Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

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VOLUME 50

NUMBER 3

MARCH 2012

CODEN: IJEB (A6) 50 (3) 173-242 (2012)

ISSN: 0019-5189 (Print); 0975-1009 (Online)

 

CONTENTS

Papers

 

 

 

Antiviral activity of crude extracts of Eugenia jambolana Lam. against highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5N1) virus

179

Richa Sood, D Swarup, S Bhatia , D D Kulkarni, S Dey, M Saini & S C Dubey

 

 

 

Anti-tumor activity of rosmarinic acid in 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) induced skin carcinogenesis in Swiss albino mice

187

R Sharmila & S Manoharan

 

 

 

Protective effect of triphala on radiation induced acute intestinal mucosal damage in Sprague Dawley rats

195

Won Sup Yoon, Chul Yong Kim, Dae Sik Yang, Young Je Park, Won Park, Yong Chan Ahn, Seok-Hyung Kim & Ghee Young Kwon

 

 

 

Preventive and curative effects of Achyranthes aspera Linn. extract in experimentally induced nephrolithiasis

201

Anshu Aggarwal, Surinder K Singla, Manish Gandhi & Chanderdeep Tandon

 

 

 

Amelioration of ionizing radiation induced lipid peroxidation in mouse liver by Moringa oleifera Lam. leaf extract

209

Mahuya Sinha, Dipesh Kr Das, Sanjukta Datta, Santinath Ghosh & Sanjit Dey

 

 

 

Effect of rosuvastatin on obesity-induced cardiac oxidative stress in Wistar rats輸 preliminary study

216

Javed A Ansari, Uma Bhandari, K K Pillai & S E Haque

 

 

 

Effect of consumption of fatty acids, calcium, Vitamin D and boron with regular physical activity on bone mechanical properties and corresponding metabolic hormones in rats

223

MR Naghii, Y Ebrahimpour, P Darvishi, G Ghanizadeh, M Mofid, G Torkaman, A R Asgari & M Hedayati

 

 

 

Mortality and testicular derangements in red flour beetles, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) exposed to hen痴 egg white proteins

232

Ranjit K Parshad & Megha Kansal

 

 

 

Note

 

 

 

Safety and immunogenicity of Brucella abortus RB51 vaccine in cross bred cattle calves in India

239

Rashmi Singh, Sanjay Singh Basera, Kamal Tewari, Shweta Yadav, Sumit Joshi, Brajesh Singh & Falguni Mukherjee

 

 

 

Announcement

 

3rd National Conference on Innovation in Indian Science, Engineering & Technology (NCISET)

178

 

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Announcement

3rd National Conference on Innovation in Indian Science,
Engineering & Technology (NCISET)

2527 February 2013, New Delhi

Sponsored by SIDDHAST Intellectual Property Innovations (P) Ltd, and jointly organized by the Vigyan Bharati, Delhi and CSIR鋒ational Physical Laboratory (NPL), the conference, to be held at the NPL, New Delhi will cover the following areas: (i) Innovative indigenous scientific efforts/Eco-friendly technology with human face in physical sciences, chemistry, electrochemistry, botany, zoology, mathematics, biotechnology, IT, health care, water, agriculture, geology, forensic sciences, environmental, space and nuclear sciences and IPR leveraging, (ii) Ayurvigyan, (iii) Yoga, (iv) Indian system of medicines, (v) Go-vigyan, (vi) Uses of herbals in modern therapy, (vii) Medical astrology, (viii) Innovations in the path of traditional knowledge and sustainable consumption/living/development with a social focus on rural development through the utilization/management of natural resources vis--vis new economic environment. For detail, please contact Dr D P Bhatt, National Coordinator NCISET 2013, and Head, IPR樽 group, c/o NCISET secretariat, National Physical Laboratory, Dr K S Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110 012, India. Mobile: 09911900671; Fax: 91-11-45609310; E-mail: dpbhatt@nplindia.ernet.in/vigyanbharati2@rediffmail.com

 

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Editor痴 note

NISCAIR痴 Policy on Plagiarism

The system of formal communication in science through publication in primary journals is based on originality and quality of information being the only criteria for publication. However, there have been tendencies to misuse the system and vitiate the process of science communication for personal benefits. One of the ills afflicting science communication is plagiarism. Attempts at plagiarism may range from verbatim, copying of extensive material of other authors, misappropriating results/data of others with minor changes in language/presentation without giving credit to original source, to publish essentially the same information more than once.

As the premier publisher in India of primary scientific journals in various disciplines of science and technology, NISCAIR strongly reiterates its policy of discouraging plagiarism of all kinds. All efforts are made detect and frustrate attempts at plagiarism through editorial screening and rigorous peer review in respect of communications received for publication in NISCAIR publications. Cooperation of the scientific community is sought in our efforts to frustrate all attempts at plagiarism.

In case any attempt to plagiarize is brought to our attention accompanied with convincing evidence, following steps would be taken:

(a)                            After consulting the respective Editorial Board Members, authors guilty of plagiarism will be debarred from publishing their papers in NISCAIR journals

(b)                           Heads of the departments/institutes of the offending authors will be intimated of such incidences of plagiarism.

(c)                            Such incidents of plagiarism will be publicized through the concerned NISCAIR journals in consultation with the respective Editorial Board Members.

 

 

Author Index

Aggarwal Anshu

201

Ahn Yong Chan

195

Ansari Javed A

216

Asgari A R

223

 

 

Basera Sanjay Singh

239

Bhandari Uma

216

Bhatia S

179

 

 

Darvishi P

223

Das Dipesh Kr

209

Datta Sanjukta

209

Dey S

179

Dey Sanjit

209

Dubey S C

179

 

 

Ebrahimpour Y

223

 

 

Gandhi Manish

201

Ghanizadeh G

223

Ghosh Santinath

209

Haque S E

216

Hedayati M

223

 

 

Joshi Sumit

239

 

 

Kansal Megha

232

Kim Chul Yong

195

Kim Seok-Hyung

195

Kulkarni D D

179

Kwon Ghee Young

195

 

 

 

 

Manoharan S

187

Mofid M

223

Mukherjee Falguni

239

 

 

 

 

Naghii M R

223

 

 

Park Won

195

Park Young Je

195

Parshad Ranjit K

232

Pillai K K

216

 

 

Saini M

179

Sharmila R

187

Singh Brajesh

239

Singh Rashmi

239

Singla Surinder K

201

Sinha Mahuya

209

Sood Richa

179

Swarup D

179

 

 

Tandon Chanderdeep

201

Tewari Kamal

239

Torkaman G

223

 

 

Yadav Shweta

239

Yang Dae Sik

195

Yoon Won Sup

195

 

 

Keyword Index

Achyranthes aspera

201

Antioxidants

187

Antioxidants

216

Antiviral

179

Apo-B

216

Apoptosis

187

Avian influenza

179

 

 

Bone

223

Boron

223

Brucellosis

239

 

 

Calcium

223

Calcium oxalate

201

Cattle

239

Cystone

201

 

 

Detoxication agents

187

 

 

Egg proteins

232

Epithelium

195

Eugenia jambolana

179

 

 

Fatty acids

223

 

 

Gamma radiation

209

Glands

195

 

 

H5N1

179

Herbal

179

High fat diet

216

Hormones

223

 

 

In ovo

179

 

 

Lamina propria

195

LDH

216

Lipid peroxidation

187

Lipid peroxidation

209

Lipid peroxides

216

Liver

209

 

 

Mortality

232

 

 

Nephrolithiasis

201

 

 

Obesity

216

 

 

Proctitis

195

 

 

Radiation protection

195

RB51

239

Reactive oxygen species

209

Red flour beetle

232

Rosmarinic acid

187

 

 

Skin cancer

187

 

 

Testis

232

Triphala

195

 

 

Urolithiasis

201

 

 

Vaccine

239

Vibration

223

Vit D

223

 

 

Correspondent author has been indicated by * sign

 

Papers

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 50, March 2012, pp. 179-186

 

 

Antiviral activity of crude extracts of Eugenia jambolana Lam. against highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5N1) virus

Richa Sooda,*, D Swarupb, S Bhatiaa, D D Kulkarnia, S Deyb, M Sainib & S C Dubeya

aHigh Security Animal Disease Laboratory, Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Anand Nagar,
Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, 462021, India

&

bDivision of Veterinary Medicine

Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar, Uttar Pradesh, 243122, India

Received 13 June 2011; revised 09 January 2012

Crude extracts of leaves and bark of E. jambolana were tested for antiviral activity against highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (H5N1) by CPE reduction assay in three different layouts to elucidate virucidal, post-exposure and pre-exposure antiviral activity of the extracts. The cold and hot aqueous extracts of bark and hot aqueous extract of leaves of E. jambolana showed significant virucidal activity (100% inhibition) which was further confirmed in virus yield reduction assay (~98 to 99% reduction) and by egg based in ovo assay. The selective index (CC50/EC50) of hot aqueous extract (248) and cold aqueous extract (43.5) of bark of E. jambolana showed their antiviral potential against H5N1 virus. The significant virucidal activity of leaves and bark of E. jambolana merits further investigation as it may provide alternative antiviral agent for managing avian influenza infections in poultry farms and potential avian-human transmission.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 50, March 2012, pp. 187-194

 

 

Anti-tumor activity of rosmarinic acid in 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) induced skin carcinogenesis in Swiss albino mice

R Sharmila & S Manoharan*

Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Annamalai University, Annamalainagar 608 002, India

Received 4 May 2011; revised 9 December 2011

Aim of the present study was to evaluate the anti-tumor effect of orally administered rosmarinic acid in
7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) induced skin carcinogenesis in Swiss albino mice. Phase I and II detoxication agents, lipid peroxidation byproducts, antioxidants and apoptotic biomarkers were used to assess chemopreventive efficacy of rosmarinic acid in DMBA induced skin carcinogenesis. Skin squamous cell carcinoma was induced at the shaved back of mice by applying DMBA (20 μg in 0.1 mL acetone) twice weekly for 8 weeks. Tumor formation (100%) was observed within 15 weeks of treatment in DMBA alone. Marked alterations in the status of above mentioned biomarkers were observed in tumor bearing mice. Oral administration of rosmarinic acid completely prevented the formation of skin tumors during DMBA-induced mouse skin carcinogenesis. Also, oral administration of rosmarinic acid brought back the status of phase I and phase II detoxication agents, lipid peroxidation byproducts, antioxidants and apoptotic markers (p53, Bcl-2, caspase-3 and caspase-9) in DMBA treated mice. Results of the present study suggested that rosmarinic acid had potent anti-cancer, anti-lipid peroxidative and apoptotic effect in DMBA-induced skin carcinogenesis.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 50, March 2012, pp. 195-200

 

 

Protective effect of triphala on radiation induced acute intestinal mucosal damage in Sprague Dawley rats

Won Sup Yoon1, Chul Yong Kim1*, Dae Sik Yang1, Young Je Park1, Won Park2, Yong Chan Ahn2, Seok-Hyung Kim3 & Ghee Young Kwon3

1Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea University College of Medicine, 5th-ga Anam-dong,
Seongbuk-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea

2Department of Radiation Oncology and 3Pathology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine,
50 Ilwon-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea

Received 25 January 2011; revised 6 December 2011

Aim of the study was to determine protective effect of triphala on radiation-induced rectal mucosal damage. Male Sprague Dawley rats (30) were divided into 5 groups. Rats in group A were sham irradiated and rats in group B underwent only irradiation. Rats in group C were administered triphala 1g/kg/day orally for 5 consecutive days before irradiation. Rats in group D and E were administered triphala 1 and 1.5 g/kg/day orally for 10 consecutive days, respectively. Rectal mucosal damage was induced by a single fraction of 12.5Gy gamma irradiation (Ir-192) on 5th day. All the rats were autopsied on 11th day and histological changes in surface epithelium, glands, and lamina propria were assessed. Proctitis showed significant improvement in surface epithelium (P<0.024), glands (P<0.000) and lamina propria (P<0.002) in group E compared to group B. Rats in group E showed significantly less change in glands (P<0.000) compared to rats in group D, All histological variables (surface epithelium, P<0.001; glands, P<0.000; lamina propria, P<0.003) compared to rats in group C. In a Tukey-b test, group E had a significantly recovered grade for glands (P<0.000) compared to groups B, C and D. Results of the present study showed that high-dose triphala improved radiation-induced damage of glands.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 50, March 2012, pp. 201-208

 

 

Preventive and curative effects of Achyranthes aspera Linn. extract in experimentally induced nephrolithiasis

Anshu Aggarwala, Surinder K Singlab, Manish Gandhib & Chanderdeep Tandona,*

aDepartment of Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, Jaypee University of Information Technology, Waknaghat 173 234, Solan, India

bDepartment of Biochemistry, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160 014, India

Received 2 August 2011; revised 9 December 2011

The present study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of Achyranthes aspera in preventing and reducing the growth of calcium oxalate stones in ethylene glycol induced nephrolithiatic model. Hyperoxaluria was induced in rats using ethylene glycol (EG, 0.4%) and ammonium chloride (1%) for 15 days and was then replaced with EG (0.4%) only. Upon administration of cystone (750 mg/kg body wt.), aqueous extract of A. aspera (500 and 1000 mg/kg body wt.), levels of renal injury markers (lactate dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase) were normalized with a decrease in serum urea and serum creatinine. Concurrent treatment reduced changes in the architecture of renal tissue and also decreased the size of crystals thereby helping in quick expulsion of the crystals. The present results indicated that Achyranthes aspera had an ability to maintain renal functioning and reduced renal injury.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 50, March 2012, pp. 209-215

 

 

Amelioration of ionizing radiation induced lipid peroxidation in mouse liver by Moringa oleifera Lam. leaf extract

Mahuya Sinhaa, Dipesh Kr Dasa, Sanjukta Dattab, Santinath Ghoshb & Sanjit Deya*

aDepartment of Human Physiology and bDepartment of Chemical Technology, University Colleges of Science,
Technology and Agriculture, 92 APC Road, Kolkata 700 009, India

Received 15 April 2011; revised 9 December 2011

Protective effect of Moringa oleifera leaf extract (MoLE) against radiation-induced lipid peroxidation has been investigated. Swiss albino mice, selected from an inbred colony, were administered with MoLE (300 mg/kg body wt)
for 15 days before exposing to a single dose of 5 Gy 60Co-gamma radiation. After treatments, animals were necropsied
at different post irradiation intervals (days 1, 7 and 15) and hepatic lipid peroxidation and reduced glutathione (GSH) contents were estimated to observe the relative changes due to irradiation and its possible amelioration by MoLE.
It was observed that, MoLE treatment restored GSH in liver and prevented radiation induced augmentation in hepatic
lipid peroxidation. Phytochemical analysis showed that MoLE possess various phytochemicals such as ascorbic acid, phenolics (catechin, epicatechin, ferulic acid, ellagic acid, myricetin) etc., which may play the key role in prevention
of hepatic lipid peroxidation by scavenging radiation induced free radicals.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 50, March 2012, pp. 216-222

 

 

Effect of rosuvastatin on obesity-induced cardiac oxidative stress in
Wistar rats輸 preliminary study

Javed A Ansari, Uma Bhandari*, K K Pillai & S E Haque

Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Hamdard University, New Delhi 110 062, India

Received 27 January 2011; revised 5 December 2011

The prevalence of obesity has been rising alarmingly and it has now become a global concern causing an enormous economic burden on the health care system. Obesity is generally linked to complications in lipid metabolism and oxidative stress. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of rosuvastatin (10 mg/kg, po) on obesity-induced oxidative stress in high fat-fed Wistar rats. Oral administration of rosuvastatin (10 mg/kg) for 21 days along with high fat diet brought about significant elevation in serum high density lipoprotein and cardiac antioxidant enzymes levels (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione peroxidase-, glutathione reductase- and glutathione-S-transferase) while decreasing in serum lactate dehydrogenase, apolipoprotein-B, lipids (triglycerides, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein-cholesterol, very low density lipoprotein-cholesterol and atherogenic index) and cardiac thiobarbituric acid reactive substances levels. The results were comparable with orlistat, a standard antiobesity drug. These preliminary results for the first time demonstrate that administration of rosuvastatin can be beneficial for the suppression of obesity-induced oxidative stress and dyslipidemia in high fat-fed Wistar rats.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 50, March 2012, pp. 223-231

 

 

Effect of consumption of fatty acids, calcium, Vitamin D and boron with regular physical activity on bone mechanical properties and corresponding metabolic hormones in rats

M R Naghii a*, Y Ebrahimpour b, P Darvishi a, G Ghanizadeh b, M Mofidc, G Torkamand, A R Asgarie, & M Hedayati f

a Sport Physiology Research Center & Health School; b Health School; c Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine,

Baqiyatallah (a.s.) University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran

dDepartment of Physical Therapy, Biomechanical Research Laboratory, Tarbiat Modares University,

Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran

e Sport Physiology Research Center, Baqiyatallah (a.s.) University of Medical Sciences,

Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran

f Obesity Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences,

Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences,

Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran

 

The consumption of fatty acids, nutrients, and regular physical activity, individually influence bone mechanical properties in rats. To investigate their effects in combination, male rats were divided into the seven groups: G1: regular food and drinking water; G2: same as Gr.1 + physical activity (Whole body vibration; WBV); G3: same as Gr.2 + Calcium, Vit. D, Boron; G4: same as Gr.3 + canola oil; G5: same as Gr.3 + sunflower oil; G6: same as Gr.3 + mix of sunflower oil and canola oil; and G7: same as Gr.3 + coconut oil; and treated for 8 weeks. Analysis between the control with the groups 2 and 3 revealed that vibration in the G2 increased the body weight (P= 0.04), with no other major difference in plasma and bone indices. Comparison between the control with the G4-G7 (the oil groups) revealed that the rats in the G5 had a lower body weight (15 % less) and a significant increase in plasma levels of Estradiol in the G7 was noted. In addition, levels of Testosterone in the G4 and G7, and Free Testosterone in the G7 had a remarkable increase. Similar trend was observed for plasma levels of Vit. D in the G4 and G5. The stiffness and the breaking strength of the femur in the G7, and the breaking strength of the lumbar in the G7 compared to the control and the G4 and G5 was significantly higher and tended to increase in comparison to the G6. Better and stronger measurements observed for coconut oil is warranted to further study its effect on biomechanical properties of bones.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 50, March 2012, pp. 232-238

 

 

Mortality and testicular derangements in red flour beetles, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) exposed to hen痴 egg white proteins

Ranjit K Parshad* & Megha Kansal

Department of Zoology, College of Basic Sciences & Humanities, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana 141 004, India.

Received 1 August 2011; revised 27 December 2011

Red flour beetle (T. castaneum) is a major pest of stored grains and is known for its adaptability to all classes of insecticides. The present study was carried out to determine the insecticidal potential of egg white proteins to manage beetle population. Protein samples obtained through salt fractionation were lyophilized and were used separately and simultaneously in different concentrations by adding them to wheat flour and milk powder. The results indicated that the mortality rate of the adult beetles was dependent on the type of treatment, concentration of protein samples and duration of feeding. In multiple-choice feeding trials beetles showed their movement towards the control section as the concentration of treatment increases. Marked abnormalities were observed in appearance and dimensions of the testes which indicated that the egg white proteins caused considerable effect on the process of spermatogenesis and sperm functions. SEM study revealed the formation of deep wrinkles and folds on the testicular surface of the testes of beetles fed on treated diets, points towards the depletion of internal cellular material. The results suggest that egg white protein affects the survival and cause subsequent derangements in the testis of red flour beetle.

 

Notes

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 50, March 2012, pp. 239-242

 

 

Safety and immunogenicity of Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine in cross
bred cattle calves in India

Rashmi Singh*, Sanjay Singh Basera, Kamal Tewari, Shweta Yadav, Sumit Joshi,
Brajesh Singh1 & Falguni Mukherjee1

Department of Veterinary Microbiology

G B Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar 263 145, India

1 R&D Centre, National Dairy Development Board, Indian
Immunologicals Limited, Gachibowli, Hyderabad 500 033, India

Received 18 May 2011; revised 29 October 2011

Safety and immunogenicity of Brucella abortus RB51 vaccine has been evaluated in an organised dairy farm in India. All the cattle (n=29) vaccinated with strain RB51 喪esponded to the vaccine as demonstrated by iELISA using acetone killed strain RB51 antigen. The percentage responders at day 35, 60 and 90 post vaccination were 100%, 95% and 20%, respectively. Strain RB51 was able to elicit a good IFN-γ response from vaccinated animals. The post-vaccination time point analysis indicated that the cumulative IFN-γ response of whole blood from vaccinates stimulated with heat killed RB51 antigen was elicited in 80% of calves at 60 days post vaccination. Absence of strain RB51 in the secretions and excretion and lack of local or systemic reaction indicated the safety of the vaccine.