Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

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VOLUME 49

NUMBER 1

JANUARY 2011

CODEN: IJEB (A6) 49 (1) - (2010) 1-76

ISSN: 0019-5189 (Print); 0975-1009 (Online)

 

CONTENTS

 

Papers

 

Effect of repeat dose of BCG vaccination on humoral response in mice model

7

Aliabbas A Hussain, Rajpal S Kashyap, Devanand R Kalorey, Shubangi R Warke,
Hemant J Purohit, Girdhar M Taori & Hatim F Daginawala

 

 

 

Digital analysis of changes by Plasmodium vivax malaria in erythrocytes

11

Maombi Edison, J B Jeeva & Megha Singh

 

 

 

2-Deoxy-D-glucose reverses the Indian red scorpion venom-induced cardiopulmonary abnormalities in anesthetized rats

16

P K Choudhry, R Pandey & S B Deshpande

 

 

 

Antidiabetic properties of Hibiscus rosa sinensis L. leaf extract fractions on non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse

24

Fahmi S Moqbel, Prakash R Naik, Najma Habeeb M & Selvaraj S

 

 

 

Antioxidant potential of Coriandrum sativum L. seed extract

30

B Deepa & C V Anuradha

 

 

 

Antioxidant potential of n-butanol fraction from extract of Jasminum mesnyi Hance leaves

39

Sakshi Borar, Priyanka Punia & A N Kalia

 

 

 

Hepato-protective potential of carotenoid meso-zeaxanthin against paracetamol, CCl4 and ethanol induced toxicity

44

Alikunjhi P Firdous, Edakkadath R Sindhu & Ramadasan Kuttan

 

 

 

Effect of Bis [benzyl Nエ-(indol-3-ylmethylene)-hydrazinecarbodithioato]-zinc(II) derivatives on wound healing in Sprague Dawley rats

50

Fathi Farag Mughrabi, Harita Hashim, Mahmood Ameen, Hamid Khaledi, Hapipah Mohd. Ali & Salmah Ismail

 

 

 

Effect of topical phenytoin on burn wound healing in rats

56

K Meena, A V Mohan, B Sharath, S N Somayaji & K L Bairy

 

 

 

Relationship between xanthophyll cycle and non-photochemical quenching in rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants in response to light stress

60

Janet Vaz & Prabhat K Sharma

 

 

Duplex-immunocapture-RT-PCR for detection and discrimination of two distinct potyviruses naturally infecting sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrid)

68

Ch V Subba Reddy, P Sreenivasulu & G Sekhar

 

 

 

Book Review

 

Applications of Plant Biotechnology: In vitro propagation, plant transformation and secondary metabolite production

74

P Ananda Kumar

 

 

 

Information for Authors

75

 

 

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Indian Journal of Experimental Biology in Open Access Mode

 

The Indian Journal of Experimental Biology (IJEB) is now an open access journal in the repository, NISCAIR Online Periodicals Repository (NOPR) [http://nopr.niscair.res.in].

Full text of all articles published in IJEB from 2006 onwards can now be accessed at NOPR in the open access mode. Papers in the current issue shall be uploaded immediately. Papers published in earlier years shall be added soon.

NOPR is based on DSpace, a digital repository software, and allows document browsing, document searching and various search options like title, author name, keywords, year, issue, etc.

 

 

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Announcement

Symposium on 25 Years of Bioinformatics in India

 

2 February 2011, Pondicherry University, Pondicherry

 

To mark the Silver Jubilee year of the Bioinformatics programme in India (1986-2011), and with an objective to provide a platform to young researchers and students to discuss the present and future challenges in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, a one day symposium will be held at the Centre for Bioinformatics, Pondicherry University, Pondicherry. The symposium will be followed by the DBT XXII Bioinformatics Coordinators Meet during 3-4 February 2011. Submissions presenting original research in the form of a poster are invited in all areas of bioinformatics and computational biology. Topics of interest include but are not limited to: (i) Biological databases and data integration, (ii) Comparative genomics, (iii) Computational proteomics, (iv) Data mining and visualization, (v) Gene expression analysis, (vi) Genome analysis, (vii) High-throughput sequencing data analysis, (viii) Molecular evolution, (ix) Molecular modeling and simulation, (x) Pattern discovery and classification, (xi) Software tools and applications, (xii) Structural biology, (xiii) Systems biology, and (xiv) Synthetic biology. For details please contact: Prof. P P Mathur, Centre for Bioinformatics, Pondicherry University, Pondicherry 605 014. Telephone: 91-413-2655212, Fax: 91-413-2655211/2655265, E-mail: ppmathur@bicpu.edu.in; contact@bicpu.edu.in. Website: http://www.bicpu.edu.in

 

Author Index

Ali Hapipah Mohd.

50

Ameen Mahmood

50

Ananda Kumar P

74

Anuradha C V

30

 

 

Bairy K L

56

Borar Sakshi

39

 

 

Choudhry P K

16

 

 

Daginawala Hatim F

7

Deepa B

30

Deshpande S B

16

 

 

Edison Maombi

11

 

 

Firdous Alikunjhi P

44

 

 

Hashim Harita

50

 

 

Husain Aliabbas A

7

Ismail Salmah

50

 

 

Jeeva J B

11

 

 

Kalia A N

39

Kalorey Devanand R

7

Kashyap Rajpal S

7

Khaledi Hamid

50

Kuttan Ramadasan

44

 

 

Meena K

56

Mohan A V

56

Moqbel Fahmi S

24

Mughrabi Fathi Farag

50

 

 

Naik Prakash R

24

Najma Habeeb M

24

 

 

Pandey R

16

 

 

Punia Priyanka

39

Purohit Hemant J

7

 

 

Reddy Ch V Subba

68

 

 

Sekhar G

68

Selvaraj S

24

Sharath B

56

Sharma Prabhat K

60

Sindhu Edakkadath R

44

Singh Megha

11

Somayaji S N

56

Sreenivasulu P

68

 

 

Taori Girdhar M

7

 

 

Vaz Janet

60

 

 

Warke Shubangi R

7

 

Keyword Index

Anti-BCG titer

7

Antihyperglycemic

39

Antioxidant

39, 44

Antioxidant level

30

 

 

BCG

7

BHCZ derivatives

50

 

 

Carotenoids

44

CCl4

44

Cholesterol

24

Coriandrum sativum L.

30

 

 

Diabetes

30

D-IC-RT-PCR

68

 

 

Energy dissipation

60

Epithelialization

56

Erythrocytes

11

Ethanol

44

 

 

Free radicals

44

 

 

Glycosylated haemoglobin

24

Gray level intensity

11

 

 

H. rosa sinensis

24

Histology

50

Hyperglycemic

24

 

 

Insulin

16, 24

Insulin sensitivity

16

Intrasite gel

50

 

 

Jasminum mesnyi

39

 

 

Light stress

60

 

 

Mesobuthus tamulus venom

16

 

 

Non-photochemical quenching

60

 

 

Oxidative stress

30

 

 

P. vivax malaria

11

Pancreatic b cells

30

 

 

Paracetamol

44

Phenytoin

56

Pulmonary edema

16

 

 

Repaglinide

16

Rice

60

 

 

Saccharum spp.

68

SCSMV

68

Secoiridoids

39

Shape descriptors

11

Silver sulphadiazine

56

Sugarcane mosaic disease

68

 

 

Tuberculosis

7

 

 

VLDL

24

 

 

Wound contraction

56

Wound healing

50

 

 

Xanthophyll cycle

60

 

 

Indian of Journal Experimental Biology

Vol. 49, January 201, pp. 7-10

 

 

 

Effect of repeat dose of BCG vaccination on humoral response in mice model

Aliabbas A Husain1, Rajpal S Kashyap1, Devanand R Kalorey2, Shubangi R Warke2, Hemant J Purohit3,
Girdhar M Taori1 & Hatim F Daginawala1*

1 Biochemistry Research Laboratory, Central India Institute of Medical Sciences, 88/2 Bajaj Nagar, Nagpur 440 010, India

2 Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Animal Biotechnology, Nagpur Veterinary College, Nagpur 440 006, India

3 Environmental Genomic Unit, National Environmental Engineering Research Institute (NEERI),
CSIR, Nehru Marg, Nagpur 440 020, India

Received 28 April 2010; revised 18 September 2010

BCG is the only vaccine presently available against tuberculosis but it is estimated to prevent only 5% of the all potentially vaccine-preventable deaths due to Tuberculosis. Keeping these in view the present study has been undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of BCG and the effect of repeat dose of BCG on antimycobacterial humoral response in mouse model. To improve BCG immunogenicity, specific anti-mycobacterial immune responses (anti-BCG titre and total IgG level) were evaluated in mouse model using boost immunization protocols with the BCG vaccine. Mice induced with a repeat dose of BCG showed an increased anti mycobacterial humoral response, which gradually declined few weeks after single dose of BCG administration. The results suggest improved efficacy of BCG vaccine by giving repeat dose of BCG that can enhance the level of immunoprotection against tuberculosis as opposed to a single BCG dose.

 

 

 

Indian of Journal Experimental Biology

Vol. 49, January 201, pp. 11-15

 

 

Digital analysis of changes by Plasmodium vivax malaria in erythrocytes

Maombi Edison1, J.B. Jeeva, & Megha Singh2,*

1Provincial Health Division, North Kivu, D.R. Congo

Division of Biomedical Engineering, VIT University, Vellore 632 014, India

2Center for Biomedical Engineering, S.G.N.E. Foundation, 12, III St., Park Av, Chennai 600 042, India

Received 24 May 2010; revised 10 September 2010

Blood samples of malaria patients (n = 30), selected based on the severity of parasitemia, were divided into low (LP), medium (MP) and high (HP) parasitemia, which represent increasing levels of the disease severity. Healthy subjects
(n = 10) without any history of disease were selected as a control group. By processing of erythrocytes images their contours were obtained and from these the shape parameters area, perimeter and form factor were obtained. The gray level intensity was determined by scanning of erythrocyte along its largest diameter. A comparison of these with that of normal cells showed a significant change in shape parameters. The gray level intensity decreases with the increase of severity of the disease. The changes in shape parameters directly and gray level intensity variation inversely are correlated with the increase in parasite density due to the disease.

 

 

Indian of Journal Experimental Biology

Vol. 49, January 201, pp. 16-23

 

 

2-Deoxy-D-glucose reverses the Indian red scorpion venom-induced cardiopulmonary abnormalities in anesthetized rats

P K Choudhry, R Pandey & S B Deshpande*

Department of Physiology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005, India

Received 11 May 2010, revised 6 September 2010

Role of 2-Deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) in reversing the Indian red scorpion (Mesobuthus tamulus concanesis Pocock, MBT) venom-induced toxicity was examined. Femoral arterial pressure, ECG and respiratory movements were recorded in urethane anesthetized rats. Plasma glucose and serum insulin levels were also estimated. Intravenous injection of 5 mg/kg MBT venom produced immediate decrease in mean arterial pressure, heart rate and respiratory frequency followed by an increase and subsequent progressive decrease. ECG pattern exhibited ischaemic changes. There was hyperinsulinemia after venom without corresponding decrease in plasma glucose. The animals died within 37ア9 min and demonstrated significant increase in pulmonary water content. 2-DG pretreatment (0.5 g/kg, iv) improved the cardiopulmonary abnormalities induced by venom and the animals survived for nearly 120 min. There was no hyperinsulinemia and increased pulmonary water content in these animals. In insulin (2 IU/kg) treated rats, the MBT venom-induced cardiopulmonary abnormalities were attenuated and ECG abnormalities were reversed. The pulmonary water content in these animals exhibited a decreasing trend and the animals survived for 120 min. Repaglinide (10 mg/kg, iv) pretreatment failed to reverse the venom-induced cardiopulmonary changes including the increased pulmonary water content. The survival time was similar to venom only group. The present results reveal that 2-DG reverses the venom-induced cardiopulmonary toxicity probably by restoring insulin sensitivity.

 

 

 

Indian of Journal Experimental Biology

Vol. 49, January 201, pp. 24-29

 

 

Antidiabetic properties of Hibiscus rosa sinensis L. leaf extract fractions on non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse

Fahmi s moqbel, Prakash R Naik*, Najma Habeeb M & Selvaraj S

Department of Studies in Zoology, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore 570 006 India

Received 9 July 2010; revised 24 September 2010

On fractionation the ethanolic extract of H. rosa sinensis leaves, 5 fractions were obtained. Of these, fraction-3 (F3) and fraction-5 (F5) were chosen for detailed investigation on non obese diabetic (NOD) mouse to study anti-diabetic properties because they were more active than others. Serum glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, triglyceride, cholesterol, blood urea, insulin, LDL, VLDL, and HDL were estimated. Both fractions F3 and F5 on oral feeding (100 and 200 mg/kg body weight) demonstrated insulinotropic nature and protective effect in NOD mice. These fractions may contain potential oral hypoglycemic agent.

 

 

Indian of Journal Experimental Biology

Vol. 49, January 201, pp. 30-38

 

 

Antioxidant potential of Coriandrum sativum L. seed extract

B Deepa & C V Anuradha*

Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science

Annamalai University, Annamalainagar 608 002, India

Received 12 January 2010; revised 16 August 2010

The seeds of C. sativum are used as a traditional drug for the treatment of diabetes. The antioxidant and free-radical-scavenging property of seeds in vitro was studied and also investigated whether the administration of seeds curtails oxidative stress in the kidney of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Incorporation of seed powder in the diet led to marked lowering of blood glucose and a rise in the levels of insulin in diabetic rats. A parallel beneficial effect was observed on oxidant 紡ntioxidant balance in the kidney. Addition of coriander seed powder not only inhibited the process of peroxidative damage but also significantly reactivated the antioxidant enzymes and antioxidant levels in diabetic rats. The total polyphenolic content of the seeds was found to be 12.2 gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/g while total flavanoid content was found to be 12.6 quercetin equivalents/g. The seeds also showed scavenging activity against superoxides and hydroxyl radicals in a concentration -dependent manner. Maximum free radical-scavenging action and free radical reducing power of coriander seed extract was observed at a concentration of 50 オg GAE. Islet histology structures showed degeneration of pancreatic islets in diabetic rats which was also reduced in diabetic rats treated with seed powder. These results show that
C. sativum seeds not only possess antihyperglycemic properties but antioxidative properties also. Increased dietary intake of coriander seeds decrease the oxidative burden in diabetes mellitus.

 

 

Indian of Journal Experimental Biology

Vol. 49, January 201, pp. 39-43

 

 

Antioxidant potential of n-butanol fraction from extract of
Jasminum mesnyi
Hance leaves

Sakshi Borar, Priyanka Punia & A N Kalia*

Department of Pharmacognosy, I S F College of Pharmacy, Moga 142 001, India

Received 30 July 2010; revised 28 September 2010

Methanolic extract of Jasminum mesnyi Hance leaves having antidiabetic activity was subjected to fractionation to obtain antioxidant and antihyperglycemic rich fraction. Different concentrations of ethyl acetate and n-butanol fractions were subjected to antioxidant assay by DPPH method, nitric oxide scavenging activity and reducing power assay. The fractions showed dose dependent free radical scavenging property in all the models. IC50 values for ethyl acetate and n-butanol fractions were 153.45ア6.65 and 6.22ア0.25 オg/ml, respectively, as compared to L-ascorbic acid and rutin (as standards; IC50 values 6.54ア0.24 and 5.43ア0.21 オg/ml, respectively) in DPPH model. In nitric oxide scavenging activity, IC50 values were 141.54ア9.95 オg/ml, 35.12ア1.58 オg/ml, 21.06ア0.95 オg/ml and 29.93ア0.32 オg/ml for ethyl acetate, n-butanol fractions,
L-ascorbic acid and rutin, respectively. n-Butanol fraction showed a good reducing potential and better free radical scavenging activity as compared to ethyl acetate fraction. Potent antioxidant n-butanol fraction showed better oral glucose tolerance test (antihyperglycemic) at par with metformin (standard drug). n-Butanol fraction contained secoiridoid glycosides which might be responsible for both antioxidant and antihyperglycemic activity.

 

 

 

Indian of Journal Experimental Biology

Vol. 49, January 201, pp. 44-49

 

 

Hepato-protective potential of carotenoid meso-zeaxanthin against paracetamol, CCl4 and ethanol induced toxicity

Alikunjhi P Firdous, Edakkadath R Sindhu & Ramadasan Kuttan*

Amala Cancer Research Centre, Amala nagar P.O, Thrissur 680 555, India

Received 4 June 2010; revised 10 August 2010

Hepato-protective potential of carotenoid meso-zeaxanthin [(3R, 3担)-β, β-carotene-3, 3′-diol] was studied using
in vivo rat models. Paracetamol (3 g/kg body wt, orally), 20% ethanol (7.5 g/kg body wt, orally) and CCl4 (2.5ml /kg, ip) were used as hepato toxins. Levels of marker enzymes of hepatic injury such as serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase, serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase and alkaline phosphatase, and serum bilirubin, which were drastically elevated by these hepato toxins were significantly decreased by meso-zeaxanthin pretreatment in a dose-dependent manner. Oxidative stress markers, tissue lipid peroxidation, conjugated dienes and tissue hydroperoxides, were high in the paracetamol treated control group animals, which were lowered by meso-zeaxanthin administration. Level of glutathione and antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase, in liver tissue was increased by meso-zeaxanthin pretreatment compared to control group during alcohol and CCl4 induced hepatotoxicity. Hydroxyproline, an indicator of fibrosis in liver tissue, decreased remarkably by meso-zeaxanthin administration despite its notable elevation in ethanol treated rats. Histopathological analysis of liver tissue showed the hepatoprotective potential of meso-zeaxanthin.

 

 

Indian of Journal Experimental Biology

Vol. 49, January 201, pp. 50-55

 

 

Effect of Bis [benzyl N'-(indol-3-ylmethylene)-hydrazinecarbodithioato]-zinc(II) derivatives on wound healing in Sprague Dawley rats

Fathi Farag Mughrabi1*, Harita Hashim1, Mahmood Ameen2, Hamid Khaledi3, Hapipah Mohd. Ali3 & Salmah Ismail2

1Department of Biology, Faculty of Applied Science University Teknologi MARA, 40450, Shah Alam, Malaysia

2Department of Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

3Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Received 25 March 2010; revised 2 August 2010

Effects of topical application of Bis[benzyl N'-(indol-3-ylmethylene)-hydrazinecarbodithioato]-zinc(II) (BHCZ) on wound healing and histology of healed wound were assessed. Sprague Dawley rats were experimentally induced wound in the posterior neck area. Tween 20 (0.2 ml of 10%) was applied to rats in Group 1 (negative control). Intrasite gel (0.2 ml) was applied topically to rats in Group 2 as reference. BHCZ at the concentrations 0.2 ml of 25, 50 and 100 mg/ml were applied to Group 3, 4 and 5, respectively. Wound dressed with BHCZ significantly healed earlier than those treated with 10% Tween 20. Also wound dressed with 100 mg/ml BHCZ accelerated the rate of wound healing compared to those dressed with intrasite gel and, 25 mg/ml and 50 mg/ml BHCZ. Histological analysis of healed wound with BHCZ showed comparatively less scar width at wound enclosure and the healed wound contained less macrophages and large amount of collagen with angiogenesis compared to wounds dressed with 10% Tween 20. Results of this study showed that wounds dressed with 100 mg/ml of BHCZ significantly enhanced acceleration of the rate of wound healing enclosure, and histology of healed wounds showed comparatively less macrophages and more collagen with angiogenesis.

 

 

Indian of Journal Experimental Biology

Vol. 49, January 201, pp. 56-59

 

 

Effect of topical phenytoin on burn wound healing in rats

K Meena, A V Mohan, B Sharath , S N Somayaji1, K L Bairy*

Department of Pharmacology, Kasturba Medical College

1Department of Anatomy, Melaka Manipal Medical College

Manipal University, Manipal 576 104, India

Received 3 December 2009; revised 18 September 2010

To evaluate the effect of phenytoin on burn wounds and to compare the effect of the combination of topical phenytoin preparation in dexamethasone treated burn wounds in rats, partial thickness thermal burn wounds were inflicted upon five groups of six rats each. Group I was assigned as control, Group II received the standard silver sulphadiazine, Group III was given topical phenytoin and Group IV received injection dexamethasone, Group V received the combination of the phenytoin and the dexamethasone. The parameters observed were epithelialization period, percentage of wound contraction and histopathological analysis as indicative of the process of healing. Phenytoin group showed significant improvement in burn wound contraction in comparison to standard silver sulphadiazine group, the combination group of topical phenytoin and dexamethasone also showed significant contraction compared to dexamethasone group. The period of epithelialization also decreased significantly in groups II, III and V. In conclusion, phenytoin promotes burn wound healing as evidenced by decrease in period of epithelialization and faster wound contraction.

 

 

Indian of Journal Experimental Biology

Vol. 49, January 201, pp. 60-67

 

 

Relationship between xanthophyll cycle and non-photochemical quenching in rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants in response to light stress

Janet Vaz & Prabhat K Sharma*

Department of Botany, Goa University, Goa 403 206, India

Received 26 January 2010; revised 25 August 2010

Thirty days old rice plants grown under low and moderate light conditions were transferred to full sunlight to observe the extent of photoinhibitory damage and protective mechanism, and the relationship between xanthophyll cycle and non-photochemical quenching (qN) under changing light environment. Control plants (low, moderate and sun grown) exhibited similar Fv/Fm ratio, indicating similar photosynthetic efficiency prior to light stress. On exposure to the high light treatment, low light grown plants exhibited faster and higher degree of photoinhibition compared to moderate and high light grown plants. Moderate and high light grown plants showed relatively less photoinhibition and also showed higher qN, indicating better capacity of energy dissipation. Increase in qN in moderate light and sun grown plants was accompanied by conversion of violaxanthin (V) to antheraxanthin (A) and zeaxanthin (Z) indicating operation of Z-dependent thermal dissipation. Rice plants fed with ascorbate (AsA), a stimulator of the de-epoxidation state of V to Z, showed higher Fv/Fm ratio and qN than the plants fed with dithiothreitol (DTT) an inhibitor of xanthophyll cycle. This indicated that an increased amount of energy reached PS II reaction centre, due to absence of A and Z formation, thereby causing greater damage to photosynthesis in DTT fed rice plants. The present data confirmed the relationship between qN and Z in dissipating the excess light energy, thereby protecting plants against photodamage.

 

 

Indian of Journal Experimental Biology

Vol. 49, January 201, pp. 68-73

 

 

Duplex-immunocapture-RT-PCR for detection and discrimination of two distinct potyviruses naturally infecting sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrid)

Ch V Subba Reddya, P Sreenivasulua* & G Sekharb

aDepartment of Virology, College of Sciences, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati 517 502, India

bAgricultural Research Station of Acharya N G Ranga Agricultural University, Perumallapalle 517 505, India

Received 25 March 2010; revised 17 September 2010

A sensitive duplex-immunocapture-RT-PCR (D-IC-RT-PCR) technique was developed for detection and discrimination of taxonomically distinct Sugarcane streak mosaic virus (SCSMV) and Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) that naturally infect sugarcane. D-IC-RT-PCR was performed using polyclonal antisera for capture of virions. Oligo 5′-d(T)18(AGC)-3′ as a common reverse primer for both viruses and virus specific forward primers, 5′-aagtggttaaacgcctgtgg-3′ and 5′-ATGTC(GA)AAGAA(GA)ATGCGCTTGC-3′ were used for amplifying ~1400 and ~900 bp fragments of SCSMV and SCMV genomes, respectively from their 3′ termini. To assess the applicability of the developed technique, 67 mosaic affected sugarcane samples were initially screened by direct antigen coating-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DAC-ELISA) followed by D-IC-RT-PCR. In DAC-ELISA, ~69 % of tested samples were shown to be positive for presence of SCSMV, ~28 % for SCMV and ~10 % for both viruses. In D-IC-RT-PCR both viruses were detected up to the dilution of 10-4. In D-IC-RT-PCR, ~76 % of tested samples were found to be positive for SCSMV, ~37 % for SCMV and ~16 % for both viruses. The sequence analyses of D-IC-RT-PCR amplicons of 3 isolates of each virus revealed that the designed primers were virus-specific. The developed technique had potential application for sensitive parallel detection of two viruses in sugarcane.

 

 

 

Indian of Journal Experimental Biology

Vol. 49, January 201, pp. 74

 

 

Book Review

 

Applications of Plant Biotechnology: In vitro propagation, plant transformation and secondary metabolite production

 

P Ananda Kumar