Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics

CODEN : IJBBBQ  ISSN : 0301-1208

Total visitors: 2,651  since 19-11-07

 

VOLUME 44

NUMBER 5

OCTOBER 2007

Special Issue
Molecular and Clinical Immunology in Health and Disease

FOREWORD

 

 

It is indeed a pleasure to know that the Indian Journal of Biochemistry and Biophysics (IJBB), a peer-reviewed journal published by National Institute of Science Publication and Information Resources (NISCAIR), New Delhi, a constituent establishment of Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) is publishing some of the invited talks/papers of 33rd Indian Immunology Society (IIS) conference held at A.I.I.M.S., New Delhi during 28-31 January 2007. The very intent of the Editor, IJBB, Director, NISCAIR and IIS, particularly the organizing secretary, Prof. D N Rao (Department of Biochemistry, A.I.I.M.S.) in disseminating such information, precisely on the issues related to public health is commendable.

The focus of the special number is the theme of the conference, “Molecular and Clinical Immunology in Health and Disease” is quite topical and often enjoys considerable attention from all quarters including students, researchers, clinicians, industry and the Government. The articles presented in this issue are contributed by the eminent scientists working in the areas of basic and applied immunology. It is for the first time that the ‘Indian Journal of Biochemistry and Biophysics’ is bringing out a dedicated issue on such a theme with the guidance and support of ‘Indian Immunology Society’ with full length articles, in the form of Minireviews and original research papers, presented in the conference either as full papers, talks, or as posters. It is pertinent to mention that not only papers from established groups in the area of research are included but also promising emerging groups have been encouraged through their significant contributions.

Minireviews on HIV-1, Tuberculosis pathogen, Typhoid, Prodigiosins, NO immune response, iNOS in asthma pathogenesis, COX-2 on lung tumor progression, role of T-cells in diabetic pregnancy, Viral complement regulators and Phosphatidylinositol kinases in cell signaling contributed by experts in the respective field of research are no doubt a valuable treasure for readers. Research articles on role of IL-10 in cervical cancer, ALL diagnosis and clinical remission, Liposomal delivery of M. leprae antigens, Immunomodulatory role of lipoarabinomannan, Activation of polymorphonuclear nutrophils in diabetes and oxidative stress, Acetylcholinesterase isozymes from Setaria cervi, Circulatory Ig levels and MOR alleles, and UDS pathogenesis are equally interesting and with their contents would prove to be a reservoir of research data with immense citation potential.

The efforts taken by the editorial team in publishing this excellent number and the professional touch provided by Prof. Rao, the organizing secretary of the conference are explicit in the flawless outcome. I see this association between IJBB and IIS as just a beginning for public good, and wish this societal relationship continue to flourish. I wish more such publications, special numbers for ‘Indian Journal of Biochemistry and Biophysics’ to benefit the readers.

 

 

                                                                                                           (Prof. N K GANGULY)

                                                                                                                       Director General,

Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR)

New Delhi

 

CONTENTS

 

Minireviews

 

Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Tat Protein: Immunological Facets of
a Transcriptional Activator


269

        Shalini Gupta and Debashis Mitra*

 

 

 

Cellular AATF Gene: Armour against HIV-1

276

        Deepak Kaul*

 

 

 

Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Dendritic Cells: Recognition, Activation and
Functional Implications


279

        Aprajita Sinha, Nasir Salam, Shashank Gupta and Krishnamurthy Natarajan*

 

 

 

Type II Phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase(s) in Cell Signaling Cascades

289

        Ranjeet Kumar Sinha and Gosukonda Subrahmanyam*

 

 

 

Prodigiosins: A Novel Family of Immunosuppressants with Anti-cancer Activity

295

        Ruchi Pandey*, Ramesh Chander and Krishna B Sainis

 

 

 

Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS): Role in Asthma Pathogenesis

303

        Jyotsna Batra, Rajshekhar Chatterjee and Balaram Ghosh*

 

 

 

Nitric Oxide and Immune Response

310

        Parul Tripathi

 

 

 

Immunological, Cellular and Molecular Events in Typhoid fever

320

        Nowsheen Hamid and S K Jain*

 

 

 

Viral Complement Regulators: The Expert Mimicking Swindlers

331

        Muzammil Ahmad, Kalyani Pyaram, Jayati Mullick and Arvind Sahu*

 

 

 

Role of T-cells in Diabetic Pregnancy and Macrosomia

344

        Naim Akhtar Khan*

 

 

 

Papers

 

Role of IL-10 in immune suppression in cervical cancer

350

        Ravi Kiran Bhairavabhotla, Veena Verma, Hemant Tongaonkar, Surendra Shastri, Ketayun Dinshaw and Shubhada Chiplunkar*

 

 

 

Comparative analysis of differential expression of sialic acids and adhesion molecules
on mononuclear cells of bone marrow and peripheral blood in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia at diagnosis and clinical remission

 

 

357

        Suchandra Chowdhury, Suman Bandyopadhyay, Sarmila Chandra and Chitra Mandal*

 

 

 

Immunomodulatory role of arabinosylated lipoarabinomannan on Leishmania donovani infected murine macrophages


366

        Surajit Bhattacharjee, N Majumder, P Bhattacharyya, S Bhattacharyya (Majumdar) and Subrata Majumdar*

 

 

 

Advanced glycosylated end products-mediated activation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils in diabetes mellitus and associated oxidative stress


373

        Anjali Gupta, A K Tripathi*, R L Tripathi, S V Madhu and B D Banerjee

 

 

 

Partial purification and characterization of acetylcholinesterase isozymes from adult bovine filarial parasite Setaria cervi


379

        Shravan K Singh, Deep C Kaushal, P Kalpana Murthy and Nuzhat A Kaushal*

 

 

 

Liposomal delivery of Mycobacterium leprae antigen(s) with murabutide and Trat peptide inhibits Fas-mediated apoptosis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells derived from leprosy patients



386

        Vineeta Chattree, Neena Khanna, Vandana Bisht and D N Rao*

 

 

 

Correlation of circulatory immunoglobulin levels with Mu opiate receptor allele

394

        Shashwat Sharad, A K Gupta, R A Singh, Manav Kapoor and Suman Kapur*

 

 

 

Role of virulence plasmid of Aeromonas hydrophila in the pathogenesis of ulcerative disease syndrome in Clarias batrachus

 

401

        Tanmay Majumdar, S Datta, D Ghosh, S Dutta, A Chakraborty, R Goswami and
S Mazumder*

 

 

 

Keyword Index

407

 

 

Author Index

412

——————

*Author for correspondence

 

 

Call for Nominations

 

Dr H.P. Heineken Prizes for Biochemistry and Biophysics and Medicine 2008

 

Nominations are being accepted for the prestigious Dr H. P. Heineken Prizes (award worth USD 1,50,000) for Biochemistry and Biophysics and Medicine 2008. Presented since 1964, the award in the field of biochemistry and biophysics is intended to encourage outstanding scientific achievements in the fields of biochemistry and biophysics, including the biochemical and biophysical aspects of microbiology, and the physiology of seed germination. Awarded since 1989, the prize in medicine is intended to encourage outstanding scientific achievements in the fields in medicine. The Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW) selects the winners of the Heineken prizes from around the world. Candidates may be  nominated by either an organization or an individual researcher. The deadline for nominations is 1 January 2008.

For more information and nomination forms, please visit http://www.knaw.nl/heinekenprizes/

 


MINIREVIEWS

Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics

Vol. 44 October 2007, pp.269-275

 

Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Tat Protein: Immunological Facets of a Transcriptional Activator

Shalini Gupta and Debashis Mitra*

National Centre for Cell Science, Pune University Campus, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007

Received 22 May 2007; revised 20 September 2007

Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection is characterized by chronic immune activation and progressive loss of CD4+ T cells, leading to a wide array of immune dysfunction, particularly involving immune response directed against viral antigens. HIV-1 encodes for fifteen proteins, which might serve as a target for immune recognition. Immune response to the envelope proteins have been studied more due to their presence on the surface of the virus. Recent studies on HIV vaccine development have focused on the Gag and Pol proteins. The transactivator Tat and Rev proteins have also been the focus of immunization studies due to their potent regulatory activity. The Tat (transactivator of transcription) protein although being nuclear in localization is also released from infected cells and acts on uninfected cells. Extracellular Tat seems to play an important role in AIDS pathogenesis. Furthermore, a correlation has been found between anti-Tat immune response and slow progression of the disease. Although several studies have shown Tat as a potential vaccine candidate with encouraging results, there are also reports raising doubt about its efficacy in multi-component HIV vaccine strategy. Here, we have addressed the issue of immune response to the most indispensable HIV-1 regulatory protein Tat.

Keywords: HIV-1, Tat, Vaccine, Cytokine, Transcription Activator, Immunosuppression

 E-mail: dmitra@nccs.res.in

 

Minireview

Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics

Vol. 44 October 2007, pp.276-278

 

Cellular AATF Gene: Armour against HIV-1

Deepak Kaul*

Molecular Biology Unit,Department of Experimental Medicine & Biotechnology,
Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education & Research, Chandigarh 160 012, India

Received 30 April 2007; revised 07 September 2007

Outcome of HIV-1 infection at the cellular level is decided by the orchestrated balance that exists between cellular nucleic acid-based adaptive immune mechanism involving non-coding micro RNAs (miRNAs) and offensive tactics of HIV-1 to suppress this host cellular immunity. In this context, the review explains the importance of a novel miRNA encoded exclusively and conspicuously by HIV-1 genome that has the ability to specifically target cellular AATF gene recognized to play a crucial role in the maintenance of adaptive immunity at nucleic acid level against HIV-1 invasion.

Keywords: HIV-1 RNomics, Cellular AATF gene, CD4 Lymphopenia

Email: dkaul_24@hotmail.com

 

Minireview

Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics

Vol. 44 October 2007, pp.279-288

 

Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Dendritic Cells: Recognition, Activation and Functional Implications

Aprajita Sinha, Nasir Salam, Shashank Gupta and Krishnamurthy Natarajan*

Immunology Group, International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067

Received 26 June 2007; revised 05 September 2007

The highly complex nature of interactions of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with cells of the immune system has puzzled researchers the world-over in understanding the pathogenesis and immunology associated with tuberculosis (TB). This has contributed to the delay in development of effective vaccine(s) for TB. Several excellent studies have provided only a glimpse of the kind and degree of immune responses elicited following infection by mycobacteria. Preferred entry via respiratory route results in the capture of mycobacteria by alveolar macrophages that eventually become their long-term hosts. Since the pathogen is rarely cleared this has resulted in the human population serving as a large reservoir for mycobacteria. Owing to their unique ability to prime naïve and memory T cells, dendritic cells (DCs) play important and indispensable roles in the initiation and maintenance of protective immune responses following infection. The kind of immune response initiated by DCs with respect to mycobacteria determines the character of immune responses mounted by the host against the pathogen. The profile of cytokines and chemokines secreted as a result of infection of DCs by mycobacteria further plays an important role in defining the course of infection. This minireview attempts to highlight key interactions of mycobacteria with dendritic cells. We discus the uptake of mycobacteria by DCs followed by DC activation and the spectrum of immune responses initiated by infected/activated DCs, followed by numerous ways the pathogen has devised to subvert protective responses.

Keywords: Dendritic cells, Mycobacteria, Immune response, Immune evasion, Mycobacterium tuberculosis

Email: natarajan@icgeb.res.in

 

Minireview

Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics

Vol. 44 October 2007, pp.289-294

 

Type II Phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase(s) in Cell signaling Cascades

Ranjeet Kumar Sinha and Gosukonda Subrahmanyam*

Biotechnology Group, School of Biosciences and Bioengineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai, India

Received 22 May 2007; revised 27 September 2007

Phosphorylated derivatives of phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) are key components of many signaling cascades. Many isoforms of PtdIns kinases, PtdIns phosphate kinases and phosphatases use these lipids in amazing networks of signaling cascades that are yet to be understood fully. PtdIns 4-kinase(s) phosphorylates PtdIns at the 4th –OH position of inositol head group and are classified in to type II and III PtdIns 4-kinases. While type III PtdIns 4-kinases are implicated in vesicular trafficking, type II PtdIns 4-kinases are suggested to play a role in cell signaling, cytoskeletal rearrangements, cell motility and in microbial pathogenicity. This paper reviews the role of type II PtdIns 4-kinases in cell signaling cascades in health and disease.

Keywords: Lipid kinases; Cell signaling; Cytoskeleton; Cell adhesion; Microbial pathogenicity

E-mail: gsm@iitb.ac.in

 

Minireview

Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics

Vol. 44 October 2007, pp. 295-302

 

Prodigiosins: A Novel Family of Immunosuppressants with Anti-cancer Activity

Ruchi Pandeya*, Ramesh Chanderb and Krishna B Sainisc

aRadiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, bFood Technology Division, cBio-Medical Group, Modular Laboratories,
Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085, India

Received 22 May 2007; revised 16 August 2007

Prodigiosins (PrGs) are a family of promising therapeutic molecules, isolated mostly from Gram-negative bacteria and characterized by a common pyrryldipyrrylmethene structure with varying side chains. They show a broad spectrum of activities such as anti-microbial, anti-malarial, anti-cancer and immunosuppressive. PrGs are attracting increasing attention due to the ongoing research for less toxic, but effective agents for cancer chemotherapy and immunosuppression for preventing allograft rejection and autoimmunity. Different analogues have been synthesized and evaluated. This review discusses the immunosuppressive and anti-cancer activities of this class of compounds, as both involve inhibition of cell proliferation. The main focus is on the in vitro and in vivo immunosuppressive activity of the different PrGs and the mechanisms involved. PrGs primarily target the T cells, though some effects are observed on other cell types also. Unlike the well-known immunosuppressant cyclosporin A, PrGs do not inhibit the secretion of IL-2 but inhibit the mitogenic signaling from IL-2, suggesting a different mechanism of action. Janus tyrosine kinase 3 (Jak3) that associates with IL-2R upon activation is considered as the molecular target for PrGs. Its restricted expression makes Jak3 as an attractive target for immunosuppressive therapy. However, the available literature suggests that some other pathways are also influenced by the PrGs. These may be important for the anti-cancer activity, as well as immunosuppressive action. Therefore, PrGs appear to be potential candidates for pharmaceutical development as immunosuppressants and also as anti-cancer agents.

Keywords: Prodigiosins, Immunosuppressants, Anti-cancer activity

E-mail: ruchipandey01@gmail.com

 

Minireview

Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics

Vol. 44 October 2007, pp.303-309

 

Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS): Role in Asthma Pathogenesis

Jyotsna Batra, Rajshekhar Chatterjee and Balaram Ghosh*

Molecular Immunogenetics Laboratory,
Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology, Delhi, 110007, India

Received 20 June 2007; revised 06 September 2007

Asthma is one of the most common chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways of the lungs, affecting more than 300 million people all over the world. Nitric oxide (NO) is endogenously produced in mammalian airways by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and is known to regulate many aspects of human asthma, including the modulation of airway and vascular smooth muscle tone and the inflammation. Asthmatic patients show an increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in airway epithelial cells and an increased level of NO in exhaled air. Using various NO inhibitors (non-specific or iNOS-specific) and gene knock-out experiments, controversial results have been obtained regarding iNOS’s beneficial and deleterious effects in the disease. In the present review, we have attempted to summarize the results of these experiments and also the genetic studies being undertaken to understand the role of iNOS in asthma. It is argued that extensive biochemical, clinical and genetic studies will be required to assess the precise role of NO in the asthma. This may help in designing selective and more potent iNOS inhibitors and NO donors for developing novel therapeutics for the asthma patients.

Keywords: iNOS, Asthma, Nitric Oxide, NOS inhibitor, Gene

E-mail: bghosh@igib.res.in

 

Minireview

Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics

Vol. 44 October 2007, pp.310-319

 

Nitric Oxide and Immune Response

Parul Tripathi*

Immunology Group, International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, New Delhi, India

Received 22 May 2007; revised 06 September 2007

Nitric oxide (NO), initially described as a physiological mediator of endothelial cell relaxation plays an important role in hypotension. It is an intercellular messenger and has been recognized as one of the most versatile players in the immune system. Cells of the innate immune system – macrophages, neutrophils and natural killer (NK) cells use pattern recognition receptors to recognize molecular patterns associated with pathogens. Activated macrophages then inhibit pathogen replication by releasing a variety of effector molecules, including NO. In addition to macrophages, a large number of other immune system cells produce and respond to NO. Thus, NO is important as a toxic defense molecule against infectious organisms. It also regulates the functional activity, growth and death of many immune and inflammatory cell types including macrophages, T lymphocytes, antigen-presenting cells, mast cells, neutrophils and NK cells. However, the role of NO in non-specific and specific immunity in vivo and in immunologically mediated diseases and inflammation is poorly understood. This review discusses the role of NO in immune response and inflammation and its mechanisms of action in these processes.

Keywords: Nitric oxide, iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase), Th1/Th2 Cytokines, Immune response, Macrophage, Endothelial cells

E-mail: parultripathi@rediffmail.com

 

Minireview

Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics

Vol. 44 October 2007, pp.320-330

 

Immunological, Cellular and Molecular Events in Typhoid Fever

Nowsheen Hamid and S K Jain*

Department of Biotechnology, Hamdard University, Hamdard Nagar, New Delhi 110 062, India

Received 02 June 2007; revised 20 September 2007

Salmonella, a facultative intracellular Gram-negative bacterium infects a wide range of hosts causing several gastrointestinal diseases and enteric fever in humans and certain animal species. Typhoid caused by Salmonella typhi remains a major health concern in India and worldwide. Also, with emergence of multidrug resistant strains, Salmonella has acquired increased virulence, communicability and survivability, resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. Though a number of vaccines for typhoid are available against S. typhi (or also against S. typhimurium), these have certain undesirable side effects and the search for new immunogens suitable for vaccine formulation is still continuing. The immune response to primary Salmonella infection involves both humoral and cell-mediated responses. The protective immunity against Salmonella depends on host- parasite interaction, however; the detailed mechanism of virulence, innate resistance and susceptibility of host remains unclear. This review focuses on the molecular, immunological and cellular mechanisms of pathogenesis of Salmonella infection to provide an insight to counteract bacterial infections and allow a better understanding of its clinical manifestations. It also reviews better technological possibilities combined with increased knowledge in related fields such as immunology and molecular biology and allow for new vaccination strategies. Some new approaches such as subunit and nucleic acid vaccines and recombinant antigen which are becoming increasingly important for the development of potential vaccines have also been discussed. A significant progress has been made in our understanding of Salmonella pathogenesis. Despite these efforts, however, many challenges exist, especially for investigators who aim to understand how the pathogenic mechanisms operating in vitro apply to in vivo model systems. However, unyielding work and collaborations between Salmonella researchers and clinicians worldwide have made significant contributions to understanding the interaction between virulence determinants and immunity required to stop the spread of this pathogen.

Keywords: Outer membrane proteins, Pathogenesis, Salmonella, Typhoid, Vaccine, Virulence

Email: skjain@jamiahamdard.ac.in

 

Minireview

Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics

Vol. 44 October 2007, pp.331-343

 

Viral Complement Regulators: The Expert Mimicking Swindlers

Muzammil Ahmad, Kalyani Pyaram, Jayati Mullick and Arvind Sahu*

National Centre for Cell Science, Pune University Campus, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007, India

Received 22 May 2007; revised 20 September 2007

The complement system is a principal bastion of innate immunity designed to combat a myriad of existing as well as newly emerging pathogens. Since viruses are obligatory intracellular parasites, they are continuously exposed to host complement assault and, therefore, have imbibed various strategies to subvert it. One of them is molecular mimicry of the host complement regulators. Large DNA viruses such as pox and herpesviruses encode proteins that are structurally and functionally similar to human regulators of complement activation (RCA), a family of proteins that regulate complement. In this review, we have presented the structural and functional aspects of virally encoded RCA homologs (vRCA), in particular two highly studied vRCAs, vaccinia virus complement control protein (VCP) and Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus complement regulator (kaposica). Importance of these evasion molecules in viral pathogenesis and their role beyond complement regulation are also discussed.

Keywords: Viral complement evasion, Viral molecular mimicry, RCA, Complement, immune evasion, KSHV, HHV-8, Vaccinia virus, Variola virus, Smallpox, HVS, RRV, Kaposica, VCP, HVS-CCPH

Email: arvindsahu@nccs.res.in

 

Minireview

Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics

Vol. 44 October 2007, pp.344-349

 

Role of T-cells in Diabetic Pregnancy and Macrosomia

Naim Akhtar Khan

UPRES EA 4183 Lipides & Signalisation Cellulaire, Université de Bourgogne,

Faculté des Sciences de la vie, 6, Boulevard Gabriel, 21000 Dijon, France

Received 22 May 2007; revised 14 August 2007

A number of studies have recently addressed the correlationship between diabetic pregnancy/macrosomia and differentiation of T-cells into Th1 and Th2 subsets. Diabetic pregnancy has been found to be associated with a decreased Th1 phenotype and IL-4 mRNA expression. In macrosomic offspring, high expression of IL-2 and IFN-g mRNA, but not of Th2 cytokines is observed, indicating that the Th1 phenotype is upregulated during macrosomia. T-cells of gestational diabetic rats and their macrosomic offspring seem to present a defect in signal transduction. Indeed, the recruitment of free intracellular calcium concentrations from intracellular pool in T-cells of these animals is altered. The phenotype of regulatory T-cells (T-Reg) is upregulated in diabetic pregnancy and their infants. T-cells in diabetic pregnancy and macrosomic obese offspring are in vivo activated. Adipokines and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-a (PPARa) also seem to modulate the pro-inflammatory cytokines in these pathologies. Hence, activation of the immune system might be considered as one of the regulatory pathways including metabolic abnormalities in these two pathologies.

Keywords: T-cells, Inflammation, Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, Diabetic pregnancy, Macrosomia

Email: naim.khan@u-bourgogne.fr

 

 

Original Papers

 

Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics

Vol. 44 October 2007, pp.350-356

 

Role of IL-10 in immune suppression in cervical cancer

Ravi Kiran Bhairavabhotla1, Veena Verma1, Hemant Tongaonkar2, Surendra Shastri3, Ketayun Dinshaw4 and Shubhada Chiplunkar1*

1Immunology, Advanced Centre for Treatment, Research and Education in Cancer, (ACTREC), 2Gynecology and Urology, 3Preventive Oncology, 4Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Tata Memorial Centre, Mumbai 400012, India

Received 29 May 2007; revised 29 August 2007

Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in the women worldwide and the most frequent in developing countries, including India. Human papilloma virus (HPV) is the major etiological factor in cervical cancer patients. Host factors are also critical in regulating tumor growth and cytokines that modulate immunologic control may be of particular importance. In the present study, we investigated the correlation between the presence of HPV and type of cytokines expressed in cervical carcinomas and attempted to elucidate the possible reasons for the immune suppression. Cytokines investigated were type-1 cytokine IFN-g  (shows immunostimulatory function and capable of limiting tumor growth) and type-2 cytokines IL-4, IL-10 and IL-6 (show immunosuppressive function and capable of stimulating tumor growth). Our data demonstrated the presence of HPV sub-types 16 and 18 in 86% and 13.8% of cervical tumor biopsies, respectively. The cervical tumor biopsies showed increased presence for mRNA for IL-10 and IL-1a, while none of the biopsies showed expression for IFN-g. A correlation was observed between the presence of HPV in cervical tumor biopsies and mRNA for IL-10. Increased percentages of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) were observed in circulation in cervical cancer patients, providing evidence for increased immune suppression. IL-10 may play a key role in maintenance of Tregs and explains the immunosuppressive state of cervical cancer patients.

Keywords: Cervical cancer, Human papilloma virus, IL-10, Regulatory T cells (Tregs), Immune suppression

Email: schiplunkar@actrec.gov.in

 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics

Vol. 44 October 2007, pp.357-365

 

Comparative analysis of differential expression of sialic acids and adhesion molecules on mononuclear cells of bone marrow and peripheral blood in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia at diagnosis and clinical remission

Suchandra Chowdhury, Suman Bandyopadhyay, Sarmila Chandra1 and Chitra Mandal*

Infectious Disease and Immunology Division, Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, 4, Raja S. C. Mullick Road,
Kolkata 700032, India

1Kothari Medical Centre 8/3, Alipore Road, Kolkata 700027, India

Received 06 July 2007; revised 31 August 2007

Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is characterized by the neoplasm of immature haematopoietic precursor cells (HPCs). We report significant differences between the expression of sialoglycoproteins and adhesion molecules on mononuclear cells (MNCs) of bone marrow (BM) and peripheral blood (PB) from individual children at diagnosis of the disease. Lymphoblasts in PB predominantly expressed 9-O-acetylated sialoglycoproteins (Neu5,9Ac2-GPs), sialic acid, α2-3 linked sialic acid, L- and P-selectins and vascular cell adhesion molecule -1 (VCAM-1) on their surface compared to BM, as determined with selective lectins and monoclonal antibodies  (mAbs) by flow cytometric analysis. CD34+CD38+ cells present either in diagnostic PB or BM always showed enhanced expression of both α2-3 and α2-6 linked sialic acids, Neu5,9Ac2-GPs, L- and P-selectins and VCAM-1, compared to CD34+CD38- population, as confirmed by higher mean fluorescence intensity (MFI). Expression of ICAM-1 was reverse. However, MFI of Neu5,9Ac2-GPs was always higher both in CD34+CD38+ and CD34+CD38- population in PB compared to BM. Diverse trend of these cell surface macromolecules was observed during clinical remission. This is the first comparative study between PB and BM, where significant differential distribution of sialylated macromolecules and adhesion molecules was observed. Hence, supervising these cell surface macromolecules at various stages of treatment might help in minimal residual disease detection, identifying mobilization factor(s) and in isolation of normal HPCs for autologous BM transplantation.

Keywords:         9-O-Acetylated sialoglycoproteins, Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, Flow cytometry, Haematopoietic precursor cells, Immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily cell adhesion molecules, Sialic acids, Selectins

E-mail: cmandal@iicb.res.in, chitra_mandal@yahoo.com

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics

Vol. 44 October 2007, pp.366-372

 

Immunomodulatory role of arabinosylated lipoarabinomannan on Leishmania donovani infected murine macrophages

Surajit Bhattacharjee, N Majumder, P Bhattacharyya, S Bhattacharyya (Majumdar) and Subrata Majumdar*

Department of Microbiology, Bose Institute, P-1/12, C.I.T. Scheme VIIM, Kolkata-700 054, India

Received 23 June 2007 ; revised 27 September 2007

Arabinosylated lipoarabinomannan (Ara-LAM), a surface glycolipid antigen isolated from avirulent Mycobacterium smegmatis is involved in modulation of host cell signaling. In this study, we investigated Ara-LAM-mediated modulation of impaired immune responses during visceral leishmaniasis caused by protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani. Ara-LAM treatment at dose of 3 μg/ml in L. donovani infected murine peritoneal macrophages as well as J774A.1 macrophage cell line exhibited a distinct up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines like TNF-a and IL-12 both at the protein and transcriptional level. In addition, generation of nitric oxide and iNOS expression were also observed. The present study showed that Ara-LAM was significantly effective in elimination of L. donovani parasites from both peritoneal as well as J774A.1 macrophages. Thus, it could be utilized as an immunomodulatory agent in prevention of leishmanial pathogenesis.

Keywords: Lipoarabinomannan, Leishmaniasis, Cytokine, Nitric Oxide

Email: subrata@bic.boseinst.ernet.in

 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics

Vol. 44 October 2007, pp.373-378

 

Advanced glycosylated end products-mediated activation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils in diabetes mellitus and associated oxidative stress

Anjali Gupta, A K Tripathi*, R L Tripathi, S V Madhu and B D Banerjee

Department of Biochemistry and Medicine, University College of Medical Sciences and G.T.B. Hospital (University of Delhi),
Dilshad Garden, Delhi-110 095, India

Received 05 July 2007; revised 30 September 2007

Two important consequences of hyperglycemia in diabetes are development of oxidative stress and formation of advanced glycation end products (AGE) which are known to be associated with diabetic complications. Relationship between AGE formation and development of oxidative stress (OS) is yet to be established. In the present study, the involvement of AGE in PMN-mediated ROS generation and the associated OS were investigated in type 2 diabetic mellitus (DM) patients. We assessed OS parameters (serum MDA, FRAP and GSH), PMN oxidative functions (respiratory burst and superoxide production) and total serum AGE in 90 subjects divided equally in three groups — control group, Group I consisting of type 2 diabetic patients without microvascular complications and Group II consisting of type 2 diabetic patients with microvascular complications. PMNs isolated from both groups (I and II) exhibited higher level of respiratory burst (RB) and produced increased amount of superoxide anion as compared to the controls. The increase was more pronounced in diabetes with complications, as compared to those without. Serum malondialdehyde (MDA) level was elevated, whereas glutathione (GSH) and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) levels were significantly reduced in diabetes as compared to the controls, suggesting the presence of oxidative stress in DM. A positive correlation between PMN oxidative function and OS parameters suggested the involvement of PMN in the development of OS in DM. Serum AGE level was also elevated in diabetic groups as compared to the controls. Further, the positive correlation between serum AGE level and PMN oxidative function suggested the involvement of AGE in increased RB and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by resting diabetic PMN. The results of the study indicate that AGE-PMN interaction possibly upregulates NADPH oxidase, leading to enhanced ROS generation and thus contributes to the pathogenesis in diabetes.

Keywords: Advanced glycosylation end products, Polymorphonuclear neutrophil, Reactive oxygen species, Oxidative stress, Diabetes mellitus

E-mail: aktripathiucms@hotmail.com

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics

Vol. 44 October 2007, pp.379-385

 

Partial purification and characterization of acetylcholinesterase isozymes from adult bovine filarial parasite Setaria cervi

Shravan K Singh1, Deep C Kaushal2, P Kalpana Murthy1 and Nuzhat A Kaushal1*

Divisions of Parasitology1 and Microbiology2, Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow-226 001, India

Received 13 June 2007; revised 11 September 2007

Filariasis is a major health problem, affecting millions of people in tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world. The isolation and characterization of parasite-specific enzyme targets is essential for developing effective control measures against filariasis. Acetylcholinesterase (AchE, E.C. 3.1.1.7), an important enzyme of neuromuscular transmission is found in a number of helminths including filarial parasites and may be playing a role in host-parasite interactions. Earlier, we demonstrated the presence of two isozymes of AchE, different from the host enzyme in the human (Brugia malayi) and bovine (Setaria cervi) filarial parasites. In the present study, two isozymes of AchE (pAchE1 and pAchE2) were isolated from S. cervi adults and characterized biochemically and immunochemically. The AchE was partially purified on Con-A Sepharose column and then subjected to preparative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) for separation of the isozymes. The AchE activity was localized by the staining of gel and the isozymes were isolated from the PAGE strips by electroelution. Both isozymes preferentially utilized acetylcholine iodide as substrate and were strongly inhibited by the true AchE inhibitor (BW284c51), suggesting that they were true AchE. The polyclonal antibodies produced against the isozymes showed significant cross-reactivity with B. malayi AchE, but not against the host enzyme. These findings suggested that both the isozymes were biochemically (in terms of their substrate specificity and inhibitor sensitivity) and immunochemically similar, but different from the host enzyme.

Keywords: Setaria cervi, Brugia malayi, Acetylcholinesterase, Bovine filarial parasite, Human filarial parasite, Filarial acetylcholinesterase

E mail: nuzhatkaushal@hotmail.com; nuzhatkaushal@yahoo.com

 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics

Vol. 44 October 2007, pp.386-393

 

Liposomal delivery of Mycobacterium leprae antigen(s) with murabutide and Trat peptide inhibits Fas-mediated apoptosis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells derived from leprosy patients

Vineeta Chattree1, Neena Khanna2, Vandana Bisht1 and D N Rao1*

1Department of Biochemistry, 2Department of Dermatovenereology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences,
Ansari Nagar, New Delhi-110029

Received 26 May 2007; revised 06 September 2007

Protective immunity against intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium leprae is dependent on the activation of T cells. Repeated stimulation of T cells by M. leprae antigens MLCwA (M. leprae total cell wall antigen) and ManLAM (mannose capped lipoarabinomannan) may lead to apoptosis in leprosy patients. In the present study, inhibition of the Fas-induced apoptosis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells of leprosy patients was investigated using above M. leprae antigen(s), in combination with immunomodulators murabutide (MB) and a Trat peptide in particulate form (liposome). Incubation of the cells with particulate mode of antigen presentation led to both decreased percentage of propidium iodide (PI) positive cells and T cells expressing Fas-FasL, as well as decreased caspase-8/-3 activities in the lepromatous patients, thereby inhibiting apoptosis, while converse was true with stimulation with soluble antigen. Concurrently, there was an upregulation of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-XL in the lepromatous patients, thereby inhibiting apoptosis. Thus, the liposomal formulation of antigen promoted proliferation of anergized T cell by inhibiting apoptosis through decreased expression of death receptors and caspase activities and increased expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-XL in these patients.

Keywords: Leprosy, Anergy, Apoptosis, Fas-FasL, Caspase activity, Bcl-xL protein, liposome, Immunomodulator

E mail: dnrao311@rediffmail.com

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics

Vol. 44 October 2007, pp.394-400

 

Correlation of circulatory immunoglobulin levels with Mu opiate receptor allele

Shashwat Sharad1, 2, A K Gupta2, R A Singh3, Manav Kapoor1 and Suman Kapur1*

1Center for Biotechnology, Biological Sciences Group, BITS, Pilani-333031, Rajasthan, India

2Allahabad Agricultural Institute- Deemed University, Naini, Allahabad, Uttar Pradesh, India

 3Institute of Human Behaviour and Allied Sciences, Delhi, India

Received 22 May 2007; revised 27 September 2007

Opiates are known to induce immunosuppression in their users (addicts). Evidences supporting their role in suppressing a variety of immunological end points in addicts have been reported by several investigators. In the present study, we investigated the changes in serum immunoglobulin (Ig) levels and their correlation with Mu opiate receptor (MOR) genotypes. Eighty-seven users and forty-five non-users were recruited for the study. Genomic DNA, isolated from the peripheral blood, was used for genotyping for C17T and A118G polymorphism using PCR-RFLP method. The frequency of A and G alleles in non-users was 89% and 11% respectively, whereas in addicts, it was 67% and 33% respectively. Case control analysis between groups revealed that 118G allele was associated with opioid dependence [Chi square (X2) = 13.56, odds ratio (OR) = 3.90, confidence interval95% (CI95%) = 1.80-8.67, p = 0.000231]. C17T polymorphism showed no association with opioid dependence [(X2) = 0.9, O R = 2.49, CI95% = 0.528-16.12, p = 0.343]. Mean Ig levels, both IgG (student’s t-test = 2.2738, p = 0.007) and IgA (student’s t-test = 2.848, p = 0.0051) differed between opiate users and non-users. IgG and IgA levels were also significantly different in individuals with different MOR genotypes. Immunosuppression was observed in AA genotype-bearing individuals, while no suppression was seen in AG and GG genotypes bearing individuals. In case of C17T polymorphism, both CC and CT genotypes bearing individuals showed immunosuppression, as judged by circulating Ig levels.

Keywords: Opiate addiction, Mu opiate receptor, Allele type, IgG, IgA, Immunosuppression, Genotyping

 

E mail: s_kapur@bits-pilani.ac.in

 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Biochemistry & Biophysics

Vol. 44 October 2007, pp.401-406

 

Role of virulence plasmid of Aeromonas hydrophila in the pathogenesis of ulcerative disease syndrome in Clarias batrachus

T Majumdar, S Datta, D Ghosh, S Dutta, A Chakraborty, R Goswami and S Mazumder*

Immunobiology Laboratory, School of Life Sciences, Visva-Bharati University, Santiniketan 731 235, India

Received 22 May 2007; revised 10 September 2007

Pathogenic Aeromonas hydrophila (strain VB21), a multiple-drug resistance strain contains a plasmid of about 21 kb. After curing of plasmid, the isolates became sensitive to antimicrobials, to which they were earlier resistant. The cured bacteria exhibited significant alterations in their surface structure, growth profile and virulence properties, and failed to cause ulcerative disease syndrome (UDS) when injected into the Indian catfish Clarias batrachus. Routine biochemical studies revealed that the plasmid curing did not alter the biochemical properties of the bacteria. After transformation of the plasmid into cured A. hydrophila the bacterium regained its virulence properties and induced all the characteristic symptoms of UDS when injected into fish. Thus, the plasmid plays a pivotal role in the phenotype, growth and virulence of
A. hydrophila and pathogenesis of aeromonad UDS.

Keywords: Ulcerative disease syndrome, Aeromonas hydrophila, Clarias batrachus, Catfish, Plasmid, Transformation

 

E mail: shibnath1@yahoo.co.in

  

KEYWORD INDEX

 

A

 

AATF (Apoptosis antagonizing transcription factor) gene

 

Cellular AATF gene: Armour against HIV-1

276

Acetylcholinesterase (AchE), filarial

 

Partial purification and characterization of acetylcholinesterase isozymes from adult bovine filarial parasite Setaria cervi

379

Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL)

 

Differential expression of sialic acids and adhesion molecules on MNCs of bone marrow and peripheral blood in childhood ALL

357

Addiction, opium

 

Correlation of circulatory immunoglobulin levels with Mu opiate receptor allele

394

Adipokines

 

Role of T-cells in diabetic pregnancy and macrosomia

344

Advanced glycosylation end products (AGE)

 

AGE-mediated activation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils in diabetes mellitus and associated oxidative stress

373

Aeromonas hydrophila

 

Role of virulence plasmid of Aeromonas hydrophila in the pathogenesis of UDS in Clarias batrachus

401

AIDS (Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome)

 

Cellular AATF gene: Armour against HIV-1

276

HIV-1 Tat protein: immunological facets of a transcriptional activator

269

Airway responsiveness

 

iNOS: role in Asthma pathogenesis

303

Anergy

 

Liposomal delivery of Mycobacterium leprae antigens with murabutide and Trat peptide inhibits Fas-mediated apoptosis of PBMCs from leprosy patients

386

Anticancer activity

 

Prodigiosins: a novel family of immunosuppressants with anti-cancer activity

295

Antigen-presenting cells (APC)

 

Liposomal delivery of Mycobacterium leprae antigens with murabutide and Trat peptide inhibits Fas-mediated apoptosis of PBMCs from leprosy patients

386

Nitric oxide and immune response

310

Apoptosis

 

Cellular AATF gene: Armour against HIV-1

276

 Liposomal delivery of Mycobacterium leprae antigens with murabutide and Trat peptide inhibits Fas-mediated apoptosis of PBMCs from leprosy patients

386

Asthma

 

 iNOS: role in Asthma pathogenesis

303

 

 

B

 

Bcl-xL protein

 

Liposomal delivery of Mycobacterium leprae antigens with murabutide and Trat peptide inhibits Fas-mediated apoptosis of PBMCs from leprosy patients

386

Brugia malayi

 

Partial purification and characterization of acetylcholinesterase isozymes from adult bovine filarial parasite Setaria cervi

379

 

 

C

 

Cancer

 

Role of IL-10 in immune suppression in cervical cancer

350

Cancer chemotherapy

 

Prodigiosins: a novel family of immunosuppressants with anti-cancer activity

295

Caspase activity

 

Liposomal delivery of Mycobacterium leprae antigens with murabutide and Trat peptide inhibits Fas-mediated apoptosis of PBMCs from leprosy patients

386

Catfish

 

Role of virulence plasmid of Aeromonas hydrophila in the pathogenesis of UDS in Clarias batrachus

401

CD4 Lymphopenia

 

Cellular AATF gene: Armour against HIV-1

276

Cell adhesion

 

Differential expression of sialic acids and adhesion molecules on MNCs of bone marrow and peripheral blood in childhood ALL

357

PtdIns 4-kinases (type II) in cell signaling cascades

289

Cell signaling

 

PtdIns 4-kinases (type II) in cell signaling cascades

289

Cervical cancer

 

Role of IL-10 in immune suppression in cervical cancer

350

Clarias batrachus

 

Role of virulence plasmid of Aeromonas hydrophila in the pathogenesis of UDS in Clarias batrachus

401

Complement system

 

Viral complement regulators: the expert mimicking swindlers

331

Cytokines

 

 HIV-1 Tat protein: immunological facets of a transcriptional activator

269

 Immunomodulatory role of arabinosylated lipoarabinomannan on Leishmania donovani infected murine macrophages

366

 Mycobacterium tuberculosis and dendritic cells: Recognition, activation and functional implications

279

 Role of IL-10 in immune suppression in cervical cancer

350

 Th1/Th2

 

 Nitric oxide and immune response

310

 Role in diabetic pregnancy and macrosomia

344

 

 

D

 

Decay-accelerating activity (DAA)

 

 Viral complement regulators: the expert mimicking swindlers

331

Dendritic cells (DCs)

 

 Mycobacterium tuberculosis and dendritic cells: Recognition, activation and functional implications

279

Diabetes mellitus

 

AGE-mediated activation of PMNs in diabetes mellitus and associated oxidative stress

373

Role of T-cells in diabetic pregnancy and macrosomia

344

 

 

E

 

Endothelial cells

 

Nitric oxide and immune response

310

 

 

F

 

Fas-FasL

 

Liposomal delivery of Mycobacterium leprae antigens with murabutide and Trat peptide inhibits Fas-mediated apoptosis of PBMCs from leprosy patients

386

Ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP)

 

 AGE-mediated activation of PMNs in diabetes mellitus and associated oxidative stress

373

Filariasis

 

 Partial purification and characterization of acetylcholinesterase isozymes from adult bovine filarial parasite Setaria cervi

379

Flow cytometry

 

 Differential expression of sialic acids and adhesion molecules on MNCs of bone marrow and peripheral blood in childhood ALL

357

H

 

Haematopoietic precursor cells (HPCs)

 

Differential expression of sialic acids and adhesion molecules on MNCs of bone marrow and peripheral blood in childhood ALL

357

HHV-8

 

 Viral complement regulators: the expert mimicking swindlers

331

HIV-1 RNomics

 

Cellular AATF gene: Armour against HIV-1

276

Human filarial parasite

 

Partial purification and characterization of acetylcholinesterase isozymes from adult bovine filarial parasite Setaria cervi

379

Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1)

 

Cellular AATF gene: Armour against HIV-1

276

HIV-1 Tat protein: immunological facets of a transcriptional activator

269

Human papilloma virus (HPV)

 

Role of IL-10 in immune suppression in cervical cancer

350

HVS-CCPH (Herpesvirus saimiri complement control protein homolog)

 

Viral complement regulators: the expert mimicking swindlers

331

Hyperglycemia

 

AGE-mediated activation of PMNs in diabetes mellitus and associated oxidative stress

373

 

 

I

 

Ig. see immunoglobulins (Ig)

 

Immune evasion

 

Mycobacterium tuberculosis and dendritic cells: Recognition, activation and functional implications

279

Viral complement regulators: the expert mimicking swindlers

331

Immune response

 

 Mycobacterium tuberculosis and dendritic cells: Recognition, activation and functional implications

279

Nitric oxide and immune response

310

Immunoglobulins (Ig)

 

Differential expression of sialic acids and adhesion molecules on MNCs of bone marrow and peripheral blood in childhood ALL

357

 IgA, IgG

 

 Correlation of circulatory immunoglobulin  levels with Mu opiate receptor allele

394

Immunomodulator

 

 Liposomal delivery of Mycobacterium leprae antigens with murabutide and Trat peptide inhibits Fas-mediated apoptosis of PBMCs from leprosy patients

386

Immunosuppressants

 

Prodigiosins: a novel family of immunosuppressants with anti-cancer activity

295

Immunosuppression

 

Correlation of circulatory immunoglobulin levels with Mu opiate receptor allele

394

HIV-1 Tat protein: immunological facets of a transcriptional activator

269

Prodigiosins: a novel family of immunosuppressants with anti-cancer activity

295

Role of IL-10 in immune suppression in cervical cancer

350

Infection

 

Mycobacterium tuberculosis and dendritic cells: Recognition, activation and functional implications

279

Inflammation

 

Role of T-cells in diabetic pregnancy and macrosomia

344

iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase)

 

 Immunomodulatory role of arabinosylated lipoarabinomannan on Leishmania donovani infected murine macrophages

366

 Nitric oxide and immune response

310

 Role in Asthma pathogenesis

303

Interleukin-10 (IL-10)

 

 Role in immune suppression in cervical cancer

350

 

 

K

 

Kala-azar. see Leishmaniasis

 

Kaposica (Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus inhibitor of complement activation)

 

Viral complement regulators: the expert mimicking swindlers

331

KSHV (Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus)

 

Viral complement regulators: the expert mimicking swindlers

331

 

 

L

 

Leishmaniasis

 

 Immunomodulatory role of arabinosylated lipoarabinomannan on Leishmania donovani infected murine macrophages

366

Leprosy

 

Liposomal delivery of Mycobacterium leprae antigens with murabutide and Trat peptide inhibits Fas-mediated apoptosis of PBMCs from leprosy patients

386

Lipid kinases

 

 PtdIns 4-kinases (type II) in cell signaling cascades

289

Lipoarabinomannan, arabinosylated (Ara-LAM)

 

Immunomodulatory role of arabinosylated lipoarabinomannan on Leishmania donovani infected murine macrophages

366

Liposome

 

 Liposomal delivery of Mycobacterium leprae antigens with murabutide and Trat peptide inhibits Fas-mediated apoptosis of PBMCs from leprosy patients

386

Lymphopenia

 

Cellular AATF gene: Armour against HIV-1

276

 

 

M

 

Macrophages

 

Mycobacterium tuberculosis and dendritic cells: Recognition, activation and functional implications

279

 Nitric oxide and immune response

310

Macrosomia

 

 Role of T-cells in diabetic pregnancy and macrosomia

344

Malondialdehyde (MDA)

 

AGE-mediated activation of PMNs in diabetes mellitus and associated oxidative stress

373

Mast cells

 

Nitric oxide and immune response

310

Microbial pathogenicity

 

PtdIns 4-kinases (type II) in cell signaling cascades

289

MOPICE (Monkeypox inhibitor of complement enzymes)

 

Viral complement regulators: the expert mimicking swindlers

331

Mu opiate receptor (MOR)

 

Correlation of circulatory immunoglobulin levels with Mu opiate receptor allele

394

Mycobacterium tuberculosis

 

and dendritic cells: Recognition, activation and functional implications

279

 

 

N

 

Neutrophils

 

Nitric oxide and immune response

310

Nitric oxide (NO)

 

 Immunomodulatory role of arabinosylated lipoarabinomannan on Leishmania donovani infected murine macrophages

366

 Nitric oxide and immune response

310

Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor

 

 iNOS: role in Asthma pathogenesis

303

NK (Natural Killer) cells

 

 Nitric oxide and immune response

310

Nramp-1(Natural resistance associated macrophage protein-1)

 

 Immunological, cellular and molecular events in typhoid fever

320

 

 

O

 

Opiate addiction

 

Correlation of circulatory immunoglobulin levels with Mu opiate receptor allele

394

Outer membrane proteins (OMPs)

 

Immunological, cellular and molecular events in typhoid fever

320

Oxidative stress

 

AGE-mediated activation of PMNs in diabetes mellitus and associated oxidative stress

373

 

 

P

 

Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC)

 

Liposomal delivery of Mycobacterium leprae antigens with murabutide and Trat peptide inhibits Fas-mediated apoptosis of PBMCs from leprosy patients

386

Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs)

 

Role of T-cells in diabetic pregnancy and macrosomia

344

Phosphatidylinositol 4-kinases

 

PtdIns 4-kinases (type II) in cell signaling cascades

289

Plasmid

 

 Role of virulence plasmid of Aeromonas hydrophila in the pathogenesis of UDS in Clarias batrachus

401

Polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN)

 

AGE-mediated activation of PMNs in diabetes mellitus and associated oxidative stress

373

Pregnancy

 

Role of T-cells in diabetic pregnancy and macrosomia

344

Prodigiosins (PrGs)

 

A novel family of immunosuppressants with anti-cancer activity

295

 

 

R

 

RCA (Regulator of complement activation)

 

Viral complement regulators: the expert mimicking swindlers

331

Reactive oxygen species (ROS)

 

 AGE-mediated activation of PMNs in diabetes mellitus and associated oxidative stress

373

Regulatory T cells (Tregs)

 

Role in diabetic pregnancy and macrosomia

344

Role of IL-10 in immune suppression in cervical cancer

350

Respiratory burst (RB)

 

AGE-mediated activation of PMNs in diabetes mellitus and associated oxidative stress

373

RRV (Rhesus rhadinovirus)

 

Viral complement regulators: the expert mimicking swindlers

331

 

 

S

 

Salmonella pathogenesis

 

Immunological, cellular and molecular events in typhoid fever

320

Selectins

 

 Differential expression of sialic acids and adhesion molecules on MNCs of bone marrow and peripheral blood in childhood ALL

357

Setaria cervi

 

Partial purification and characterization of acetylcholinesterase isozymes from adult bovine filarial parasite Setaria cervi

379

Sialic acids

 

Differential expression of sialic acids and adhesion molecules on MNCs of bone marrow and peripheral blood in childhood ALL

357

Sialoglycoproteins, 9-O-acetylated (9Ac2-GPs)

 

Differential expression of sialic acids and adhesion molecules on MNCs of bone marrow and peripheral blood in childhood ALL

357

Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)

 

HIV-1 Tat protein: immunological facets of a transcriptional activator

269

Smallpox

 

Viral complement regulators: the expert mimicking swindlers

331

Sodium antimony gluconate (SAG)

 

 Immunomodulatory role of arabinosylated lipoarabinomannan on Leishmania donovani infected murine macrophages

366

SPICE (Smallpox inhibitor of complement enzymes)

 

 Viral complement regulators: the expert mimicking swindlers

331

 

 

T

 

Tat

 

HIV-1 Tat protein: immunological facets of a transcriptional activator

269

T cells

 

 Role in diabetic pregnancy and macrosomia

344

 Role of IL-10 in immune suppression in cervical cancer

350

Th1/Th2 cytokines

 

 Nitric oxide and immune response

310

Role in diabetic pregnancy and macrosomia

344

T lymphocytes

 

 Nitric oxide and immune response

310

Transcription activator

 

HIV-1 Tat protein: immunological facets of a transcriptional activator

269

Transformation

 

Role of virulence plasmid of Aeromonas hydrophila in the pathogenesis of UDS in Clarias batrachus

401

TTSS (Type III secretion system)

 

 Immunological, cellular and molecular events in typhoid fever

320

Tuberculosis (TB)

 

Mycobacterium tuberculosis and dendritic cells: Recognition, activation and functional implications

279

Tumor growth

 

Role of IL-10 in immune suppression in cervical cancer

350

Typhoid fever

 

Immunological, cellular and molecular events in typhoid fever

320

 

 

U

 

Ulcerative disease syndrome (UDS)

 

Role of virulence plasmid of Aeromonas hydrophila in the pathogenesis of UDS in Clarias batrachus

401

 

 

V

 

Vaccine

 

HIV-1 Tat protein: immunological facets of a transcriptional activator

269

Immunological, cellular and molecular events in typhoid fever

320

Vaccinia virus complement control protein (VCP)

 

Viral complement regulators: the expert mimicking swindlers

331

Variola virus

 

Viral complement regulators: the expert mimicking swindlers

331

VCAM-1 (Vascular-cell adhesion molecule-1)

 

 Differential expression of sialic acids and adhesion molecules on MNCs of bone marrow and peripheral blood in childhood ALL

357

Viral molecular mimicry

 

 Viral complement regulators: the expert mimicking swindlers

331

Virulence

 

 Immunological, cellular and molecular events in typhoid fever

320

 Role of virulence plasmid of Aeromonas hydrophila in the pathogenesis of UDS in Clarias batrachus

401



Ahmad M                                                              331

Bandyopadhyay S                                               357

Banerjee B D                                                         373

Batra J                                                                    303

Bhairavabhotla R K                                             350

Bhattacharjee S                                                    366

Bhattacharyya P                                                   366

Bhattacharyya (Majumdar) S                             366

Bisht V                                                                   386

Chakraborty A                                                      401

Chander R                                                             295

Chandra S                                                              357

Chatterjee R                                                          303

Chattree V                                                             386

Chiplunkar S                                                         350

Chowdhury S                                                        357

Datta S                                                                   401

Dinshaw  K                                                            350

Dutta S                                                                   401

Ghosh B                                                                 303

Ghosh D                                                                401

Goswami R                                                            401

Gupta A K                                                             394

Gupta A                                                                 373

Gupta Shalini                                                        269

Gupta Shashank                                                   279

Hamid N                                                                 320

Jain S K                                                                  320

Kapoor M                                                              394

Kapur S                                                                  394

Kaul D                                                                    276

Kaushal D C                                                          379

Kaushal N A                                                         379

Khan N A                                                              344

Khanna N                                                              386

Madhu S V                                                            373

Majumdar S                                                           366

Majumdar T                                                          401

Majumder N                                                          366

Mandal C                                                               357

Mazumder S                                                          401

Mitra D                                                                  269

Mullick J                                                                331

Murthy  P K                                                          379

Natarajan K                                                           279

Pandey R                                                               295

Pyaram K                                                               331

Rao D N                                                                 386

Sahu A                                                                   331

Sainis K B                                                              295

Salam N                                                                  279

Sharad S                                                                394

Shastri S                                                                350

Singh R A                                                              394

Singh S K                                                              379

Sinha A                                                                  279

Sinha R K                                                              289

Subrahmanyam G                                                 289

Tongaonkar H                                                      350

Tripathi P                                                               310

Tripathi A K                                                          373

Tripathi R L                                                           373

Verma V                                                                 350


ANNOUNCEMENTS

 

 

Society for Free Radical Research–India (SFRR–India) Satellite Meeting

(February 11-12, 2008)

 

On Theme

 

Free Radicals and Antioxidants in Human Health, Gene Regulation and Signal Transduction

 

Venue: Conference Hall, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi 110 029

                                   Organizer: Department of Biochemistry, AIIMS, New Delhi 110 029

 

Highlights of the Meeting

 

Invited Talks from National & International Speakers on Following Topics:

 

·          Cardiovascular Diseases

·          Herbal & Natural Antioxidants

·          Oxidative Stress in Cancer, Diabetes, Liver, Neuronal & Digestive Diseases

·          Free Radicals & Apoptosis

·          Inflammation, Immunity & Infectious Diseases

·          Redox Signalling

 

·Radiation, Radioprotection & Xenotoxicity

·Free Radicals in Food Sciences, Environmental Biology & Human Reproduction

·Bioinformatics & Free Radical Biology

·Methodology & Recent Developments in Laboratory Techniques

·Microbes & Oxidative Stress

·Drug Delivery & Targeting

 

Free Papers & Posters Presentation by Students & Scientists

Awards for Best Poster & Best Paper Presentation by Students & Scientists/Bursary to Few Deserving Students

 

For registration, accommodation and abstract submission please contact:

Dr. D.N. Rao
Organizing Secretary
Dept. of Biochemistry, AIIMS, New Delhi 110 029

E-mail: sfrrsatellite@gmail.com

Tel: 91-11-26593545, 91-11-26195609 (O)
Fax: 91-11-26588641; Mobile: 9868592706

Website: www.aiims.ac.in  (please see conference and workshops)

_________________

12th ISCB Annual Conference (ISCBC-2008)

International Conference on “The Interface of Chemistry-Biology in Biomedical Research”

(February 22 - 24, 2008)

 

  An International Conference on “The Interface of Chemistry-Biology in Biomedical Research” is being organized jointly by Chemistry Group, Birla Institute of Technology and Science (BITS), Pilani, and Indian Society of Chemists and Biologists (ISCB) at Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani, Rajasthan, India during February 22-24, 2008.

  The aim of the conference is to understand the need of chemistry-biology interface and its potential for the innumerable possible applications in biomedical research, healthcare, drug development, marine science, etc. Abstracts are invited for oral/poster presentations from delegates and scientists working in the areas of medicinal chemistry, phytochemistry, nutraceutical and marine organism, combinatorial chemistry, high-throughput screening, drug discovery, supramolecular chemistry, QSAR, bioinformatics, in-silico biology, pharmaceutical sciences, biochemistry, molecular biology, cell biology, pharmacology, toxicology, clinical trials, biomedical applications of instruments, process development in drug substances, intellectual property right issues and GLP related to drug research. Selected abstracts will be considered for detailed papers to be published in the special issue of Indian Journal of Chemistry Section B and Indian Journal of Biochemistry and Biophysics.

 For further information contact:

Dr. Dalip Kumar

Convener, Chemistry Group

BITS Pilani-333031, Rajasthan

Phone: 01596-245073/Ext 279

Fax: +91-1596-244183

Email:    dalipk@bits-pilani.ac.in

Dr. Anil Kumar

Co-Convener

Chemistry Group BITS Pilani-333 031

Phone:  01596-245073/Ext 276

Fax: +91-1596-244183

Email: anilkadian@gmail.com

Dr. P.M.S. Chauhan

General Secretary, ISCB

Medicinal Chemistry Division

CDRI, Lucknow 226 001.

Phone: 0522-2612411/Ext 4770

Fax: +91-522-2623405

Email: premsc58@hotmail.com