Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

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VOLUME 49

NUMBER 4

APRIL 2011

CODEN: IJEB (A6) 49 (3) 241-308 (2011)

ISSN: 0019-5189 (Print); 0975-1009 (Online)

 

CONTENTS

 

Papers

 

Effect of anti-mosquito midgut antibodies on development of malaria parasite,

 

Plasmodium vivax and fecundity in vector mosquito Anopheles culicifacies

 

(Diptera: culicidae)

245

Manoj Chugh, T Adak, Neelam Sehrawat & S K Gakhar

 

 

 

Mucuna pruriens Linn. seed extract pretreatment protects against cardiorespiratory

 

and neuromuscular depressant effects of Naja sputatrix (Javan spitting cobra) venom in rats

254

Shin Yee Fung, Nget Hong Tan, Si Mui Sim, Enrico Marinello, Roberto Guerranti & John Chinyere Aguiyi

 

 

 

Effect of Aloe vera (Aloe barbadensis Miller) gel on doxorubicin-induced

 

myocardial oxidative stress and calcium overload in albino rats

260

Gaurav Kaithwas, Kiran Dubey & K K Pillai

 

 

 

Behavioural and neurochemical evaluation of Perment an herbal formulation

 

in chronic unpredictable mild stress induced depressive model

269

M Ramanathan, B Balaji, A Justin, N Gopinath, M Vasanthi & R V Ramesh

 

 

 

Hepatoprotective action of ethanolic extracts of Melia azedarach Linn. and

 

Piper longum Linn and their combination on CCl4 induced hepatotoxicity in rats

276

H Rajeswary, R Vasuki, P Samudram & A Geetha

 

 

 

Anti-hyperlipidemic and antioxidant potential of different fractions of

 

Terminalia arjuna Roxb. bark against PX- 407 induced hyperlipidemia

282

Saravanan Subramaniam, Subramaniam Ramachandran, Subasini Uthrapathi,

Victor Rajamanickam Gnamanickam & Govinda Prasad Dubey

 

 

 

Comparative study of 6-APA production by free and agar immobilized bacteria

 

in nutrient broth culture

289

A K Dolui & S Das

 

 

 

Bioemulsifier production by Streptomyces sp. S22 isolated from garden soil

293

Javed P Maniyar, Dhawal V Doshi, Smita S Bhuyan & Shilpa S Mujumdar

 

 

 

Response of multiple herbicide resistant strain of diazotrophic cyanobacterium, Anabaena variabilis, exposed to atrazine and DCMU

 

298

Surendra Singh, Pallavi Datta & Archna Tirkey

 

 

Note

 

A sensitive and specific ES-31 antigen detection based fluorometric assay for confirmation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in cell culture

 

304

Anindita Majumdar, Gauri Wankhade, Pranita D Kamble, Deepti Joshi &

B C Harinath

 

 

 

Announcement

244

 

 

Information for Authors

307

 

覧覧覧覧覧

 

Announcement

 

Short Term Training Course on Molecular Biology/Biotechnology

at Centre for Biotechnology, Maharshi Dayanand University, Rohtak

 

214 May 2011

 

Sponsored by the Department of Biotechnology, Ministry of Science & Technology, Govt. of India, the two week short term training course on Molecular Biology/Biotechnology, is intended for college teaching personnel with some scientific background who are seeking basic and advanced level molecular biology training and who wish to become conversant with the discipline. For details regarding qualification, application format and fees, etc., please visit
the website
www.mdurohtak.com. Applications should reach to The Director, Centre
for Biotechnology, M. D. University, Rohtak 124 001 on or before 2 April 2011.
Telephone:+91-1262-393101; Mobile: +91-9896014951; E-mail: director.cbt.mdu@gmail.com

 

 

 

Editor痴 Note

 

The Indian Journal of Experimental Biology is covered by the following international abstracting and indexing services:

 

Science Citation Index ExpandedTM

PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nim.nih.gov/)

MEDLINE

BIOSIS

Chemical Abstracts Service

Excerpta Medica

Informascience

Refrativnyi Zhurnal

Zoological Records

 

 

 

Author Index

Adak T

245

Aguiyi John Chinyere

254

 

 

Balaji B

269

Bhuyan Smita S

293

 

 

Chugh Manoj

245

 

 

Das S

289

Datta Pallavi

298

Dolui A K

289

Doshi Dhawal V

293

Dubey Govinda Prasad

282

Dubey Kiran

260

 

 

Fung Shin Yee

254

 

 

Gakhar S K

245

Geetha A

276

Gnamanickam
Victor Rajamanickam

 

282

Gopinath N

269

Guerranti Roberto

254

 

 

Harinath B C

304

 

 

Joshi Deepti

304

Justin A

269

 

 

Kaithwas Gaurav

260

Kamble Pranita D

304

 

 

Majumdar Anindita

304

Maniyar Javed P

293

Marinello Enrico

254

Mujumdar Shilpa S

293

 

 

Pillai K K

260

 

 

Rajeswary H

276

Ramachandran
Subramaniam

 

282

Ramanathan M

269

Ramesh R V

269

 

 

Samudram P

276

Sehrawat Neelam

245

Sim Si Mui

254

Singh Surendra

298

Subramaniam Saravanan

282

 

 

Tan Nget Hong

254

Tirkey Archna

298

 

 

Uthrapathi Subasini

282

 

 

Vasanthi M

269

Vasuki R

276

 

 

Wankhade Gauri

304

 

 

Keyword Index

Actinomycetes

293

Aloe vera gel

260

6-Aminopenicillanic acid

289

Anopheles culicifacies

245

Anti-mosquito midgut  antibodies

245

Antioxidant

260, 282

Antivenom effect

254

Anxiety

269

Atrazine

298

 

 

Biherbal extract

276

Bioconversion

289

Bioemulsifier

293

 

 

CCl4

276

Chronic mild stress

269

Coronary heart disease

282

Corticosterone

269

Cyanobacteria

298

DCMU

298

Depression

269

Diagnostic test

304

 

 

Emulsification activity

293

ES-31 antigen

304

 

 

Free Radical

260

 

 

Hepatoprotective

276

Herbicide

298

HPLC assessment

289

Hyperlipidemia

282

 

 

Immunofluorescent staining

304

Immunology

254

 

 

Magnesium

260

Marker enzyme

276

Mucuna pruriens seed

254

Mutants

298

Mycobacterium tuberculosis

304

 

 

Naja sputatrix venom

254

Noradrenaline

269

 

 

Penicillin G acylase

289

Penicillin G

289

Perment

269

Photosynthesis

298

Plasmodium vivax

245

Poloxamer 407

282

Polysaccharide

260

 

 

Serotonin

269

Streptomyces sp. S22

293

Surface tension

293

 

 

Terminalia arjuna

282

 

 

Correspondent author has been indicated by * sign

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 49, April 2011, pp.245-253

 

 

Effect of anti-mosquito midgut antibodies on development of malaria
parasite, Plasmodium vivax and fecundity in vector mosquito
Anopheles culicifacies (Diptera: culicidae)

Manoj Chugh*, T Adak, Neelam Sehrawat & S K Gakhar

Centre for Biotechnology, Maharshi Dayanand University, Rohtak 124 001, India

National Institute of Malaria Research, Dwarka, Delhi 110 009, India

Received 28 May 2009; revised 1 February 2011

The effect of anti-mosquito-midgut antibodies on the development of the malaria parasite, P.vivax was studied by feeding the vector mosquito, An. culicifacies with infected blood supplemented with serum from immunized rabbits. In order to get antisera, rabbits were immunized with midgut proteins of three siblings species of Anopheles culicifacies, reported to exhibit differential vectorial capacity. The mosquitoes that ingested anti-midgut antibodies along with infectious parasites had significantly fewer oocysts compared to the control group of mosquitoes. The immunized rabbits generated high titer of antibodies. Their cross reactivity amongst various tissues of the same species and with other sibling species was also determined. Immunogenic polypeptides expressed in the midgut of glucose or blood fed An. culicifacies sibling species were identified by Western blotting. One immunogenic polypeptide of 62 kDa was exclusively present in the midgut of species A. Similarly, three polypeptides of 97, 94 and 58 kDa and one polypeptide of 23 kDa were present exclusively in species B and C respectively. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed the localization of these antigens on baso-lateral membrane and microvilli. The effects of anti-mosquito midgut antibodies on fecundity, longevity, mortality and engorgement of mosquitoes were studied. Fecundity was also reduced significantly. These observations open an avenue for research toward the development of a vector-based malaria parasite transmission-blocking vaccine.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 49, April 2011, pp.254-259

 

 

Mucuna pruriens Linn. seed extract pretreatment protects against cardiorespiratory and neuromuscular depressant effects of Naja sputatrix (Javan spitting cobra) venom in rats

Shin Yee Fung*, Nget Hong Tan, Si Mui Sim, Enrico Marinello, Roberto Guerranti & John Chinyere Aguiyi

Faculty of Medicine & CENAR, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia,

Received 5 August 2010; revised 9 December 2010

Mucuna pruriens has been used by native Nigerians as a prophylactic for snakebite. The protective effects of M. pruriens seed extract (MPE) were investigated against the pharmacological actions of N. sputatrix (Javan spitting cobra) venom in rats. The results showed that MPE-pretreatment protected against cardiorespiratory and, to a lesser extent, neuromuscular depressant effects of N. sputatrix venom. These may be explained at least in part by the neutralisation of the cobra venom toxins by anti-MPE antibodies elicited by the MPE pretreatment.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 49, April 2011, pp.260-268

 

 

Effect of Aloe vera (Aloe barbadensis Miller) gel on doxorubicin-induced myocardial oxidative stress and calcium overload in albino rats

Gaurav Kaithwas*, Kiran Dubey & K K Pillai

Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Jamia Hamdard University, New Delhi 110 016, India

Received 18 May 2010; revised 21 December 2010

Administration of a single dose of doxorubicin (DOX) (7.5 mg/kg, iv) produces cardiotoxicity, manifested biochemically by significant decrease in blood glutathione (GSH) and tissue GSH along with elevated levels of serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK). In addition, cardiotoxicity was further confirmed by significant increase in lipid peroxides expressed as malondialdehyde (MDA, secondary indicator of lipid peroxidation), tissue catalase and tissue superoxide dismutase (SOD). Administration of A. vera gel (100 and 200 mg/kg) orally for 10 days produced a significant protection against cardiotoxicity induced by DOX evidenced by significant reductions in serum LDH, serum CPK, cardiac lipid peroxides, tissue catalase and tissue SOD along with increased levels of blood and tissue GSH. The results revealed that A. vera gel produced a dose dependent protection against DOX induced cardiotoxiaty.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 49, April 2011, pp.269-275

 

 

Behavioural and neurochemical evaluation of Perment an herbal formulation in chronic unpredictable mild stress induced depressive model

M Ramanathan*, B Balaji & A Justin,

Department of Pharmacology, PSG College of Pharmacy, Coimbatore 641 004, India

and

N Gopinath, M Vasanthi & R V Ramesh

N Rama Varier Ayurveda Foundation, Madurai 625 004, India

Received 14 July 2010; revised 24 January 2011

Perment, a polyherbal Ayurvedic formulation that contains equal parts of Clitoria ternatea Linn., Withania somnifera Dun., Asparagus racemosus Linn., Bacopa monniera Linn., is used clinically as mood elevators. The aim of the present study was to explore the behavioural effects and to understand possible mode of action of Permentin stress induced depressive model. Chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) was used to induce depression in rats. Open field exploratory behaviour, elevated plus maze, social interaction and behavioural despair tests were used to assess behaviour. Using standard protocols plasma noradrenaline, serotonin, corticosterone and brain/adrenal corticosterone levels were measured to support the behavioural effects of Perment. Exposure to CUMS for 21 days caused anxiety and depression in rats, as indicated by significant decrease in locomotor activity in the open field exploratory behaviour test and increased immobility period in the behavioural despair test. Permentpredominantly exhibited antidepressant action than anxiolytic activity. Further Permentincreased the plasma noradrenaline and serotonin levels in stressed rats. No significant alteration in the brain corticosterone level in stressed rats was observed with Permenttreatment. However the adrenal corticosterone level is decreased with Perment. It can be concluded that the Permentformulation exhibited synergistic activity, has a significant antidepressant and anxiolytic activity, which may be mediated through adrenergic and serotonergic system activation. Currently the formulation is clinically used as anxiolytic but the present results suggest that the formulation can also be indicated in patients affected with depression.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 49, April 2011, pp.276-281

 

 

Hepatoprotective action of ethanolic extracts of Melia azedarach Linn. and
Piper longum Linn and their combination on CCl4 induced hepatotoxicity in rats

H Rajeswary*

Dr. MGR Educational & Research Institute, Maduravoyal, 600 095, India

R Vasuki

Vel痴 College of Pharmacy, Old Pallavaram, Chennai 600 117, India

P Samudram

Tagore Medical College &Hospital, Rathinamangalam, Chennai, 600 048, India

A Geetha

Bharathi Women痴 College, Mint, Chennai, 600 001, India

Received 29 June 2010; revised 11 January 2011

A comparison of analysis in evaluating the hepatoprotective action of ethanolic extract of M. azedarach (MAE) and
P. longum (PLE) with their combination biherbal extract (BHE) against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) induced hepatic damage is reported in albino rats. There was a marked elevation of serum marker enzyme levels in CCl4 treated rats, which were restored towards normalization in the drug (MAE and/or PLE:50 mg/kg body weight po, once daily for 14 days) treated animals. The biochemical parameters like total protein, total bilirubin, total cholesterol, triglycerides, and urea were also restored towards normal levels. The combined BHE showed more significant reduction of the enzymes than MAE or PLE against CCl4 induced hepatotoxicity. The results strongly indicate that BHE has more potent hepatoprotective action than MAE or PLE individually against CCl4 induced hepatic damage in rats. Among these extracts, BHE showed similar hepatoprotective action to silymarin, which was the positive control in this study.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 49, April 2011, pp.282-288

 

 

Anti-hyperlipidemic and antioxidant potential of different fractions of Terminalia arjuna Roxb. bark against PX- 407 induced hyperlipidemia

Saravanan Subramaniam*

Department of Pharmacology, PSG College of Pharmacy, Coimbatore 641 004, India

Subramaniam Ramachandran

Department of Pharmacology, KMCH College of Pharmacy, Coimbatore 641 048, India

and

Subasini Uthrapathi, Victor Rajamanickam Gnamanickam & Govinda Prasad Dubey

Department of Pharmacology, Centre for Advanced Research in Indian System of Medicine
SASTRA University, Thanjavur 613 402, India

Received 10 February 2010; revised 12 January 2011

The three fractions diethyl ether, ethyl acetate and ethanol. of T. arjuna exerted hypolipidemic and antioxidative effects at two different doses levels of 175 and 350 mg/kg body weight in Poloxamer (PX)-407 induced hyperlipidemic albino Wistar rats. The hypolipidemic and antioxidant effects of T. arjuna fractions were noticed as EtOH>diethyl ether>ethyl acetate. The results suggest that ethanolic fraction of T. arjuna possesses the potent properties of being antioxidant and hypolipidemic than other fractions. In turn, it has therapeutic potential for the prevention of coronary arterial disease.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 49, April 2011, pp.289-292

 

 

Comparative study of 6-APA production by free and agar immobilized bacteria in nutrient broth culture

A K Dolui & S Das

Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Dibrugarh University, Dibrugarh 786 004, India

Received 23 June 2010, revised 3 December 2010

In the present study different bacterial samples were isolated from soil of different places of Dibrugarh and screened for biotransformation ability to produce 6-Aminopenicillanic acid. Among ten isolated bacterial samples, three gram positive bacterial samples designated as AKDD-2, AKDD-4 and AKDD-6 showed the production of 6-APA from penicillin G. Assessment of production of 6-APA after incubation in penicillin G (2 mg/ml) by three different samples separately in free and agar immobilization state was done by HPLC analysis. Reusability of immobilized cells was found successful up to 14 days.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 49, April 2011, pp.293-297

 

 

 

Bioemulsifier production by Streptomyces sp. S22 isolated from garden soil

Javed P Maniyar, Dhawal V Doshi, Smita S Bhuyan & Shilpa S Mujumdar*

Department of Microbiology, Modern College of Arts, Science and Commerce, Shivajinagar, Pune 411 005, India

Received 10 September 2010; revised 10 December 2010

Out of 45 actinomycetes isolated from garden soil, pond water and air; fifteen showed good emulsification activity. Streptomyces sp. S22 isolated from garden soil produced maximum bioemulsifier with 0.5% (v/v) sunflower oil during stationary phase at 37ーC, pH 6 and 250 rev/min. Emulsification activity was maximum (320 EU/ml) with sunflower oil as substrate. Partially purified bioemulsifier from Streptomyces sp. S22 was a peptidoglycolipid containing lipid (51.25%), protein (30%), non-reducing sugar (17.75%) and reducing sugar (1%). The yield of partially purified bioemulsifier was
1.6 g/l and reduced the surface tension of water by 23.09 mN/m. The bioemulsifier produced by Streptomyces sp. S22 was stable at room temperature for seven days.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 49, April 2011, pp.298-303

 

 

 

Response of multiple herbicide resistant strain of diazotrophic cyanobacterium, Anabaena variabilis, exposed to atrazine and DCMU

Surendra Singh, Pallavi Datta* & Archna Tirkey

Algal Biotechnology Laboratory, Department of Biological Sciences, Rani Durgavati University, Jabalpur 482 001, India

Received 1 June 2010; revised 24 January 2011

Effect of two photosynthetic inhibitor herbicides, atrazine (both purified and formulated) and [3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethyl urea] (DCMU), on the growth, macromolecular contents, heterocyst frequency, photosynthetic O2 evolution and dark O2 uptake of wild type and multiple herbicide resistant (MHR) strain of diazotrophic cyanobacterium A. variabilis was studied. Cyanobacterial strains showed gradual inhibition in growth with increasing dosage of herbicides. Both wild type and MHR strain tolerated < 6.0 mg L-1 of atrazine (purified), < 2.0 mg L-1 of atrazine (formulated) and < 0.4 mg L-1 of DCMU indicating similar level of herbicide tolerance. Atrazine (pure) (8.0 mg L-1) and 4.0 mg L-1 of atrazine (formulated) were growth inhibitory concentrations (lethal) for both wild type and MHR strain indicating formulated atrazine was more toxic than the purified form. Comparatively lower concentrations of DCMU were found to be lethal for wild type and MHR strain, respectively. Thus, between the two herbicides tested DCMU was more growth toxic than atrazine. At sublethal dosages of herbicides, photosynthetic O2 evolution showed highest inhibition followed by chlorophyll a, phycobhiliproteins and heterocyst differentiation as compared to carotenoid, protein and respiratory O2 uptake.

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 49, April 2011, pp.304-306

 

Note

 

A sensitive and specific ES-31 antigen detection based fluorometric assay for confirmation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in cell culture

Anindita Majumdar1, Gauri Wankhade1, Pranita D Kamble3, Deepti Joshi2 & B C Harinath1*

1Jamnalal Bajaj Tropical Disease Research Centre

2 Departments of Pathology and 3Biochemistry

Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences,
Sevagram, Wardha 442 102, India

Received 5 August 2010; revised 20 December 2010

Confirmation of presence of M. tuberculosis bacilli on microscopic examination is very important in diagnosis of tuberculosis. The present study was undertaken to find the usefulness of mycobacterial ES-31 serine protease as a marker to detect tuberculosis bacilli using fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugated anti-ES-31 serine protease antibody. This immunofluorescence method was compared with Ziehl-Neelsen and auramine-O staining methods for detection of tuberculosis bacilli. Slides were prepared for each serially diluted tuberculosis H37Ra bacilli (1ラ107 bacilli/ml to 5 bacilli/ml). Slides for each dilution group were stained by ZN method, auramine-O and immunostaining methods using fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugated anti-ES-31 serine protease antibody. ZN staining method showed efficacy for detection of M. tuberculosis H37Ra upto 1ラ104 bacilli/ml while auramine-O method showed upto 1ラ102 bacilli/ml. The presence of bacilli was indicated by green fluorescence on immunostaining using anti-ES-31 antibody conjugate and this method was effective upto 10 bacilli/ml. The slides which were negative for ZN (1ラ103 cells/ml) and auramine-O (100 cells/ml) method showed positivity on restaining with immunofluorescent staining method. The results of this preliminary study showed that immunofluorescent staining method using specific anti-ES-31 antibody conjugate was more sensitive for detection of tuberculosis bacilli than ZN and auramine-O methods in samples of laboratory strain. The utility of this method will be studied further in clinical specimens.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 49, April 2011, pp.307-308

 

Information for Authors