Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

http://www.niscair.res.in; http://nopr.niscair.res.in

 

Total visitors: 5833 since 29-05-2012

 

VOLUME 50

NUMBER 6

JUNE 2012

CODEN: IJEB (A6) 50 (4) 379-442 (2012)

ISSN: 0019-5189 (Print); 0975-1009 (Online)

 

CONTENTS

 

Papers

 

 

 

Hyaluronic acid with or without bone marrow derived-mesenchymal stem cells improves     osteoarthritic knee changes in rat model: A preliminary report

            Abdul Razzaq Suhaeb, Sangeetha Naveen, Azura Mansor & Tunku Kamarul

383

 

 

Elucidation of neuroprotective role of endogenous GABA and energy metabolites in middle
cerebralartery occluded model in rats

          M Ramanathan, C Saravana Babu, A Justin & S Shanthakumari

391

 

 

Effects of glucocorticoids on plasma levels of thyroid hormones (T4 and T3) and testicular activity in catfish, Clarias gariepinus during different phases of annual breeding cycle

             P Suchiang, S Varkey & B B P Gupta

398

 

 

Moringa oleifera Lam. leaf extract prevents early liver injury and restores antioxidant status in mice fed with high-fat diet

            Nilanjan Das, Kunal Sikder, Santinath Ghosh, Bernard Fromenty & Sanjit Dey

404

 

 

Effect of Nigella sativa seeds extracts on iNOS through antioxidant potential only: Crude/total extract              as molecular therapy drug

            Yamini B Tripathi, AP Chaturvedi & Nidhi Pandey

413

 

 

Antistress activity of ethanolic extract of Asparagus racemosus Willd roots in mice

          Tanuj Joshi, Sangeeta P Sah & Anita Singh

419

 

 

Acute toxicity of Bisphenol A in rats

            Jayanti Pant & Shripad B Deshpande

425

 

 

Microbial fuel cells demonstrate high coulombic efficiency applicable for water remediation

            Mercy Devasahayam & Sam A Masih

430

 

 

Evaluation of certain insecticides on nettings for their efficacy and wash resistance against mosquito species

            T Jeyalakshmi & R Shanmugasundaram

439

 

 

Announcements

 

 

 

Call for BRSI Annual Awards Nominations for 2011 and Fellows for 2012; National Workshop on Marine Fish and shellfish Immunology and Immunotechnology

381

 

Announcements

 

The Biotech Research Society, India (BRSI)

 

Call for BRSI Annual Awards Nominations for 2011 and Fellows for 2012

 

Nominations are invited for the following BRSI Annual Awards and election of Fellows:

 

1. Young Scientist Award: Members of BRSI of 35 years or below as on 31st December 2011 involved in Biotech R&D for his/her outstanding contributions would be eligible. Award carries a silver medal, citation and memento.

2. Woman Scientist Award: Women members of BRSI below the age of 45 years as on 31st December 2011 involved in Biotech R&D for her outstanding contributions would be eligible. Award carries a silver medal, citation and memento.

3. Life Time Achievement Award: Members of BRSI above the age of 55 years as on 31st December 2011 involved in Biotech R&D for his/her life time contribution to the field of Biotechnology would be eligible. Award carries a silver medal, citation and memento.

4. Industrial Medal Award: Members of BRSI involved in Biotech R&D for his/her outstanding contribution, which has resulted in commercialization of a product/process. Award carries a silver medal, citation and memento.

5. Fellow of BRSI: Eminent members of BRSI having long-standing and significant contribution to the field working in various areas of biotechnology shall be considered to be elected as Fellow of BRSI (FBRS).

6. Honorary Fellow of BRSI: Eminent persons who have rendered distinguished service to the nation in Biotechnology shall be considered to be conferred as Honorary Fellow of BRSI.  Award carries a citation and a memento. Nomination can be made by the members of the Board of BRSI. For this, the nominee may or may not be member of BRSI.

7. AU-CBT Excellence Awards for Research Scholars (Two awards): Members of BRSI registered for PhD studies in any Indian university/institute below the age of 30 years as on 31st December 2011 involved in Biotech R&D for his/her outstanding performance. Award carries a citation and cash award of Rs. 5000 for each.

8. SBC-MKU Genomics Award: Members of BRSI involved in R&D in the area of Genomics Sciences for his/her outstanding contribution. Award carries a silver medal, citation and memento.

9. Malaviya Memorial Awards for Teaching Faculties (Two awards – one for Young Faculty below the age of
40 years and one for the Senior Faculty above the age of 40 years): Members of BRSI working as teachers involved in Biotech R&D for his/her outstanding contribution. Award carries a silver medal, citation and memento.

 

Details of general terms and conditions and nomination form are available at www.brsi.in or can be obtained from Prof. Ashok Pandey at ashokpandey56@yahoo.co.in or pandey@niist.res.in  The last date to receive the nominations is 31st July 2012

 

————————————

 

National Workshop on Marine Fish and Shellfish Immunology and Immunotechnology

 

9–14 July 2012, Parangipettai

 

Sponsored by the Department of Biotechnology, the Workshop will focus on the application of immunotechnology to marine and shellfish. The laboratory sessions will cover the following topics:
(i) Isolation and identification of immune cells by marine fish and shellfish blood, (ii) ELISA and immunodiagnostic tests, (iii) Electrophoresis, (iv) NBT assay, and (v) Lysozomal activity. The workshop is targeting research scholars, college/university faculty members, young scientists, company researchers and management staff in aquaculture and biotechnology industry. For detail, please contact Dr B Deivasigamani, Organising Secretary, Centre of Advanced Study in Marine Biology, Faculty of Marine Sciences, Annamalai University, Parangipettai, 608 502, India. Telephone: +91-04144-243223/ext. 262; Cell: 09443880023; 07598327606; Fax: +91-04144-243 641; E-mail: bdeivasigamani@gmail.com

 

———————————

 

 

 

Author Index

Chaturvedi AP

413

 

 

Das Nilanjan

404

Deshpande Shripad B

425

Devasahayam Mercy

430

Dey Sanjit

404

 

 

Fromenty Bernard

404

 

 

Ghosh Santinath

404

Gupta B B P

398

 

 

Jeyalakshmi T

439

Joshi Tanuj

419

Justin A

391

 

 

Kamarul Tunku

383

 

 

Mansor Azura

383

Masih Sam A

430

 

 

Naveen Sangeetha

383

 

 

Pandey Nidhi

413

Pant Jayanti

425

 

 

Ramanathan M

391

 

 

Sah Sangeeta P

419

Saravana Babu C

391

Shanmugasundaram R

439

Shanthakumari S

391

Sikder Kunal

404

Singh Anita

419

Suchiang P

398

Suhaeb Abdul Razzaq

383

 

 

Tripathi Yamini B

413

 

 

Varkey S

398

 

 

Keyword Index

Anti-inflammatory

413

Antioxidant

404,413

Antistress

419

Asparagus racemosus

419

Aspartate

391

ATP

391

 

 

Bioelectricity

430

Bioremediation

430

BPA

425

Breeding phase

398

 

 

Cerebral ischemia

391

Corticosteroids

398

Coulombic efficiency

430

 

 

E. coli

430

 

 

Fish

398

Food supplements

413

Glutamate

391

Glutathione

391

 

 

Hepatoprotection

404

High fat-diet

404

Hyaluronic acid

383

Hypotension

425

 

 

Insecticides

439

 

 

Leaf

404

Lethal dose

425

 

 

Mesenchymal stem cells

383

MFC

430

MoLE

404

Monosodium iodoacetate

383

Moringa oleifera

404

Mosquito

439

NAFLD

404

Net treatment

439

Neuroprotection

391

Nigella sativa

413

 

 

Osteoarthritis rat model

383

 

 

Respiratory arrest

425

Restraint stress

419

Root extract

419

 

 

Saponins

419

 

 

Testis

398

Thyroid hormones

398

Toxic chemical from plastics

425

 

 

Wash resistance

439

 

 

Correspondent author has been indicated by * sign

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 50, June 2012, pp. 383-390

 

 

Hyaluronic acid with or without bone marrow derived-mesenchymal stem cells improves osteoarthritic knee changes in rat model: A preliminary report

Abdulrazzaq Mahmod Suhaeb, Sangeetha Naveen*, Azura Mansor & Tunku Kamarul

Tissue Engineering Group (TEG),

National Orthopaedic Centre of Excellence in Research and Learning (NOCERAL),
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya
50603 Lembah Pantai, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Received 24 October 2011

Despite being a complex degenerative joint disease, studies on osteoarthritis (OA) suggest that its progression can be reduced by the use of hyaluronic acid (HA) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). The present study thus aims to examine the effects of MSC, HA and the combination of HA-MSC in treating OA in rat model. The histological observations using O’Driscoll score indicate that it is the use of HA and MSC independently and not their combination that delays the progression of OA. In conclusion, the preliminary study suggest that the use of either HA or MSCs effectively reduces OA progression better than their combined use.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 50, June 2012, pp. 391-397

 

 

Elucidation of neuroprotective role of endogenous GABA and energy metabolites in middle cerebral artery occluded model in rats

 

M Ramanathan1,*, C Saravana Babu2, A Justin1 & S Shanthakumari3

1Department of Pharmacology, PSG College of Pharmacy, Peelamedu, Coimbatore 641 004, India

2Center for Toxicology & Developmental Research, Sri Ramachandra University,
Chennai 600 116, India

3Department of Pathology, PSG Institute of Medical Sciences & Research, Peelamedu,
Coimbatore 641 004, India

Received 28 January 2012; revised 28 March 2012

The excitatory amino acids (EAA) like glutamate, aspartate and inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA (gama amino butyric acid) play an important role in the pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia. The objective of the present study is to elucidate the role of endogenous GABA against EAA release in different regions during ischemia. The transient focal ischemia was induced in rats by using middle cerebral artery occlusion model (MCAo). The results indicate gradual elevation of brain glutamate, aspartate and GABA level at different brain regions and attained peak level at 72 h of ischemic reperfusion (IR). At 168 h of IR the EAA levels declined to base line but GABA level was found to be still elevated. The biochemical analysis shows the depleted brain ATP, Na+K+ATPase content and triphasic response of glutathione activity. It can be concluded that time dependent variation in the EAA and GABA release, endogenous GABA can be neuroprotective and earlier restoration of energy deprivation is essential to prevent further neurodegeneration. To have efficient treatment in ischemic condition, multiple approaches like energy supply, antagonism of EAA, controlling calcium function are essential.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 50, June 2012, pp. 398-403

 

 

Effects of glucocorticoids on plasma levels of thyroid hormones (T4 and T3) and testicular activity in catfish, Clarias gariepinus during different phases of
annual breeding cycle

P Suchiang, S Varkey & B B P Gupta*

Environmental Endocrinology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong 793 022, India

Received 1 September 2011; revised 22 March 2012

Effects of short-term administration of corticosterone and cortisol on plasma levels of thyroid hormones, gonado-somatic index and testicular histology have been reported in catfish, Clarias gariepinus during different phases of its breeding cycle. Corticosterone administration had no significant effect on plasma levels of T4, T3 and T3/T4 ratio, irrespective of doses and phases of breeding cycle. However, 5 µg dose of cortisol significantly increased plasma levels of T3 and the T3/T4 ratio during quiescent and regressive phases, while it significantly decreased plasma levels of T4 during progressive phase. During breeding phase, 2 µg and 5 µg doses of cortisol significantly decreased plasma levels of T4 and T3, respectively, while 5 µg dose of cortisol alone reduced T3/T4 ratio. Irrespective of phases of annual breeding cycle and doses, short-term administration of corticosterone and cortisol had no significant effect either on GSI or testicular histology. These findings suggest that corticosterone is ineffective in stimulating plasma levels of thyroid hormones, while cortisol, depending on dose and phase/season, may differentially increase, decrease or have no effect on plasma levels of thyroid hormones in C. gariepinus.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 50, June 2012, pp. 404-412

 

 

Moringa oleifera Lam. leaf extract prevents early liver injury and restores antioxidant status in mice fed with high-fat diet

Nilanjan Dasa, Kunal Sikdera, Santinath Ghoshb, Bernard Fromentyc & Sanjit Deya*

aDepartment of Physiology, bDepartment of Chemical Technology, University Colleges of Science and Technology,
University of Calcutta, Kolkata 700 009, India

cINSERM, U991, Foie, Métabolismes et Cancer, 2 avenue du Pr Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes, France

Received 16 August 2011, revised 27 February 2012

Consumption of high-fat diet (HFD) induces nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and may lead to multiple complications affecting human health. In the present study, effect of Moringa oleifera leaf extract (MoLE) in alleviating HFD induced liver injury in mice has been reported. Liver histology and serum activity of hepatic marker enzymes i.e. aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) have been studied. Lipid peroxidation (LPO), ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were also estimated using liver homogenate. Results of the study suggested that MoLE treatment protected HFD-induced liver damage as indicated by histopathology and liver enzyme activity compared to only-HFD fed group (P<0.05). Interestingly, early signs of HFD-induced fatty liver were also alleviated by MoLE. Moreover, significant increase in endogenous antioxidant parameters and lower lipid peroxidation were found in liver of all MoLE treated groups. Results of the study indicated that MoLE has both preventive as also curative hepatoprotective activity.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 50, June 2012, pp. 413-418

 

 

Effect of Nigella sativa seeds extracts on iNOS through antioxidant potential only: Crude/total extract as molecular therapy drug

Yamini B Tripathi*, AP Chaturvedi & Nidhi Pandey

Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005, India

Received 3 February 2012; revised 23 March 2012

There is general belief that only pure phytomolecules may be used as molecular therapeutic agent through one to one action. However, the traditional systems of medicine e.g. Ayurveda, uses the crude extracts, mostly water decoctions and oils, as drug. A comparative study of hexane, ethyl acetate and methanol fractions of N. Sativa seeds has been carried out on fresh rat-peritoneal-macrophage culture with reference to their role on various targets of lipopolysaccharide induced release of nitric oxide (NO) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. The results indicated significant antioxidant potential with methanolic extract as most effective. Its mechanism of action was proposed primarily through its antioxidant potential and not through direct inhibition of other kinases, involved in its signaling cascade.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 50, June 2012, pp. 419-424

 

 

Antistress activity of ethanolic extract of Asparagus racemosus
Willd roots in mice

Tanuj Joshi1,*, Sangeeta P Sah2 & Anita Singh2

1Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Bhimtal Campus, Kumaun University, Nainital 263 136, India

2Devsthali Vidyapeeth College of Pharmacy, Lalpur, Rudrapur 263 148, India

Received 29 August 2011; revised 27 March 2012

Ethanolic extract of the roots of A. racemosus improved the stress tolerance in chemical writhing test and swimming endurance test at all the doses as compared to stress control group. Restraint stress induced elevation of blood glucose, triglyceride and cholesterol levels were significantly lowered by pretreatment with extract. Moreover, stress induced variations in levels of lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide, protein and glutathione content in mouse brain were significantly ameliorated by pretreatment with extract. The extract attenuated the elevated weight of adrenal glands and increased the reduced weight of the spleen during stress. In conclusion, the results suggest antistress property of Asparagus racemosus in different model of stress.

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 50, June 2012, pp. 425-429

 

 

Acute toxicity of Bisphenol A in rats

Jayanti Pant & Shripad B Deshpande*

Department of Physiology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 22 1005, India

Received 15 December 2011; revised 28 March 2012

Bisphenol A (BPA), an estrogenic compound, is used in manufacturing plastics and is known to produce toxic effects on various systems in man and animals. Since the use of plastics in day-to-day life is increasing, exposure to BPA will also increase. Therefore, this study was undertaken to determine the median lethal dose (LD50) of BPA via intraperitoneal and intravenous route in adult rats (by Dixon’s up and down method) and also to know the acute systemic changes (in blood pressure, respiration and ECG) produced by lethal dose of BPA. Adult female albino rats of Charles Foster strain were used in the study. LD50 of BPA was 841 and 35.26 mg/kg body weight for ip and iv route, respectively. Injection of lethal dose of BPA (40 mg/kg body weight) produced acute toxicity manifesting as immediate respiratory arrest and hypotension after the injection of BPA followed by bradycardia. The animals died within 7.3 ± 0.7 min. Volume of ethanol (vehicle; 0.1 mL) present in the lethal dose of BPA was not lethal and had no effect on respiration, blood pressure and heart rate. The results provide evidence that the acute exposure to BPA produces lethality with a very narrow range of lethal and survival dose for iv route. Further, the lethality appears to be due to respiratory arrest and hypotension.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 50, June 2012, pp. 430-438

 

 

Microbial fuel cells demonstrate high coulombic efficiency applicable
for water remediation

 

Mercy Devasahayam* & Sam A Masih

Centre for Transgenic Studies, Sam Higginbottom Institute of Agriculture, Technology and Sciences
(SHIATS), Naini, Allahabad 211007, India

Received 14 November 2011; revised 22 March 2012

Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) convert biomass into electricity by the metabolic activity of microorganisms and are also used for remediation and water treatment. Power output was compared for a dual chambered membrane MFC using either E. coli or two Yamuna river samples, Yamuna (before the Sangam region)—slow flow (sample 1) and Sangam region—fast flow (sample 2). E. coli and the two river water samples 1 and 2 gave a maximum voltage of 779, 463 and 415 mV respectively. Using E. coli the maximum power density obtained with a 100 Ω resistor was 220.66 mW/cm2 and the highest power generated 6068.41 mW. The results demonstrate E. coli, river sample 1 and river sample 2 have a comparable coulombic efficiency of 85.2, 71 and 77% respectively when using 0.4% sucrose as substrate. The decrease in chemical oxidative demand of all river water samples using MFC technology demonstrates efficient remediation of inland water.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 50, June 2012, pp. 439-442

 

 

Evaluation of certain insecticides on nettings for their efficacy and wash resistance against mosquito species

T Jeyalakshmi* & R Shanmugasundaram

International Institute of Biotechnology and Toxicology, Padappai, Kancheepuram 601 301, India

Received 27 August 2011; revised 19 March 2012

Five insecticides (Bifenthrin, Deltamethrin, Etofenprox, Permethrin and Lamda cyhalothrin) recommended by WHO, at their recommended dose were compared for their efficacy and wash resistance through bioassay against mosquito vectors, Culex quinquefasciatus, Aedes aegypti and Anopheles stephensi. Etofenprox treated nettings exhibited better knockdown and mortality than the other insecticides. The order of efficacy of the insecticides treated nettings was Etofenprox ≥ Deltamethrin > Lambda cyhalothrin > Permethrin > Bifenthrin.