Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

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VOLUME 51

NUMBER 9

SEPTEMBER 2013

CODEN: IJEB (A6) 51 (9) 681-772 (2013)

ISSN: 0019-5189 (Print); 0975-1009 (Online)

CONTENTS

 

 

 

Papers

 

 

 

Quick Golgi method: Modified for high clarity and better neuronal anatomy

685

 

 

Nisha Patro, Kamendra Kumar & Ishan Patro

 

 

 

Cardioprotective effect of root extract of Picrorhiza kurroa (Royle Ex Benth) against isoproterenol-induced cardiotoxicity in rats

694

 

 

Mukesh Nandave, Shreesh Kumar Ojha, Santosh Kumari, Tapas Chandra Nag, Raj Mehra, Rajiv Narang & Dharamvir Singh Arya

 

 

 

Anti-diabetic and antihyperlipidemic effect of allopolyherbal formulation in OGTT and STZ-induced diabetic rat model

702

 

 

Swati Manik, Vinod Gauttam & A N Kalia

 

 

 

Antibacterial potential of hydroalcoholic extracts of Triphala components against multidrug-resistant uropathogenic bacteria – A preliminary report

709

 

 

Anwesa Bag, Subir Kumar Bhattacharyya, Nishith Kumar Pal & Rabi Ranjan Chattopadhyay

 

 

 

Antiepileptic potential of Anisomeles indica (Linn.) Kuntze aerial parts in pentylenetetrazole-induced experimental convulsions in Wistar rats

715

 

 

Ankush Sundriyal, Krishna Reddy V Bijjem & Ajudhia N Kalia

 

 

 

Inhibitory and stimulating effect of magnesium on vanadate-induced lipid peroxidation under
in vitro conditions

721

 

 

Agnieszka Ścibior, Dorota Gołębiowska, Irmina Niedźwiecka & Agnieszka Adamczyk

 

 

 

Impact of pre-exposure of tail suspension on behavioural parameters like locomotion, exploration, and anxiety in mice

732

 

 

Pravin Popatrao Kale, Veeranjaneyulu Addepalli & Shalaka Ramesh Ghadawale

 

 

 

Somatic embryo-like structures of strawberry regenerated in vitro on media supplemented
with 2,4-D and BAP

739

 

 

Genesia F Omar, Fouad H Mohamed, Klaus-Thomas Haensch, Sawsan H Sarg & Mohamed M Morsey

 

 

 

Antioxidant response and Lea genes expression under salt stress and combined salt plus water stress in two wheat cultivars contrasting in drought tolerance

746

 

 

Priyanka Bhagi, Vikramjit Kaur Zhawar& Anil Kumar Gupta

 

 

 

Effect of cadaverine on Brassica juncea (L.) under multiple stress

758

 

 

Pushpa C Tomar, Nita Lakra & Shyam Narayan Mishra

 

 

 

Identification of natural compounds which inhibit biofilm formation in clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae

764

 

 

H Magesh, Arun Kumar, Ayesha Alam, Priyam, Uma Sekar, Venil N Sumantran & Rama Vaidyanathan

 

 

 

Announcements

 

 

 

International Conference on Emerging Trends in Biomarker Research–Prospects & Challenges (ICBR-2013); 4th International Conference on Stem Cells and Cancer (ICSCC-2013): Proliferation, Differentiation and Apoptosis

684

——————————————

Announcements

International Conference on

Emerging Trends in Biomarker Research–Prospects & Challenges (ICBR-2013)

13 and 14 September 2013

Venue: CSIR-Indian Institute of Chemical Technology (IICT) Hyderabad, India

 

Sponsored by the Departments of Science & Technology (DST), and Biotechnology (DBT), Ministry of Science & Technology, New Delhi, India, the Council of Scientific & Industrial Research (CSIR), New Delhi, India, and the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR), New Delhi, India, and Organized by the Centre for Biotechnology and Bioinformatics (CBB), School of Life Sciences (SLS), Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Advanced Studies (JNIAS), 6th Floor, Buddha Bhavan, M.G Road, Secunderabad  500 003, the Conference will cover following streams: (i) Biomarkers discovery and development, (ii) Companion diagnostics and personalized medicine, (iii) Biomarkers in clinical development, (iv) Enabling technologies and identification, (v) Biomarkers for better prognosis and diagnosis, (vi) Biomarkers development—Case Studies,
(vii) Translational biomarkers in drug development, and (viii) Cancer molecular markers to guide therapy. For details, please contact: Mr. M Asimuddin, e-mail: asim@jnias.in, mobile: 0091-7893203414 or Ms. B Bhargavi, e-mail: bhargavi@jnias.in, mobile: 0091-9652155215.

—————————————

4th International Conference on Stem Cells and Cancer (ICSCC-2013):

Proliferation, Differentiation and Apoptosis

19-22 October 2013

Venue: Durbar Hall, Haffkine Institute, Parel, Mumbai, India

Jointly organised by the Institute of Experimental Cancer Research, Comprehensive Cancer Center Ulm, University Hospital Ulm, Ulm, Germany, the Spanish National Cancer Research Center (CNIO), Madrid, Spain, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, El Paso, USA, and the International Center for Stem Cells, Cancer and Biotechnology (ICSCCB), Pune, India, the ICSCC-2013 will cover basic and applied research on DNA replication, DNA damage and repair mechanisms, proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of all types of stem cells as well as all types of cancer cells and other topics related to stem cells and cancer research and treatment. For details please contact: Dr. Sheo Mohan Singh, Director, ICSCCB, R.H. 2, Ujwal Regalia, Near Prabhavee Teck Park, Baner Road, Pune 411 045, India. Telephone: +91-9545089202, e-mail: info@icsccb.org; icscc2013@gmail.com. Web: www.icsccb.org

———————————

 

Author Index

Adamczyk Agnieszka

721

Addepalli Veeranjaneyulu

732

Alam Ayesha

764

Arun Kumar

764

Arya Dharamvir Singh

694

Bag Anwesa

709

Bhagi Priyanka

450

Bhattacharyya Subir Kumar

709

Bijjem Krishna Reddy V

715

Chattopadhyay Rabi Ranjan

709

Gauttam Vinod

702

Ghadawale Shalaka Ramesh

732

Gołębiowska Dorota

721

Gupta Anil Kumar

450

Kale Pravin Popatrao

732

Kalia A N

702

Kalia Ajudhia N

715

Kamendra Kumar

685

Klaus-Thomas Haensch

739

Kumari Santosh

694

Lakra Nita

758

Magesh H

764

Manik Swati

702

Mehra Raj

694

Mishra Shyam Narayan

758

Mohamed Fouad H

739

Morsey Mohamed M

739

Nag Tapas Chandra

694

Nandave Mukesh

694

Narang Rajiv

694

Niedźwiecka Irmina

721

Ojha Shreesh Kumar

694

Omar Genesia F

739

Pal Nishith Kumar

709

Patro Ishan

685

Patro Nisha

685

Priyam

764

Sarg Sawsan H

739

Ścibior Agnieszka

721

Sekar Uma

764

Sumantran Venil N

764

Sundriyal Ankush

715

Tomar Pushpa C

758

Vaidyanathan Rama

764

Zhawar Vikramjit Kaur

450

 

 

Keyword Index

ABA

746

Allopolyherbal formulation

702

Anisomeles indica

715

Antioxidant

746

Anxiety

732

Auxin

739

Biofilm inhibition

764

Brassica juncea

758

Bupropion

732

Cadaverine

758

Caffeine

732

Cerebellum

685

Cerebral cortex

685

Cytokinin

739

Cytoxicity study

709

Dendritic spines

685

Diabetes mellitus

702

Drug resistance

709

Duloxetine

732

Efflux pumps inhibitors

764

Epilepsy

715

Exploration

732

Flavonoids

715

Fragaria × ananassa

739

Hemodynamics

694

Klebsiella pneumoniae

764

LEA

746

Left ventricular dynamics

694

Lipid peroxidation

694,721

Liver

721

Locomotion

732

Magnesium

721

Maximal electroshock

715

Metal

758

Minimum inhibitory concentration

764

Multi-drug resistance

764

Myocardial injury

694

Nicotine

732

OGTT model

702

Oxidative stress

694

Oxidative stress

721

Pentylenetetrazole

715

Polyherbal formulation

702

Pre-exposure to TST

732

Purkinje neurons

685

Pyramidal neurons

685

Rapid-Golgi fixative

685

Salinity

758

Salt stress

746

Somatic embryogenesis

739

Streptozotocin

702

Stress

758

Total phenolics

709

Triphala components

709

Uropathogens

709

Vanadate

721

Water stress

746

Wheat

746

 

            Correspondent author is marked by *

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 51, September 2013, pp. 685-693

 

 

 

Quick Golgi method: Modified for high clarity and better neuronal anatomy

Nisha Patro1, Kamendra Kumar1 & Ishan Patro1,2,*

1School of Studies in Neuroscience, Jiwaji University, Gwalior India, 474 011

2School of Studies in Zoology, Jiwaji University, Gwalior India, 474 011

Received 3 December 2012; revised 20 June 2013

The Golgi methods have long been used to study the neuronal soma, axons, dendritic arborization and spines. The major concerns of the Golgi method have been its unpredictable nature (inconsistency of impregnation of the stain), time consumed, tissue hardening and clear background, resulting in several modifications to improve the cellular visualization. In the present work we describe a modification of the rapid-Golgi method that takes the benefit of perfusion fixation (with rapid-Golgi solution) then post-fixation in the same fixative for 36 h followed by 36 h impregnation in aqueous AgNO3 followed by vibratomy. This modification is simpler, faster and inexpensive, provides a consistent staining of neurons with good resolution of neuronal soma, dendritic arborization as well as spines with much reduced formation of silver chromate crystals and background in just 3 days.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 51, September 2013, pp. 694-701

 

 

Cardioprotective effect of root extract of Picrorhiza kurroa (Royle Ex Benth) against isoproterenol-induced cardiotoxicity in rats

Mukesh Nandavea*, Shreesh Kumar Ojhab, Santosh Kumaric, Tapas Chandra Nagd, Raj Mehrad,
 Rajiv Narange & Dharamvir Singh Aryab

aSPP School of Pharmacy & Technology Management, SVKM’S NMIMS, Mithibai College Building, Vile Parle (West),
Mumbai 400 056, India

bCardiovascular Laboratory, Department of Pharmacology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi 110 029, India

cDivision of Plant Physiology, Indian Agriculture Research Institute (IARI), New Delhi 110 016, India

Departments of dAnatomy, and eCardiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi 110 029, India

Received 19 October 2012; revised 7 May 2013

Normal rats pre-treated with P. kurroa (200 mg/kg) alone did not showed significant change, however, isoproterenol (ISP) administration resulted in hemodynamic and left ventricular dysfunction, oxidative stress, and lipid peroxidation. Such cardiac dysfunction was significantly prevented by P. kurroa root extract pre-treatment. Pre-treatment significantly attenuated the ISP-induced oxidative stress by restoring myocardial superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase enzymes except reduced glutathione content. P. kurroa pre-treatment markedly attenuated the ISP-induced rise in lipid peroxidation, thereby prevented leakage of myocyte creatine kinase-MB and lactate dehydrogenase enzymes. The results suggest that P. kurroa root extract possesses significant cardioprotective effect, which may be attributed to its antioxidant, anti-peroxidative, and myocardial preservative properties.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 51, September 2013, pp. 702-708

 

 

Anti-diabetic and antihyperlipidemic effect of allopolyherbal formulation in OGTT and STZ-induced diabetic rat model

Swati Manik, Vinod Gauttam & A N Kalia*

Department of Pharmacognosy, ISF College of Pharmacy, Moga, 1420 01, India

Received 11 October 2012; revised 3 June 2013

The present study was undertaken to evaluate the antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic activities of Allopolyherbal formulation (APHF) consisting of combinations of three well known medicinal plants used in traditional medicines (Trigonella foenum graceum, Momordica charantia, Aegle marmelos) and synthetic oral hypoglycaemic drug (Glipizide-GL). The optimized combination of lyophilized hydro-alcoholic extracts of drugs was 2:2:1 using OGTT model. The optimized PHF was simultaneously administered with GL and optimized using OGTT model in diabetic rats and further studied in STZ-induced diabetic rats for 21 days. The results (serum glucose level, lipid profile, hepatic enzymes and body weight) were compared with the standard drug GL (10 mg/kg body wt). The optimized APHF (500+5 mg/kg body wt) has shown significant antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic activities. The results were comparable with the standard; even better than the GL (10 mg/kg body wt) alone. The proposed hypothesis has reduced the no. of drug components from eight to three and dose almost 50 % of both PHF and GL which fulfil the FDA requirements for export. Thus the developed APHF will be an ideal alternative for the existing hypoglycemic formulations in the market with an additional advantage of hypolipidemic effect and minimizing the cardiovascular risk factors associated with diabetes.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 51, September 2013, pp. 709-714

 

 

Antibacterial potential of hydroalcoholic extracts of Triphala components against multidrug-resistant uropathogenic bacteria – A preliminary report

Anwesa Bag*, Subir Kumar Bhattacharyya, Nishith Kumar Pal1 & Rabi Ranjan Chattopadhyay

Agricultural and Ecological Research Unit, Indian Statistical Institute, 203, Barrackpore Trunk Road, Kolkata 700 108, India

Received 28 December 2012; revised 20 June 2013

Triphala”, the Ayurvedic wonder is used traditionally for the treatment of different types of diseases since antiquity.
The hydroalcoholic extracts of the three components of Triphala powder demonstrated varying degrees of strain specific antibacterial activity against multidrug-resistant uropathogenic bacteria. Terminalia chebula fruit extract was active against all the test isolates followed by Terminalia belerica and Emblica officinalis. There was a close association between antibacterial activity and total phenolic content of Triphala components.The test plant extracts were also found to be non-toxic on human erythrocyte membrane at recommended and even higher doses. The preliminary results of the present study may help in developing effective and safe antimicrobial agents from Triphala components for the treatment of urinary tract infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 51, September 2013, pp. 715-720

 

 

Antiepileptic potential of Anisomeles indica (Linn.) Kuntze aerial parts in pentylenetetrazole-induced experimental convulsions in Wistar rats

Ankush Sundriyala, Krishna Reddy V Bijjemb & Ajudhia N Kaliaa*

Departments of Pharmacognosya and Pharmacologyb, ISF College of Pharmacy, Moga 142 001, India

Received 5 October 2012; revised 3 June 2013

The chloroform (4.20% w/w), ethyl acetate (4.23% w/w) and aqueous decoction (12.11% w/w) extracts of the aerial parts of A. indica were screened for the antiepileptic activity against maximal electroshock (MES) model and pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) models at  doses of 200, 400 mg/kg, po once. Phenytoin and diazepam (25 and 2 mg/kg, ip) were used as standard drugs in MES and PTZ model, respectively. Further, ethyl acetate extract (active extract) was fractionated into flavonoid and tannin fraction, which were subsequently evaluated for the antiepileptic potential against both MES and PTZ models at a dose of 50 mg/kg, po. Pretreatment with ethyl acetate extract 200, 400 mg/kg, po, for 1 week showed significant antiepileptic activity against PTZ induced convulsions only. Isolated flavonoid fraction showed more potent antiepileptic activity as compared to ethyl acetate extract, without any neurotoxic effect. However, tannin fraction did not produce antiepileptic activity against PTZ induced convulsions. It may be concluded that the flavonoids fraction of ethyl acetate extract of aerial parts of A. indica, but not the aqueous decoction has antiepileptic potential, without producing neurotoxic effects.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 51, September 2013, pp. 721-731

 

 

Inhibitory and stimulating effect of magnesium on vanadate-induced lipid peroxidation under in vitro conditions

Agnieszka Ścibiora,b*, Dorota Gołębiowskaa, Irmina Niedźwieckaa & Agnieszka Adamczyka

a Laboratory of Physiology & Animal Biochemistry, Department of Zoology & Invertebrate Ecology, Institute of Environmental Protection, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, 102 Kraśnicka Ave, 20-718 Lublin, Poland

b Laboratory of Oxidative Stress, Centre of Interdisciplinary Research, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin,
102 Kraśnicka Ave, 20-718 Lublin, Poland

Received 9 November 2012; revised 24 May 2013

The behaviour of Mg related to vanadium(V)-induced lipid peroxidation (LPO) under in vitro conditions was examined. The studies performed on the liver supernatants (LS) obtained from control, sodium metavanadate-intoxicated, and sodium metavanadate-magnesium sulphate-administered male Wistar rats revealed and confirmed the pro-oxidative potential of V. Simultaneously, they indicated that the improved Mg status may be one of the mechanisms by which the treatment with this element may contribute to reduction of oxidative stress under the conditions of vanadate exposure. On the other hand, the results confirmed that Mg may also stimulate LPO and demonstrated that the incubation conditions and the experimental treatment of the rats from which the liver supernatants were obtained affect the intensity of the examined free radical process.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 51, September 2013, pp. 732-738

 

 

Impact of pre-exposure of tail suspension on behavioural parameters like locomotion, exploration, and anxiety in mice

Pravin Popatrao Kalea,b, Veeranjaneyulu Addepallia,* & Shalaka Ramesh Ghadawalea

aDepartment of Pharmacology, Shobhaben Pratapbhai Patel School of Pharmacy and Technology Management,
NMIMS University, Mumbai, 400 056, India

bDepartment of Pharmacology, Dr Bhanuben Nanavati Collage of Pharmacy, Vile Parle West, Mumbai 400056, India

Received 23 July 2012; revised 28 May 2013

The tail suspension test (TST) is a valid tool for assessing antidepressant activity. Association between depression and lower locomotion and exploration activities is also reported. In the present study, photoactometer, hole board and elevated plus maze tests were performed to evaluate locomotion, exploration and anxiety activities on animals of first and second set, however animals of second set were pre-exposed to TST. The comparison between these two sets will help in understanding the impact of pre-exposure to TST on behavioural parameters. In both sets, swiss albino mice were treated with caffeine (10 mg/kg, ip), bupropion (10 mg/kg, ip), duloxetine (10 mg/kg, ip), nicotine (0.8 mg/kg, sc) and normal saline. Control group of second set showed significant decrease in locomotion, exploration and increase in anxiety when compared against control group of first set. In second set, duloxetine, bupropion, and nicotine treated groups showed significant increase in locomotion when compared against control group of same set. Overall, pre-exposure to TST leads to significant decrease in locomotion, exploration activities and increase in anxiety level. Further studies demonstrating it’s time bound impact on brain monoamine levels with correlation to behavioural paradigms may help to validate these outcomes.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 51, September 2013, pp. 739-745

 

 

Somatic embryo-like structures of strawberry regenerated in vitro on media supplemented with 2,4-D and BAP

Genesia F Omar1, Fouad H Mohamed1, Klaus-Thomas Haensch2*, Sawsan H Sarg1 & Mohamed M Morsey1

1Department of Horticulture, Faculty of Agriculture, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt

2Department Plant Propagation, Leibniz-Institute of Vegetable and Ornamental Crops,
Kühnhäuser Straße 101, D‑99090 Erfurt, Germany

Received 18 January 2013; revised 5 June 2013

Somatic embryo-like structures (SELS) were produced in vitro from leaf disk and petiole explants of two cultivars of strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa Duch) on Murashige and Skoog medium with different concentrations and combinations of 2,4‑dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) and sucrose to check the embryonic nature of these structures histologically. A large number of SELS could be regenerated in both cultivars on media with 2 - 4 mg L-1 2,4-D in combination with 0.5 - 1 mg L-1 BAP and 50 g L-1 sucrose. Histological examination of SELS revealed the absence of a root pole. Therefore these structures cannot be strictly classified as somatic embryos. The SELS formed under the tested culture conditions represent malformed shoot-like and leaf-like structures. The importance of these results for the propagation of strawberries via somatic embryogenesis is discussed.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 51, September 2013, pp. 746-757

 

 

Antioxidant response and Lea genes expression under salt stress and combined salt plus water stress in two wheat cultivars contrasting in drought tolerance

Priyanka Bhagi, Vikramjit Kaur Zhawar*& Anil Kumar Gupta

Department of Biochemistry, College of Basic Sciences and Humanities,

Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana, 141 004, India

Received  31 July 2012; revised 1 July 2013

Two wheat cultivars, C306 and PBW343 contrasting in drought tolerance were compared for their antioxidant response and Lea genes’ expression under salt stress (SS) and combined stress (CS) of salt stress plus water stress during seedlings growth. The drought susceptible cultivar (PBW343) behaved different towards SS/CS than towards WS. It accumulated more dry masses in shoots, more ascorbate, had higher ascorbate to dehydroascorbate ratio, lesser dehydroascorbate, lesser malondialdehyde (MDA), more proline and higher antioxidant enzymes under SS than under WS. CS increased dry masses, ascorbate, ascorbate to dehydroascorbate ratio, antioxidant enzymes and decreased dehydroascorbate and MDA contents from levels under WS. The drought tolerant cultivar (C306) though showed higher levels of ascorbate, ascorbate to dehydroascorbate ratio, lower levels of dehydroascorbate, showed lesser dry biomasses in shoots, higher MDA and lesser ascorbate peroxidase and catalase activities under SS than under WS and these features were improved on combining WS with SS. All lea genes were induced under all stresses in both cultivars except Wrab17 in C306 only, was not induced under any stress. Eight Lea genes out of ten were induced higher under WS than SS in C306 but induced same in PBW343. Wdhn13 gene was higher salt-responsive than other lea genes in both cultivars.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 51, September 2013, pp. 758-763

 

 

Effect of cadaverine on Brassica juncea (L.) under multiple stress

Pushpa C Tomar*, Nita Lakra1 & Shyam Narayan Mishra2

*Department of Biotechnology Engineering, FET, Manav Rachna International University, Faridabad 121 004, India

1School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110 067, India

2Faculty of Life sciences, Maharishi Dayanand University, Rohtak 124 001, India

Received 9 October 2012; revised 5 June 2013

The cadaverine (Cad), an organic diamine was examined for its response on growth in salinity and metal stressed
B. juncea cv RH-30 vis-à-vis compared the response of ammonium nitrate. The Cad (1 mM) application ameliorated the effect caused by salinity and metal stress on seed germination and plant growth. The plant growth recovery (dry biomass accumulation) was dependent on stress and diamine type. The higher growth recovery potential of Cad under both stresses was due to elevation in photosynthetic pigments, nitrate reductase activity and organic nitrogen as well as soluble protein, It is inferred that growth in stressed seedlings was mediated by Cad through lowering endogenous Cd/Pb and Na+/K+ level in leaf and shoot tissues.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 51, September 2013, pp. 764-772

 

 

Identification of natural compounds which inhibit biofilm formation in clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae

H Magesha, Arun Kumara, Ayesha Alama, Priyama, Uma Sekarb, Venil N Sumantranc & Rama Vaidyanathana*

aDepartment of Biotechnology, Dr. M.G.R.Educational and Research Institute,

E.V.R. Periyar Salai, Maduravoyal, Chennai 600 095, India

bDepartment of Microbiology, Sri Ramachandra University, Porur, Chennai 600 116, India

cBhupat & Jyothi Mehta School of Biosciences, Indian Institute of Technology, Chennai 600 036, India

Received 14 November 2012; revised 18 June 2013

Klebsiella pneumoniae, an important opportunistic pathogen, exists as a biofilm in persistent infections and in-dwelling medical devices. With the objective of identifying natural compounds inhibiting biofilm formation in K. pneumoniae, 35clinical isolates were screened,out of which 7 strong biofilm producers were identified. Six natural compounds were tested for their inhibitory effects on bacterial growth and biofilm formation by determining the minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum concentration for biofilm inhibition (MBIC) for each compound. The results show that reserpine followed by linoleic acid, were the most potent biofilm inhibitors. Reserpine, an efflux pump inhibitor was effective at biofilm inhibition at a concentration of 0.0156 mg/mL, 64-fold lower concentration than its MIC. Linoleic acid, an essential fatty acid was effective as a biofilm inhibitor at 0.0312 mg/mL, which is 32-fold lower than its MIC. Berberine, another plant derived antimicrobial, chitosan and eugenol had an MBIC value of 0.0635 mg/mL. Curcumin, a natural phenolic compound was effective at biofilm inhibition at a concentration of 0.25 mg/mL, which is 50 fold less than its MIC. Notably, the MIC and MBIC data on these 6 natural compounds was reproducible in all seven high biofilm forming isolates of K. pneumoniae. The present report is a comprehensive comparative analysis of the dose dependent inhibition of various natural compounds on biofilm formation in K. pneumoniae.