Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

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VOLUME 48

NUMBER 12

DECEMBER 2010

CODEN: IJEB (A6) 48 (12) - (2009) 1161-1270

ISSN: 0019-5189 (Print); 0975-1009 (Online)

 

CONTENTS

 

Papers

 

Fluvastatin, a lipophilic statin, induces apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells through mitochondria-operated pathway

1167

      Wu Zhang, Jian Wu, Lin Zhou, Hai-Yang Xie & Shu-Sen Zheng

 

 

 

Cloning and expression of chicken granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GMCSF) gene

1175

      Uttara Chaturvedi, Shahina Kalim, Rajiv Kumar, Pradeep Sawant, Sangeeta Tiwari,
S K Khurana, A P Sahoo, Sudesh Palia & Ashok Kumar Tiwari

 

 

 

Immunogenicity of iron-regulated outer membrane proteins of Pasteurella multocida B:2 in mice model

1181

      Subhash Kharab & Shiv Charan

 

 

 

Vasoprotection by melatonin and quercetin in rats treated with cisplatin

1188

      K E Atalik , B Keleş, Y Uyar, M A Dündar, M Öz & H H Esen

 

 

 

Eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids enriched polyunsaturated fatty acids from the coastal marine fish of Bay of Bengal and their therapeutic value

1194

      Rabindranath Bera, Tushar K Dhara, Ranjan Bhadra, Gopal C Majumder & Parimal C Sen

 

 

 

Oily fraction of Semecarpus anacardium Linn nuts involves protein kinase C activation for its pro-inflammatory response

1204

      Yamini B Tripathi, Nidhi Pandey, Deepshikha Tripathi & Pratibha Tripathi

 

 

 

In vitro free radical scavenging activity of wild edible mushroom, Pleurotus squarrosulus (Mont.) Singer

1210

      Jaita Pal, Sourav Ganguly, Khandakar Saifa Tahsin & Krishnendu Acharya

 

 

 

Screening of certain medicinal plants from India for their anti-quorum sensing activity

1219

      Maryam Zahin, Sameena Hasan, Farrukh Aqil, Mohd. Sajjad Ahmad Khan, Fohad Mabood Husain & Iqbal Ahmad

 

 

 

Biological activity of sea anemone proteins: I. Toxicity and histopathology

1225

      Vinoth S Ravindran, L Kannan, & K Venkateshvaran

 

 

 

Biological activity of sea anemone proteins: II. Cytolysis and cell line toxicity

1233

      Vinoth S Ravindran, L Kannan & K Venkateshvaran

 

 

 

Simultaneous removal of NOx and SO2 in exhausted gas through landfill leachate

1237

      Yaqiong Han & Weijiang Zhang

 

 

 

Annual Index

 

      Contents

1243

 

 

      Keyword Index

1258

 

 

      Author Index

1262

 

 

List of Experts

1266

 

—————————————

 

NISCAIR Policy on Plagiarism

 

The system of formal communication in science through publication in primary journals is based on originality and quality of information being the only criteria for publication. However, there have been tendencies to misuse the system and vitiate the process of science communication for personal benefits. One of the ills afflicting science communication is plagiarism. Attempts at plagiarism may range from verbatim, copying of extensive material of other authors, misappropriating results/data of others with minor changes in language/presentation without giving credit to original source, to publish essentially the same information more than once.

As the premier publisher in India of primary scientific journals in various disciplines of science and technology, NISCAIR strongly reiterates its policy of discouraging plagiarism of all kinds. All efforts are made detect and frustrate attempts at plagiarism through editorial screening and rigorous peer review in respect of communications received for publication in NISCAIR publications. Cooperation of the scientific community is sought in our efforts to frustrate all attempts at plagiarism.

It is mandatory on the part of the corresponding author to furnish the following certificate at the time of submission of the manuscript for publication:

 

[This is to certify that the reported work in the article entitle, “(give full title with all the authors name)” submitted for publication in the journal, the……………………. is an original one and has not been submitted for publication elsewhere. I/we further certify that proper citation to the previously reported work have been given and no data/table/figures have been quoted verbatim from other publications without giving due acknowledgement and without the permission of the author(s). The consent of all the authors of this article has been obtained for submitting the article to the journal, “………………….”

Signatures and names of all the authors]

 

In case any attempt to plagiarize is brought to our attention accompanied with convincing evidence, following steps would be taken:

(a)        After consulting the respective Editorial Board Members, authors guilty of plagiarism will be debarred from publishing their papers in NISCAIR journals

(b)        Heads of the departments/institutes of the offending authors will be intimated of such incidences of plagiarism.

(c)      Such incidents of plagiarism will be publicized through the concerned NISCAIR journals in consultation with the respective Editorial Board Members.

 

————————

Author Index

Acharya Krishnendu

1210

Ahmad Iqbal

1219

Aqil Farrukh

1219

Atalik K E

1188

 

 

Bera Rabindranath

1194

Bhadra Ranjan

1194

 

 

Chaturvedi Uttara

1175

 

 

Dhara Tushar K

1194

Dűndar M A

1188

 

 

Esen H H

1188

 

 

Ganguly Sourav

1210

 

 

Han Yaqiong

1237

Husain Fohad Mabood

1219

 

 

Jaita Pal

1210

 

 

 

 

Kalim Shahina

1175

Kannan L

1225,1233

Keles B

1188

Khan Mohd. Sajjad
 Ahmad

 

1219

Kharab Subhash

1181

Khurana S K

1175

 

 

Majumder Gopal C

1194

 

 

Öz M

1188

 

 

Palia Sudesh

1175

 

 

Rajiv Kumar

1175

Ravindran Vinoth S

1225,1233

 

 

Sahoo A P

1175

Sameena Hasan

1219

Sawant Pradeep

1175

 

 

 

 

Sen Parimal C

1194

Shiv Charan

1181

 

 

Tahsin Khandakar Saifa

1210

Tiwari Ashok Kumar

1175

Tiwari Sangeeta

1175

 

 

Uyar Y

1188

 

 

Venkateshvaran K

1225,1233

 

 

Wu Jiang

1167

 

Xie Hai-Yang

1167

 

 

Zahin Maryam

1219

Zhang Weijiang

1237

Zhang Wu

1167

Zheng Shu-Sen

1167

Zhou Lin

1167

 

Keyword Index

Anaerobic denitrifying
 bacteria

 

1237

Anti-cancer

1233

Antioxidant activity

1210

Anti-QS activity

1219

Aorta

1188

 

 

b-carotene

1210

Cataract

1194

Chelating ability

1210

Chromobacterium violaceum

1219

Cisplatin

1188

Co-culture

1237

Combined removal of
 NOx/SO2

 

1237

Cytolytic

1233

 

 

Diabetes

1194

Docosahexaenoic acid

1194

 

 

Eicosapentaenoic acid

1194

Erythrocytes

1233

 

 

Fluvastatin

1167

 

 

Genetic adjuvant

1175

GMCSF

1175

 

 

Hepatocellular carcinoma

1167

 

 

Immunogenicity

1181

Iron-regulated proteins

1181

 

 

L929

1233

Landfill leachate

1237

Lycopene

1210

 

 

Mammalian toxicity

1225

Mercury poisoning

1194

Mice

1181

Mitochondria-operated
 pathway

 

1167

 

 

NO-scavenging

1210

 

 

 

 

Outer membrane proteins

1181

 

 

P388

1233

Pasteurella multocida B:2

1181

PCR

1175

Phenolics

1210

Polyunsaturated fatty acid

1194

Pseudomonas aeruginosa

1219

 

 

Quercetin

1188

Quorum sensing

1219

 

 

Reducing power

1210

 

 

Sea anemone protein

1225

Sea anemone protein

1233

Sulfate reducing bacteria

1237

Swarming motility

1219

 

 

Thermostable

1225

 

 

Vasoprotection

1188

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 48, December 2010, pp. 1167-1174

 

 

Correspondent author has been indicated by * sign

 

Fluvastatin, a lipophilic statin, induces apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells through mitochondria-operated pathway

Wu Zhang, Jian Wu, Lin Zhou, Hai-Yang Xie & Shu-Sen Zheng*

Division of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, Department of Surgery

Key Laboratory of Combined Multi-organ Transplantation, Ministry of Public Health

Key Laboratory of Organ Transplantation, Zhejiang Province, First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine,
Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003, China

Received 8 March 2010; revised 23 July 2010

Fluvastatin, a lipophilic statin, was known to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in many cancer cells. Its potential anticancer was evaluated in three hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines (HepG2, SMMC-7721 and MHCC-97H). Cells were treated with fluvastatin in vitro and its effect on cell proliferation, cell cycle, invasion and apoptosis was determined. Mechanism of apoptosis induced by fluvastatin on HCC cell lines was also investigated through western blotting and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) analysis. It was observed that fluvastatin inhibited proliferation of HCC cells by inducing apoptosis and G2/M phase arrest in a dose-dependent manner. The results of cell invasion assay revealed that fluvastatin significantly decreased the invasion potency of HCC cells. A mitochondria-operated mechanism for fluvastatin induced apoptosis might be involved and was supported by Western blotting and MMP analysis. After fluvastatin treatment, expression of Bcl-2 and procaspase-9 were downregulated, cytochrome c (cytosolic extract), Bax and cleaved-caspase-3 protein expression were increased. Furthermore, a breakdown of MMP in HCC cells was observed. To conclude, these results have provided a rationale for clinical investigations of fluvastatin in future as a potential anticancer reagent for growth control of HCC.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 48, December 2010, pp. 1175-1180

 

 

Cloning and expression of chicken granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GMCSF) gene

Uttara Chaturvedi1, Shahina Kalim2, Rajiv Kumar1, Pradeep Sawant1, Sangeeta Tiwari3, S K Khurana4, A P Sahoo1,
Sudesh Palia1, & Ashok Kumar Tiwari1*

1Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Animal Biotechnology, Indian Veterinary Research Institute,
Izatnagar 243 122, UP, India

2Department of Biochemistry, Bundelkhand University, Jhansi 284 128, UP, India

3Faculty of Animal Sciences, MJP, Rohilkhand University, Bareilly 243 006, UP, India

4Senior Scientist, NRC on Equines, Sirsa Road, Hisar, 125 001, Haryana, India

Received 4 January 2010; revised 20 May 2010

Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GMCSF), a multifunctional cytokine can enhance immune responses when administered along with DNA vaccine. Aim of the present study was to clone and express the chicken GMCSF cytokine for use as ‘genetic adjuvant’. Chicken GMCSF gene 435bp was amplified using specific primers in which restriction sites of BamHI and HindIII were at forward and reverse primers respectively. The PCR product was cloned into eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA 3.1(+) and clones were confirmed by restriction digestion and nucleotide sequencing. Functional activity of recombinant GMCSF was checked by expression of GMCSF specific mRNA in transfected Vero cells by RT-PCR of total RNA isolated from transfected Vero cells. The recombinant plasmid can be used as genetic adjuvant in chicken.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 48, December 2010, pp. 1181-1187

 

 

Immunogenicity of iron-regulated outer membrane proteins of
Pasteurella multocida B:2 in mice model

 

Subhash Kharb & Shiv Charan*

Department of Veterinary Microbiology, CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar 125 004, India

Received 12 April 2010; revised 28 June 2010

The present study was conducted to investigate the role of iron-regulated outer membrane proteins (IROMP) of Pasteurella multocida B:2 in mice as potential immunogens. Outer membrane proteins extracted from P. multocida B:2 grown under normal (OMP) and iron-deficient (IROMP) conditions were subjected to discontinuous SDS-PAGE. Nine polypeptides of MW ranging from 85.1 to 16.7 kDa from OMP preparations and two additional polypeptides of MW 95.4 and 89.1 kDa from IROMP preparations were observed with bands of MW 37.2 and 34.7 kDa as major proteins. Mice were immunized twice with OMP, IROMP-enriched fractions and whole cell lysate (WCL) via subcutaneous route at day 0 and 21. Antibody titers were determined from sera collected at weekly interval and protection was studied against challenge using 102 cfu of P. multocida two weeks after secondary immunization via intranasal and subcutaneous routes. IROMP and OMP immunized mice provoked significant antibody responses and IROMP induced higher antibody responses. IROMP and OMP immunized mice showed protection (100%) upon intranasal challenge and a protection (84%) following subcutaneous challenge as compared to high mortality (84%) in control mice. These results indicate that OMP enriched with IROMP fractions can be superior means of immunization.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 48, December 2010, pp. 1188-1193

 

 

Vasoprotection by melatonin and quercetin in rats treated with cisplatin

K E Atalık1*, B Keleş2, Y Uyar3, M A Dündar2, M Öz4 & H H Esen5

Department of 1Pharmacology, 2Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, 3Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery,
Ok Meydanı Education and Investigation Hospital, İstanbul, Turkey, 4Experimental Medicine and Application Center,
University of Selçuk, Konya, 42080, Turkey, 5Pathology, Faculty of Meram Medicine

Received 23 December 2009; revised 5 August 2010

Cisplatin-based chemotherapy has a variety of vascular side effects. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the beneficial effect of melatonin and cisplatin on the alterations in vascular reactivity and structure of cisplatin-treated rats. Phenylephrine (PHE) and KCl-caused concentration-dependent contractions of rat aorta. Pretreatment with cisplatin increased the sensitivity but not the max response to PHE and KCl. In rats treated with melatonin or quercetin before cisplatin, the EC50 values, but not the maximal response to both agents were significantly higher than cisplatin-treated group. Compared to the control group, cisplatin-treatment significantly reduced the luminal area of the aorta. In melatonin and quercetin-treated aortas the luminal area values were significantly higher than cisplatin-treated group. The results demonstrate for the first time that melatonin and quercetin treatment may protect the aorta in cisplatin-based chemotherapy.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 48, December 2010, pp. 1194-1203

 

 

Eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids enriched polyunsaturated fatty acids from the coastal marine fish of Bay of Bengal and their therapeutic value

Rabindranath Bera#1, Tushar K Dhara1, Ranjan Bhadra2, Gopal C Majumder3 & Parimal C Sen1,*

1Division of Molecular Medicine, Bose Institute, P-1/12, C.I.T. Scheme VII-M, Kolkata 700 054

2Vijaygarh Jyotish Ray College Research and Development Center, 8/2 Bejoygarh, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032

3Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, CSIR, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032

Received 26 June 2009; revised 24 June 2010

Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)/docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) enriched polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) significantly present in marine fish oil emerge as preventive agents for combating many health problems specially in chronic or metabolic disorders. The fish in the coastal area of Bay of Bengal has remained unexplored with respect to EPA/DHA enriched PUFA content in its oils, although it may be a potential source in harnessing the health benefit. In this study, seven varieties of the coastal fish were analysed for the content of EPA/DHA. The one locally known as lotte, (Harpadon nehereus) though has low content of total lipids, was found to have high EPA/DHA in its oil. The phospholipids rich fraction was extracted from the total fish oil. The EPA/DHA enriched PUFA was isolated to investigate the potential use for health benefits. EPA/DHA is found to act as protective agent against mercury poisoning studied in cell culture as well as in animal mode. It is found to be highly preventive in diabetes. The lotte is available in the coastal area of Bay of Bengal adjoining West Bengal, India in large scale and it is the first report showing EPA/DHA enriched PUFA in these fish oil that can be availed to harness in important health benefits.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 48, December 2010, pp. 1204-1209

 

 

Oily fraction of Semecarpus anacardium Linn nuts involves protein kinase C activation for its pro-inflammatory response

Yamini B Tripathi* & Nidhi Pandey*

Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005, India

and

Deepshikha Tripathi & Pratibha Tripathi

Research and Development Centre, Prof SN Tripathi Memorial Foundation, 1, Gandhi Nagar, Naria, Varanasi 221005, India

Received 23 December 2009; revised 21 June 2010

The oily fraction (non polar fraction-NPF) of S. anacardium (SA) significantly increased the expression of protein kinase C-δ (PKC-δ) in macrophages in concentration dependent manner, which was similar to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) response. Further, H-7 (1-(5-isoquinolinesulphonyl)-2-methylpiperazine), an inhibitor of PKC significantly inhibited this NPF mediated response in a concentration dependent manner. In the post treatment kinetics, H-7 showed this inhibition only up to 6 min post NPF/PMA addition, but in similar condition, quercetin, a flavone with reported antioxidant property, showed this inhibition only up to 2 min. The results clearly suggest that oily fraction of SA nuts enhances the expression of PKC protein, which may be responsible for its reported pro-inflammatory property.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 48, December 2010, pp. 1210-1218

 

 

In vitro free radical scavenging activity of wild edible mushroom,
Pleurotus squarrosulus (
Mont.) Singer

Jaita Pal, Sourav Ganguly, Khandakar Saifa Tahsin & Krishnendu Acharya*

Molecular and Applied Mycology and Plant Pathology Laboratory,

Department of Botany, University of Calcutta, 35, Ballygunge Circular Road,

Kolkata 700 019, India

Received 16 February 2010; revised 21 July 2010

Cellular damage caused by reactive oxygen species has been implicated in several diseases and hence antioxidants have significant importance in human health. Cold water, hot water and methanolic extract of Pleurotus squarrosulus were evaluated for antioxidant activity against hydroxyl radical, DPPH (1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) radical, superoxide radical, nitric oxide (NO) scavenging, reducing power, ferrous ion chelating ability and β-carotene/linoleic acid assay. Total phenol, flavonoid, β-carotene and lycopene content were also determined. Hot water extract showed significant antioxidant activity in all the test systems. Hydroxyl radical scavenging activity of all the extracts has been significant compared to positive control. Hot water extract has been found to have higher phenolic, total flavonoid, β-carotene and lycopene content than cold water and methanolic extract of the mushroom. Results of this study showed that, hot water extract has maximum antioxidant property and may be utilized as a promising source of therapeutics.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 48, December 2010, pp. 1219-1224

 

 

Screening of certain medicinal plants from India
for their anti-quorum sensing activity

Maryam Zahin, Sameena Hasan, Farrukh Aqil1, Mohd. Sajjad Ahmad Khan, Fohad Mabood Husain &
Iqbal Ahmad*

Department of Agricultural Microbiology, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202 002, India

Received 16 November 2009; revised 7 May 2010

Discovery of quorum sensing (QS) system to coordinate virulence and biofilm formation in bacterial pathogens has triggered search for safe, stable and non-toxic anti-QS compounds from natural products. Ethanolic extracts of 24 Indian medicinal plants were tested by agar well and disc diffusion assay for anti-QS activity using Chromobacterium violaceum (CV12472 and CVO26) reporter strains. AHL from C. violaceum CV31532 was isolated and partially purified for its use in CVO26 based bioassay. Effect on swarming-motility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1) was also recorded at sub-MIC concentrations of extracts. Of the 24 medicinal plants screened Hemidesmus indicus (L.) Schult (root), Holarrhena antidysenterica (Roth)A.DC. (bark), Mangifera indica L. (seed) Punica granatum L. (pericarp) and Psoralea corylifolia L. (seed) demonstrated varying level of inhibition of violacein production in the reporter strains. Moreover, a significant reduction in swarms was recorded over control. The inhibition of violacein production and swarming motility may be due to direct or indirect interference on QS by active constituents or the interactive effect of different phytocompounds present in the extracts. These plant extracts may be selected for activity guided fractionation to identify and characterize the active principle.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 48, December 2010, pp. 1225-1232

 

 

Biological activity of sea anemone proteins: I. Toxicity and histopathology

Vinoth S Ravindran1*, L Kannan2 & K Venkateshvaran3†

1, 2Centre of Advanced Study in Marine Biology, Annamalai University, Portonovo 608 502, India

3Aquatic Biotoxinology Laboratory, Central Institute of Fisheries Education, Versova, Mumbai 400 054, India

Received 1 May 2008: revised 12 July 2010

The crude as well as partially purified protein fractions from anemone species viz. Heteractis magnifica, Stichodactyla haddoni and Paracodylactis sinensis, collected from the Gulf of Mannar, south east coast of India were found to be toxic at different levels to mice. The mice showed behavioral changes such as loss of balance, opaque eyes, tonic convulsions, paralysis, micturiction, flexing of muscles, prodding (insensitive to stimulii), foaming from mouth and exophthalmia. The toxic proteins upon envenomation produced several chronic and lethal histopathological changes like formation of pycnotic nuclii and glial nodules in the brain; heamolysis, thrombosis and myocardial haemorrhage in the heart; granulomatous lesions, and damage to the hepatic cells in the liver and haemorrhage throughout the kidney parenchyma and shrinkage of glomerular tufts in the kidney. The toxins proved to be neurotoxic, cardiotoxic, nephrotoxic and hepatotoxic by their action on internal organ systems. The toxins were also thermostable till 60oC and had considerable shelf life.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 48, December 2010, pp. 1233-1236

 

 

Biological activity of sea anemone proteins: II. Cytolysis and cell line toxicity

Vinoth S Ravindran1*, L Kannan2 & K Venkateshvaran3,†

1,2Centre of Advanced Study in Marine Biology, Annamalai University, Portonovo 608 502, India

3Aquatic Biotoxinology Laboratory, Central Institute of Fisheries Education, Versova, Mumbai 400 054, India

Received 1 May 2008; revised 12 July 2010

Potent cytolytic activity was exhibited by proteins extracted from three sea anemones viz. Heteractis magnifica, Stichodactyla haddoni and Paracodylactis sinensis by affecting the red blood corpuscles (RBC) and the mouse fibroblast cell line (L929) and leukemia cell line (P388). Crude toxin of all the three anemone species induced spontaneous hemolysis of chicken, goat and human erythrocytes. The crude toxin of H. magnifica (0.98 mg/ml) elicited hemolysis at levels of 4096, 512 and 4096 HU (hemolytic unit) in chicken, goat and human erythrocytes respectively. Subsequently, the crude toxin of S.haddoni (0.82 mg/ml) exhibited a hemolytic activity of 256, 128 and 512 HU and that of P. sinensis (0.60 mg/ml) had a hemolytic activity of 128, 4096 and 512 HU. Most of the partially purified proteins of these anemones also exhibited the activity against the three different erythrocytes. The viability of L929 and P388 was adversely affected on adding the crude toxins. The symptoms of toxicity shown by the cells were rounding, lysis and detachment from the substratum. These effects were the least in S. haddoni, as compared to those the crude toxins of the other two species. Inhibition of growth of L929 exhibited by the toxin of the three species ranged between 61.08 and 93.38%. Similarly, inhibition of the growth of P388 ranged between 51.32 and 86.16%. The present investigation reveal the cytotoxic nature of anemone toxins.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 48, December 2010, pp. 1237-1242

 

 

Simultaneous removal of NOX and SO2 in exhausted gas through landfill leachate

Yaqiong Han & Weijiang Zhang*

School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072, People’s Republic of China

Received 3 November 2009; revised 16 July 2010

Simultaneous removal of NOx and SO2 from exhausted gas were investigated by studying co-culture of sulfate reducing bacteria and anaerobic denitrifying bacteria, separated from landfill leachate. When H2S, generated by sulfate reducing bacteria was chosen as the sole electron donor for anaerobic denitrifying bacteria, the co-culture system demonstrated a faster NO removal rate, higher stability and better permanence. When the feed gas flow rates of N2 and SO2 were maintained constant at 0.1 m3/h and 16 ml/min respectively, the maximum NO-removal rate could be achieved at over 92% with NO feed gas kept between 2-6 ml/min, while the SO2 removal rate was always above 95%. Long-term continuous removal of NO exhibited an evident periodicity of five days, however, the fluctuation range of NO-removal was decreasing. Moreover, the decrease of the gas flow rate and the increase in NO inlet concentration could contribute to a higher NO-removal rate.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 48, December 2010, pp 1243-1265

 

 

Annual Index

Annual Contents

Annual Keyword Index

Annual Author Index

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 48, December 2010, pp. 1266-1270

 

 

List of Experts