Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

ISSN: 0019-5189   CODEN: IJEB (A6) 41(3) 185-278 (2003)
VOLUME 41

NUMBER 3

MARCH 2003

 

CONTENTS

Review Article

 

Fighting cancer in the information age: The role of Internet

Sanjoy Kumar Pal, G S Pandey, A Kesari, G Choudhuri & Balraj Mittal

189

 

 

Papers

 

Sinusoidal electromagnetic field of 50 Hz helps in retaining calcium in tibias of aged rats

K L Khanduja & N Syal

201

 

 

Studies on kinetic properties of acid phosphatase from nuclei-free rat liver homogenate using different substrates

Jignesh D Pandya, Bhavesh D Patel, Subhash D Katewa & Surendra S Katyare

 

205

 

 

Histological changes in intestine in semichronic diarrhoea induced by lactose enriched diet in rats: Effect of Diarex-vet

S K Mitra, Ashish Sachan, Venkatesha Udupa, S J Seshadri & K Jayakumar

 

211

 

 

Inhibition of mutagenicity of food-derived heterocyclic amines by sulforaphane — A constituent of broccoli

Shishu & I P Kaur

 

216

 

 

Melatonin produced metabolic changes in testis and did not prevent indomethacin-induced testicular lipid peroxidation in adult rat

Faried Abdel-Kader El-Sayed Hemieda

 

220

 

 

Effect of disinfectants on stability and transmissibility of R-plasmid in E. coli isolated from drinking water

Suman Tewari, Pramod W Ramteke & S K Garg

 

225

 

 

Mentha piperita (Linn.) leaf extract provides protection against radiation induced chromosomal damage in bone marrow of mice

R M Samarth & Ashok Kumar

 

229

 

 

Wound healing property of ethanolic extract of leaves of Hyptis suaveolens with

supportive role of antioxidant enzymes

Annie Shirwaikar, Radhika Shenoy, A L Udupa, S L Udupa & Somashekar Shetty

 

238

 

 

A comparative study of allitin and garlic on lipid turnover  in a teleost,

Anabas testudineus (Bloch)

Cyril Johnson, A Banerji & Oommen V Oommen

 

242

 

 

Chitin degrading potential of bacteria from extreme and moderate environment

N N Nawani & B P Kapadnis

248

 

 

Immuno-pathotyping of Karnal bunt (Tilletia indica) isolates of wheat using

anti-mycelial antibodies

Gaurav K Varshney, U S Singh, D P Mishra & Anil Kumar

 

255

 

 

High frequency axillary bud multiplication and ex vitro rooting of Wedelia chinensis (Osbeck) Merr. — A medicinal plant

K P Martin, M R Beena & Dominic Joseph

 

262

 

 

Notes

 

Antioxidant tolerance of kidney after irradiation

Neslihan Bukan, Yıldız Güney, Ayşe Hiçsönmez & Ayşe Bilgihan

267

 

 

Gender differences in predator induced pain perception in rats

H H Sudhakar & D Venkatesh

270

 

 

Association of cucumovirus and potyvirus with betelvine (Piper betle L.) as evidenced by ELISA and RT-PCR

S K Raj, A Srivastava, M R Chowdhury & J K Johri

 

273

 

 

Book Review

 

Nutrition and Aging

277

Suresh I S Rattan

 

   
Author Index
 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 41, March 2003, pp. 189-200

 

 

Review Article

 

Fighting cancer in the information age: The role of Internet

Sanjoy Kumar Pal, G S Pandey, A Kesari, G Choudhuri & Balraj Mittal

 

Cancer is a major health problem worldwide which is likely to assume alarming proportions in the next two decades. Communication and information have increasingly been considered important in helping people to cope with cancer. The arrival of Internet offers the opportunity to fundamentally reinvent medicine and health care delivery. Medical professionals can now use the Internet for continuing medical education, access latest medical information, for fast confirmation of diagnosis, exchange opinion on treatment strategies and in palliative care. Internet can provide cost-effective and timely ways to deliver a complex mix of interesting and high-quality information and expertise to cancer patients. Patients can also independently search the Internet to know about their illness and treatment options. However, of concern is the quality of information that is available in the ‘Net’. Some Internet sites may contain erroneous information on cancer and can pose serious problems. There are also many good sites, which provide quality information on cancer for medical professionals, researchers and patients. This article focuses on how the Internet will aid us in fight against cancer.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 41, March 2003, pp. 201-204

 

 

Papers

Sinusoidal electromagnetic field of 50 Hz helps in retaining calcium in tibias of aged rats

K L Khanduja & N Syal

 

Received 26 June 2002; revised 27 December 2002

 

 

Effect of 50Hz sinusoidal electromagnetic field (SEMF) on normal bone physiology was evaluated in young and old female and male Wistar rats. Exposure to SEMF resulted in increased 45Ca retention in tibias of aged animals only. Levels of serum calcium in young female and male rats were significantly less than in respective aged rats. These were further decreased after 4 weeks of SEMF exposure. SEMF exposure did not change the serum calcium levels in aged rats, and inorganic phosphates in young and aged animals. Similarly, the levels of tartrate resistant acid and alkaline phosphatase were significantly decreased in young rats, whereas the levels remained unchanged in aged rats of either sex. The results revealed that SEMF of 1mT can prevent bone calcium loss due to aging in animals.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 41, March 2003, pp. 205-210

 

 

Studies on kinetic properties of acid phosphatase from nuclei-free rat liver homogenate using different substrates

Jignesh D Pandya, Bhavesh D Patel, Subhash D Katewa & Surendra S Katyare

 

Received 10 July 2002; revised 2 December 2002

 

 

Kinetic properties of rat liver acid phosphatase were evaluated using the conventional synthetic substrates sodium beta glycerophosphate (GP) and p-nitrophenyl phosphate (PNPP) and physiologically occurring phosphate esters of carbohydrates, vitamins and nucleotides. The extent of hydrolysis varied depending on the substrates; phosphate esters of vitamins and carbohydrates were in general poor substrates. Kinetic analysis revealed the presence of two components of the enzyme for all the substrates. Component I had low Km and low Vmax. Opposite was true for component II. The Km values were generally high for GP, PNPP and adenosine diphosphate (ADP). Amongst the nucleotides substrates AMP showed high affinity i.e. low Km. The increase in enzyme activity in general at high substrate concentration seems to be due to substrate binding and positive cooperativity. AMP which showed highest affinity was inhibitory at high concentration beyond 1mM. The results suggest that in situ the nucleotides may be the preferred substrates for acid phosphatase.

 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 41, March 2003, pp. 211-215

 

 

Histological changes in intestine in semichronic diarrhoea induced by lactose enriched diet in rats: Effect of Diarex-vet

S K Mitra, Ashish Sachan, Venkatesha Udupa & S J Seshadri

and

K Jayakumar

 

Received 13 October 1999; revised 7 January 2003

 

 

Efficacy of Diarex-Vet (The Himalaya Drug Company, Makali, Bangalore, India) was evaluated histologically in semichronic diarrhoea induced by lactose enriched diet in rats. The rats in different groups were given lactose enriched diet alone for 2 days before starting the treatment with Diarex-Vet at a dose of 250, 500 and 750 mg/kg body weight along with lactose enriched diet for 5 days. Animals were euthanised at the end of 5 days of treatment and histological changes were observed in the ileum, caecum and colon. Semiquantitative analysis of goblet cells in intestines showed dose dependent response among the treated groups. The morphological changes were comparable to normal in the group given 750 mg/kg body wt Diarex-Vet. The effects observed were attributed to the lactase like analogous activity of Diarex-Vet or the inhibition of the osmotic processes in the intestinal lumen thereby reducing the morphological changes in the intestines.

 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 41, March 2003, pp. 216-219

 

 

Inhibition of mutagenicity of food-derived heterocyclic amines by sulforaphane — A constituent of broccoli

Shishu& I P Kaur

 

Received 28 October 2002; revised 23 December 2002

 

 

Sulforaphane, a constituent of broccoli was investigated for its antimutagenic potential against different classes of cooked food mutagens (heterocyclic amines). These include imidazoazaarenes such as 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ), 2-amino-3,4-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (MeIQ), 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx) and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP); pyridoindole derivatives such as 3-amino-1,4-dimethyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole (Trp-P-1) and 3-amino-1-methyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole (Trp-P-2); and, dipyridoimidazole derivative such as 2-amino-6-methyldipyrido[1,2-a:3’,2’-d]imidazole (Glu-P-1). Tests were carried out by Ames Salmonella/reversion assay using Salmonella typhimurium TA98 (frame shift mutation sensitive) and TA100 (base pair mutation sensitive) bacterial strains in the presence of Aroclor 1254-induced rat liver S9. Results of these in vitro antimutagenicity studies strongly suggest that sulforaphane is a potent inhibitor of the mutagenicity induced by imidazoazaarenes such as IQ, MeIQ and MeIQx (~60% inhibition) and moderately active against pyridoindole derivatives such as Trp-P-1 and Trp-P-2 (32-48% inhibition), but ineffective against dipyridoimidazole derivative (Glu-P-1) in TA100.

 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 41, March 2003, pp. 220-224

 

 

Melatonin produced metabolic changes in testis and did not prevent indomethacin-induced testicular
lipid peroxidation in adult rat

Faried Abdel-Kader El-Sayed Hemieda

 

Received 17 September 2002; revised 18 December 2002

 

 

Melatonin was orally given to rats at the dosage of 0.75 mg/rat/day for 7 days and challenged on the day 7 with a single toxic dose of indomethacin (20mg/kg, intramuscularly) to test either protection afforded by melatonin against indomethacin-induced oxidative tissue damage or effects of repeated administration of this hormone on some testicular metabolic parameters. The results showed increased lipid peroxidation, as evidenced by the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, accompanied by non-significantly decreased glutathione content in the testis of rats treated with indomethacin. However, prior administration of melatonin failed to prevent indomethacin-induced testicular lipid peroxidation. No change in the production of lipid peroxidation and glutathione was observed as well after treatment with melatonin alone. Meanwhile, exogenous melatonin inhibited testicular levels of total lipid, total protein, and activity of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase. All treated rats exhibited unchanged activity of both acid phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase. The results indicated inability of oral administration of melatonin to prevent some of the oxidative damaging effects of indomethacin in the rat testis. In addition, the study provided an evidence that melatonin has an inhibitory action on the testicular metabolism in adult rats and thereby suggests a possible role of this hormone in modulating functions of rat testis.

 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 41, March 2003, pp. 225-228

 

 

Effect of disinfectants on stability and transmissibility of R-plasmid in E. coli isolated from drinking water

Suman Tewari, Pramod W Ramteke & S K Garg

 

Received 8 July 2002; revised 24 December 2002

 

 

Drug resistant enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC, 086 serotype) isolated from contaminated piped drinking water supply (Fecal coliform 160/100ml) was studied for effect of disinfectants (chlorine and UVB) on stability and transmissibility of R-plasmid. The strain was resistant to streptomycin and bacitracin and tolerant to multiple metal ions of Cd, Cr, Co, As, Ni, Zn and Hg. A plasmid of molecular size of 3.7 Kb was detected in the organism. After exposure to sublethal doses of disinfectants, complete elimination of resistances to streptomycin and Cr was observed. Partial loss of resistance to Hg due to chlorine was detected. Although UVB did not effected the pattern of transmissibility effect on frequency of transfer was observed. Surprisingly, in UVB irradiated cells, significantly enhanced rate of transfer was noted.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 41, March 2003, pp. 229-237

 

 

Mentha piperita (Linn.) leaf extract provides protection against radiation induced chromosomal damage in
bone marrow of mice

R M Samarth & Ashok Kumar

 

Received 19 September 2002; revised 27 December 2002

 

 

Oral administration of M. piperita (1 g/kg body weight/day) before exposure to gamma radiation was found to be effective in protecting against the chromosomal damage in bone marrow of Swiss albino mice. Animals exposed to 8 Gy gamma radiation showed chromosomal aberrations in the form of chromatid breaks, chromosome breaks, centric rings, dicentrics, exchanges and acentric fragments. There was a significant increase in the frequency of aberrant cells at 6 hr after irradiation. Maximum aberrant cells were observed at 12 hr post-irradiation autopsy time. Further, the frequency of aberrant cells showed decline at late post-irradiation autopsy time. However, in the animals pretreated with Mentha extract, there was a significant decrease in the frequency of aberrant cells as compared to the irradiated control. Also significant increase in percentage of chromatid breaks, chromosome breaks, centric rings, dicentrics, exchanges, acentric fragments, total aberrations and aberrations/damaged cell was observed at 12 hr post-irradiation autopsy time in control animals, whereas Mentha pretreated irradiated animals showed a significant decrease in percentage of such aberrations. A significant decrease in GSH content and increase in LPO level was observed in control animals, whereas Mentha pretreated irradiated animals exhibited a significant increase in GSH content and decrease in LPO level but the values remained below the normal. The radioprotective effect of Mentha was also demonstrated by determining the LD50/30 values (DRF=1.78). The results from the present study suggest that Mentha pretreatment provides protection against radiation induced chromosomal damage in bone marrow of Swiss albino mice.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 41, March 2003, pp. 238-241

 

 

Wound healing property of ethanolic extract of leaves of
Hyptis suaveolens with supportive role of antioxidant
enzymes

Annie Shirwaikar, Radhika Shenoy, A L Udupa, S L Udupa & Somashekar Shetty

 

Received 10 October 2002; revised 17 January 2003

 

 

Ethanolic extract of leaves of Hyptis suaveolens was evaluated for its wound healing activity in ether-anaesthetized Wistar rats at two different doses (400 and 800mg/kg) using incision, excision, and dead space wound model. Significant increase in skin breaking strength, granuloma breaking strength, wound contraction, hydroxyproline content and dry granuloma weight and decrease in epithelization period was observed. A supportive study made on granuloma tissue to estimate the levels of catalase and superoxide dismutase recorded a significant increase in the level of these antioxidant enzymes. Granuloma tissue was subjected to histopathological examination to determine the pattern of lay-down for collagen using Van Gieson and Masson Trichrome stains. Enhanced wound healing activity may be due to free radical scavenging action of the plant and enhanced level of antioxidant enzymes in granuloma tissue. Better collagenation may be because of improved antioxidant studies.

 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 41, March 2003, pp. 242-247

 

 

A comparative study of allitin and garlic on lipid turnover in a teleost, Anabas testudineus (Bloch)

Cyril Johnson, A Banerji & Oommen V Oommen

 

Received 30 May 2002; revised 3 January 2003

 

 

Both allitin and garlic have anti-lipogenic properties substantiated by the activity of three lipogenic enzymes and lipid profiles. The rise in the HDL levels and simultaneous fall in the LDL upon garlic intake is the most convincing indicator of reduced lipid concentration. However, the administration of allitin recorded a decrease in the HDL and LDL levels, but when calculated on a percentage basis, there was a marginal increase in the HDL level. On the basis of results, it can be concluded that garlic or its derivatives have hypolipidaemic effect in submammalian vertebrates also. The cholesterol lowering effect of allitin and garlic can be commercially exploited for producing fish with low cholesterol for possible human consumption.

 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 41, March 2003, pp. 248-254

 

 

Chitin degrading potential of bacteria from extreme and moderate environment

N N Nawani & B P Kapadnis

 

Received 22 November 2002; revised 19 January 2003

 

 

Five hundred chitin-degrading bacteria were isolated from 20 different locations. High percentage of potent chitin-degraders was obtained from polluted regions. Potent chitin- degrading bacteria were selected by primary and secondary screening. Among the selected isolates, 78% were represented by the genus Streptomyces. Majority of the isolates had good chitinolysis relative to the growth although isolates with better growth were also seen. Such isolates are important for the production of SCP from chitinous wastes. The potent isolates belonged to the genera Streptomyces, Kitasatosporia, Saccharopolyspora, Nocardioides, Nocardiopsis, Herbidospora, Micromonospora, Microbispora, Actinoplanes, Serratia, Bacillus and Pseudomonas. This study forms a comprehensive base for the study of diversity of chitinolytic systems of bacteria

 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 41, March 2003, pp. 255-261

 

 

Immuno-pathotyping of Karnal bunt (Tilletia indica) isolates of wheat using anti-mycelial antibodies

Gaurav K Varshney, U S Singh, D P Mishra & Anil Kumar

 

Received 18 June 2002; revised 28 November 2002

 

 

Two types of polyclonal antibodies raised against whole lyophilized (LMA) and fractionated mycelial antigen (FMA) of most virulent, Pantnagar isolate of T. indica were used for the development of immunoassay systems, viz. dot immuno-binding assay (DIBA) and indirect enzyme linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA) procedures. The immuno-assays were developed by performing antigen concentration kinetics and antibody dilution curves analyses. These assays were employed for immuno-analysis of diversity amongst KB pathogen based on antibodies reactivity pattern and subsequently categorization into distinct sero-groups. The reactivity of two polyclonal antibodies was tested with 15 (P1-P15) isolates of T. indica. When anti-LMA antibodies were tested, four serologically distinct groups were formed based on percent reactivity (>75%, highly reactive; 60-75%; moderately reactive, <50-25%; low reactive and <25%, non-reactive). However, when anti-FMA antibodies were used, two distinct sero-groups were formed based on reactivity patterns (group I, highly reactive P1, P3, P4, P11 and P13, group II, less reactive P2, P4, P5, P6, P7, P8, P9, P10, P12, P14 and P15).

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 41, March 2003, pp. 262-266

 

 

High frequency axillary bud multiplication and ex vitro rooting of Wedelia chinensis
(Osbeck) Merr. — A medicinal plant

K P Martin, M R Beena & Dominic Joseph

 

Received 23 August 2002; revised 5 December 2002

 

 

An efficient protocol was achieved for rapid propagation of Wedelia chinensis (Osbeck) Merr. through axillary bud proliferation and ex vitro rooting. Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with benzyladenine (BA; 8.87 µM) and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA; 2.46 µM) was optimal for axillary bud proliferation, which developed a mean of 8.3 shoots/node. Excision and culture of node segments from in vitro shoots on medium supplemented with the same concentration of growth regulators developed more than 30 shoots within 40 days. Excision and culture of nodes in succession enhanced the number of shoots. Shoot multiplication did not exhibit decrease in the number of shoots even at 10th subculture. Nevertheless, the shoots exhibited a tendency towards stunted nature. But reduction of BA to 4.44 or 2.22 M resumed normal growth of shoots. Half strength MS medium fortified with IBA (2.46 µM) induced the highest number of roots. All in vitro rooted shoots survived in field. Dipping of the basal end of shoots collected from multiplication medium in IBA (2.46 µM) solution for 7 days induced roots and its transfer to small pots facilitated the survival of all rooted shoots (100%). Rooting ex vitro by direct transfer of shoots from multiplication medium exhibited 89.2 per cent survival. Use of commercial sugar and tap water and also the omission of in vitro rooting reduce the propagation cost 50-70 per cent. The protocol enables to harvest more than 50,000 plantlets within 150 days starting from a single node explant.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 41, March 2003, pp. 267-269

 

 

Notes

Antioxidant tolerance of kidney after irradiation

Neslihan Bukan, Yıldız Güney, Ayşe Hiçsönmez & Ayşe Bilgihan

 

Received 29 September 2002; revised 11 December 2002

 

 

Different doses of irradiation were performed in which group 1 (non-irradiated), group 2 (8 Gy/single dose/whole body) and group 3 (15 Gy/single dose/whole body) were formed of guinea pigs. After 24 hr of radiation exposure the levels of lipid peroxidation product, malondialdehyde, (MDA), glutathione (GSH) and activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were measured in the whole kidney. The MDA content increased in animals irradiated with 8 and 15 Gy. And group 3 showed an increase the level of MDA. GSH contents of kidney in group 2 and 3 increased. The activity of SOD decreased markedly in group 3 when compared with control group. The activity of GSH-Px decreased significantly in group 2 and group 3 in comparison to controls. It may be concluded that a high dose of ionizing irradiation cause excessive oxidative stress in kidney.

 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 41, March 2003, pp. 270-272

 

 

Gender differences in predator induced pain perception
in rats

H H Sudhakar & D Venkatesh

 

Received 23 October 2002; revised 24 December 2002

 

 

Pain is an unpleasant sensation. It warns the living being about the impending damage to the tissues. The perception of pain is influenced by physical and psychological factors. The impact of chronic intermittent psychological stress on pain perception and the differences in antinociceptive responses have been studied in male and anestrous female albino rats. Fifteen rats in each group were subjected to psychological stress, by exposing them to their natural predator – cat, for a duration of 20 min daily for 12 consecutive days. Tail flick response latency to radiant heat was used as a measure to evaluate pain perception. It was observed that both the groups had a relatively high pain threshold at the beginning of exposure schedule due to the modulation of opioid analgesic system by the higher level of circulating testosterone in males and low level of estrogen in anaestrous females. However, the threshold for pain perception showed a gradually declining trend in both the groups over the next 11 days to reach the control values. This increase in sensitivity to pain or decreased pain threshold could be attributed to the phenomenon of habituation.

 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 41, March 2003, pp. 273-276

 

 

Association of cucumovirus and potyvirus with betelvine (Piper betle L.) as evidenced by ELISA and RT-PCR

S K Raj1, A Srivastava1, M R Chowdhury3 & J K Johri2

1Molecular Virology, 2Plant Protection Division, National Botanical Research Institute, Lucknow-226 001.

3Agricultural Food Engineering Department, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721 302, India

 

 

Received 23 August 2002; revised 21 January 2003

 

 

An attempt was made to detect various viruses of Piper betle grown at Mahoba and Banthara in India. DAC-ELISA and RT-PCR tests were performed in leaf sap samples of betelvine for detection of a cucumovirus (Cucumber mosaic virus) and potyvirus (Bean yellow mosaic virus) using specific antibodies and universal primers of respective viruses. DAC-ELISA could detect only CMV. However, RT-PCR detected both cucumovirus and potyvirus infection in betelvine samples. Association of CMV with betelvine was observed for the first time in the present study.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology Vol. 41, March 2003, pp. 277-278

 

 

Book Review

Nutrition and Aging

 

AUTHOR INDEX

Banerji A

242

Nawani N N

248

Beena M R

262

 

 

Bilgihan Ayşe

267

Oommen V Oommen

242

Bukan Neslihan

267

 

 

 

 

Pal Sanjoy Kumar

189

Choudhuri G

189

Pandey G S

189

Chowdhury M R

273

Pandya Jignesh D

205

 

 

Patel Bhavesh D

205

Garg S K

225

 

 

Güney Yıldız

267

Raj S K

273

 

 

Ramteke Pramod W

225

Hemieda Faried Abdel-Kader El-Sayed

220

Rattan Suresh I S

277

Hiçsönmez Ayşe

267

 

 

 

 

Sachan Ashish

211

Jayakumar K

211

Samarth R M

229

Johnson Cyril

242

Seshadri S J

211

Johri J K

273

Shenoy Radhika

238

Joseph Dominic

262

Shetty Somashekar

238

 

 

Shirwaikar Annie

238

Kapadnis B P

248

Shishu

216

Katewa Subhash D

205

Singh U S

255

Katyare Surendra S

205

Srivastava A

273

Kaur I P

216

Sudhakar H H

270

Kesari A

189

Syal N

201

Khanduja K L

201

 

 

Kumar Anil

255

Tewari Suman

225

Kumar Ashok

229

 

 

 

 

Udupa A L

238

Martin K P

262

Udupa S L

238

Mishra D P

255

Udupa Venkatesha

211

Mitra S K

211

 

 

Mittal Balraj

189

Varshney Gaurav K

255

 

 

Venkatesh D

270