Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

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VOLUME 52

NUMBER 12

DECEMBER 2014

CODEN: IJEB (A6) 52 (12) 1153-1248 (2014)

ISSN: 0019-5189 (Print); 0975-1009 (Online)

 

CONTENTS

 

 

Papers

 

 

 

Influence of L-arginine during bovine in vitro fertilization

1159

 

 

Thiago Velasco Guimarães Silva*, Bruno Baraúna da Silva, André Luiz Alves de Sá, Nathalia Nogueira da Costa, Rafael Vilar Sampai, Marcela da Silva Cordeiro, Priscila Di Paula Bessa Santana, Paulo Roberto Adona, Simone do Socorro Damasceno Santos, Moysés dos Santos Miranda & Otávio Mitio Ohashi

 

 

 

Prenatal and developmental toxicity study of meclizine and caffeine combination in female albino wistar rats

1165

 

 

Sandeep M & Alvin Jose M*

 

 

 

Daily consumption of banana marginally improves blood glucose and lipid profile in hypercholesterolemic subjects and increases serum adiponectin in type 2 diabetic patients

1173

 

 

Ratchada Cressey*, Warunee Kumsaiyai & Ampika Mangklabruks

 

 

 

Evaluation of ‘cattle’ and ‘Indian Bison’ type antigens of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis for diagnosis of Bovine Johne’s Disease using ‘indigenous ELISA’ and AGPT

1182

 

 

Donna Pahangchopi, Ran Vir Singh, Shoor Vir Singh*, Paritosh Das, Deepak Sharma, Tarun Sardana, Naveen Kumar, Kundan Kumar Chaubey & Saurabh Gupta

 

 

 

Isolation of compound and CNS depressant activities of Mikania scandens Willd with special emphasis to brain biogenic amines in mice

1186

 

 

Dilipkumar Pal* & Upal Kanti Mazumder

 

 

 

Analysis on the arcelin expression in bruchid pest resistant wild pulses using real time RT-qPCR

1195

 

 

Shanmugavel Sakthivelkumar, Velayutham Veeramani, Karuppiah Hilda, Munusamy Arumugam & Sundaram Janarthanan*

 

 

 

Reliable screening technique for evaluation of wild crucifers against mustard aphid
Lipaphis erysimi (Kalt.)

1201

 

 

SP Singh*, Sandeep Kumar, YP Singh & Ram Singh

 

 

Chromium accumulation potential of Zea mays grown under four different fertilizers

1206

 

 

B Dheeba*, P Sampathkumar and K Kannan

 

 

 

Annual Index

 

 

 

Author Index

1211

 

 

Subject Index

1215

 

 

List of Experts

1244

 

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NISCAIR Policy on Plagiarism

 

The system of formal communication in science through publication in primary journals is based on originality and quality of information being the only criteria for publication. However, there have been tendencies to misuse the system and vitiate the process of science communication for personal benefits. One of the ills afflicting science communication is plagiarism. Attempts at plagiarism may range from verbatim, copying of extensive material of other authors, misappropriating results/data of others with minor changes in language/presentation without giving credit to original source, to publish essentially the same information more than once.

As the premier publisher in India of primary scientific journals in various disciplines of science and technology, NISCAIR strongly reiterates its policy of discouraging plagiarism of all kinds. All efforts are made detect and frustrate attempts at plagiarism through editorial screening and rigorous peer review in respect of communications received for publication in NISCAIR publications. Cooperation of the scientific community is sought in our efforts to frustrate all attempts at plagiarism.

It is mandatory on the part of the corresponding author to furnish the following certificate at the time of submission of the manuscript for publication:

 

[This is to certify that the reported work in the article entitle, “(give full title with all the authors name)” submitted for publication in the journal, the……………………. is an original one and has not been submitted for publication elsewhere. I/we further certify that proper citation to the previously reported work have been given and no data/table/figures have been quoted verbatim from other publications without giving due acknowledgement and without the permission of the author(s). The consent of all the authors of this article has been obtained for submitting the article to the journal, “………………….”

Signatures and names of all the authors]

 

In case any attempt to plagiarize is brought to our attention accompanied with convincing evidence, following steps would be taken:

After consulting the respective Editorial Board Members, authors guilty of plagiarism will be debarred from publishing their papers in NISCAIR journals

Heads of the departments/institutes of the offending authors will be intimated of such incidences of plagiarism.

Such incidents of plagiarism will be publicized through the concerned NISCAIR journals in consultation with the respective Editorial Board Members.

 

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Author Index

Alvin Jose M

1165

Ampika Mangklabruks

1173

André Luiz Alves de Sá

1159

Arumugam Munusamy

1195

 

 

Bruno Baraúna da Silva

1159

 

 

Chaubey Kundan Kumar

1182

 

 

Das Paritosh

1182

Dheeba B

1206

 

 

Gupta Saurabh

1182

 

 

Hilda Karuppiah

1195

 

 

Janarthanan Sundaram

1195

 

 

Kannan K

1206

Kumar Naveen

1182

Kumar Sandeep

1201

Marcela da Silva Cordeiro

1159

Mazumder Upal Kanti

1186

Moysés dos Santos Miranda

1159

 

 

Nathalia Nogueira da Costa

1159

 

 

Otávio Mitio Ohashi

1159

 

 

Pahangchopi Donna

1182

Pal Dilipkumar

1186

Paulo Roberto Adona

1159

Priscila Di Paula Bessa Santana

1159

 

 

Rafael Vilar Sampai

159

Ratchada Cressey

1173

 

 

Sakthivelkumar Shanmugavel

1195

Sampathkumar P

1206

Sandeep M

1165

Sardana Tarun

1182

Sharma Deepak

1182

Simone do Socorro Damasceno Santos

1159

Singh Ram

1201

Singh Ran Vir

1182

Singh Shoor Vir

1182

Singh SP

1201

Singh YP

1201

 

 

Thiago Velasco Guimarães Silva

1159

 

 

Veeramani Velayutham

1195

 

 

Warunee Kumsaiyai

1173

 

 

 

 

Keyword Index

AGPT

1182

Analgesic

1186

anticonvulsant activity

1186

Antifertility

1165

Antimetabolic protein

1195

Aphid infestation index

1201

Aphis fabae

1201

 

Behavioural profiles

 

1186

Bioremediation

1206

BJD

1182

Blastocysts

1159

Bos indicus

1159

Bos taurus

1159

Brain amino acid

1186

Brassica spp.

1201

 

 

Caffeine

1165

Camelina sativa

1201

Canavalia virosa

1195

Capsella bursa-pastoris

1201

Catecholamine

1186

Cholesterol

1173

Cleavage

1159

CNS depressant effects

1186

Crambe abysinnica

1201

Diabetes

1173

ELISA

1182

Embryo

1159

Embryo toxicity

1165

Environment

1206

Farm yard manure

1206

Gene expression

1195

 

 

Heavy metal stress

1206

Hypocholesterolemics

1173

Hypoglycemics

1173

Indian cow

1182

Insect pest

1201

Insects

1195

IVF

1159

JD

1182

Lablab purpureus

1195

Leather industry

1206

Lepidium sativum

1201

Livestock

1182

Locomotor activities

1186

Maize

1206

MAP

1182

Meclizine

1165

Metabolic syndrome

1173

Morning sickness

1165

Musa spp.

1173

NPK

1206

Obesity

1173

Oocytes

1159

Panchakavya

1206

Pentylene tetrazole

1186

Pest resistance

1195

Phytoremediation

1206

Plantain

1173

Rapeseed

1201

Reproductive toxicity

1165

Resistance

1201

Semen

1159

Sleeping time

1186

Soil pollution

1206

Sperm capacitation

1159

Spermatozoa

1159

Susceptibility

1201

Tuberculosis

1182

Vermicompost

1206

Vigna umbellate

1195

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 52, December 2014, pp. 1159-1164

 

 

Influence of L-arginine during bovine in vitro fertilization

Thiago Velasco Guimarães Silva1*, Bruno Baraúna da Silva1, André Luiz Alves de Sá1, Nathalia Nogueira da Costa1, Rafael Vilar Sampaio2, Marcela da Silva Cordeiro3, Priscila Di Paula Bessa Santana1, Paulo Roberto Adona4,
Simone do Socorro Damasceno Santos1, Moysés dos Santos Miranda1 & Otávio Mitio Ohashi1

1Institute of Biological Sciences, In vitro Fertilization Laboratory, Federal University of Pará, Rua Augusto Corrêa 66075110, Brazil

2Faculty of Animal Science and Food Engineering, University of São Paulo, Pirassununga, SP, Brazil

3Federal Institute of Pará, Abaetetuba, PA, Brazil

4Paraná North University, Tamarana, PR, Brazil

Received 13 June 2013; revised 01 October 2014

The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of using L-arginine during in vitro fertilization (IVF) on in vitro embryonic development using Bos taurus and Bos indicus semen. Effect of different concentrations (0, 1, 10 and 50 mM) of L-arginine, added to the IVF medium, was evaluated on the fertilization rate at 18 h post-fertilization (hpf), NO3-/NO2- production during IVF by the Griess colorimetric method (30 hpf), cleavage and blastocyst rates (on Day 2 and Day 7 of culture, respectively) and total blastocyst cell number (Day 7 of culture). The results reveal that the addition of 50 mM L-arginine to IVF medium, with either Bos taurus or Bos indicus spermatozoa, decreased the cleavage rate and blastocyst rate compared to the control group. Other concentrations did not affect embryo production. However, 1 mM L-arginine with
Bos indicus semen increased the proportion of hatched blastocysts. These results indicate that high L-arginine concentrations may exhibit toxic effects on bovine gametes during in vitro fertilization.

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 52, December 2014, pp. 1165-1172

 

 

Prenatal and developmental toxicity study of meclizine and caffeine combination in female albino wistar rats

Sandeep M & Alvin Jose M*

Department of Pharmacology, Swamy Vivekanandha College of Pharmacy, Tiruchengode 637 205, Tamil Nadu, India

Received 30 July 2013; revised 27 October 2014

Meclizine and caffeine combination is used for the treatment of morning sickness. Both compounds are teratogenic and caffeine is known to possess anti-fertility activity also. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the reproductive toxic effect of meclizine and caffeine combination. Three doses were taken for the study; low dose (LD; meclizine 3.7 mg/kg and caffeine 3 mg/kg) was selected from commercially available formulation, middle dose (MD; meclizine 37 mg/kg and caffeine 30 mg/kg) and high dose (HD; meclizine 370 mg/kg and caffeine 300 mg/kg). The mixture was administered 1-7 days and
8-14 days for fertility and embryotoxic studies respectively. Laparotomy was done on 10th day of gestation period. Number of implants and corpora lutea were counted, pre and post-implantation losses were determined. In embryo toxicity study fetuses were evaluated for external, skeletal and visceral examination. High dose was removed from both fertility and embryotoxicity studies due to its severe toxicity to the dam. Significant anti-fertility activity was observed at middle dose. Embryotoxicity study showed significant reduction in fetal body weight, body length and body mass index, dam body weight gain on gestation
day 14. Absolute kidney weight in MD and absolute and relative spleen weight in both LD and MD were significantly reduced. There was no increase in external or internal congenital anomalies at both LD and MD. The, results suggest that prescription of meclizine and caffeine for morning sickness in early pregnancy should be reviewed carefully.

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 52, December 2014, pp. 1173-1181

 

 

Daily consumption of banana marginally improves blood glucose and lipid
profile in hypercholesterolemic subjects and increases serum adiponectin in
type 2 diabetic patients

Ratchada Cressey1*, Warunee Kumsaiyai1 & Ampika Mangklabruks2

1Department of Medical Technology, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences; 2Department of Internal Medicine,
Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, 50200, Thailand

Received 10 October 2013; revised 04 April 2014

In this study, we explored the effects of consumption of banana in thirty hypercholesterolemic and fifteen type 2 diabetic subjects. They were given a daily dose of 250 or 500 grams of banana for breakfast for 12 weeks. Fasting serum lipid, glucose and insulin levels were measured initially as well as every 4 weeks. Daily consumption of banana significantly lowered fasting blood glucose (from 99±7.7 to 92±6.9 and 102±7.3 to 92±5.7 mg∙dL-1 (p<0.05) after consuming banana 250 or 500 g/day for 4 wk, respectively) and LDL-cholesterol/HDL-cholesterol ratio (from 2.7±0.98 to 2.4±0.85 and 2.8±0.95 to 2.5±0.79, p<0.005) in hypercholesterolemic volunteers. Analysis of blood glycemic response after eating banana showed significantly lower 2 h-postprandial glucose level compared to baseline in hypercholesterolemic volunteers given a dose of 250 g/day. The changes of blood glucose and lipid profile in diabetic patients were not statistically significant, but for plasma levels of adiponectin, there were significantly increased (from 37.5±9.36 to 48.8±7.38 ng∙ml-1, p<0.05) compared to baseline. Although it remains to be confirmed with larger group of volunteers, this pilot study has demonstrated that daily consumption of banana (@ 250 g/day) is harmless both in diabetic and hypercholesterolemic volunteers and marginally beneficial to the later.

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 52, December 2014, pp. 1182-1185

 

 

Evaluation of ‘cattle’ and ‘Indian Bison’ type antigens of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis for diagnosis of Bovine Johne’s Disease using ‘indigenous ELISA’ and AGPT

 

Donna Pahangchopi1, Ran Vir Singh1, Shoor Vir Singh2*, Paritosh Das1, Deepak Sharma1, Tarun Sardana1, Naveen Kumar2, Kundan Kumar Chaubey2 & Saurabh Gupta2

1Division of Animal Genetics, Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar, Uttar Pradesh, India

2Division of Animal Health, Central Institute for Research on Goats, Makhdoom, Farah, Mathura, Uttar Pradesh, India

Received 18 October 2013; revised 07 February 2014

Two antigens (‘cattle’ type and ‘Indian Bison’ type) of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis were evaluated for diagnosis of Johne’s disease (JD) in a gaushala (cattle herd). Of the 160 cows of Sahiwal and Hariana breeds screened, 81 (50.6%) tested positive in ELISA and 66 (41.8%) in AGPT test. Using the two antigens, 33.5% tested positive in both the tests while 41.1% tested negative. Exclusively, only 8.2% tested positive in ELISA while 17.1% tested positive in AGPT. Two antigens together detected 58.9% prevalence of MAP in the gaushala. Individually, indigenous ELISA using antigen from native source of MAP proved superior to AGPT in the diagnosis of JD in cows.

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 52, December 2014, pp. 1186-1194

 

 

Isolation of compound and CNS depressant activities of Mikania scandens
Willd with special emphasis to brain biogenic amines in mice

Dilipkumar Pal1* & Upal Kanti Mazumder2

1Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Guru Ghasidas Vishwavidyalaya (A Central University), Koni, Bilaspur 495 009, India

2Ex-Professor, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032, India

Received on 26 March 2013, revised 28 October 2014

Mikania scandens, a twining herb that grows as a weed in India and Bangladesh is used as vegetables and is a good source of vitamin A, C, B complex, mikanin, sesquiterpenes, betasitosterin, stigmasterol and friedelin. The present communication reports CNS depressant activities with special emphasis to brain biogenic amines in mice. Ethanol extract of leaves of M. scandens (EEMS) was prepared by Soxhalation and analyzed chemically. EEMS potentiated sleeping time induced by pentobarbitone, diazepam and meprobamate and showed significant reduction in the number of writhes and stretches. EEMS caused significant protection against pentylene tetrazole-induced convulsion and increased catecholamines and brain amino acids level significantly. Results showed that EEMS produced good CNS depressant effects in mice.

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 52, December 2014, pp. 1195-1200

 

 

Analysis on the arcelin expression in bruchid pest resistant wild pulses
using real time RT-qPCR

 

Shanmugavel Sakthivelkumar, Velayutham Veeramani, Karuppiah Hilda,
Munusamy Arumugam & Sundaram Janarthanan*

Department of Zoology, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600 025, India

Received 29 October 2013; revised 19 August 2014

Arcelin, the antimetabolic protein from wild pulses is a known natural insecticidal molecule. Wild pulses with high arcelin content could serve as potential source to increase the levels of insect resistance in cultivated pulse crops. In this study, arcelin (Arl) gene expression was screened in seven stored product insect pest resistant wild pulse varieties using real time RT-qPCR. Arcelin gene specific real time PCR primers were synthesized from arcelin mRNA sequence of the wild pulse variety, Lablab purpureus. The results revealed different levels of arcelin gene expression in the tested varieties. Canavalia virosa registered significantly high content indicating its suitability for utilization of arcelin gene in developing stored product insect pest resistance with other cultivated pulses.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 52, December 2014, pp. 1201-1205

 

 

Reliable screening technique for evaluation of wild crucifers against
mustard aphid Lipaphis erysimi (Kalt.)

SP Singh1,2*, Sandeep Kumar2, YP Singh1 & Ram Singh1

1Directorate of Rapeseed-Mustard Research, Sewar, Bharatpur, Rajasthan 321303, India

2National Bureau of Plant Genetic Resources, Pusa Campus, New Delhi 110012, India

Received 23 January 2014; revised 7 June 2014

Wild crucifers namely Arabidopsis thaliana, Brassica fruticulosa, B. rugosa, B. spinescens, B. tournefortii, Camelina sativa, Capsella bursa-pastoris, Crambe abysinnica, Cronopus didymus, Diplotaxis assurgens, D. gomez-campoi,
D. muralis, D. siettiana, D. tenuisiliqua, Enatharocarpus lyratus, Lepidium sativum and Sinapis alba along with five cultivated Brassica species including B. rapa (BSH-1), B. juncea (Rohini), B. napus (GSC-6), B. carinata (DLSC-2) and Eruca sativa (T-27) were screened against mustard aphid Lipaphis erysimi (Kalt.) with a standardized technique under definite level of aphid pressure developed using specially designed cages. Observations have revealed that B. fruticulosa,
B. spinescens, Camelina sativa, Crambe abysinnica and Lepidium sativum were resistant to mustard aphid L. erysimi with aphid infestation index (AII) ≤1. Capsella bursa-pastoris was highly susceptible to bean aphid, Aphis fabae during its vegetative stage (with 100% mortality). Other genotypes were found in the range of ‘susceptible’ to ‘highly susceptible’ with AII ranging 3-5.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 52, December 2014, pp. 1206-1210

 

 

Chromium accumulation potential of Zea mays grown under four
different fertilizers

B Dheeba1*, P Sampathkumar1 & K Kannan2

1Department of Chemistry and Biosciences; 2Department of Mathematics, Srinivasa Ramanujan Centre,
SASTRA University, Kumbakonam 612 001, Tamil Nadu, India.

Received 29 January 2014; revised 03 November 2014

Chromium (Cr) contamination in soil is a growing concern in sustainable agriculture production and food safety. We performed pot experiment with chromium (30 mg/ soil) to assess the accumulation potential of Zea mays and study the influence of four fertilizers, viz. Farm Yard Manure (FYM), NPK, Panchakavya (PK) and Vermicompost (VC) with respect to Cr accumulation. The oxidative stress and pigment (chlorophyll) levels were also examined. The results showed increased accumulation of chromium in both shoots and roots of Zea mays under FYM and NPK supply, and reduced with PK and VC. While the protein and pigment contents decreased in Cr treated plants, the fertilizers substantiated the loss to overcome the stress. Similarly, accumulation of Cr increased the levels of antioxidant enzymes such as catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and peroxidase (POD) indicating the enhanced damage control activity. However, these levels were relatively low in plants supplemented with fertilizers. Our results confirm that the maize can play an effective role in bioremediation of soils polluted with chromium, particularly in supplementation with fertilizers such as farm yard manure and NPK.