Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

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VOLUME 48

NUMBER 6

JUNE 2010

CODEN: IJEB (A6) 48 (6) - (2010) 525-616

ISSN: 0019-5189 (Print); 0975-1009 (Online)

 

CONTENTS

 

 

Papers

 

Changes in cytosolic Ca2+ levels correspond to fluctuations of lactate levels in crosstalk of astrocyte-neuron cell lines

529

Shantanu Ghosh, Deepak K Kaushik, James Gomes, Shahid Nayeem,
Shashank Deep & Anirban Basu

 

 

 

Small-sized neurons of trigeminal ganglia express multiple voltage-sensitive calcium channels: A qualitative immunohistochemical study

538

Subrata Basu Ray, Sagolshem S Singh & R D Mehra

 

 

 

Galanin regulation of LH release in male rats

544

Manisha Arora Pandit & R N Saxena

 

 

 

Inhibition of hCG-induced spawning by a-methylparatyrosine, a tyrosine hydroxylase inhibitor, in the catfish Heteropneustes fossilis (Bloch)

549

R Chaube & K P Joy

 

 

 

Anti-resorptive effect of pilose antler blood (Cervus Nippon Temminck) in ovariectomized rats

554

Jian-Hong Yang, Yi Cao, Rui-Lin Wang, Yu-Rong Fei, Hui Zhang, Pu Feng &
Jing Liu

 

 

 

Thyroxine induced stress and its possible prevention by catechin

559

Amar K Chandra, Sabyasachi Sinha & Shyamosree Roy Choudhury

 

 

 

Effect of Ocimum sanctum, turmeric extract and vitamin E supplementation on the salivary gland and bone marrow of radioiodine exposed mice

566

Uma S Bhartiya, Lebana J Joseph, Yogita S Raut & Badanidiyoor S Rao

 

 

 

Wound healing potential of ethanolic extract of Kalanchoe pinnata Lam.
Leaf輸 preliminary study

572

B Shivananda Nayak, Julien R Marshall & Godwin Isitor

 

 

 

Effect of preferential cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced striatal lesions in rats: Behavioral, biochemical and histological evidences

577

Amit Gupta, Ashish Dhir, Anil Kumar & S K Kulkarni

 

 

 

Evaluation of genotoxic effects in male Wistar rats following microwave exposure

586

Sanjay Kumar, Kavindra Kumar Kesari & Jitendra Behari

 

 

 

NaCl pretreatment alleviates salt stress by enhancement of antioxidant defense system and osmolyte accumulation in mungbean (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek)

593

Papiya Saha, Paratima Chatterjee & Ashok K Biswas

 

 

 

Evaluation of multiple plant growth promoting traits of an isolate of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain Psd

601

Ashutosh Upadhyay & Sheela Srivastava

 

 

 

Isolation of genomic DNA from medicinal plants without liquid nitrogen

610

Pratibha Sharma, Neha Joshi & Anubhuti Sharma

 

 

 

Information for Authors

615

 

 

覧覧覧覧覧覧覧

 

 

Editor痴 Note

 

The Indian Journal of Experimental Biology is covered by the following international abstracting and indexing services:

 

Science Citation Index ExpandedTM

PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nim.nih.gov/)

MEDLINE

BIOSIS

Chemical Abstracts Service

Excerpta Medica

Informascience

Refrativnyi Zhurnal

Zoological Records

 

 

覧覧覧覧覧覧覧

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology in Open Access Mode

 

The Indian Journal of Experimental Biology (IJEB) is now an open access journal in the repository, NISCAIR Online Periodicals Repository (NOPR) [http://nopr.niscair.res.in].

Full text of all articles published in IJEB from 2006 onwards can now be accessed at NOPR in the open access mode. Papers in the current issue shall be uploaded immediately. Papers published in earlier years shall be added soon.

NOPR is based on DSpace, a digital repository software, and allows document browsing, document searching and various search options like title, author name, keywords, year, issue, etc.

 

 

 

 

Author Index

Basu Anirban

529

Behari Jitendra

586

Bhartiya Uma S

566

Biswas Ashok K

593

 

 

Cao Yi

554

Chandra Amar K

559

Chatterjee Paratima

593

Chaube R

549

Choudhury Shyamosree Roy

559

 

 

Deep Shashank

529

Dhir Ashish

577

 

 

Fei Yu-Rong

554

Feng Pu

554

 

 

Ghosh Shantanu

529

Gomes James

529

Gupta Amit

577

 

 

Isitor Godwin

572

 

 

Joseph Lebana J

566

Joshi Neha

610

Joy K P

549

 

 

Kaushik Deepak K

529

Kesari Kavindra Kumar

586

Kulkarni S K

577

Kumar Anil

577

 

 

Liu Jing

554

 

 

Marshall Julien R

572

Mehra R D

538

 

 

Nayak B Shivananda

572

Nayeem Shahid

529

 

 

Pandit Manisha Arora

544

 

 

Rao Badanidiyoor S

566

Raut Yogita S

566

Ray Subrata Basu

538

 

 

Saha Papiya

593

Sanjay Kumar

586

Saxena R N

544

Sharma Anubhuti

610

Sharma Pratibha

610

Singh Sagolshem S

538

Sinha Sabyasachi

559

Srivastava Sheela

601

 

 

Upadhyay Ashutosh

601

 

 

Wang Rui-Lin

554

 

 

Yang Jian-Hong

554

 

 

Zhang Hui

554

 

 

Keyword Index

ANLS

527

Acclimation

593

Antibiotics

601

Antimicrobial property

601

Antioxidants

559,566

 

 

Biocontrol

601

Biosynthesis gene

601

Bone marrow

566

Bone mineral density

554

 

 

Calcium

538

Calcium upregulation

527

Catalase

559,586

Catechin

559

Cerebral vasoregulation

527

CTAB

610

Cyclooxygenase

577

 

 

DNA isolation

610

 

 

17 b-estradiol

554

Excision wound

572

 

 

Free radical

559

 

 

Galanin

544

Galantide

544

 

 

Ganglia

538

Glutathione peroxidase

586

Growth and metabolism

593

 

 

Human Chorionic
 Gonadotropin

 

549

Hydroxyproline

572

 

 

IAA biosynthesis

601

Immunohistochemistry

538

Insulin-like growth factor-1

554

Ion channel

538

Isoenzyme ratio

527

 

 

Kalanchoe pinnata

572

 

 

Lactate dehydrogenase

527

LH

544

LHRH

544

Lipid peroxidation

559

Liquid nitrogen

610

1-methyl-4-phenyl-
 1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine

 

577

 

 

a-Methylparatyrosine

549

Micronuclei

586

Microwave radiation

586

Mungbean

593

 

 

NaCl pretreatment

593

Neuropeptide

544

Neuroprotection

577

Nimesulide

577

 

 

Osteoporosis

554

Ovulation

549

Oxidative stress

559,577

 

 

Parkinson痴 disease

577

PCR

610

Phosphate solubilization

601

Pilose antler blood

554

 

 

Radioiodine

566

RAPD

610

Rat

538

Reactive oxygen species

586

 

 

Salivary glands

566

Spawning

549

Superoxide dismutase

559,586

 

 

Testosterone

554

Thyroxine

559

Trigeminal

538

Tyrosine hydroxylase

549

 

 

 

Correspondent author has been indicated by * sign

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 48, June 2010, pp. 529-537

 

 

 

Changes in cytosolic Ca2+ levels correspond to fluctuations of lactate levels
in crosstalk of astrocyte-neuron cell lines

Shantanu Ghosh1*, Deepak K Kaushik2, James Gomes3, Shahid Nayeem4, Shashank Deep4 & Anirban Basu2

1Behavioural & Cognitive Science Laboratory,
Department of Humanities & Social Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology New Delhi 110 016, India

2National Brain Research Centre, NH-8, Manesar, Haryana 122 050, India

3School of Biological Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi 110 016, India

4Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi 110 016, India

Received 6 November 2009; revised 11 March 2010

Neurons and astrocytes differentially express isoenzymes of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). The metabolic consequences for the variations in mRNA expression of LDH isoenzyme subtypes in neurons and astrocytes control cerebral vasoregulation. Moreover, cellular signalling consequences for functional neurovascular control may also be dependent on LDH isoenzyme subtype profiles. Initial computer simulations revealed glutamate-induced calcium waves in connected astrocytes, and showed concomitant changes in the expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and lactic acid metabolism. To validate these findings, the nature and extent of glutamate-dependent signalling crosstalk in murine cell lines were investigated through correlated lactate levels and calcium upregulation. Neuro2A and C8D1A cells were separately treated with timed supernatant extracts from each other and their LDH1 and LDH5 isoenzyme responses were recorded. Western blot analysis showed LDH1/LDH5 isoenzyme ratio in the astrocytes to be positively correlated with Neuro2A-derived lactate levels estimated by the amplitude of 1.33-ppm spectral peak in 1H-NMR, and LDH1/LDH5 isoenzyme ratio in neurons is negatively correlated with C8D1A-derived lactate levels. Significant modulations of the calcium-responsive protein pCamKII levels were also observed in both cell lines, particularly correlations between pCamKII and lactate in C8D1A cells, thus explaining the calcium dependence of the lactate response. Together, these observations indicate that lactate is a key indicator of the metabolic state of these cell types, and may be a determinant of release of vasoregulatory factors.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 48, June 2010, pp. 538-543

 

 

Small-sized neurons of trigeminal ganglia express multiple voltage-sensitive calcium channels: A qualitative immunohistochemical study

Subrata Basu Ray*, Sagolshem S Singh & R D Mehra

Department of Anatomy, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), Ansari Nagar, New Delhi 110 029, India

Received 26 November 2009; revised 10 February 2010

The cell bodies of pseudounipolar neurons of the trigeminal ganglia have been presumed to play a supportive role to neurites, which transmit various sensations like pain from the periphery to the brain stem. However, several studies have recently shown that these neuronal cell bodies could modulate the afferent stimuli by up-regulating various ion channels and also by increasing the synthesis of neuropeptides like calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Since voltage-sensitive calcium ion channels (VSCCs) determine neuropeptides/ neurotransmitters released by neurons, the aim of the present
study was to localize the various VSCCs (N-, P/Q-, L-, T- and R-types) in the trigeminal ganglia neurons by immunohistochemistry. The results showed that all the VSCCs are expressed by the cell bodies of neurons though the small-sized neurons showed higher expression of these channels. The small-sized neurons were identified by immunohistochemical localization of CGRP, the most common neuropeptide for pain transmission in the trigeminal ganglia neurons. Some of these channels (N, P/Q and T types) were also expressed on the cell surface though previous electrophysiological studies have shown the expression of all the channels on the cell surface. It is suggested that the cell bodies could play a more active role than hereto ascribed to these, in the modulation of sensory stimuli.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 48, June 2010, pp. 544-548

 

 

Galanin regulation of LH release in male rats

Manisha Arora Pandit* & R N Saxena

Department of Zoology, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007, India

Received 24 July 2009; revised 15 March 2010

The present study examines the role of cerebroventricular administered (IIIrd ventricle) galanin on LHRH and LH release in adult and immature male rats. In both age groups, galanin stimulated LHRH synthesis and release from the hypothalamus, leading to a higher release of pituitary LH which in turn increased plasma LH levels. Galantide, a galanin receptor blocker, on the other hand, drastically reduced hypothalamic LHRH and plasma LH while increasing pituitary LH. In vitro incubation of anterior pituitary cells with galanin followed by LHRH resulted in increased release of pituitary LH but not by galanin alone. Galantide exhibited no such effect either alone or with LHRH. These results indicate that galanin is an important regulator for both hypothalamic LHRH and hypophysial LH and its role is independent of age in the case of male rats.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 48, June 2010, pp. 549-553

 

 

Inhibition of hCG-induced spawning by a-methylparatyrosine, a tyrosine hydroxylase inhibitor, in the catfish Heteropneustes fossilis (Bloch)

R Chaube& K P Joy*

Department of Zoology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005, India

Received 13 August, 2009; revised 15 March 2010

In this study, the effect of pharmacological inhibition of catecholaminergic activity on hCG-induced spawning was evaluated and correlated with tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity, the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine biosynthesis. Gravid female H. fossilis collected in both prespawning and spawning phases were given a-methylparatyrosine (a-MPT: 250mg/g body weight, ip, an irreversible inhibitor of TH) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG: 100 IU/fish, ip) alone or in combination. The fish were sampled at different intervals for measuring hypothalamic and ovarian TH activity and checking spawning response. The administration of hCG resulted in ovulation and spawning in both phases with a higher response in the spawning phase. The administration of a-MPT did not induce any response, like the control fish. In the
hCG +
a-MPT groups, the spawning response of hCG was significantly inhibited and delayed by the inhibitor. The spawning response of hCG was accompanied by a significant increase in both hypothalamic and ovarian TH activity at
6 and 12 h of the injection. However, at 24hr the activity decreased except in the spawning phase. The
a-MPT treatment inhibited TH activity significantly in a duration謀ependent manner. In the hCG + a-MPT groups, enzyme activity was inhibited at all duration. The results indicate the involvement of catecholamines during the hCG-induced spawning and the specific functional nature of the involvement needs further investigation.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 48, June 2010, pp. 554-558

 

 

Anti-resorptive effect of pilose antler blood (Cervus nippon Temminck) in ovariectomized rats

Jian-Hong Yanga,b, Yi Caob,c, Rui-Lin Wangb, Yu-Rong Feib, Hui Zhangb,d, Pu Fengd & Jing Liua*

aSchool of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026, China

bSchool of Life Sciences, Graduate University of CAS, Beijing 100049, China

cSchool of Life Sciences, Jiling University, Changchun 130000, China

dYu Quan Hospital, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100049, China

Received 7 August 2009; revised 01 February 2010

Anti-bone resorption activity of pilose antler blood (Cervus nippon Temminck) were evaluated in ovariectomized Wistar rats. The rats were randomly divided into sham operated group (SHAM), ovariectomized group (OVX) and pilose antler blood treated group. The ovariectomized rats were treated with pilose antler blood orally in 4000ml/kg daily doses for 10 weeks. Compared with SHAM group, serum 17 b-estradiol level decreased significantly and osteocalcin level increased significantly in OVX group, indicating successful model of osteoporosis. The experiments showed that the bone mineral density of the lumbar spine and left femur in OVX group decreased remarkably compared to SHAM group but normalized by treatment with pilose antler blood. Additionally, serum levels of insulin-like growth factor-1and testosterone were lower obviously in OVX group than those in SHAM group but preserved by pilose antler blood treatment. However, no obvious changes in serum levels of calcium, phosphorus, total alkaline phosphatase and osteoprotegerin were observed among three groups. These results suggested that administration of pilose antler blood was effective in alleviating osteoporosis in ovariectomized rats.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 48, June 2010, pp. 559-565

 

 

Thyroxine induced stress and its possible prevention by catechin

Amar K Chandra*, Sabyasachi Sinha & Shyamosree Roy Choudhury

Endocrinology and Reproductive Physiology Laboratory, Department of Physiology, University College of Science
and Technology, University of Calcutta, 92, Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Kolkata 700 009, India

Received 30 January 2009; revised 4 March 2010

Free radicals are all known to damage cell components. The present study was designed to evaluate the free radical generation in the testis and liver and also to determine the testicular and hepatic antioxidant enzyme activities with and without catechin administration in thyroxine induced male Sprague-Dawley rats. The experimental animals were divided into four groups, six on each division. L-thyroxine (T4) (0.3 mg/kg body weight) was administered to experimental groups for 15 days. Another group (CAT-T4) was administered with L-thyroxine (T4) in the dose as mentioned and catechin (100mg/kg of body weight/day) simultaneously. Third group was administered only with catechin, and the remaining group was kept as control. Lipid peroxidation level (LPO) increased in L-thyroxine treated rats as compared to control, while LPO level was almost normal in L-thyroxine (T4) and catechin (CAT-T4) treated group. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities were increased in L-thyroxine (T4) treated rats as compared to control, where as there were almost at normal level in L-thyroxine (T4) and catechin (CAT-T4) treated groups. The results show that, thyroxine administration develops oxidative stress; the organism defends it against the effects of oxidative stress by increasing SOD and catalase activities as a protective mechanism and catechin, being an antioxidant, normalizes lipid peroxidation in testis and liver including SOD and catalase activities.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 48, June 2010, pp. 566-571

 

 

Effect of Ocimum sanctum, turmeric extract and vitamin E supplementation
on the salivary gland and bone marrow of radioiodine exposed mice

Uma S Bhartiya*, Lebana J Joseph, Yogita S Raut & Badanidiyoor S Rao

Radiation Medicine Centre, Bio-Medical Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre,
c/o Tata Memorial Hospital Annexe, Parel, Mumbai 400 012, India
Radiological Physics & Advisory Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center,
Trombay, Mumbai 400 074, India

Received 19 August 2009; revised 1 February 2010

Significant increase in the salivary gland weight was observed after exposure to single therapeutic dose of 3.7 MBq
of 131I in mice. Pre-supplementation of antioxidants, O. sanctum leaf extract, turmeric extract and vitamin E for 15 days before 131I exposure demonstrated significant reduction in the salivary gland weight. No major histopathological changes were observed in the salivary gland of experimental animals at 24 h of exposure. Micronuclei index in the bone marrow of polychromatic (PCEs) and normochromatic erythrocytes (NCEs) remained unchanged in all the experimental groups. However, PCE/NCE ratio in the bone marrow decreased significantly in all the 131I exposed animals irrespective of antioxidant supplementation status. The normalization of salivary gland weight by antioxidant pre-supplementation in radioiodine exposed mice is suggestive of the possible ameliorating effect of antioxidants on the salivary gland weight recommending further detailed studies regarding the functional aspect of the salivary gland in higher animals.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 48, June 2010, pp. 572-576

 

 

Wound healing potential of ethanolic extract of Kalanchoe
pinnata
Lam. leaf輸 preliminary study

B Shivananda Nayak*, Julien R Marshall & Godwin Isitor

Department of Preclinical Sciences, Faculty of Medical Sciences. The University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad

Received 3 November 2009; revised 24 February 2010

The extract of K. pinnata was evaluated for its wound healing activity by using excision wound model in rats. On day 11, animals treated with the ethanolic leaf extract exhibited 86.33 % reduction in the wound area, compared to petroleum jelly treated control (69.36%) and the mupirocin treated standard (85.49%). The hydroxyproline content of extract treated animals was higher, as compared to control and the standard groups. Histological analysis was also consistent with the proposal that K. pinnata leaf extract exhibits significant wound healing potential. The increased rate of wound contraction and hydroxyproline content in the extract treated animals supports the claims made by traditional healers of the benefits obtained from the medicinal use of K. pinnata.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 48, June 2010, pp. 577-585

 

 

Effect of preferential cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor against
1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced striatal lesions in rats: Behavioral, biochemical and histological evidences

Amit Gupta, Ashish Dhir, Anil Kumar & S K Kulkarni*

Pharmacology Division, University Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences

Panjab University, Chandigarh 160 014, India

Received 19 May 2009; revised 24 February 2010

Cyclooxygenase (COX) isoenzyme is known to play an important role in the pathophysiology of Parkinson痴 disease. The present study evaluated the neuroprotective effect of nimesulide, a preferential COX-2-inhibitor against
1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tertahydropyridine (MPTP)-model of Parkinson痴 disease. Intrastriatal administration of MPTP (32 μmol in 2 μl) produced a significant decrease in the locomotor activity. Biochemical investigation of striatal region revealed a significant enhancement in the oxidative stress as evidenced by increased lipid peroxidation levels, nitrite levels and myeloperoxidase activity along with depleted antioxidant pool (reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase levels) and reduced redox (GSH/GSSG) ratio. MPTP administration also showed significant mitochondrial complex-I inhibition and reduction in the mitochondrial viability. Histological examination of the MPTP-treated brain sections revealed alteration in the histo-architecture as well as undifferentiated bodies of varying contour and lesions. Chronic administration of nimesulide (5 or 10 mg/kg, po) for 12 days, significantly reversed the behavioral, biochemical, mitochondrial and histological alterations induced by MPTP. In conclusion, the findings of the present study implicate the possible neuroprotective potential of nimesulide in MPTP-treated rats and thus highlight the therapeutic potential of COX-inhibitors in treatment of Parkinson痴 disease.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 48, June 2010, pp. 586-592

 

 

Evaluation of genotoxic effects in male Wistar rats following
microwave exposure

Sanjay Kumar, Kavindra Kumar Kesari & Jitendra Behari*

Bioelectromagnetic Laboratory, School of Environmental Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110 067, India

Received 5 October 2009; revised 18 March 2010

Wistar rats (70 days old) were exposed for 2 h a day for 45 days continuously at 10 GHz [power density 0.214 mW/cm2, specific absorption rate (SAR) 0.014 W/kg] and 50 GHz (power density 0.86 μW/cm2, SAR 8.0 ラ10-4 W/kg). Micronuclei (MN), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and antioxidant enzymes activity were estimated in the blood cells and serum. These radiations induce micronuclei formation and significant increase in ROS production. Significant changes in the level of serum glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase were observed in exposed group as compared with control group. It is concluded that microwave exposure can be affective at genetic level. This may be an indication of tumor promotion, which comes through the overproduction of reactive oxygen species.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 48, June 2010, pp. 593-600

 

 

NaCl pretreatment alleviates salt stress by enhancement of antioxidant defense system and osmolyte accumulation in mungbean (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek)

Papiya Saha, Paramita Chatterjee & Asok K Biswas*

Plant Physiology and Biochemistry Laboratory, Department of Botany, University of Calcutta
35, Ballygunge Circular Road, Kolkata 700 019, India

Received 14 October 2009; revised 12 February 2010

Enhancement of salt (NaCl) tolerance by pretreatment with sublethal dose (50 mM) of NaCl was investigated in
V. radiata seedlings. NaCl stress caused drastic effects on roots compared to shoots. Accompanying reductions in length, number of root hairs and branches, roots became stout, brittle and brown in color. Salt stress caused gradual reduction in chlorophyll, carotenoid pigment contents and chlorophyll fluorescence intensity also. Superoxide dismutase and catechol peroxidase activities increased under stress in both roots and leaves. But catalase activity showed an increase in roots and decrease in leaves. In these seedlings, the oxidative stress has been observed under salinity stress and the level of proline, H2O2 and malondialdehyde content were increased. But pretreatment with sublethal dose of NaCl was able to overcome the adverse effects of stress imposed by NaCl to variable extents by increasing growth and photosynthetic pigments of the seedlings, modifying the activities of antioxidant enzymes, reducing malondialdehyde and H2O2 content and increasing accumulation of osmolytes like proline. Thus, mungbean plants can acclimate to lethal level of salinity by pretreatment with sublethal level of NaCl, improving their health and production under saline condition.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 48, June 2010, pp. 601-609

 

 

Evaluation of multiple plant growth promoting traits of an isolate of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain Psd

Ashutosh Upadhyay & Sheela Srivastava*

Department of Genetics, University of Delhi South Campus, Benito Juarez Road, New Delhi 110 021, India

Received 17 August 2009; revised 20 January 2010

P. fluorescens strain Psd was isolated from the rhizosphere of Vigna mungo and evaluated for its multiple plant growth promoting and biocontrol properties against F. oxysporum. Interestingly, this strain not only produces a range of antimicrobial compounds but also solubilizes complexed phosphates and synthesizes phytohormone (IAA). These properties can be assessed to elucidate the agronomic significance and rhizospheric competence of this soil isolate. Biocontrol action has been demonstrated in vitro against some other rhizospheric bacteria, and a phytopathogenic fungus along with wild type E. coli K-12. Genetic evidence for the antimicrobial status of strain Psd has been derived in terms of elucidating a unique combination of phenazine and pyrrolnitrin biosynthesis genes, not reported for any other P. fluorescens strain. The conserved part of antibiotics biosynthesis operon has been PCR amplified, cloned, sequenced and phylogenetic relationship based on similar genes from a few known Pseudomonads has been derived. The properties possessed by strain Psd may enable the bacterium to establish itself successfully in the rhizosphere.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 48, June 2010, pp. 610-614

 

 

Isolation of genomic DNA from medicinal plants without liquid nitrogen

Pratibha Sharma, Neha Joshi & Anubhuti Sharma*

Department of Bioscience & Biotechnology, Banasthali University, Banasthali 304 022, India

Received 8 September 2009; revised 18 February 2010

Genomic DNA was extracted from eight medicinal plants using the present DNA extraction protocols (CTAB extraction method) with some modifications. Leaves were fixed in different fixing solutions containing absolute alcohol (99.99%), chloroform and EDTA, but without liquid nitrogen. DNA quality and quantity obtained were comparable to those isolated with liquid nitrogen, as the λ260280 ratio with liquid nitrogen was in range 1.3-1.7 and with other fixing solutions it was 1.1-1.5. Absolute alcohol showed best results as fixing solution. Good quality of DNA was isolated without using liquid nitrogen from different medicinal plant species. DNA isolated by this method was suitable for various molecular biology applications.