Indian Journal of Biotechnology


VOLUME 4

CODEN:IJBNAR 4(4) 429-586 (2005)

 

OCTOBER 2005

ISSN:0972-5849

 

CONTENTS

 

Reviews

 

 

Lipase fermentation: Progress and prospects

437

 

  IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 C12N9/16, 9/18, 9/20; C12P; C12R1:01, 1:10, 1:15, 1:20, 1:38, 1:39,1:59,1:72,1:80,1:385, 1:845,1:865

 

 

        Vijay Gunasekaran & Debabrata Das

 

 

 

 

 

Biological preservation of foods–Bacteriocins of lactic acid bacteria

446

 

        IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 A23L3/3571

 

 

        K Jeevaratnam, M Jamuna & A S Bawa

 

 

 

 

 

Molecular basis of flower initiation—A review

455

 

        IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 A01G7/00; A01N

 

 

        R Parimalan, P Giridhar, A John Joel & S Jagadeesan

 

 

 

 

 

Papers

 

 

Green fluorescent protein tagging:  A novel tool in biomedical research

466

 

        IPC Code: Int. Cl.7    G01N33/533; G03C1/73

 

 

        Mohammed Akbar & Hee Yong Kim

 

 

 

 

 

Preparation of a reusable enzyme strip for determination of serum cholesterol

471

 

        IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 G01N33/535

 

 

        Deepak Bhatia, Suman & C S Pundir

 

 

 

 

 

Carotenoid production from microalga, Dunaliella salina

476

 

        IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 C07C403/24; C12N1/12

 

 

        Dipak S Pisal & S S Lele

 

 

 

 

 

Production of microbial iron chelators (siderophores) by fluorescent Pseudomonads

484

 

        IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 C08G59/70; C12R1:39, 1:40

 

 

        R Z Sayyed, M D Badgujar, H M Sonawane, M M Mhaske & S B Chincholkar

 

 

 

 

 

Influence of fermentation conditions on levan production by Zymomonas mobilis CT2

491  

 

        IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 C12N1/16, 9/24; C12R1:01

 

 

        V Senthilkumar & P Gunasekaran

 

 

.

 

 

Studies on process and nutritional parameters for production of alkaline protease by Thermoactinomyces thalpophilus PEE 14

 

497

 

        IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 C12N9/50; C12R1:01

 

 

        P Ellaiah, G Divakar, P Vasu, M Sunitha & P Udaya Shankar

.

 

Partial purification and characterization of a pectin lyase produced by Penicillium oxalicum in solid-state fermentation (SSF)

 

501

 

        IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 C12N9/88; C12R1: 80

 

 

      Sangeeta Yadav & N V Shastri

 

 

 

 

 

Concurrent infection with WSSV and MBV in Tiger prawn, Penaeus monodon (Fabricious) in West Bengal and their detection using PCR and DNA Dot-blot hybridization technique

 

 

506

 

        IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 C12N15/10; G01N33/53

 

 

      S S Mishra, M S Shekhar & I S Azad

 

 

 

 

 

Isolation and deletion analysis of meristem specific promoter from Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench.

 

516

 

        IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 C12N15/10, 15/79

 

 

        Anju Verma & P Ananda Kumar

 

 

 

 

 

Genetic diversity in Indian cotton (Gossypium spp.) cultivars as revealed by RAPD analysis

 

522

 

        IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 C12N15/10

 

 

        M K Rana, M Vafai Tabar & K V Bhat

 

 

 

 

 

A novel approach for simultaneous detection of Citrus yellow mosaic virus and Citrus greening bacterium by multiplex polymerase chain reaction

 

528

 

        IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 C12N15/10

 

 

         V K Baranwal, S Majumder, Y S Ahlawat & R P Singh

 

 

 

 

 

Assessment of variation in isoproturon in susceptible and resistant biotypes of Phalaris minor Retz. by RAPD analysis

 

534

 

        IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 C12N15/10

         

 

        Rupa S Dhawan, A K Dhawan, S Kajla & R Moudgil

 

 

 

 

 

Response of selected aquatic macrophytes towards textile dye wastewaters

538

 

        IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 C02F3/32, 10-3:30

 

 

        K P Sharma, Kamayani Sharma, Suresh Kumar, Shweta Sharma, Ruby Grover, Pratima Soni, S M Bhardwaj, R K Chaturvedi & Subhasini Sharma

 

 

 

 

 

Efficient plant regeneration from encapsulated somatic embryos of Hyoscyamus

        muticus L.

 

546

 

        IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 A01H4/00, 5/04, 5/06

 

 

        Avantika Pandey & Suresh Chand

 

 

 

 

 

Shoot regeneration from immature cotyledonary nodes in black gram [Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper]

 

551

 

        IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 A01H4/00, 5/04

 

 

        M Muruganantham, A Ganapathi, S Amutha, G Vengadesan & N Selvaraj

  

 

 

 

 

Callus induction and oraganogenesis from various explants in Vigna radiata  (L.) Wilczek

556

 

        IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 A01H4/00, 5/04, 5/06

 

 

        Srinath Rao, Prabhavati Patil & C P Kaviraj

 

 

Micropropagation of Entada pursaetha DC. –An endangered medicinal plant of Western Ghats

 

561

 

        IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 A01H4/00, 5/04, 5/05

 

 

        S M Vidya, V Krishna, B K Manjunatha & K Shankarmurthy

 

 

 

 

 

Short Communications  

 

 

Batch kinetic studies in phenol biodegradation and comparison

565

 

        IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 C12P1/04; C12R1:09, 1:365, 1:40

 

 

        V Vijayagopal & T Viruthagiri 

 

 

 

 

 

In vitro micropropagation of Geoderum purpureum R.Br

568

 

        IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 A01H4/00, 5/04, 5/06

 

 

        A Mohapatra & G R Rout

    

 

 

 

 

List of Referees

571

 

 

 

 

Annual Author Index

577

 

 

 

 

Annual Subject Index

579

 

 

 

 

Annual IPC Code Index

582

 

 

 

 

583

 


 

AUTHOR INDEX

 


Das D

437

Gunasekaran V

437

Bawa A S

446

Jamuna M

446

Jeevaratnam K

446

Giridhar P

455

Jagadeesan S

455

John Joel A

455

Parimalan R

455

Akbar M

466

Kim H Y

466

Bhatia D

471

Pundir C S

471

Suman

471

Lele S S

476

Pisal D S

476

Badgujar M D

484

Chincholkar S B

484

Mhaske M M

484

Sayyed R Z

484

Sonawane H M

484

Gunasekaran P

491

Senthilkumar V

491

Divakar G

497

Ellaiah P

497

Sunitha M

497

Udaya Shankar P

497

Vasu P

497

Shastri N V

501

Yadav S

501

Azad I S

506

Mishra S S

506

Shekhar M S

506

Ananda Kumar P

516

Verma A

516

Bhat K V

522

Rana M K

522

Vafai Tabar M

522

Ahlawat Y S

528

Baranwal V K

528

Majumder S

528

Singh R P

528

Dhawan A K

534

Dhawan R S

534

Kajla S

534

Moudgil R

534

Bhardwaj S M

538

Chaturvedi R K

538

Grover R

538

Kumar S

538

Sharma K

538

Sharma K P

538

Sharma S

538

Sharma S U

538

Soni P

538

Chand S

546

Pandey A

546

Amutha S

551

Ganapathi A

551

Muruganantham M

551

Selvaraj N

551

Vengadesan G

551

Kaviraj C P

556

Patil P

556

Rao S

556

Krishna V

561

Manjunatha B K

561

Shankarmurthy K

561

Vidya S M

561

Vijayagopal V

565

Viruthagiri T

565

Mohapatra A

568

Rout G R               

568


 


Indian Journal of Biotechnology

Vol 4, October 2005, pp 437-445

 

 

Lipase fermentation: Progress and prospects

Vijay Gunasekaran and Debabrata Das*

Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721 302, India

Received 20 January 2004, revised 18 October 2004, accepted 25 November 2004

Lipases are the most versatile industrial enzymes and are known to bring about a range of bioconversion reactions. This compendium throws light on the developments in the field of fermentation of lipases and their scale up. Recently, interests have been shown on solid-state fermentation of lipases in order to facilitate the use of low cost agricultural wastes as substrates. Whole cell immobilization processes for lipase production have been applied directly to enhance their biocatalytic activity and to obtain prolong use.

Keywords: lipase, enzyme production, solid-state fermentation, whole cell immobilization, fats and oils

IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 C12N9/16, 9/18, 9/20; C12P; C12R 1:01, 1:10, 1:15, 1:20, 1:38, 1:39, 1:59, 1:72, 1:80, 1:385, 1:845, 1:685

Indian Journal of Biotechnology

Vol 4, October 2005, pp 446-454

 

 

          Biological preservation of foods–Bacteriocins of lactic acid bacteria

K Jeevaratnam*, M Jamuna and A S Bawa

Defence Food Research Laboratory, Siddarthanagar, Mysore 570 011, India

Received 10 December 2003, revised 26 August 2004, accepted 1 October 2004

Lactic acid bacteria and their antimicrobial metabolites have potential as natural preservatives to control the growth of spoilage and pathogenic bacteria in foods. To date, nisin is the only bacteriocin that has found practical applications in some industrially processed foods. Its antibacterial activity and possible use as a biopreservative has been studied in a large number of food systems. Its application for the control of some pathogens and food spoilage organisms has been approved in a number of countries. Limited studies have shown that pediocins from several Pediococcus strains can also be used effectively in food systems to control Listeria monocytogenes. This review discusses the potential of lactic acid bacteria and their principal antimicrobial peptides, bacteriocins in biological preservation of foods. It is anticipated that the advances in bacteriocins research and combination treatments for food preservation will benefit both the consumer and the producer.

Keywords:     biological preservation, lactic acid bacteria, bacteriocins, food-borne pathogens, food spoilage bacteria,             biopreservatives, nisin, pediocin

IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 A23L3/3571

 

Indian Journal of BiotechnologyVol 4, October 2005, pp 455-465

 

          Molecular basis of flower initiation—A review

 

R Parimalan, P Giridhar*, A John Joel1 and S Jagadeesan1

Plant Cell Biotechnology Department, Central Food Technological Research Institute, Mysore 570 020, India

1 Centre for Plant Breeding and Genetics, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore 641 003, India

Received 19 April 2004; revised 25 November 2004; accepted 20 December 2004

Plants have many differences, like protandry, protogyny, etc. However, amidst these differences, all angiosperms have a common mechanism of flowering, i.e. concentric pattern of flowering (sepal, petal, stamen and carpel). The mechanism or the genes thorough which plants maintain boundaries between the four, sepal-petal-stamen-carpel, are also given due importance. Once a plant attains competence, flowers may be produced through the reorganization of SAM directly to floral meristem, or through the inflorescence or co-inflorescence meristem, in response of exogenous and endogenous signals. Initiation, determination and differentiation are classed into four stages and this is the region which is studied here in detail. Some organ specificity genes, like MALE STERILITY (MS) and BICAUDAL (BIC), move us towards a better understanding of the mechanism like male sterility and self-incompatibility in plants. Models like ABC, biophysical, MCDK, etc., help in explaining the mechanism of flowering on a molecular basis. However, in general, the path towards flowering is laid when the floral repressor genes are down regulated. Recently identified miRNAs in plants authenticate them and also give out the mechanism by which they down regulate. It has also been found out that MADS-box gene family and CArG-box genes (where those MADS domain protein binds) are highly conserved. Their role in flower development is also touched upon.

Keywords: cDNA, floral development, mutant, photoperiod, shoot apical meristem

IPC Code: Int.Cl.7 A01G7/00,A01N

Indian Journal of BiotechnologyVol 4, October 2005, pp 466-470

 

          Green fluorescent protein tagging: A novel tool in biomedical research

Mohammed Akbar* and Hee Yong Kim

Section of Mass Spectrometry, Laboratory of Membrane Biochemistry and Biophysics

NIAAA, NIH, Rockville, MD 20852, USA

Received 15 November 2004; revised 25 June 2005; accepted 29 August 2005

In recent years, the green fluorescent protein (GFP) isolated from the jellyfish, Aequorea victoria, has become a novel tool in biomedical research. The tagging of GFP to proteins of interest has widely been used in studies involving various biological events both in vitro and in vivo. In this report, the authors demonstrate the utility of GFP tagging for studying localization of protein kinase C (PKCa), and pleckstrin homology (PH) domains of phospholipase C (PLCd1), and Akt in mouse neuroblastoma (Neuro 2A) cells. The authors also show the real time translocation of PKCa and Akt-PH-EGFP to the membrane upon stimulation with either 12-phorbal myristate acetate (PMA) or insulin growth factor (IGF). Pretreatment of cells expressing PKCa-EGFP or Akt-PH-EGFP with staurosporine (a protein kinase inhibitor) or wortmanin (a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor), prevented the translocation of these proteins to the membrane. These data demonstrate that, GFP tagging could be employed as a tool to study sub cellular localization and distribution of signaling proteins in response to external stimuli in real time.

Keywords : plasma membrane, translocation, localization, PI3-kinase, Akt, PKC

IPC code : Int. Cl.7 G01N33/533; G03C1/73

Indian Journal of BiotechnologyVol 4, October 2005, pp 471-475

 

          Preparation of a reusable enzyme strip for determination of serum cholesterol

Deepak Bhatia, Suman and C S Pundir*

Biochemistry Research Laboratory, Department of Bio-Sciences, M D University, Rohtak 124 001, India

Received 15 July 2004, revised 30 August 2004, accepted 15 October 2004

A reusable enzyme strip for the determination of cholesterol was prepared by co-immobilizing cholesterol esterase (CEase), cholesterol oxidase (COD) and peroxidase (POD) onto alkylamine glass beads af­fixed on a plastic strip by a non-reactive fixative. The co-immobilized enzymes retained 71.42% of initial activity of free enzymes with a conjugation yield of 11.0 mg g-1 beads and showed optimum activity at pH 6.6, when incubated at 32°C for 6 min. The strip was employed for direct determination of total cholesterol in serum. The minimum detection limit of the method was 2.14 mg dL-1 reaction mixture. The within batch and between batch coefficient of variation (CV) were <7.0% and <19.0%, respectively. The serum total cholesterol values as determined by the strip, were in good correlation (r=0.885) with those by commercial enzo-kit method employing free enzymes. The method is characterized by reuse of co-immobilized enzymes with great ease and unaffected by various serum substances.

Keywords: alkylamine glass, cholesterol, cholesterol esterase, cholesterol oxidase, enzyme strip, peroxidase, serum

IPC code: Int. Cl7 G01N33/535

Indian Journal of BiotechnologyVol 4, October 2005, pp 476-483

 

          Carotenoid production from microalga, Dunaliella salina

 

Dipak S Pisal and S S Lele*

Food and Fermentation Technology Department, Mumbai University Institute of Chemical Technology
Matunga, Mumbai 400 019, India

Received 24 May 2004; revised 13 October 2004; accepted 15 November 2004

Carotenoid content of microalga, Dunaliella salina was increased using different stress parameters, such as cell division inhibition (vinblastine), nitrogen starvation, high salinity and high irradiation with high temperature. Vinblastine had very little favourable effect. Salinity above 3 M significantly decreased the cell growth rate due to cell death but increased the per cell carotenoid content. With nitrogen starvation, b-carotene content increased from 1.65 pg/cell to 7.05 pg/cell. However, the maximum b-carotene (8.28 pg/cell) was obtained with high irradiation along with high temperature.

Keywords: b-carotene, carotenoids, Dunaliella salina, microalgae

IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 C07C403/24; C12N1/12

 

Indian Journal of BiotechnologyVol 4, October 2005, pp 484-490

 

          Production of microbial iron chelators (siderophores) by
fluorescent Pseudomonads

 

R Z Sayyed1, M D Badgujar, H M Sonawane, M M Mhaske and S B Chincholkar*

Department of Microbiology, School of Life Sciences, North Maharashtra University, Jalgaon 425 001, India

1Department of Microbiology, Mooljee Jaitha College, Jalgaon 425 002, India

Received 20 July 2004; revised 3 November 2004; accepted 5 December 2004

Two fluorescent pseudomonads, Pseudomonas fluorescens NCIM 5096 and P. putida NCIM 2847 produced maximum yield of hydroxamate type of siderophore (87 & 83% units, respectively) in modified succinic acid medium (SM). (NH4)2SO4 and amino acids were found to stimulate bacterial growth as well as siderophore production. However, optimum siderophore yield was obtained with urea. Increase in iron concentration up to 100 µM favoured growth but drastically affected siderophore production in both the strains. Threshold level of iron (FeCl3), which repressed siderophore production in both the strains, was 30 µM. Sunflower oil proved to be suitable and cost effective defoaming agent for siderphore production in bioreactors. The results of shake flask level were found reproducible at scaled up conditions in bioreactors. Moreover, P. fluorescens NCIM 5096 inoculation enhanced seed germination, root length and shoot length of wheat (Triticum aestivum) under pot culture conditions.

Keywords: iron, optimization, Pseudomonads, siderophores, wheat growth

IPC Code: Int.Cl.7 C08G59/70; C12R1:39,1:40

Indian Journal of BiotechnologyVol 4, October 2005, pp 491-496

 

          Influence of fermentation conditions on levan production by
Zymomonas mobilis CT2

V Senthilkumar and P Gunasekaran*

Department of Microbial Technology, Centre for Excellence in Genomic Sciences, School of Biological Sciences,
Madurai Kamaraj University,  Madurai  625 021, India

Received 23 January 2004, revised 6 October 2004, accepted 5 November 2004

Zymomonas mobilis produces two extracellular sucrases namely levansucrase (sac B) and sucrase (sac C). A mutant strain of Z. mobilis CT2 defective in sucrase sac C, constructed earlier by gene disruption1, produced higher levels of levan  (27.2 g L-1) than the parent strain B14023 (15.4 g L-1) from 200 g L-1 of sucrose at 25°C and pH 5.0. Increasing fermentation temperature from 25 to 35°C enhanced ethanol concentration from 17.8 to 46.4 g L-1 due to increased rate of sucrose hydrolysis but decreased the transfructosylation activity from 165 to 56 U mL-1. Addition of glucose or fructose to the fermentation medium considerably reduced the levan production due to the inhibition of levansucrase activity.

Keywords: Zymomonas mobilis, levansucrase, levan, sucrase, fermentation

IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 C12N1/16; C12R1:01; C12N9/24

Indian Journal of BiotechnologyVol 4, October 2005, pp 497-500

 

          Studies on process and nutritional parameters for production of alkaline protease by Thermoactinomyces thalpophilus PEE 14

P Ellaiah*, G Divakar, P Vasu, M Sunitha and P Udaya Shankar

Pharmaceutical Biotechnology Division, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Andhra University

Visakhapatnam 530 003, India

Received 19 April 2004, revised 24 August 2004, accepted 10 October 2004

Studies on process and nutritional parameters for the production of extracellular alkaline protease employing Thermoactinomyces thalpophilus PEE 14 was carried out. Different initial pH, incubation temperatures and time and inoculum levels and their age were studied. Effects of different nutritional parameters, trace elements and metabolic inhibitors on protease production were also studied. The maximum enzyme activity was obtained with incubation temperature of 55ºC, initial pH of 10, incubation time of 24 h, level of inoculum 10 per cent and age of the inoculum 72 h. Results of nutritional and trace element parameters showed that pyridoxin, L-cysteine and sodium molybdate showed best vitamin, amino acid and trace elements, respectively. Silver nitrate, antibiotic framycitine and surfactant cetrimide showed strong inhibitory effect on protease production. 

Keywords:     alkaline protease, inhibitors, nutritional factors, submerged fermentation, Thermoactinomyces  thalpophilus PEE 14

IPC code: Int. Cl.7 C12N9/50; C12R1:01

Indian Journal of BiotechnologyVol 4, October 2005, pp 501-505

 

 

          Partial purification and characterization of a pectin lyase produced by Penicillium oxalicum in solid-state fermentation (SSF)

Sangeeta Yadav* and N V Shastri

Post-Graduate Teaching Department of Biochemistry, Nagpur University, Nagpur 440 010, India

Received 23 December 2003, revised 21 September 2004, accepted 10 November 2004

An extracellular pectin lyase (PNL) EC. 4.2.2.10, produced by Penicillium oxalicum grown on mandarin peel meal in solid-state fermentation was studied. The enzyme was partially purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation. The partially purified preparation showed a pH optima of 8.0 and was stable over a pH range of 4.0-8.0. The optimum temperature of the thermolabile enzyme was 40°C. The enzyme, however, lost its activity quickly at temperatures over 50°C. The Km of the enzyme was found to be 2.08 mg/mL of citrus pectin, which was substantially lower than the values already reported. Phenolic compounds except tannic acid and several divalent ions and other inhibitors examined had no significant effect on the enzyme activity.

Keywords: ssf, Penicillium oxalicum, pectin lyase, pectin transeliminase, pectinases

IPC code: Int. Cl.7 C12N9/88; C12R1:80

Indian Journal of BiotechnologyVol 4, October 2005, pp 506-515

 

          Concurrent infection with WSSV and MBV in Tiger prawn, Penaeus monodon (Fabricious) in West Bengal and their detection using PCR and
DNA Dot-blot hybridization technique

 

S S Mishra*, M S Shekhar1 and I S Azad1

Biotechnology Laboratory, Central Inland Fisheries Research Institute (ICAR), Barrackpore, Kolkata 700 120, India

1Central Institute of Brackishwater Aquaculture (ICAR), 75 Santhome High Road, R A Puram, Chennai 600 028, India

Received 1 July 2004; revised 25 November 2004; accepted 28 December 2004

Prevalence status of white spot disease (WSD), caused by white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) and Monodon baculovirus (MBV), was studied in different prawn farms in North and South-24 paragana districts of West Bengal, specifically in the areas previously affected by WSD. In total 283 samples of giant tiger prawn Penaeus monodon, Indian white prawn P. indicus and giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii from 12 different farms were screened and presence of MBV occlusion-bodies (Obs) were detected. Of samples screened, 30 samples showed multiple spherical Obs typical of MBV infection. Of 80 samples screened using PCR, 17 (21.25%) were positive for MBV and 51 samples (63.75%) were positive for WSSV, and amplified DNA of 674 bp and 643 bp, respectively was visualized on 1% agarose gel electrophoresis. Significantly all samples showing positive reaction with MBV were also positive for WSSV in PCR, indicating co-infection of prawns with both MBV and WSSV. However, none of the M. rosenbergii samples were positive of MBV-Obs but 5 samples were positive for WSSV in PCR. Both MBV and WSSV amplified DNA were labeled with alkaline phosphatase using Alkphos DNA labeling reagent kit and samples were screened using DNA dot-blot and slot-blot hybridization. All samples showing positive PCR reaction were also found positive in DNA hybridization

Keywords: DNA probe, MBV, PCR, Tiger prawn, white spot disease, WSSV

IPC Code: Int.Cl.7 C12N15/10,G01N33/53

Indian Journal of BiotechnologyVol 4, October 2005, pp 516-521

 

 

Isolation and deletion analysis of meristem specific promoter from
Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench.

 

Anju Verma1 and P Ananda Kumar*

National Research Centre for Plant Biotechnology, Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi 110012, India

Received 15 March 2004, revised 14 September 2004, accepted 15 October 2004

A meristem specific promoter of the S-phase specific gene (cyc07) has been cloned from Sorghum bicolor by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using a proof reading DNA polymerase (Pfu polymerase). The 595 bp promoter consists of 2 repeats, a CAAT box and TATA box. The sequence was cloned in pBI 121 vector carrying the gene for b-D-glucuronidase (GUS) by replacing the 35S CaMV promoter. Transgenic tobacco plants were developed by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and analyzed for tissue-specific expression. Incubation of kanamycin-resistant tobacco shoots with GUS substrate resulted in intense blue colouration in the shoot tips, root tips and root hairs proving that the promoter sequences were enough to induce meristem specific activity of the reporter gene. Four sequential deletions from the 5' end were carried out. The deletion analysis indicated that a 13 bp repeat I sequence was essential for regulation of meristem specific expression of the reporter gene.

Keywords: Sorghum bicolor, cyc07S promoter, deletion analysis

IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 C12N15/10; 15/79

 

Indian Journal of BiotechnologyVol 4, October 2005, pp 522-527

 

 

Genetic diversity in Indian cotton (Gossypium spp.) cultivars as revealed by RAPD analysis

M K Rana*, M Vafai Tabar1 and K V Bhat

National Research Centre on DNA Fingerprinting, National Bureau of Plant Genetic Resources, Pusa Campus
New Delhi 110 012, India

Received 29 January 2004, revised 28 October 2004, accepted 15 November 2004

Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis was carried in 32 cultivars of diploid (Gossypium arboreum) and tetraploid (Gossypium hirsutum) cottons. Selected 26 RAPD primers generated 401 bands, 272 of which were found to be polymorphic. All the primers produced polymorphic amplification products, however, the extent of polymorphism varied with each primer.  Tetraploid cultivars were found to have less genetic diversity than the diploid ones. Exotic tetraploid cultivars also possessed less genetic diversity than the Indian tetraploid cultivars. UPGMA cluster analysis resulted in two broad clusters each of which represented different species of the genus Gossypium. All the cultivars could be discriminated from one another using combined profiles for 26 primers.

Keywords:  Gossypium spp., G. arboreum, G. hirsutum, genetic diversity, RAPD

IPC code: Int. Cl.7 C12N15/10

Indian Journal of BiotechnologyVol 4, October 2005, pp 528-533

 

A novel approach for simultaneous detection of Citrus yellow mosaic virus and Citrus greening bacterium by multiplex polymerase chain reaction

V K Baranwal*,  S Majumder, Y S Ahlawat and R P Singh1

Plant Virology Unit, Division of Plant Pathology, Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi 110 012, India

1Potato Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, P O Box 20280, Fredericton, NB, Canada E3B 4Z7

Received 16 August 2004; revised 16 November 2004; accepted 12 December 2004

A method of multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was developed for the simultaneous detection of Citrus yellow mosaic virus (CYMV) and fastidious Citrus greening bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLa) in sweet orange trees. Initially total DNA from individual CLa and CYMV infected citrus plants were mixed and both pathogens were detected simultaneously by multiplex PCR. Subsequently, both pathogens were detected from the total DNA obtained after mixing midribs of CLa-infected and CYMV-infected leaf lamina of the sweet oranges. The finally adopted multiplex PCR protocol simultaneously detected CLa and CYMV from the total DNA extracted from the midrib of leaf of citrus plants infected by both the pathogens. Thus, the present protocol demonstrated the presence of mixed infections of CLa and CYMV in citrus orchards trees. The technique would also prove highly useful in disease survey, nursery certification and quarantine applications.

Keywords: Citrus greening bacterium, Citrus yellow mosaic virus, multiplex polymerase chain reaction, simultaneous detection

IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 C12N15/10

Indian Journal of BiotechnologyVol 4, October 2005, pp 534-537

 

Assessment of variation in isoproturon in susceptible and resistant biotypes of Phalaris minor Retz. by RAPD analysis

Rupa S Dhawan*, A K Dhawan, S Kajla and R Moudgil

CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Regional Research Station, Uchani, Karnal 132 001, India

Received 22 November 2003, revised 21 September 2004, accepted 15 October 2004

The extensive use of isoproturon for the control of weeds in wheat fields for the past 20 years has lead to the formation of isoproturon resistant biotypes of Phalaris minor. This problem was first identified in Haryana and later in Panjab and some parts of Uttar Pradesh. PCR based RAPD technique, which can detect variability at DNA level was used to assess the variability among the two isoproturon susceptible and two resistant biotypes of Phalaris minor. Nine oligonucleotides (10 base) were screened for their ability to produce polymorphic bands. Three primers did not amplify DNA of one or the other biotypes. Three more did not show any polymorphism amongst the biotypes. The rest three indicated 20% polymorphism level. The size of amplified DNA segments ranged from 105 to 1020 base pair (bp). The mean dissimilarity value of these biotypes was 0.19. Highest dissimilarity (0.21) could be observed between the two resistant biotypes. Cluster analysis of the RAPDs generated separated one of the resistant biotypes from rest of the populations. Primer 20 A0 showed maximum polymorphic value of 1.0 between the susceptible biotype from Karnal and the resistant biotype from Kalwehri. This suggests that the technique could be utilized in the assessment of genetic diversity of the populations existing in other states and developing markers for the resistant trait.

Keywords: Phalaris minor, isoproturon resistance, RAPD profiles

IPC code: Int. Cl.7 C12N15/10

Indian Journal of BiotechnologyVol 4, October 2005, pp 538-545

 

Response of selected aquatic macrophytes towards textile dye wastewaters

 

K P Sharma*, Kamayani Sharma, Suresh Kumar, Shweta Sharma1, Ruby Grover, Pratima Soni,
S M Bhardwaj, R K Chaturvedi and Subhasini Sharma1

Department of Botany and 1Department of Zoology, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur 302004, India

Received 31 March 2004; revised 16 August 2004; accepted 25 October 2004

Ten aquatic macrophytes, Ceratophyllum demersum, Hydrilla verticillata (submerged), Azolla pinnata, Eichhornia crassipes, Lemna aequinoctialis, Spirodela polyrhiza (free-floating), Cyperus alopecuroides, Phragmites karka, Polygonum barbatum and Typha angustata (emergent) were screened for tolerance towards textile dye wastewaters, released during processing (dye fixing and washing) of printed cloth, to raise constructed wetlands for their phytoremediation. The concentrated dye wastewaters of first wash were found toxic to plant growth. The free-floating plant species were almost dead in dilute acidic-azo water (pH 4.3-6.2), while their growth was adversely affected in neutral-azo (pH 7) and silicate waters (pH 9-10). Amongst emergent macrophytes; Polygonum died in acidic-azo and silicate waters, while its growth in neutral-azo was adversely affected. Cyperus too did not grow well in dye wastewaters, especially the acidic-azo water, whereas growth of Typha in wastewaters was similar to control plants. Phragmites was the only plant species growing better than the control plants in dye wastewaters, both in laboratory and field studies. Lemna and Spirodela are recommended for assessing the toxicity of textile dye wastewaters, and Phragmites for raising constructed wetlands to treat the same.

Keywords: dye wastewaters, emergent macrophytes, free floating macrophytes, submerged macrophytes

IPC Code: Int.Cl.7 C02F3/32; 103:30

Indian Journal of BiotechnologyVol 4, October 2005, pp 546-550

 

Efficient plant regeneration from encapsulated somatic embryos of
Hyoscyamus muticus L.

 

Avantika Pandey* and Suresh Chand

Plant Tissue Culture and Genetics Research Group, School of Life Sciences, Devi Ahilya University,
Khandwa Road Campus, Indore 452 017, India

Received 2 April 2004, revised 11 October 2004, accepted 14 November 2004

A protocol has been developed for plant regeneration from encapsulated somatic embryos of Hyoscyamus muticus L. Somatic embryogenesis was achieved in callus cultures derived from cotyledonary leaf pieces on MS (1962) medium enriched with NAA (0.26–2.64 mM) and BAP (2.2 mM). For synthetic seed production and subsequent conversion into plantlets, somatic embryos were encapsulated using 3% sodium alginate and 75 mM CaCl2 as gel matrix. Maximum conversion frequency of 69% was noted from encapsulated somatic embryos cultured on MS medium without plant growth regulators. Plantlets with well developed shoots and roots were transferred to pots containing autoclaved mixture of peat moss, compost and soil (1:1:1). The encapsulated embryos could be stored up to 60 days at 4oC. There was negligible mortality of complete plants while they were being transferred from artificial soil to natural soil and finally to the open field.

Keywords: cotyledonary leaf, Hyoscyamus muticus, plant regeneration, somatic embryos, synthetic seed

IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 A01H4/00, 5/04, 5/06

 

Indian Journal of BiotechnologyVol 4, October 2005, pp 551-555

 

Shoot regeneration from immature cotyledonary nodes in
black gram [Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper]

 

M Muruganantham, A Ganapathi*, S Amutha, G Vengadesan and N Selvaraj1

Department of Biotechnology, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620 024, India

1Department of Botany, Periyar E V R College (Autonomous), Tiruchirappalli 620 023, India

Received 19 April 2004; revised 20 September 2004; accepted 18 October 2004

Eighteen-day-old immature cotyledonary node explants (18 d after anthesis) of black gram produced multiple shoots in MS salts+B5 vitamins containing medium in the presence of BA (1.0 mg/L), TDZ (0.1 mg/L) and AdS (15 mg/L). Maximum shoot proliferation (28 shoot/explant) occurred at the end of second subculture after 45 d. Periodic excision of regenerated shoots from explants increased shoot regeneration efficiency during subculture. The combination of TDZ and AdS with BA significantly increased shoot proliferation. Elongation and rooting were performed in GA3 (0.6 mg/L) and IBA (1.0 mg/L) containing media, respectively. The in vitro raised plantlets were acclimatized in green house and successfully transplanted to the field with a survival rate of 60%.

Keywords: axillary meristem, black gram, immature cotyledonary node, subculture, Vigna mungo

IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 A01H4/00, 5/04

 

Indian Journal of BiotechnologyVol 4, October 2005, pp 556-560

 

Callus induction and organogenesis from various explants in
Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek

 

Srinath Rao*, Prabhavati Patil and C P Kaviraj

Plant Tissue Culture Laboratory, Department of Botany, Gulbarga University, Gulbarga 585 106, India

Received 8 March 2004, revised 25 November 2004, accepted 15 December 2004

Effect of different growth regulators and their concentration on callus formation and organogenesis in various explants and callus was studied in mung bean [Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek. 2,4-D and NAA alone or in combination with Kn supported callus induction and further growth. 2,4-D proved better than NAA and addition of Kn at 4.6 (mM/L) further enhanced the growth of callus. Organogenesis was obtained from callus, shoot tip and cotyledonary node explants on BAP medium.

Keywords: Vigna radiata, callus induction, micropropagation, mung bean

IPC code: Int. Cl.7 A01H4/00, 5/04, 5/06

Indian Journal of BiotechnologyVol 4, October 2005, pp 561-564

 

Micropropagation of Entada pursaetha DC¾An endangered medicinal
plant of Western Ghats

S M Vidya, V Krishna, B K Manjunatha and K Shankarmurthy

Department of Biotechnology, Kuvempu University, Shankaraghatta 577 451, India

Received 1 July 2004; revised 11 September 2004; accepted 15 October 2004

A micropropagation protocol has been standardized for an endangered leguminous woody climber, Entada pursaetha using cotyledonary node explants. The synergetic effect of BAP (5 mg/L) with NAA (0.5 mg/L) induced a mean of 9.8±1.23 adventitious shoots from the cotyledonary node. The frequency of shoot production was highest (98.7%) in proximal transverse half of the cotyledon. The microshoots rooted well on MS half strength medium supplemented with 2 mg/L IBA. 70% of the hardened regenerants were acclimatized to the soil.

Keywords: Entada pursaetha, cotyledonary node, shoot organogenesis, micropropagation

IPC code: Int. Cl.7 A01H4/00, 5/04, 5/05

Indian Journal of BiotechnologyVol 4, October 2005, pp 565-567

 

Batch kinetic studies in phenol biodegradation and comparison

 

V Vijayagopal* and T Viruthagiri

Department of Chemical Engineering, Annamalai University, Annamalai Nagar 608 002, India

Received 22 March 2004; revised 24 August 2004;
accepted 15 September 2004

Pure cultures of pseudomonas putida, Nocardia sp., Bacillus circulans and a mixed culture, isolated from mangrove forest soil, were used to study phenol biodegradation in the batch reactor. The aim was to determine the kinetics of phenol biodegradation by measuring the biomass growth rates and phenol concentration as a function of time in a batch reactor. The kinetic constants, specific growth rate (mm), inhibition coefficient for phenol (Ki) and half saturation coefficient for phenol (Ks) were determined using the Haldene equation [mms/(Ks + S + (S2/Ki)]. The values obtained for kinetic constants are in the range of those published in literature for pure and mixed cultures degrading phenol. The length of the lag phase before the exponential growth phase increases linearly with phenol concentration. As compared to others, p. putida has the maximum specific growth rate both in the present study as well as in literature. Thus, selecting a pure culture of p. putida for phenol degradation could lead to higher efficiencies.

KeywordsBacillus circulans, biodegradation, mixed culture, phenol, pseudomonas pudita, Nocardia sp.

IPC Code: Int.Cl.7 C12P1/04; C12R1:09,1:365,1:40

Indian Journal of BiotechnologyVol 4, October 2005, pp 568-570

 

In vitro micropropagation of Geoderum purpureum R.Br

A Mohapatra and G R Rout*

Plant Tissue Culture Laboratory, Plant Biotechnology Division Regional Plant Resource Centre
Bhubaneswar 751 015, India

Received 16 January 2004; revised 17 November 2004;
accepted 18 December 2004

An in vitro micropropagation system was developed for Geoderum purpureum, an important terrestrial orchid, through axillary meristem culture and by manipulating cytokinin and auxin. Multiple shoots were induced from explants cultured on agar-based Murashige and Skoog medium supplemented with 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP; 2.0-3.0 mg/L), indole-3-acetic acid (IAA; 0.5-1.0 mg/L) and sucrose [3% (w/v)]. Maximum number of shoot buds was obtained with 3.0 mg/L BAP and 1.0 mg/L IAA. The rate of shoot multiplication was maintained in subsequent subculture on similar fresh culture medium. Elongated shoots were separated and rooted on half strength basal MS medium supplemented with IAA or IBA and 2% (w/v) sucrose. Maximum percentage of rooting was obtained on medium having 0.5 mg/L IAA. Plantlets, thus developed were established in soil with 80% surviability.

Keywords: axillary bud, in vitro, micropropagation, orchid, shoot multiplication

IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 A01H4/00, 5/04, 5/06


ANNUAL AUTHOR INDEX

 

 


Ahlawat Y S

528

Akbar M

466

Alam S I

227

Altaf M

242

Altosaar I

72

Amutha S

551

Ananda Kumar P

72, 516

 

 

Angumeenal A R

246

Anis M

261

Arora A

251

Awasthi A K

389

Azad I S

506

 

 

Babu S M

384

Badgujar M D

484

Bajaj B K

149

Bala S

72

Balagurunathan R

271

Bandyopadhyay S K

367

Banerjee R

127

Baranwal V K

528

Barua S

367

Bawa A S

446

Bera M B

222

Bhadrayya K

342

Bhardwaj S M

538

Bhat K V

56, 522

Bhatia D

471

Bhattacharya T K

287

Bhushan B

287

Bind R B

88, 363

Buam J J 

257

Buragohain A K

396

 

 

Chabukswar M M

409

Chadha S

56

Chand S

78, 546

Chandramohan N

384

Chaturvedi O H

144

Chaturvedi R K

538

Chaturvedi V K

284

Chawla H S

251

Chincholkar S B

484

Chirangini P

404

Choudhary V

287

 

 

Dabhole M P

290

Dagla H R

400

Dahiya S

373

Daithankar A V

115

Das D

437

Decruse S W

265

Deodhar M A

409

Devi J

307

Devi S

72

Dhaked RK

227

Dhaneshwar S S

316

Dhawan A K

534

Dhawan R S

534

Divakar G

497

Dutta J R

127

Dutta P K

127

 

 

Ellaiah P

497

 

 

Farkade V D

232

Frutos R

72

 

 

Gairola N

316

Ganapathi A

551

Gangaprasad A

265

Gangawane L V

153

Giridhar P

455

Gopalaswamy G

384

Grover R

38

Gunasekaran P

491

Gunasekaran V

437

Gupta P K

88, 284, 363

 

 

Hemadri D

367

 

 

Jagadeesan S

455

Jakhmola R C

44

Jamil K

173

Jamuna M

446

Jeevaratnam K

446

John Joel A

455

John R K

378

Joishy K N

290

Joseph Babu

293

Joseph B

194

Joshi G V

82

Joshi S N

316

 

 

Kadam S S

106

Kadam T A

153

Kajla S

534

Kannan V

277

Kar P K

389

Kashyap S

156

Kathiresan K

358

Kim H Y

466

Ko J M

307

Kovi R C

373

Krishna V

561

Kuddus M

293

Kumar P S

72

Kumar P

287

Kumar S

538

Kumaramanickavel G

194

 

 

Lakhanpaul S

56

Laskar M A

257

Latha B V

353

Latha J N L

139

Lele R D

9

Lele S S

476

Lyngdoh J P

257

 

 

Mahadik K R

115

Mahalakshmi A

216, 323

Majumder S

528

Malik Y

93

Mamatha G

194

Mandal A B

65

Mane J J

106

Manja K S

353

Manjunatha B K

561

Marikkannu R

21

Maruthi Mohan P

139

Mhaske M M

484

Minakshi

93, 373

Minakshi

 

Mishra S S

506

Misra A K

144

Mittal B

358

Mohapatra A

568

Mondal B

367

Moudgil R

534

Mukherjee M

358

Mulherkar R

82

Munirajappa

422

Murali H S

353

Muruganantham M

551

Mya M M

100

 

 

Nair G M

194

Naresh K N

82

Nath S

396

Naveena B J

342

 

 

Padamwar M N

115

Palanivelu P

21

Pandey A

336

Pandey Av

546

Pandey K D

284

Pandey R

93

Pandit A B

232, 241

Paradkar A R

115

Pardha Saradhi P

72

Parimalan R

455

Patel A K

336

Patil A A

88

Patil P

556

Patnaik P R

201

Paul A

72

Pisal D S

476

Pisal S S

106, 115

Prabhavathy Das G

173

Prakasham R S

347

Prasad G

93, 373

Prasad R

144

Praveen M

414

Premraj R

186

Pundir C S

471

 

 

Rai A

367

Rama Rao K

139

Rama Swamy N

414

Ramachandran S

336

Raman G

194

Rambabu M

414

Ramteke P W

293

Rana M K

522

Rao S

556

Rashmi K

139

Reddy G

342

Reddy P M M

422

Rout G R

568

Roy A

100

Roy B

65

 

 

Saini M

88, 363

Samal S K

378

Sanyal A

367

Saratchandra B

389

Sarma P N

347

Saxena P

134

Saxena R K

100

Sayyed R Z

484

Seeni S

265

Selvam M M

271

Selvaraj N

551

Senthilkumar V

491

Seo B B

307

Shah M H

106

Shankarmurthy K

561

Sharma A

287

Sharma G N

404

Sharma K

538

Sharma S

538

Sharma Sameer

88

Sharma Satyawati

156

Sharma Su

538

Sharma S D

47

Sharma S R

72

Sharma N

419

Shastri N V

501

Shekhar M S

506

Shekhawat N S

400

Shenbagarathai R

216, 323

Singh A K

78

Singh L

227

Singh R P

528

Sinha S K

404

Sonawane H M

484

Soni P

538

Sreenivas Rao R

347

Sresty T V S

72

Srivastava A

358

Srivastava P P

389

Srivastava S

122

Srivastava S K

122

Subba Rao Ch

347

Subhash K

414

Sujatha K

216, 323

Suman

471

Sunitha M

497

Surendranathan K K

39

Syiem D

257

Syiem M B

209

Szakacs G

336

 

 

Taank V

149

Thakur I S

134

Thakur R L

149

Thangavelu K

389

Tripathi M K

144

Trivedi P C

419

 

 

Udaya Shankar P

497

Ugandhar T

414

Upender M

414

 

 

Vafai Tabar M

522

Vaithiyanathan S

144

Vanitha V

277

Vasu P

497

Vasudevan P

156

Vengadesan G

551

Venkappayya D

246

Venkataiah P

414

Verma A

516

Verma P C

284

Vidya S M

561

Vijayagopal V

565

Vijayan K

389

Viruthagiri T

565

 

 

Walunj S S

363

 

 

Yadav S

501

Yunus A S

378



ANNUAL SUBJECT INDEX

 

 


mAbs

9

Actic acid

342

Adhatoda vasica

396

 phenolic exudates

396

Adult stem cells (ASCs)

173

Adventitious shoot regeneration

257

AFLP

56

Agroforestry

153

Akt

466

 translocation

466

Alkaline protease

497

 inhibitors

497

 nutritional factors

497

Alkylamine glass

471

AM fungi

153

Amorphophallus campanulatus

246

α-Amylase

336

Anaerobe

293

Antarctica

227

Antarctica

293

Antifungal activity

271

Antisens oligonucleotides

9

Antisense technology

316

Antiviral

384

Apo B

358

Aptameters

9

Aspergillus fumigatus

139

A. niger

246

A. oryzae

336

Azotobacter

153

Bacillus sp.

227, 347

B. circulance

347, 565

B. subtilis

419

B. thuringiensis

72

 cry1Ab

72

 cry1B

72

Bacteriocins

446

Banana

39

 fruit ripening

39

 mechanism of delay in

 ripening

 

39

 post-harvest biotechnology

39

Banana juice

39

Banana products

39

6-Benzylaminopurine (BAP)

404

Biocontrol

419

Biodegradable plastics

216

Biodegradable polymers

186

Biodegradation

186

Biofertilizers

209

Biological preservation

446

Biopreservatives

446

Bioremediation

139

 metals

139

Biosorption

139

 binding capacity

139

Black gram

551

Bluetongue virus

373

 serotyping

373

BmNPV

384

Bombyx mori

384, 389

 genetic variability

389

Bos indicus

88,363

BRV

93

Cabbage

72

Calcium dependent

 thermostability

222

Callus induction

251, 556

 micropropagation

556

b-Carotene

476

Carotenoids

353, 476

Castor oil

241

Catechol-1,2-dioxygenase

134

CGTase production

347

Chickpea

251

Chloris virgata

400

4-Chlorobenzoic acid

134

Chlorocatechol

134

Cholesterol

471

Cholesterol esterase

471

Cholesterol oxidase

471

Citric acid

246

Citrus greening bacterium

528

Citrus yellow mosaic virus

528

Cloning

323

Cold-active enzymes

227

Colony PCR

323

Cotyledonary leaf

546

Cryopreservation

47

 genetic stability

47

 somatic embryos

47

Cyanobacteria

209

 immobilization

209

 inoculum

209

cyc07S promoter

516

Cyclochrome P450

9

D1S80

358

Dalbergia sissoo

78

 plant regeneration

78

DEAE-cellulose

134

Decalepis arayalpathra

265

Degradation

277

Dekkera anomala

290

Deletion analysis

516

Desert grass

400

Diabetes

9

Diamondback moth

72

DIG probes

93

Diversity analysis

56

cDNA

455

cDNA sequence

363

DNA probe

506

Dot-blot hybridization

93

Dunaliella salina

476

Dye wastewaters

538

Ecorestoration

265

Embryonic stem cells (ESCs)

173

Emergent macrophytes

538

Endemic

265

Entada pursaetha

561

 cotyledonary node

561

 micropropagation

561

Enzyme

347

Enzyme economy

241

Enzyme production

437

Enzyme strip

471

Estrogen receptors

122

Ethanol production efficiency

149

Eukaryotic mRNAs

21

 3′ untranslated region

21

 5′ untranslated region

21

Explant browning

257

Fats & Oils

437

Fermentation

149, 353, 491

Fe-toxicity tolerance

65

Floral development

455

FLP

287

Food spoilage bacteria

446

Food-borne pathogens

446

Fowl adenovirus 4

367

Free floating macrophytes

538

FT-IR analysis

323

Fungicides

271

Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cumini

419

G & P genotyping

93

β-Galactosidase

227, 232

 location factor

232

 translocation

232

Ganciclovir

82

Garcinia indica

409

 hardening

409

 rooting

409

Gel filtration

134

Gene silencing

316

Glycerol

149

Gossypium spp.

522

 genetic diversity

522

Green fluorescent protein (GFP)

466

Green gram

56

Hair

287

 DNA

287

 genotyping

287

Head and neck cancer

82

 gene therapy

82

Hemopoietic stem cells (HESCs)

173

Hexon gene

367

 sequencing

367

High gravity molasses

149

HSV-tk

82

Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs)

173

Human genome

9

Hyoscyamus muticus

546

 plant regeneration

546

Hypervariable region

358

Immunological tests

384

In situ hybridization

307

 FISH

307

 GISH

307

In vitro plant regeneration

261

Indian solanum

414

Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA)

404

Infectious pancreatic necrosis

 virus (IPNV)

378

Iinsecticidal protein genes

72

Interleukin-2

88

 cDNA sequence

88

 expression

88

Iron

484

Isozyme analysis

65

Kaempferia spp.

404

Killer phenomenon

290

Killer toxin

290

Killer yeast

290

Kinetics

246

Kinetin (Kn)

404

Kluyveromyces lactis

232

 cytoplasm

232

 periplasm

232

Lactic acid bacteria

446

Lactobacillus amylophilus

342

Lasota

106

 additives

106

 antibody titer

106

 DSC

106

 FTIR

106

 lyophilization

106

 XRPD

106

Leaf protein profiles

422

Levan

491

Levansucrase

491

Lipase activity

222

Lipase

222, 241, 293, 437

 hydrolysis

241

 solvent effect

241

Malathion

277

Marine actinomycetes

271

Maternal contamination

358

Meloidogyne incognita

419

Metal ions

246

Microalgae

476

Micropropagation

265, 396, 409, 568

 in vitro

568

Microrhizome

404

Minigenome

378

Mixed culture

565

MS medium

261

Mulberry

422

Mungbean

56

Mustard straw

144

Mutant

455

α-Naphthalene acetic acid (NAA)

404

N-fixation

153

Nitrogen fixation

209

Nocardia sp.

565

Nostoc

209

Nude mice

82

Orchid

568

 axillary bud

568

 shoot multiplication

568

phb Operon

323

Organogenic regeneration

251

Osmotic stress

149

mPCR

194, 528

 cost analysis

194

 simultaneous detection

528

PCR

216, 287, 506

 colony

216

 seminested

216

Pectin lyase

501

Pectin transeliminase

501

Pectinases

501

Penicillium oxalicum

501

Peptides

9

Peroxidase

471

Pesticides

277

PHA synthase

216

Phalaris minor

534

 isoproturon resistance

534

 RAPD profiles

534

Phenol

565

 biodegradation

565

Phorate

153

Photoperiod

455

Physical map

307

PI3-kinase

466

Pichia kluyveri

290

Plant pathogens

271

Plant-cyanobacterial

 associations

209

Plantlet regeneration

400

 scutellum

400

Plasma membrane

466

Plasmodium falciparam

100

 antigen

100

 ELISA

100

 field study

100

 glycophospholipid

100

 LIA

100

 MDI

100

 sensitivity

100

 specificity

100

Plasticity

173

Pluripotency

173

Poly-β-hydroxy butyrate

323

Polyhydroxyalkanoate

216

Polymer

186

Potentilla fulgens

257

Prenatal diagnosis

358

Probe labeling

307

Prokaryotic

88, 363

Protease

127

 artificial neural network

127

 kinetics

127

 simulation

127

Protein kinase C

466

 localization

466

Pseudomonads

484

Pseudomonas

216

Pseudomonas sp.

127, 323

P. aeruginosa

222

P. fluorescens

419

p. pudita

565

Psoralea corylifolia

261

 endangered

261

Psychrotroph

227

Rabies

284

 differentiation

284

 fixed

284

 street

284

RAPD

522

RAPD markers

389

RB1 gene

194

 mutations

194

RBBR dye

144

 decolouration

144

rDNA

307

Recombinant

88, 363

Regeneration

414

Restriction endonuclease analysis

284

Reverse genetics

378

Rhodotorula glutinis

353

Rice

65

RNA interference (RNAi)

316

RT-PCR

93, 284, 373

Saccharomyces

 cerevisiae

149, 201, 290

 inflow disturbances

201

 oscillatory metabolism

201

 process analysis

201

Salt tolerant

400

SDS-PAGE

134

Semi-mature zygotic embryos

78

Serratia marcescens

277

Serum

471

Shoot apical meristem

455

Shoot organogenesis

561

 shoot tip

396

Short interfering RNAs (siRNA)

316

Siderophores

484

 optimization

484

Silk fibroin

115

 impedance

115

in vivo

115

 natural moisturizer

115

 SEM

115

 TEWL

115

Silver staining

422

Solanum surattense

414

Solid-state fermentation

 (SSF)

336, 342, 437, 501

Somatic embryos

414, 546

Sorghum bicolor

516

Spent brewing grains

 

Spirulina platensis

384

Stem cell

9

Stem cell markers

173

Streptomyces

271

 axillary meristem

551

 immature cotyledonary node

551

 subculture

551

Submerged fermentation (SmF)

497

Submerged macrophytes

538

Sucrase

491

Synthetic seed

546

Taguchi method

342

Tetrasubstituted pyrazoles

122

 quantitative structure-activity

 relationship

122

Thermoactinomyces

 thalpophilus PEE 14

497

Thiadiazuron

396

Tiger prawn

506

 


 MBV

506

 white spot disease

506

 WSSV

506

Tissue culture

261

TNF-α

363

 expression

363

Tolerance

153

Transgenic plants

72

Trehalose

149

Trichoderma hamatum

419

T. harzianum

419

T. viride

419

Tween-20

222

UlTRaSCAN

21

UTR patterns

21

UTRScan

21

                               


Variable number of tandem

 repeats (VNTR)

358

Vigna mungo

551

V. radiate

56, 556

Virus

284, 367

Virus vaccine

378

VP2 gene

373

Western ghats

265

Wheat bran

342

Wheat growth

484

White rot fungi

144

Whole cell immobilization

437

Xenograft

82

Zymomonas mobilis

491


 

 


INDIAN JOURNAL OF BIOTECHNOLOGY

 

Instructions to Contributors

 


The Indian Journal of Biotechnology, a quarterly journal, publishes original research papers, reviews, digests (biotechnology highlights), news-scan, etc. The journal covers papers on Biotechnology in the following main areas: (i) Agriculture; (ii) Animal husbandry; (iii) Environment; (iv) Industry; (v) Microbiology; (vi) Medicine; (vii) Bio-informatics; and (viii) Socio-legal and ethical aspects.

Indian Journal of Biotechnology invites original research and review manuscripts not submitted for publication elsewhere. It is mandatory on the part of the corresponding author to furnish the following certificate at the time of submission of the manuscript:

This is to certify that the reported work in the paper entitled "                " submitted for publication is an original one and has not been submitted for publication elsewhere. I/we further certify that proper citations to the previously reported work have been given and no data/tables/figures have been quoted verbatim from other publications without giving due acknowledgement and without the permission of the author(s). The consent of all the authors of this paper has been obtained for submitting the paper to the "Indian J Biotechnology".

Signatures and names of all the authors

The copyright of the paper will be transferred from the author to publisher. One original and two copies of the manuscript should be submitted to the editor. The manuscript, after referees’ acceptance, will be sent back to the author(s) along with referees’ comments. For re-submission, two copies of the revised version of the manuscript, and a copy on floppy disk [3.5¢¢ (1.44 MB)] using word processing software such as MS Word (version 6 and onwards), or PDF files (version 4 and onwards), or as an attachment to e-mail should be submitted to the editor.

 

Preparation of the Manuscript

Manuscripts should be typed in double space (11 pt, Times New Roman font preferred) on one side of the bond paper of 22×28 cm. All pages should be numbered consecutively. Use SI units, and give equivalent SI units in parenthesis when the use of other units is unavoidable. Symbols should conform to standard guidelines.

Title—It should be short & informative (15 pt), to be typed in only first letter of the first word capital; also, after colon or hyphen, first letter of the first word capital. Latin names are to be given in italics.

Short Running Title—Not in excess of 50 characters, to be all in capitals.

Keywords—Five or six keywords (in normal; 9 pt) indicating the contents of the manuscript.

Authors—Names of authors to be typed in first letters capital (10 pt).

Addresses of Authors—Addresses of the institution (s) where the work was carried out including telephone (office only), fax number and e-mail address (9 pt). Author for correspondence should be indicated with an asterisk (*)

Main Headings—Each manuscript should be divided into the following main headings (typed in bold, first letters capital, on the left hand side of the page; 11 pt): Abstract, Introduction, Materials and Methods, Results, Discussion, Acknowledgement, References.

Sub-Headings—Typed in flush left, bold, first letters capital (9 pt).

Sub-Sub Headings—Bold-Italics, first letters capital
(9 pt).

Abstract—Should be brief not exceeding 200 words, typed in normal (9 pt).

Introduction—A brief and precise literature review with objectives of the research undertaken and essential background be given.

Materials and Methods—Materials and Methods should include the source and nature of material, experimental design and the techniques employed. New methods should be described in sufficient details, and others can be referred to published work.

Results—Results should contain data, which are essential for drawing main conclusion from the study. Wherever needed, the data should be statistically analyzed. Same data should not be presented in both table and figure form.

Discussion—The discussion should deal the interpretation of the results. Wherever possible, results and discussion can be combined.

Tables—Tables should be typed in double space on separate sheets, numbered consecutively, and only contain horizontal cells. The table headings should be typed with the first letter capital.

Figures—The line drawings, illustrations, photographs, etc. will be accepted in TIFF files with hard copy. JPEG/GIF files will not be accepted. For each figure, a glossy print or original drawing may be submitted. Photomicrographs should have a scale bar. Line drawings should be roughly twice the final printed single column size of 7.5 cm width. Text figures should be numbered in Arabic numerals. Lettering, numbering, symbols and lines in the graphs/illustrations should be sufficiently clear and large to withstand reduction up to 50%. Captions and legends to illustrations should be typed on a separate sheet of paper. Line drawings and photographs should contain figure number, author’s name and the orientation (top) on the reverse with a soft lead pencil. Photostat copies and dot matrix prints will not be accepted.

References—References should be cited in the text by the consecutive numbers of their occurrence; the numbers are to be shown as superscript at the end of the statement related to that particular reference, e.g. It also inhibits the activity of endogenous DNA polymerase of HBV7.

Following the same sequence of the text, the list of references be appended under the References heading. Each reference should provide names and initials of all the authors, giving coma in between the authors and ‘&’ before the last author. In case, the authors are more than five, then use et al after the 5th author. It should be followed by title of the paper, abbreviated title of journal (in italics), volume number, year of publication (within circular bracket), and the starting and closing page numbers. Abbreviated titles should conform to the international guidelines, e.g. The Chemical Abstracts Service Source Index (CASSI) or BIOSIS

The style of references should be:

 

Research Papers

·     Ghosh A C & Basu P S, Extracellular polysaccharide production by Azorhizobium caulinodans from stem nodules of leguminous emergent hydrophyte Aeschynomene aspera, Indian J Exp Biol, 39 (2001) 155-159 [If accepted for publication, give (in press) in place of volume, year and pages].

·     Newell C A, Lowe J M, Merryweather A, Rooke L M & Hamilton W D O, Transformation of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L) Lam) with Agrobactericum tumefaciens and regeneration of plants expressing cowpea trypsin inhibitor and snowdrop lectin, Plant Sci, 107 (1995) 215-227.

·     Hoffman M P, Zalom F G, Smilanick J M, Malyj L D, Kiser J et al, Field evaluation of transgenic tobacco containing genes encoding Bacillus thuringensis d-endotoxin or cowpea trypsin inhibitor: Efficacy against Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), J Econ Entomol, 85 (1991) 2516-2522

 

Books & Proceedings of Conferences

·     Truzuki T & Irukayama K, Minamata disease (Elsevier, Amsterdam) 1977, 30-45.

·     Roels O A & Mahadevan S, Vitamin A, in The vitamins: Chemistry, pathology and methods, 2nd edn, vol VI, edited by P Gyorgy & W N Pearson (Academic Press, New York) 1967, 139-210.

·     Allossp P G, Nutt K A, Geijsk R J & Smith G R, Transgenic Sugarcane with increased resistance to canegrub, in Sugarcane pest management in the new millennium, 4th Sugarcane Entomol Workshop, held on 7-10 Feb, 2000 (Int Soc Sugarcane Technol, Khon-khon, Thailand) 2000, 63-67.

·     Chaturvedi H C & Sharma A K, Citrus tissue culture, in Proc Natl Semin Plant Tissue Cult (ICAR, New Delhi) 1988, 36-46.

·     Kapoor B C, 2000. Managing in the face of not-so-developed and organized environment, paper presented in Natl Symp Manag Dev, Institute of Public Administration, Jaipur, India, 21-23 July, 2000.

 

Thesis & Dissertation

·     Chaturvedi H C, In vitro growth and controlled morphogenesis in callus tissue of Rauvolfia serpentina. Ph D Thesis, Agra University, Agra, 1968.

 

Patent

·     Trepaginer J H, New surface finishings and coatings, US Pat 1276323 (to DuPont Inc, USA). 27 June, 2000; Chem Abstr, 49 (2000) 27689.

Manuscript along with referees’ comments will be sent to the author identified for correspondence on the title page of the manuscript. It should be checked carefully and the modified manuscript should be returned within ten days of receipt. No page proofs will be sent to author(s).

 

Reprints—Twenty five reprints will be supplied gratis.