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Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

 

 

 

ISSN : 0019-5189

 

CODEN : IJEB (A6) 42(8) 743-846 (2004)

VOLUME 42

NUMBER 8    

AUGUST 2004

 

 

 

CONTENTS

 

Review Article

 

Fetal growth and development: Roles of fatty acid transport proteins and nuclear transcription factors in human placenta

747

Asim K Duttaroy

 

 

 

Papers

 

Role of l-lysine HCl in adoptive immune therapy towards development of suitable tuberculosis vaccination

758

S Dasgupta, V Chandran, A Bhinge, S Sewlikar, A Nimbkar & D Datta

 

 

 

Quercetin attenuates thermal hyperalgesia and cold allodynia in STZ-induced diabetic rats

766

Muragundla Anjaneyulu & Kanwaljit Chopra

 

 

 

Clenbuterol treatment stimulates cell proliferation in denervated chick gastrocnemius muscle

770

Surender S Katoch & Karuna Sharma

 

 

 

Bacopa monniera Linn. extract modulates antioxidant and marker enzyme status in fibrosarcoma bearing rats

776

G Rohini, K E Sabitha & C S Shyamala Devi

 

 

 

Effect of bamboo shoot, Bambusa arundinacea (Retz.) Willd. on thyroid status under conditions of varying iodine intake in rats

781

Amar K Chandra, Dishari Ghosh, Sanjukta Mukhopadhyay & Smritiratan Tripathy

 

[IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 A61 K 35]

 

 

 

Effect of aqueous leaf extract of Irvingia gabonensis on gastrointestinal tract in rodents

787

F Abdulrahman, I S Inyang, J Abbah, L Binda, S Amos & K Gamaniel

 

[IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 A61 P]

 

 

 

Effect of Coscinium fenestratum on hepatotoxicity in rats

792

M R Venukumar & M S Latha

 

[IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 A61 K]

 

 

 

Analysis of time-dependent recovery from beryllium toxicity following chelation therapy and antioxidant supplementation

798

Sonia Johri, Sadhana Shrivastava, Pragya Sharma & Sangeeta Shukla

 

 

In vitro antioxidant studies of Annona squamosa Linn. leaves

803

Annie Shirwaikar, K Rajendran & C Dinesh Kumar

 

 

 

Effect of repeated intraperitoneal exposure to picrotoxin on rat liver lysosomal function

808

Munjal M Acharya, Surbhi H Khamesra & Surendra S Katyare

 

[IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 A61 D 7/00]

 

 

 

Analgesic activity of new synthetic thiazolidine-4-ones derivatives

812

M Sushma, S Sudha, N Shivamurthy & B V Venkataraman

 

[IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 A61 P]

 

 

 

Effect of different intensities of swimming exercise on testicular oxidative stress and reproductive dysfunction in mature male albino Wistar rats

816

I Manna, K Jana & P K Samanta

 

 

 

Infiltration by CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes in bursa of chickens infected with Infectious Bursal Disease Virus (IBDV): Strain-specific differences

823

Bhawna Poonia & Shiv Charan

 

 

 

Production of interspecies chimeras by transplanting rosy barb (Puntius conchonius) embryonic cells to zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos

830

M S Sawant, S C Zhang, Q Y Wang & Y J Wang

 

 

 

Improvement of dry matter digestibility of water hyacinth by solid state fermentation using white rot fungi

837

R Mukherjee, M Ghosh & B Nandi

 

[IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 A01 F; C 12 P 39/00]

 

 

 

Notes

 

Effect of nucleoside-5¢-phosphates on collagen-induced in vitro mineralization

844

H S Talwar, S K Singla, C Tandon & R K Jethi

 

   
Author Index
 
   
Keyword Index
 

 

 

 

  

 

Review Article

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

 Vol. 42, August 2004, pp. 747-757

 

Fetal growth and development: Roles of fatty acid transport proteins and nuclear transcription factors in human placenta

Asim K Duttaroy

 

In the feto-placental unit, preferential transport of maternal plasma arachidonic acid (20:4n-6) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:5n-3) across the placenta is of critical importance for fetal growth and development. More than 90 per cent of the fat deposition in the fetus occurs in the last 10 weeks of pregnancy. All of the n -3 and n -6 fatty acid structures acquired by the fetus have to cross the placenta and fetal blood are enriched in long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) relative to the maternal supply. Fatty acids cross the placental microvillous and basal membranes by simple diffusion and via the action of membrane bound (FAT, FATP and p-FABPpm) and cytoplasmic fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs). The direction and magnitude of fatty acid flux is mainly dictated by the relative abundance of available binding sites. The existence of a fatty-acid-transport system comprising multiple binding proteins in human placenta may be essential to facilitate the preferential transport of maternal plasma fatty acids in order to meet the requirements of the growing fetus. The critical importance of long-chain fatty acids in cellular homeostasis demands an efficient uptake system for these fatty acids and their metabolism in tissues. In fact, involvement of several nuclear transcription factors (PPARg, LXR, RXR, and SREBP-1) is critical in the expression of genes responsible for fatty acids uptake, placental trophoblast differentiation and hCG production. These indicate that these receptors are potential regulators of placental lipid transfer and homeostasis. This review discusses importance of nuclear receptors and fatty acid binding/transport proteins in placental fatty acid uptake, transport and metabolism.

 

 

Papers

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

 Vol. 42, August 2004, pp. 758-765

 

 

Role of l-lysine HCl in adoptive immune therapy towards development of
suitable tuberculosis vaccination

S Dasgupta, V Chandran, A Bhinge, S Sewlikar, A Nimbkar & D Datta

 

L-Lysine HCl is being proposed to be a possible biocompatible adjuvant to enhance immune response by virtue of its probable non-specific bridging action and cellular proliferation properties. This proposal has been tried to be substantiated by designing an in vitro culture protocol, varying the concentration of L-lysine HCl and its further in vivo application. Splenic lymphocyte population has been extracted from mice and co-cultured with extracted mice macrophage population in presence of either Bacille Calmette Guerrin (BCG) or Hepatitis B surface antigen (HbsAg) and added L-lysine hydrochloride in culture media.  Post incubation of these cultures, “taught” cell population has been adoptively transferred in naïve mice. These mice were then challenged by respective antigen dose, Change in Immune response with this challenge was noted. Antibody titre was followed in all the experiments as a measure of immune response. In adoptive immune transfer experiment of with HbsAg (AIT-HbsAg), similar to that with BCG (AIT-BCG), after the incubation period, antibody titre was higher in added lysine containing cultures in comparison with the control ones. Post transfer followed by antigen challenge, in AIT-BCG the expected augmentation in immune response was hardly visible. But in AIT-HbsAg, with the help of lysine booster, the animals responded better as far as the antibody titre is concerned.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

 Vol. 42, August 2004, pp. 766-769

 

Quercetin attenuates thermal hyperalgesia and cold allodynia in STZ-induced diabetic rats

Muragundla Anjaneyulu & Kanwaljit Chopra

 

Neuropathic pain is one of the important microvascular complications of diabetes. Oxidative stress and superoxide play a critical role in the development of neurovascular complications in diabetes. Aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of quercetin, a bioflavonoid on thermal nociceptive responses in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats assessed by tail-immersion and hot plate methods. After 4-weeks of a single intravenous STZ injection (45 mg/kg body weight), diabetic rats exhibited a significant thermal hyperalgesia and cold allodynia along with increased plasma glucose and decreased body weights as compared with control rats. Chronic treatment with quercetin (10 mg/kg body weight; p.o) for 4-weeks starting from the 4th week of STZ-injection significantly attenuated the cold allodynia as well as hyperalgesia. Results indicate that quercetin, a natural antioxidant, may be helpful in diabetic neuropathy.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

 Vol. 42, August 2004, pp. 770-775

 

Clenbuterol treatment stimulates cell proliferation in denervated
chick gastrocnemius muscle

Surender S. Katoch & Karuna Sharma

 

Daily administration of clenbuterol, a beta adrenoceptor agonist (0.5 mg/kg body weight; for 7 days) to normal innervated and denervated adult chicks (Gallus domesticus) resulted in different growth related responses by gastrocnemius muscle. While normal innervated muscle undergoes hypertrophy, structural reorganization in denervated tissue is accomplished by the de novo emergence of new cells. A contrasting cell population with extremely narrow cross sectional dimensions is a characteristic feature of denervated muscle in presence of clenbuterol. Measurement of fiber dimensions, number of cells per unit area and examination of histochemical preparations support this.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

 Vol. 42, August 2004, pp. 776-780

 

Bacopa monniera Linn. extract modulates antioxidant and marker
enzyme status in fibrosarcoma bearing rats

G Rohini, K E Sabitha, C S Shyamala Devi

 

Antioxidative property and tumor inhibitive property of B. monniera (20mg/kg body wt, sc) was examined in 3-methylcholanthrene induced fibrosarcoma rats. Antioxidant enzymes such as catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and the levels of glutathione (GSH) and the rate of lipid peroxidation (LPO) in the liver and kidney tissues were assessed. A significant increase was noted for the rate of LPO with a corresponding decrease in the antioxidant enzyme status in fibrosarcoma bearing rats. In fibrosarcoma bearing rats, the tumor markers like lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatine kinase (CK), alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST) and sialic acid (SA) were increased in the serum. Treatment with B. monniera extract significantly increased the antioxidant enzyme status, inhibited lipid peroxidation and reduced the tumor markers. It can be concluded that B.monniera extract promotes the antioxidant status, reduces the rate of lipid peroxidation and the markers of tumor progression in the fibrosarcoma bearing rats.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

 Vol. 42, August 2004, pp. 781-786

 

Effect of bamboo shoot, Bambusa arundinacea (Retz.) Willd. on thyroid status
under conditions of varying iodine intake in rats

Amar K Chandra, Dishari Ghosh, Sanjukta Mukhopadhyay & Smritiratan Tripathy
 

Young shoots or sprouts of common bamboos are used as food in third world countries. Evidences suggest the presence of cyanogenic glucoside like anti-thyroidal substance in bamboo shoots (BS) but effect of prolonged BS consumption on thyroid status under conditions of varying iodine nutriture remains unexplored. The study was undertaken to evaluate goitrogenic content, in vitro anti thyroid peroxidase (TPO) activity and in vivo anti thyroid potential of BS with and without extra iodide. Fresh BS contains high cyanogenic glucoside (551 mg/kg), followed by thiocyanate (24mg/kg) and glucosinolate (9.57mg/kg). In vitro inhibition in TPO activity was found with raw, raw boiled and cooked extracts. Inhibition constant (IC50) and PTU equivalence of fresh BS were 27.5±0.77 μg and 3.27 respectively. Extra iodide in the incubation media reduced TPO inhibition induced by BS but could not cancel it. Thyroid weight, TPO activity and total serum thyroid hormone levels of BS fed animals for 45 and 90 days respectively were determined and compared with controls. Significant increase in thyroid weight as well as higher excretion of thiocyanate and iodine along with marked decrease in thyroid peroxidase activity, T4 and T3 levels were observed in BS fed group. Chronic BS consumption gradually developed a state of hypothyroidism. Extra iodide had reduced the anti-thyroidal effect of BS to an extent but could not cancel it because of excessive cyanogenic glucoside, glucosinolate and thiocyanate present in it.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

 Vol. 42, August 2004, pp. 787-791

 

Effect of aqueous leaf extract of Irvingia gabonensis on gastrointestinal tract in rodents

F Abdulrahman, I S Inyang, J Abbah, L Binda, S Amos & K Gamaniel

 

Effect of the aqueous leaf extract of I.gabonensis on the gastrointestinal tract was investigated on isolated rabbit jejunum, guinea pig ileum, gastrointestinal motility, castor oil-induced diarrhoea in mice and castor oil-induced fluid accumulation in rats. The results showed that the extract exhibited a concentration-dependent relaxation of spontaneous pendular movement of isolated rabbit jejunum and guinea pig ileum, and attenuated both acetylcholine-induced contraction of rabbit jejunum and histamine-induced contraction of guinea pig ileum. The extract (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) also caused a significant dose-dependent decrease of gastrointestinal motility in mice (40.12, 39.45 and 37.45%), intestinal fluid accumulation in rats (71.43, 81.63 and 83.27%), and remarkably protected mice against castor oil-induced diarrhoea [58.33, 75 and 91.67% (Di Carlo score)] respectively.  Preliminary phytochemical screening of the aqueous leaf extract of I. gabonensis revealed the presence of saponins, tannins, phenols and phlobatanins.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

 Vol. 42, August 2004, pp. 792-797

 

Effect of Coscinium fenestratum on hepatotoxicity in rats

 M R Venukumar & M S Latha

 

Anti-hepatotoxic activity of methanol extract of Coscinium fenestratum stem (MEC) was investigated against carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatopathy in rats. Hepatotoxic rats were treated with MEC for a period of 90 days (60mg/kg body weight, daily, orally by intubation). Anti-hepatotoxic effect was studied by assaying the activities of serum marker enzymes like aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma glutamyl transpeptidase, lactate dehydrogenase etc. and glucose (6) phosphate dehydrogenase in liver. We also estimated the concentrations of total proteins, total lipids, triglycerides, phospholipids and cholesterol in serum, liver and kidney. The activities of all the marker enzymes registered a significant elevation in carbon tetrachloride-treated rats, which were significantly recovered towards an almost normal level in animals co-administered with MEC. Other biochemical changes induced by carbon tetrachloride too showed reliable signs of retrieving towards the normalcy. Histopathological analysis confirmed the biochemical investigations. This study unravels the anti-hepatotoxic activity of MEC.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

 Vol. 42, August 2004, pp. 798-802

 

Analysis of time-dependent recovery from beryllium toxicity following chelation therapy and antioxidant supplementation

Sonia Johri, Sadhana Shrivastava, Pragya Sharma & Sangeeta Shukla

 

Efforts have been made to minimize the toxic effect caused by beryllium. Adult cyclic rats of Sprague Dawley strain were administered a bolus dose of 50mg/kg beryllium nitrate intramuscularly. The chelation therapy with glutathione (GSH), dimercapto propane sulfonic acid (DMPS)+ selenium (Se) and D-Penicillamine (DPA) + Se was given for 3 days followed by a rest of 1,3 and 7 days respectively. The results revealed a significant fall in the blood sugar level, serum alkaline phosphatase activity, serum proteins. A significant rise in the transaminases i.e. aspartate aminotranferase and alanine aminotranferase pattern is indicative of leakage of enzymes from liver resulting in alterations in the cell permeability. A rise in the hepatic lipid peroxidation activity is a direct indication of oxidative damage resulting in free radical generation. Results of the distribution studies by atomic absorption spectrophotometry reveal an increased concentration of beryllium in liver and kidney followed by lung and uterus. The relative ability of 3 chelating agents to act as antagonists for acute beryllium poisoning have been examined in liver, kidney, lungs and uterus. The appreciable change in the beryllium concentration in various organs is duration-dependent during the entire period being highly significant after 7 days rest. From the biochemical assays, and distribution studies it can be assumed that DPA+Se was the most effective therapeutic agent followed by DMPS+Se and GSH. Thus it can be concluded that DPA+Se is a better therapeutic agent as compared to DMPS+Se and GSH.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

 Vol. 42, August 2004, pp. 803-807

 

In vitro antioxidant studies of Annona squamosa Linn. Leaves

Annie Shirwaikar, K Rajendran & C Dinesh Kumar

 

The free radical scavenging potential of the leaves of A. squamosa was studied by using different antioxidant models of screening. The ethanolic extract at 1000 mg/ ml showed maximum scavenging of the radical cation, 2,2- azinobis- (3- ethylbenzothiazoline- 6- sulphonate) (ABTS) observed upto 99.07% followed by the scavenging of the stable radical 1,1- diphenyl, 2- picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) (89.77 %) and nitric oxide radical (73.64 %) at the same concentration. However, the extract showed only moderate scavenging activity of superoxide radicals and antilipid peroxidation potential, which was performed using rat- brain homogenate. The findings justify the therapeutic applications of the plant in the indigenous system of medicine, augmenting its therapeutic value.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

 Vol. 42, August 2004, pp. 808-811

 

Effect of repeated intraperitoneal exposure to picrotoxin on rat liver lysosomal function

Munjal M Acharya, Surbhi H Khamesra & Surendra S Katyare

 

Effect of repeated (20 days) exposure to picrotoxin (PTX) on rat liver lysosomal function was evaluated by measuring the free and total activities of acid phosphatase, cathepsin D, ribonuclease II (RNAse II) and deoxyribonuclease II (DNAse II). The free activities of the nucleases (both RNAse II and DNAse II) were increased following PTX exposure. The total DNAse II activity was increased by 2.2-fold whereas the total acid phosphatase activity was decreased by 28%. Consequently, the ratios of total activity / free activity were low in the PTX exposed groups, implying loss of membrane integrity. Cathepsin D activity was completely abolished. The results show that repeated exposure to PTX can lead to lysosomal dysfunction in liver.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

 Vol. 42, August 2004, pp. 812-815

 

Analgesic activity of new synthetic thiazolidine-4-ones derivatives

M Sushma, S Sudha, N Shivamurthy & BV Venkataraman

 

Ten new synthetic thiazolidine-4-ones derivatives (5 chlorothiazolidine-4-ones, 3 methoxythiazolidine-4-ones and 2 hydoxythiazolidine-4-ones) having different substituents at R1, R2 and R3 were evaluated for their analgesic activity using different animal models and their structure activity relationship was also elucidated. Chlorothiazolidine-4-ones and methoxythiazolidine-4-ones exhibited analgesic activity in tail flick test, tail immersion test and acetic acid writhing test. C-III (chloride substituents at R1 and R2) produced higher latencies than any other compounds in tail flick test and C-I (no substituents at R1 and R2) was not effective in acetic acid writhing test. Hydroxythiazolidine-4-ones did not show analgesic activity in any of the animal models used. In conclusion, the character of substituents at R3 of thiazolidine moiety position may have an effect on the analgesic activity of thiazolidine-4-ones and either chloride or methoxy substitution may be necessary to produce analgesic activity. Two chloride substituents in a compound may increase the central analgesic activity of the compound.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

 Vol. 42, August 2004, pp. 816-822

 

Effect of different intensities of swimming exercise on testicular oxidative stress and reproductive dysfunction in mature male albino Wistar rats

I Manna, K Jana & P K Samanta

 

Swimming exercise for 1, 2 and 3 hr for 5 days/week for consecutive 4 weeks, results in a significant reduction in testicular, epididymal, prostetic, seminal vesicle somatic indices; epididymal sperm count, sperm motility; preleptotine spermatocytes, mid pachytene spermatocytes and stage 7 spermatids; plasma levels of testosterone, luteinizing hormone; testicular D5, 3b-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, 17b-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase; testicular superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-s-transferase and glutathione along with significant elevation in malondialdehyde in male albino rats. However, no significant change was noted in final body weight, spermatogonia-A and plasma level of follicle stimulating hormone. The results that oxidative stress develops with the increasing of exercise intensity, which may interfere in male reproductive activities.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

 Vol. 42, August 2004, pp. 823-829

  

Infiltration by CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes in bursa of chickens infected with Infectious Bursal Disease Virus (IBDV): strain-specific differences

 Bhawna Poonia & Shiv Charan

 

In order to investigate if there is any definite correlation between the degree of T-cell response in the bursa of Fabricius (BF) and the virulence of Infectious Bursal Disease (IBD) virus strains, chickens were infected with strains of different virulence i.e. mild (Lukert strain), intermediate (Georgia strain) or invasive intermediate (IV-95 strain). At various times post-inoculation, bursal samples were collected to study virus specific histopathological lesions, the distribution of viral antigen and the extent of T-cell infiltration in the bursa. Most severe bursal lesions were induced by IV-95 strain (the invasive intermediate strain), whereas Lukert, the mild strain caused the least severe lesions. The number of virus positive cells in the bursa was highest in chickens infected with IV-95 strain. Substantial infiltration of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells in the bursal follicles of virus-infected groups was observed from 4 d.p.i. onwards. The magnitude of T-cell response was more in the birds infected with intermediate (Georgia) or invasive intermediate strains of virus than chickens inoculated with mild (Lukert) strain, even when 10-fold higher doses of the inoculums were used. PHA responses to peripheral lymphocytes were found suppressed in all the groups of chickens only transiently. The results indicate that the magnitude of T-cell responses in BF during IBDV infection is influenced more by the virulence of virus strain rather than the quantum of viral load in BF. Over all these studies may have implications in understanding the role of T-cells in pathogenesis and immunity in IBD.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

 Vol. 42, August 2004, pp. 830-836

 

Production of interspecies chimeras by transplanting rosy barb (Puntius conchonius) embryonic cells to zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos

M S Sawant, S C Zhang , Q Y Wang  & Y J Wang

 

Establishment of a cell-mediated gene transfer system has potential as a new breeding technique for commercially valuable fishes. As an important step toward developing an inter-species chimera, cells from blastula-stage embryos of rosy barb (Puntius conchonius) were transplanted into zebrafish (Danio rerio) blastula-stage embryos to observe the development of the recipient. From the total of 473 transplants obtained only a fraction of 13 chimeras appeared perfectly normal after one month. Over two in normal 13 chimeras showed some characters from the donor cells with scarce pigmentation. This is the first successful inter-species study on zebrafish by using blastula cell transplants from rosy barb both belonging to the same family cyprinidae.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

 Vol. 42, August 2004, pp. 837-843

 

Improvement of dry matter digestibility of water hyacinth by solid state
fermentation using white rot fungi

R Mukherjee, M Ghosh & B Nandi

 

Feeding value of water hyacinth biomass colonized by three species of white rot fungi during solid-state fermentation was investigated. All three organisms proved to be efficient degraders and enhanced dry matter digestibility. Loss of organic matter was maximum (23.6 ± 0.1% dry wt) after 48 days by P. ostreatus. C. indica showed maximum cellulose degradation (18.5 ± 0.1% dry wt) than other two fungi after 48 days of incubation. In all cases, an extensive removal of hemicellulose at the initial growth period and a delayed degradation of lignin were observed. Hemicellulolysis was maximum (46.3 ± 0.1% dry wt) by C. indica, but delignification (14.2 ± 0.2% dry wt) by P. sajor-caju after 48 days. The amount of reducing sugar in the degraded biomass decreased at early stages, but increased as degradation progressed in all three cases (maximum 1.1 ± 0.05% dry wt after 48 days by C. indica). Soluble nitrogen content increased only during 16-32 days of incubation (highest 1.1 ± 0.1% dry wt after 32 days by P. sajor-caju). Crude protein of the bioconverted biomass increased gradually up to 32 days but decreased thereafter (maximum 10.3 ± 0.1% dry wt after 32 days by P. sajor - caju). Per cent change in in vitro dry matter digestibility of degraded substrates enhanced gradually after 8 days and reached maximum after 32 days but thereafter decreased (highest + 20.4 ± 0.3% dry wt by P. sajor-caju). The results demonstrated the efficient degrading capacity of the test fungi and their potential use in conversion of water hyacinth biomass into mycoprotein—rich ruminant feed, more so by P. sajor-caju.

 

 

Note

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

 Vol. 42, August 2004, pp. 844-846

 

Effect of nucleoside-5¢-phosphates on collagen-induced in vitro mineralization

H S Talwar, S K Singla, C Tandon, & R K Jethi

 

Nucleoside triphosphates (NTPs) at 4-10 mM concentrations were found to inhibit the rates of collagen-induced in vitro mineralization and ion exchange reactions. The sequential removal of the terminal phosphate groups caused a step-wise decrease in their inhibitory potency. The results suggest that NTPs inhibit the rates of ion uptake and exchange reactions at concentrations much lower than their intracellular physiological concentrations. Thus NTPs may be involved in the control of biological mineralization and the tissues which mineralize under physiological conditions develop a system to locally convert NTPs to NDPs and NMPs.

 

 

 Author Index

 

Abbah J

  787

Johri Sonia

798

Sharma Karuna

770

Abdulrahman F

787

 

 

Sharma Pragya

798

Acharya Munjal M

  808

Katoch Surender S

770

Shirwaikar Annie

803

Amos S

787

Katyare Surendra S

808

Shiv Charan

823

Anjaneyulu Muragundla

766

Khamesra Surbhi H

808

Shivamurthy  N 

812

 

 

Kumar C Dinesh

803

Shrivastava Sadhana

798

Bhinge A

758

 

 

Shukla Sangeeta

798

Binda L

787

Latha M S

792

Shyamala Devi C S

776

 

 

 

 

Singla S K

844

Chandra Amar K

781

Manna I

816

Sudha S

812

Chandran V

758

Mukherjee R

837

Sushma M

812

Chopra Kanwaljit

766

Mukhopadhyay Sanjukta

781

 

 

 

 

 

 

Talwar H S

844

Dasgupta S

758

Nandi B

837

Tandon C

844

Datta D

758

Nimbkar A

758

Tripathy Smritiratan

781

Duttaroy Asim K

747

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poonia Bhawna

823

Venkataraman B V

812

Gamaniel K

787

 

 

Venukumar M R

792

Ghosh Dishari

781

Rajendran K

803

 

 

Ghosh M

837

Rohini G

776

Wang Q Y

830

 

 

 

 

Wang Y J

830

Inyang I S

787

Sabitha K E

776

 

 

 

 

Samanta P K

816

Zhang S C

830

Jana K

816

Sawant M S

830

 

 

Jethi R K

844

Sewlikar S

758

 

 

 
 
Keyword Index

 

Acetic acid writhing test

812

Exercise

816

Nucleoside-5´-phosphates

844

Acid phosphatase

808

 

 

 

 

Adoptive immune therapy

758

Fatty acid transport protein

747

Oxidative stress

816

b-Adrenoceptor agonist

770

Fetal growth

747

 

 

Analgesic activity

812

Fibrosarcoma

776

Pathogenesis

823

Annona squamosa

803

Free radicals

803

Picrotoxin

808

Anti-hepatotoxic effect

792

 

 

 

 

Antioxidant

776

Gastrocnemius muscle

770

Quercetin

766

Antioxidant

803

Gastrointestinal tract

787

 

 

Antioxidant  supplementation

798

Glucosinolates

781

Rat

816

 

 

 

 

RNAse II

808

Bacopa monniera

776

Hot plate

766

Rosy barb

830

Bamboo shoot

781

Human placenta

747

 

 

Beryllium toxicity

798

Hydroxythiazolidine-4-ones

812

Solid state fermentation

837

Biodelignification

837

Hyperalgesia

766

Spermatogenesis

816

Blastula cells

830

 

 

Steroidogenesis

816

Bursa of Fabricius

823

Immunity

823

Structure activity relationship

812

 

 

In vitro dry matter digestibility

837

 

 

Carbon tetrachloride

792

In vitro priming

758

Tail flick test

812

Chelation therapy

798

Infectious Bursal disease

823

Tail immersion test

812

Chimera

830

Irvingia gabonensis

787

Tail-immersion

766

Chlorothiazolidine-4-ones

812

 

 

T-cell response

823

Clenbuterol

770

L-lysine monohydrochloride

758

Thiazolidine-4-ones

812

Cold allodynia

766

Lysosomal function

808

Thiocyanate

781

Collagen

844

 

 

Thyroid hormone

781

Coscinium fenestratum

792

Marker enzyme

776,

Thyroid peroxidase

781

Cyanogenic glucosides

781

 Latha M S

792

Time-dependent recovery

798

 

 

Methoxythiazolidine-4-ones

812

 

 

Denervation

770

3-Methylcholanthrene

776

Water hyacinth

837

Diabetic neuropathy

766

Mineralization

844

White rot fungi

837

Diarrhoea

787

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nuclear transcription factor

747

Zebrafish

830