type of activity originally started a decade ago by Prof. T. Ramasarma of Biochemistry Department, IISc. Bangalore wherein a few interested people used to gather once in a while and discuss various frontier topics and thought provoking concepts in modern biology. TRendys benefits many youngsters by encouraging innovative thinking and promoting the courage to speak up and discuss any break away idea. It has been receiving a tremendous response from the students and researchers. The 10th meeting of TRendys was held at CDFD, Hyderabad with Dr. Seyed Hasnain as convenor during November 2003. The 11th meeting is scheduled to be held at CFTRI, Mysore during October 05-06, 2004 with Dr. V. Prakash as the convenor.

  About 10-12 persons who fit into the philosophy of these meetings are invited to speak on a topic of their choice, more in the nature of a concept, a thought or a breakaway idea. The presentation could also be an integrated and critical review of a new development in a well-defined area related to the area of interest of the speaker. This forum is not intended for presenting data of one's own research findings. All the invitees are expected to find their own travel money. The Organizers would provide local hospitality.

  Scientists/researchers interested to know more and participate in this kind of activity may please contact Dr. Prakash, (Director, Central Food Technological Research Institute, Mysore - 570 020, INDIA. Phone: 0821-2517760. Fax: 0821-2516308. E-mail : director@cftri.com), convenor for the 2004 meeting or Prof. K. Subba Rao (Department of Biochemistry, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad - 500 046. Tel: 23010451(O); 23010256(R); FAX; 23010451. E.mail: ksrsl@uohyd.ernet.in).

 

Standing Committee

 


Dr. T. Ramasarma, Bangalore

Dr. V. Prakash, Mysore

Prof. V. Sitaramam, Pune

Dr. Syed Hasnain, Hyderabad

Dr. H Majumdar, Kolkata

Dr A Balakrishnan, Chennai

Dr T N R V Thampan, Thiruvananthapuram

Dr. Amit Ghosh, Chandigarh

Dr. Dipankar Chatterji, Bangalore

Dr. Anil Tyagi, New Delhi

Dr. Satyajit Rath, New Delhi

Dr. A.J. Rao, Bangalore

Dr. Santosh Kar, New Delhi

Dr. P. Kondiah, Bangalore

and

Prof. K. Subba Rao, Hyderabad