Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

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VOLUME 51

NUMBER 2

FEBRUARY 2013

CODEN: IJEB (A6) 51 (2) 101-180 (2013)

ISSN: 0019-5189 (Print); 0975-1009 (Online)

 

CONTENTS

 

 

Papers

 

 

Pluripotent lineage of CD133 stem cells isolated from human skin samples

107

        Avvari Bhaskara Balaji, Kaiser Jamil, Gangaraju Maruthi Ram & G Suryanarayan Raju

 

 

 

Cloning and expression analysis of multiple proteins encoding P gene of Newcastle disease virus

116

        Rajiv Kumar, Ashok K Tiwari, Uttara Chaturvedi, G Ravi Kumar, A P Sahoo,Sudesh Kumar & Sangeeta Tiwari

 

 

 

Development of a peptide based latex agglutination assay for serotype identification of foot and mouth disease virus

124

        Dilpreet Kaur, Gurpreet Kaur, Mudit Chandra, Hari M Saxena & Padam N Dwivedi

 

 

 

Glycyrrhizin ameliorates insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and oxidative stress in         fructose-induced metabolic syndrome-X in rat model

129

        Rajarshi Sil, Doel Ray & Abhay Sankar Chakraborti

 

 

 

Aqueous extract of Allium sativum L bulbs offer nephroprotection by attenuating vascular endothelial growth factor and extracellular signal-regulatedkinase-1 expression in diabetic rats

139

        Shiju T M, Rajkumar R, Rajesh N G & Pragasam Viswanathan

 

 

 

Ameliorative effect of Luffa acutangula Roxb. on doxorubicin induced cardiac and nephrotoxicity
in mice

149

        Vishal B Jadhav, Vishnu N Thakare , Anupama A Suralkar & Suresh R Naik

 

 

 

Healing effects of Aegle marmelos (L.) Correa fruit extract on experimental colitis

157

        M K Gautam, R R Ghatule, A Singh, V Purohit, M Gangwar, Mohan Kumar & R K Goel

 

 

 

Anti-oxidative protection against iron overload-induced liver damage in mice by
Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp. Leaf extract

165

        Rhitajit Sarkar, Bibhabasu Hazra & Nripendranath Mandal

 

 

 

Effect of newly isolated Lactobacillus ingluvieii ADK10, from chicken intestinal tract on         acetaminophen induced oxidative strss in Wistar rats

174

        Arpita Mandal, Tanmay Paul, Suchismita Roy, Shreya Mandal, Shrabani Pradhan, Keshab Ch. Mondal & Dilip Kumar Nandi

 

 

 

 

 

NISCAIR Policy on Plagiarism

 

 

The system of formal communication in science through publication in primary journals is based on originality and quality of information being the only criteria for publication. However, there have been tendencies to misuse the system and vitiate the process of science communication for personal benefits. One of the ills afflicting science communication is plagiarism. Attempts at plagiarism may range from verbatim, copying of extensive material of other authors, misappropriating results/data of others with minor changes in language/presentation without giving credit to original source, to publish essentially the same information more than once.

As the premier publisher in India of primary scientific journals in various disciplines of science and technology, NISCAIR strongly reiterates its policy of discouraging plagiarism of all kinds. All efforts are made detect and frustrate attempts at plagiarism through editorial screening and rigorous peer review in respect of communications received for publication in NISCAIR publications. Cooperation of the scientific community is sought in our efforts to frustrate all attempts at plagiarism.

It is mandatory on the part of the corresponding author to furnish the following certificate at the time of submission of the manuscript for publication:

 

[This is to certify that the reported work in the article entitle, “(give full title with all the authors name)” submitted for publication in the journal, the……………………. is an original one and has not been submitted for publication elsewhere. I/we further certify that proper citation to the previously reported work have been given and no data/table/figures have been quoted verbatim from other publications without giving due acknowledgement and without the permission of the author(s). The consent of all the authors of this article has been obtained for submitting the article to the journal, “………………….”

Signatures and names of all the authors]

 

In case any attempt to plagiarize is brought to our attention accompanied with convincing evidence, following steps would be taken:

(a)    After consulting the respective Editorial Board Members, authors guilty of plagiarism will be debarred from publishing their papers in NISCAIR journals.

(b)   Heads of the departments/institutes of the offending authors will be intimated of such incidences of plagiarism.

(c)    Such incidents of plagiarism will be publicized through the concerned NISCAIR journals in consultation with the respective Editorial Board Members.

 

 

Author Index

Balaji Avvari Bhaskara

107

 

 

Chakraborti Abhay Sankar

129

Chandra Mudit

124

Chaturvedi Uttara

116

 

 

Dwivedi Padam N

124

 

 

Gangwar M

157

Gautam M K

157

Ghatule R R

157

Goel R K

157

 

 

Hazra Bibhabasu

165

 

 

Jadhav Vishal B

149

Jamil Kaiser

107

 

 

Kaur Dilpreet

124

Kaur Gurpreet

124

Mandal Arpita

174

Mandal Nripendranath

165

Mandal Shreya

174

Mohan Kumar

157

Mondal Keshab Ch.

174

 

 

Naik Suresh R

149

Nandi Dilip Kumar

174

 

 

Paul Tanmay

174

Pradhan Shrabani

174

Purohit V

157

 

 

Rajesh N G

139

Rajiv Kumar

116

Rajkumar R

139

Raju G Suryanarayan

107

Ram Gangaraju Maruthi

107

Ravi Kumar G

116

Ray Doel

129

Roy Suchismita

174

 

 

Sahoo A P

116

Sarkar Rhitajit

165

Saxena Hari M

124

Shiju T M

139

Sil Rajarshi

129

Singh A

157

Sudesh Kumar

116

Suralkar Anupama A

149

 

 

Thakare Vishnu N

149

Tiwari Ashok K

116

Tiwari Sangeeta

116

 

 

Viswanathan Pragasam

139

 

 

Keyword Index

Acetaminophen

174

Aegle marmelos

157

Annexin V assay

116

Antioxidants

149,157

 

 

Biomarkers

149

 

 

Cajanus cajan

165

Cardioprotective

149

CD133

107

CD29

107

CD34

107

CD49f

107

Colitis

157

 

 

Diabetes

139

Diabetic nephropathy

139

DNA protection

165

Doxorubicin

149

 

 

FACS

107

Ferritin

165

FMD virus

124

Free radical scavenging activity

174

Free radicals

157

Fruit pulp

157

 

 

Garlic extract

139

Glucose transporter 4

129

Glycation

129

 

 

Hepatoprotection

165

High fructose diet

129

Hypolipidemic

139

 

 

Immunophenotyping

107

In vitro expression

116

Indulin resistance

129

Iron overload

165

 

 

Lactobacillus ingluvieii ADK10

174

Latex agglutination test

124

Luffa acutangula

149

MACS

107

Metabolic syndrome

129

Myeloperoxidase

157

 

 

Nephroprotectant

139

Nephroprotective activity

149

Newcastle disease virus

116

Non-structural protein 2B

124

 

 

Oxidative stress

174

 

 

P gene

116

Peroxisome proliferators activated receptor γ


129

 

 

RNA editing

116

 

 

Serotype specific peptides

124

Skin stem cells

107

 

 

Viral gene oncotherapy

116

 

 

 

            Correspondent author is marked by *

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol.51, February 2013, pp. 107-115

 

 

 

Pluripotent lineage of CD133 stem cells isolated from human skin samples

 

Avvari Bhaskara Balaji1, 2, Kaiser Jamil1,*, Gangaraju Maruthi Ram2 & G Suryanarayana Raju3

1Genetics Department, Bhagwan Mahavir Medical Research Center, 10-1-1, Mahavir Marg, Masab Tank,
Hyderabad 500 004, India

2Zoology Department, Osmania University, Hyderabad 500 007, India

3Department of Surgical Oncology Nizams Institute of Medical Sciences,

Hyderabad, 500 082, India

Received 28 December 2011; revised 31 October 2012

Skin stem cells are very important in cosmetics, pharmacological and regenerative medicine and burn cases. Foreskin samples surgically removed after circumcision from boys below 7 years were collected and primary epidermal cells were prepared by enzymatic and mechanical tituration method. Selecting CD133 (prominin-1) multipotent stem cell marker, enriched stem cells were analyzed by MACS using CD133 antibodies conjugated with magnetic beads. CD133 positive and negative cells with specific skin stem cells markers like - CD34 (Universal stem cells marker), CD29 (integrin beta-1) and CD49f (integrin alpha-6) immunophenotypes were screened and sorted in flowcytometer. Further the expression of four embryonic genes or transcription factors of pluripotent stem cells were analyzed for pluripotent character of sorted cells. It was found that skin stem cell markers associated with CD133 cells, differentially expressed CD34, CD29 and CD49f immunophenotyes on both positive and negative CD133 cells in FACS analysis. The embryonic stem cell markers (induced pluripotent stem cell markers) like Oct4, SOX2, Notch-2 and K19 genes were expressed in CD133
positive epidermal cells. It is therefore evident that foreskin derived epidermal stem cells showed pluripotent or
multipotent nature. This finding opens up avenues for new uses of these stem cells for direct cell seeding in wound
healing, surgical suturing and drug screening.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol.51, February 2013, pp. 116-123

 

 

 

Cloning and expression analysis of multiple proteins encoding P gene
of Newcastle disease virus

Rajiv Kumar1, Ashok K Tiwari*1, Uttara Chaturvedi1, G. Ravi Kumar1, A P Sahoo1,
Sudesh Kumar1 & Sangeeta Tiwari2

1Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Veterinary Biotechnology, Indian Veterinary Research Institute,
Izatnagar, 243 122, India

2Faculty of Animal Sciences, MJP Rohilkhand University, Bareilly, 2430 06, India

Received 26 May 2011; revised 12 September 2012

Viral gene oncotherapy is emerging as a biotherapeutic cancer treatment modality based on targeted killing of cancer cells by viral genes. Newcastle disease virus (NDV) has the property to cause selective oncolysis of tumor cells sparing normal cells. NDV has a single stranded negative sense RNA genome, which is 15,186 nucleotide long and consists of six genes, which codes for eight proteins. NDV like other paramyxoviruses has the ability to generate multiple proteins from the P gene. P protein is encoded by an unedited transcript of the P gene, whereas the V and W protein are the results of RNA editing event in which one and two G residues are inserted at a conserved editing site within the P gene mRNA resulting in V and W transcripts, respectively. Although NDV is known to cause oncolysis by triggering apoptosis, the role of different viral proteins in selective oncolysis is still unclear. P gene edited products are known for its anti-apoptotic property in homologous host. In the present study, NDV P gene and its RNA edited products were amplified, cloned, sequenced and in vitro expression was done in HeLa cells. Further constructs were assayed for their apoptosis inducing ability in HeLa cells. Preliminary study suggested that P, V and W proteins are not apoptotic to HeLa cells.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol.51, February 2013, pp. 124-128

 

 

 

Development of a peptide based latex agglutination assay for serotype identification of foot and mouth disease virus

Dilpreet Kaur, Gurpreet Kaur*, Mudit Chandra, Hari M Saxena & Padam N Dwivedi

Department of Veterinary Microbiology, College of Veterinary Science, Guru Angad Dev
Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, Ludhiana 141004, India

Received 17 February 2013; revised 15 October 2012

Out of 200 serum samples collected from cattle (142) and buffaloes (58) of various ages and sexand subjected to latex agglutination test (LAT) using serotype specific peptides (O, A, Asia 1) and also with peptide for non-structural protein 2B (NSP-2B), 114 (70%) samples were positive against FMDV type ‘O’, 102 (51%) against serotype ‘A’ and 104 (52%) against serotype ‘Asia 1’. With NSP-2B peptide a total of 71 (35.5%) samples were positive. The results suggest that LAT could be used for the diagnosis of foot and mouth disease virus as it is easy, cheap and effective test.

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol.51, February 2013, pp. 129-138

 

 

 

 

Glycyrrhizin ameliorates insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and oxidative stress in fructose-induced metabolic syndrome-X in rat model

Rajarshi Sil, Doel Ray# & Abhay Sankar Chakraborti*

Department of Biophysics, Molecular Biology and Bioinformatics, University College of Science, University of Calcutta,
92 Acharyya Prafulla Chandra Road, Kolkata 700 009, India

Received 26 June 2012; revised 8 October 2012

This study investigates if glycyrrhizin, a constituent of licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) root, is able to treat the complications (insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and oxidative stress) of metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome was induced in rats by feeding a fructose-enriched (60%) diet for six weeks, after which single dose of glycyrrhizin (50 mg/kg body weight) was administered intraperitoneally. Different biochemical parameters from blood were estimated during three weeks after treatment. Then the rats were sacrificed to collect skeletal muscle tissue. Glycyrrhizin reduced the enhanced levels of blood glucose, insulin and lipids in metabolic syndrome group. Increased advanced glycation end products of hemoglobin, glycohemoglobin, hemoglobin-mediated iron release and iron-mediated free radical reactions (arachidonic acid and deoxyribose degradation) in metabolic syndrome were inhibited by glycyrrhizin treatment. Reduced activities of enzymatic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase and catalase) and elevated oxidative stress markers (malonaldehyde, fructosamine, hemoglobin carbonyl content and DNA damage) in metabolic syndrome were reversed to almost normal levels by glycyrrhizin. The decreased levels of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) proteins in skeletal muscle of metabolic syndrome group were elevated by glycyrrhizin, indicating improved fatty acid oxidation and glucose homeostasis.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol.51, February 2013, pp. 139-148

 

 

 

Aqueous extract of Allium sativum L bulbs offer nephroprotection by attenuating vascular endothelial growth factor and extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1 expression in diabetic rats

 

Shiju TMa, Rajkumar Ra, Rajesh NGb & Pragasam Viswanathana,*

aRenal Research Lab, Biomedical Research Center, School of Bio Sciences and Technology,

VIT University, Vellore 632 014, India.

bDepartment of Pathology, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER),
Dhanvantri Nagar, Puducherry 605006, India

Received 7 May 2012; revised 19 September 2012

To investigate the nephroprotective effect of garlic and elucidate the mechanism by which it prevents the
progression of diabetic nephropathy in diabetic rats, diabetes was induced by a single ip injection of streptozotocin
(45 mg/kg body weight). Garlic extract (500 mg/kg body weight) and aminoguanidine (1 g/L) were supplemented in the treatment groups. Histopathological examination using H&E, PAS staining and the immunohistochemical analysis of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1 (ERK-1) expression were performed on kidney sections at the end of 12 weeks. Significant change in both, the urine and serum biochemistry confirmed kidney damage in diabetic animals which was further confirmed by the histological changes such as mesangial expansion, glomerular basement membrane thickening, glycosuria and proteinuria. However, the diabetic animals treated with garlic extract showed a significant change in urine and serum biochemical parameters such as albumin, urea nitrogen  and creatinine  compared to that of diabetic rats. Further, the garlic supplemented diabetic rats showed a significant decrease in the expression of VEGF and ERK-1 compared to diabetic rats, attenuating mesangial expansion and glomerulosclerosis. Thus, garlic extract rendered nephroprotection in diabetic rats.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol.51, February 2013, pp. 149-156

 

 

 

Ameliorative effect of Luffa acutangula Roxb. on doxorubicin induced cardiac
and nephrotoxicity in mice

Vishal B Jadhav1, Vishnu N Thakare2, Anupama A Suralkar1 & Suresh R Naik2 *

1Department of Pharmacology, Padm Dr D Y Patil Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Research,
Pimpri, Pune 411 018, India

2Department of Pharmacology, Sinhgad Technical Education Society’s,
Sinhgad Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences (SIPS), Lonavala, Pune 410 401, India

Received 20 April 2012; revised 29 October 2012

The present study reports protective effect of hydro-alcoholic extract of Luffa acutangula (HAELA) on doxorubicin (DXR) induced cardio and nephro toxicity in mice by studying various serum biomarkers, antioxidants in target organs and histoarchitecture alterations. Pretreatment with HAELA reversed significantly the elevated serum biomarkers, alanine amino transferase, lactate dehydrogenase and creatinine phosphokinase in heart and kidney in DXR treated mice. In addition, HAELA treatment inhibited elevated malondialdehyde formation and restored the depleted glutathione, catalase, superoxide dismutase in heart and kidney tissue. The altered histoarchitecture of heart and kidney tissue due to DXR treatment were also improved with HAELA. The protective activity observed with HAELA on DXR induced cardio and nephrotoxicity in mice was found to be related to its antioxidant property which finally results in membrane stabilization.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol.51, February 2013, pp. 157-164

 

 

 

Healing effects of Aegle marmelos (L.) Correa fruit extract on experimental colitis

M K Gautam*, R R Ghatule*, A Singh*, V Purohit*, M Gangwar**, Mohan Kumar*** & R K Goel*†

Departments of *Pharmacology, ** Microbiology and ***Pathology,

Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005, India

Received 1 May 2012; revised 15 September 2012

Graded doses of 50% ethanolic extract of dried fruit pulp of Aegle marmelos (AME) (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) daily for 14 days in acetic acid (AA)-induced colitis in rats showed 200 mg/kg of AME as an optimal effective dose against AA-induced colonic damage score and weight. This dose (200 mg/kg; po) was further studied in AA-induced colitis for its effects on various physical (mucous/blood in stool, food and water intake and body weight changes), histology, antibacterial activity and biochemical parameters like free radicals (nitric oxide and lipid peroxidation), antioxidants (superoxide dismutase, catalase and reduced glutathione) and myeloperoxidase (acute-inflammatory marker) activities in rat colonic tissue. AME decreased colonic mucosal damage and inflammation (macroscopic and microscopic), mucous/bloody diarrhea, fecal frequency and increased body weight affected in AA-induced colitis. AME showed significant antibacterial activity and enhanced the antioxidants but decreased free radicals and myeloperoxidase activities thereby decreasing tissue damage and inflammation and thus, affording ulcer healing. The above effects of A. marmelos authenticated its use in indigenous system of Medicine.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol.51, February 2013, pp. 165-173

 

 

 

Anti-oxidative protection against iron overload-induced liver damage in mice by Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp. leaf extract

Rhitajit Sarkar, Bibhabasu Hazra & Nripendranath Mandal*

Division of Molecular Medicine, Bose Institute, P-1/12 CIT Scheme VII M, Kolkata 700054, India

Received 22 May 2012; revised 29 October 2012

In view of the contribution of iron deposition in the oxidative pathologic process of liver disease, the potential of 70% methanolic extract of C. cajan leaf (CLME) towards antioxidative protection against iron-overload-induced liver damage in mice has been investigated. DPPH radical scavenging and protection of Fenton reaction induced DNA damage was conducted in vitro. Post oral administration of CLME to iron overloaded mice, the levels of antioxidant and serum enzymes, hepatic iron, serum ferritin, lipid peroxidation, and protein carbonyl and hydroxyproline contents were measured, in comparison to deferasirox treated mice. Oral treatment of the plant extract effectively lowered the elevated levels of liver iron, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl and hydroxyproline. There was notable increment in the dropped levels of hepatic antioxidants. The dosage of the plant extract not only made the levels of serum enzymes approach normal value, but also counteracted the overwhelmed serum ferritin level. The in vitro studies indicated potential antioxidant activity of CLME. The histopathological observations also substantiated the ameliorative function of the plant extract. Accordingly, it is suggested that Cajanus cajan leaf can be a useful herbal remedy to suppress oxidative damage caused by iron overload.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol.51, February 2013, pp. 174-180

 

 

 

Effect of newly isolated Lactobacillus ingluviei ADK10, from chicken intestinal tract on acetaminophen induced oxidative stress in Wistar rats

Arpita Mandal1, Tanmay Paul2, Suchismita Roy1, Shreya Mandal1, Shrabani Pradhan1, Keshab Ch. Mondal2 &
Dilip Kumar Nandi1*

1Department of Microbiology, Nutrition, and Human Physiology, Raja N L Khans Women’s college, Midnapore 721 102, India.

2Department of Microbiology, Vidyasagar University, Midnapore 721102, India.

Received 12 April 2012; revised 10 October 2012

The total antioxidative activity of L. ingluviei ADK10 isolated from chicken intestine intact cells and cell free culture supernatant (CFCS) was 54- 67.95%. The ability to scavenge a,a-Diphenyl-b-Picrylhydrazyl free radical ranged from 71 and 64% in intact cells and CFCS respectively. Total reducing activity of bacteria was equivalent to 290 ΅M/L of cysteine. Reducing glutathione activity was equivalent to 93.95΅g/mL. Oral administration of the strain at a dose of 109 cfu/kg body weight to acetaminophen induced oxidative stress in rats increased catalase, glutathione and superoxide dismutase activity in the blood, liver and kidney and lowered malondialdehyde level. The results indicate that L. ingluviei ADK10 has potential free radical scavenging activity for the treatment of oxidative stress related disease.