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Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

 

 

ISSN : 0019-5189

CODEN : IJEB (A6) 42(11) 1147-1287 (2004)

VOLUME 42

NUMBER 12

DECEMBER 2004

 

 

CONTENTS

 

Review Article

 

A global perspective of radiation-induced signal transduction pathways in cancer therapeutics

1153

Seema Gupta & Mansoor M Ahmed

 

 

 

Papers

 

Azide resistance in Rhizobium ciceri linked with superior symbiotic nitrogen fixation

1177

 V Vijay Bhaskar & L R Kashyap

 

 

 

Molecular and functional characteristics, growth promoting effect and persistence of selected parent isolates and streptomycin resistant derivatives of rice rhizobacteria

1186

 R C Boro, C Goswami, D Thakuria, M K Modi & N C Talukdar

 

 

 

Effect of alpha-1 adrenergic receptor antagonist, terazosin, on cardiovascular functions in anaesthetised dogs

1195

R Sharma, V M Ahuja & M Fahim

 

 

 

Micropropagation of Clerodendrum aculeatum through adventitious shoot induction and production of consistent amount of virus resistance inducing protein

1200

Aparna Srivastava, R K Gupta & H N Verma

 

 

 

Modulation of osmotic stress effects on photosynthesis and respiration by temperature in mesophyll protoplast of pea

1208

Padmanabh Dwivedi & A S Raghavendra

 

 

 

Effect of aqueous extract of Cyamopsis tetragonoloba Linn. beans on blood glucose level in normal and alloxan-induced diabetic rats

1212

Hayat M Mukhtar, S H Ansari, M Ali, Z A Bhat & T Naved

 

[IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 A 61 P]

 

 

 

Larvicidal activity of plant extracts used alone and in combination with known synthetic larvicidal agents against Aedes aegypti

1216

Gauri Harve & Vijayalaxmi Kamath

 

 

 

Toxicological effect and biochemical alterations induced by different fractions of Euphorbia royleana latex in freshwater harmful vector snail Lymnaea acuminata

1220

Sudhanshu Tiwari, S K Singh & Ajay Singh

 

 

African catfish, Clarias gariepinus (Burchell, 1822): An ideal candidate for biowaste management

1226

C Sambhu

 

 

 

Electroantennogram responses of Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens) to volatiles

1230

 Ruchira Raina, Mary Joseph & Avalokiteswar Sen

 

 

 

In vitro explant culture of mantle epithelium of freshwater pearl mussel

1235

S K Barik, J K Jena & K Janaki Ram

 

 

 

Conversion efficiency and nutrient digestibility of certain seaweed diets by laboratory reared Labeo rohita (Hamilton)

1239

M S Bindu & V Sobha

 

 

 

Notes

 

In vitro microtuberization in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) cultivars

1245

B M Sakha, A K Bhatia, V K Batra, V K Chaudhary, P Batra & S C Khurana

 

 

 

Effect of nimesulide co-administration on pharmacokinetics of lithium

1248

Shabir Sidhu, Amit Kondal, Samir Malhotra, S K Garg & P Pandhi

 

 

 

Annual Index 2004

 

 

 

Contents

1251

 

 

Keyword Index

1268

 

 

Author Index

1273

 

 

List of Experts

1277

 

 

Announcements

1281

 

 

 

 Erratum

 

Nodulation competitiveness between contrasting phage phenotypes of pigeonpea rhizobial strains, by Ashok Mishra, B Dhar & R M Singh, Indian J Exp Biol, Vol.42, June 2004, pp.611-615.

 

Abstract, line no.4 from top, the sentence may be read as “The phage-indicator strain (A039) exhibited higher competitiveness over the lysogenic strain (A025 Smr); the phage sensitive strain (IHP-195) over the phage resistant strain (IHP 195 SmrVr); and the small plaque developing strain (IHP195 Smr) over the large plaque developing strain (A059) in association with pigeonpea cv. bahar both under laboratory and field conditions”.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

 Vol. 42, December 2004, pp 1153-1176

 

 

Review Article

 

A global perspective of radiation-induced signal transduction pathways in cancer therapeutics

Seema Gupta & Mansoor M Ahmed

 

Radiation is a well established therapeutic modality for the treatment of solid tumors. By merging molecular biological approaches with radiation biology, a significant number of signaling events elicited by ionizing radiation have been delineated. These signaling pathways include events leading to cell cycle arrest, apoptosis or cell survival. There are two major signaling events that affect radiation response. One is the intrinsic/constitutive pro-survival signaling event that is present in proliferating tumor cells while the other is “induced pro-survival event” in response to radiation, both of these events confer resistance to the killing effects of radiation.

 

In this review, signaling pathways that lead to either apoptosis or survival of cells following ionizing radiation are discussed in detail. In addition, mechanisms of action for gene/drug based inhibitors that modulate the expression and function of various genes and gene products involved in pro-survival signaling pathways are described. Further, novel strategies to abrogate the “induced radiation resistance” leading to enhanced therapeutic efficacy of ionizing radiation have been proposed. These novel strategies include the use of radio-gene therapy, low dose fractionated radiation therapy as a chemopotentiator and therapeutic utility of high radiation dose induced bystander effect. The complete understanding of the molecular pathways leading to apoptosis/survival of cells following ionizing radiation will help in tailoring more effective novel strategies and treatment modalities for complete eradication of cancer.

 

 

 

Papers

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 42, December 2004, pp 1177-1185

 

Azide resistance in Rhizobium ciceri linked with superior symbiotic nitrogen fixation

V Vijay Bhaskar  & L R Kashyap

 

Isolated azide resistant (AzR) native R. ciceri strain 18-7 was resistant to sodium azide at 10 µg/ml. To find if nif-reiteration is responsible for azide resistance and linked to superior symbiotic nitrogen fixation, transposon (Tn5) induced azide sensitive mutants were generated. Using 4 kb nif-reiterated Sinorhizobium meliloti DNA, a clone C4 that complemented azide sensitivity was isolated by DNA hybridization from genomic library of chickpea Rhizobium strain Rcd301. EcoRI restriction mapping revealed the presence of 7 recognition sites with a total insert size of 19.17 kb. Restriction analysis of C4 clone and nif-reiterated DNA (pRK 290.7) with EcoRI and XhoI revealed similar banding pattern. Wild type strain 18-7, mutant M126 and complemented mutant M126(C4) were characterized for symbiotic properties (viz., acetylene reduction assay, total nitrogen content, nodule number and fresh and dry weight of the infected plants) and ex-planta nitrogenase activity. Our results suggested that azide resistance, nif-reiteration, and superior symbiotic effectiveness were interlinked with no correlation between ex-planta nitrogenase activity and azide resistance in R. ciceri.

 

 

  

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

 Vol. 42, December 2004, pp 1186-1194

 

Molecular and functional characteristics, growth promoting effect and persistence of selected parent isolates and streptomycin resistant derivatives of rice rhizobacteria

R C Boro, C Goswami, D Thakuria, M K Modi & N C Talukdar

 

Molecular and functional characteristics of seven azospirilla and five phosphorus solubilizing bacteria (PSB) isolates of rice rhizosphere, growth promotion ability of two efficient strains, Azospirillum amazonense A10 (MTCC4716) and Bacillus megaterium P5 (MTCC4714) and their persistence based on streptomycin resistant derivatives (SRD), were determined. SDS-PAGE and isozyme banding patterns of the isolates were used to arbitrarily group the azospirilla into 4 and PSB into 3 clusters and as markers to ascertain their identity. The azospirilla produced 2.0 to 10.5 ppm of IAA like substances and showed nitrogenase activity of 0.02 to 3.55 nmole C2H4/hr/ml of pure culture. PSB isolates produced 7.8 to 15.0 ppm IAA like substances and 20 to 128 ppm soluble P. Induction of resistance to streptomycin resulted in changes of these properties. Co-inoculation of rice with SRD A10 and SRD P5 and their parental strains in separate treatments enhanced grain yield over control by 31 and 12.4%, respectively. Nitrogenase activity of rice roots under SRD co-inoculated treatment was higher (4.16 nmole C2H4/hr/hill) than that under parental strains co-inoculated treatment (3.76 nmole C2H4/hr/hill). SDS-PAGE profile and population count of the strains confirmed their establishment in rice rhizosphere and persistence over a year after inoculation.

 

 

  

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

 Vol. 42, December 2004, pp 1195-1199

 

Effects of alpha-1 adrenergic receptor antagonist, terazosin, on cardiovascular functions in anaesthetised dogs

R Sharma & V M Ahuja  and M Fahim

 

Initially a dose-response curve of phenylephrine was constructed at dose strengths of 1-16 mg/kg in a cumulative manner. Phenylephrine caused a significant rise in the mean arterial pressure, left ventricular systolic pressure, left ventricular contractility, stroke volume and a significant decline in the heart rate. Terazosin was administered in three selected doses of 10, 100 and 300 mg/kg. Following each dose of terazosin, dose-response curve of phenylephrine was constructed. Terazosin, per se, decreased the basal mean arterial pressure, left ventricular systolic pressure, left ventricular contractility and stroke volume significantly in a dose dependent manner with an increase in the heart rate with no significant change in the cardiac output. The baroreflex sensitivity at all the three doses remained unchanged. In conclusion, the present findings support the view that terazosin reduces the blood pressure in a physiologically more favorable manner by maintaining the neural integrity of the cardiovascular system.

 

  

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

 Vol. 42, December 2004, pp 1200-1207

 

Micropropagation of Clerodendrum aculeatum through adventitious shoot induction and production of consistent amount of virus resistance inducing protein

Aparna Srivastava, R K Gupta & H N Verma

 

Rapid micropropagation through adventitious shoot induction from in vitro raised leaf explants of Clerodendrum aculeatum (Verbenaceae), was successfully achieved for the first time. Basal portion of the leaves showed highest regeneration potential when grown on MS medium supplemented with BA (5.0 mg/l) and NAA and IBA (0.5 mg/l of each). Shoots after elongation in growth regulator-free medium, were rooted in MS medium containing 0.5 mg/l of NAA and IBA. Aqueous leaf extract of in vitro raised plants, induced high degree of resistance against viruses in susceptible healthy hosts when applied prior to virus inoculation. Upon purification from leaves of cultured plants, the resistance inducing protein, showed molecular mass of 34 kDa. Amount of resistance inducing protein obtained from leaves of cultured plants, was consistent throughout the year, as compared to the protein isolated from leaves of field grown plants, which showed marked seasonal fluctuation. The purified 34 kDa protein from in vitro raised plants, was serologically related to field grown plants and possessed similar characteristics. The micropropagated plants were successfully established in earthen pots under greenhouse conditions.

 

  

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

 Vol. 42, December 2004, pp 1208-1211

 

 Modulation of osmotic stress effects on photosynthesis and respiration by temperature in mesophyll protoplast of pea

Padmanabh Dwivedi & A S Raghavendra

 

Exposure of mesophyll protoplast of pea to osmotic stress decreases the rate of photosynthesis while stimulating marginally the respiratory rate of mesophyll protoplasts. The interaction of osmotic and temperature stress during the modulation of photosynthetic and respiratory rates of pea (Pisum sativum var Azad P1) mesophyll protoplasts was investigated. The protoplasts were exposed to either iso-osmotic (0.4 M) or hyper-osmotic (1.0 M) concentration of sorbitol at 15° and 25°C. The rates of photosynthesis and respiration were studied. At optimum temperature of 25°C, there was a decrease in photosynthesis (<10%) at hyper-osmoticum (osmotic effect), whereas respiration increased marginally (by about 15%). Low temperature (15°C) aggravated the sensitivity of both respiration and photosynthesis to osmotic stress. At 15°C, the decrease in photosynthesis due to osmotic stress was >35%, while the respiratory rate was stimulated by 30%. The relative proportion of cytochrome pathway decreased by about 50% at both 15°C and 25°C while that of alternative pathway increased, more so, at 15°C, when the mesophyll protoplasts were subjected to hyper-osmoticum stress. The titration experiments showed that extent of engagement of alternative pathway was higher, the slope value was slightly higher for 15°C compared to 25°C. Low temperature modulates the effect of hyper-osmoticum stress on photosynthesis and respiration, and results in increased participation of alternative pathway.

 

 

  

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 42, December 2004, pp 1212-1215

  

Effect of aqueous extract of Cyamopsis tetragonoloba Linn. beans on blood glucose level in normal and alloxan-induced diabetic rats

Hayat M Mukhtar, S H Ansari, M Ali, Z A Bhat & T Naved

 

Effect of feeding orally the aqueous extract of beans of Cyamopsis tetragonoloba was investigated on fasting blood glucose levels in glucose loaded, normal and alloxan-induced diabetic rats and compared with gliclazide, a reference drug. The aqueous extract of beans at 250 mg/kg body wt significantly lowered blood glucose levels in alloxan-induced diabetic rats within 3 hr of administration. Continued administration of the extract at the same dose daily for 10 days produced statistically significant reduction in the blood glucose levels while marginal activity was seen in normal and glucose-loaded rats.

 

 

  

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

 Vol. 42, December 2004, pp 1216-1219

 

 Larvicidal activity of plant extracts used alone and in combination with known synthetic larvicidal agents against Aedes aegypti

Gauri Harve & Vijayalaxmi Kamath

 

Larvicidal activity of acetone and petroleum ether extracts of four plants Murraya koenigii, Coriandrum sativum, Ferula asafoetida, Trigonella foenum graceum and synthetic larvicides Fenthion and Temephos used alone and in combination was carried out against A. aegypti larvae under laboratory conditions. Optimum values were found out by using different concentrations of each plant (ranged 25ppm-900ppm) and both synthetic larvicides (ranged 0.01-7.5ppm). The synergistic study was carried out by using 0.05ppm of Temephos and Fenthion with 25ppm of M. koenigii, F. asafetida, T. foenum graceum and 100 ppm of C. sativum. All the plants showed potential synergistic activity although showed comparatively poor larvicidal activity when tested individually.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

 Vol. 42, December 2004, pp 1220-1225

  

Toxicological effect and biochemical alterations induced by different fractions of Euphorbia royleana latex in freshwater harmful vector snail Lymnaea acuminata

Sudhanshu Tiwari, S K Singh & Ajay Singh

 

Laboratory evaluation was made to assess the molluscicidal activity of different fractions of Euphorbia royleana (Family- Euphorbiaceae) latex obtained through sephadex gel column against freshwater snail Lymnaea (Radix) acuminata Lamarack. This snail is the vector of liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica Linnaeus and Fasciola gigantica Cobbold, which causes endemic fascioliasis in cattle and livestock. The toxic effect of the different fractions was time dependent and fifth fraction obtained through benzene: ethyl acetate (5:5) had maximum molluscicidal activity against Lymnaea acuminata. There was a significant negative correlation between LC values and exposure periods thus increase in exposure time, the LC50 value of V fraction of Euphorbia royleana latex was decreased from 14.28 mg/l (24 hr) to 9.28 mg/l (96 hr) against Lymnaea acuminata. After exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of this fraction there were significant time and dose dependent alterations observed in pyruvate, lactate levels, ALAT, AAT, AChE and cytochrome oxidase enzyme activities in different body tissues of Lymnaea acuminata. It is proposed that the fifth fraction of E. royleana latex can be used as a molluscicide for controlling the harmful snail population from aquatic ecosystem without any harm due to their reversible toxic action.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

 Vol. 42, December 2004, pp 1226-1229

  

African catfish, Clarias gariepinus (Burchell, 1822): An ideal candidate for biowaste management

C Sambhu

 

Juveniles of African catfish, C. gariepinus were fed with different biowastes procured from various stations viz., slaughter houses, poultry sheds, fish markets, hotel kitchens and ware houses. Maximum growth was obtained in the fishes fed with poultry wastes and minimum in the fishes fed with warehouse waste. Total protein, fat, and dry matter contents were high in poultry and butcher wastes fed fishes. Culture of catfishes in controlled conditions by feeding biowaste is an alternative step to control the prevailing wide spreading culture practices of African catfish, which poses a threat to inland aquatic biodiversity. The present approach is ideal for recycling biowastes to fish protein and to keep our environment clean and hygienic.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

 Vol. 42, December 2004, pp 1230-1234

 

 Electroantennogram responses of Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens) to volatiles

Ruchira Raina, Mary Joseph & Avalokiteswar Sen

 

Electrophysiological responses of adult males and females of C.carnea to commonly occurring plant volatiles were recorded using the electroantennogram technique. Responses to 28 volatiles evaluated indicate that both depolarization and recovery to the baseline were rapid in females compared to males. Normalized EAG responses relative to the standard, trans-caryophyllene reveal significant differences between the chemicals as also between the sexes. The response of males to several of the compounds, particularly the terpenoids was higher than females. The pooled averages to the different classes of chemical compounds reveal greater response for fatty acid derivatives and terpenoids, particularly the oxygenated monoterpenes and the sesquiterpenes. These findings are discussed in relation to volatiles released in the cotton ecosystem.

 

 

  

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

 Vol. 42, December 2004, pp 1235-1238

 

 In vitro explant culture of mantle epithelium of freshwater pearl mussel

S K Barik, J K Jena & K Janaki Ram

 

The in vitro culture of nacre secreting pallial mantle explants of freshwater pearl producing mussel, Lamellidens marginalis (Lamarck) included depuration of pearl mussels with different physical and chemical agents to eradicate various commensals, removal of pallial mantle ribbon, aseptic preparation of explants from the ribbon and transfer of those explants into tissue culture petri dishes. Special synthetic tissue culture media enriched with additives viz., inactivated calf fetal serum and antibiotics were poured into plates with explants. The culture plates were incubated at 30oC in a CO2 incubator at 5% CO2. The cultures could be maintained for 42-45 days without any contamination. After 12 hr epithelial like cells began to migrate out and formed a complete cell sheet surrounding the explant within 12-15 days. The epithelial cells in the culture indicated functional viability as subsequently after 38-40 days of culture, typical aragonitic 'nacre' crystals of CaCO3 could be observed throughout the culture plates.

 

  

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 42, December 2004, pp 1239-1244

 

 Conversion efficiency and nutrient digestibility of certain seaweed diets by laboratory reared Labeo rohita (Hamilton)

M S Bindu & V Sobha

 

Impact of three different types of seaweed diets on growth, feed utilization and nutrient digestibility of L. rohita was studied for 120 days. The seaweed diet fed fishes, especially Ulva based diet showed comparatively higher growth and weight increment. Good food conversion ratio, food assimilation efficiency, protein efficiency ratio and better nutrient digestibility were recorded for seaweed diet fed fishes. The results suggests the suitability of utilizing seaweeds, Ulva fasciata, Spyridia insignis and Sargassum wightii as partial substitute for fishmeal in formulated diets of L. rohita.

 

 

 

Notes

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 42, December 2004, pp 1245-1247

 

 In vitro microtuberization in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) cultivars

B M Sakha, A K Bhatia, V K Batra ,V K Chaudhary, P Batra & S C Khurana

 

Mechanism of microtuberization in three elite cultivars kufri badhsha (KB), kufri chandramukhi (KCM) and kufri jawahar (KJ) of potato was studied. Sprouts of all the three cultivars were used to obtain in vitro shoot cultures. MS medium supplemented with chlorocholine chloride was found to be most suitable for all the cultivars. Maximum tuberization was obtained under incubation conditions of continuous darkness at 20ş±1oC. The highest number of micro-tubers per plant basis was produced under continuous darkness and KCM recorded the highest yield of micro-tubers and was found significantly superior to KJ and KB.

 

 

 

 Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 42, December 2004, pp 1248-1250

 

 Effect of nimesulide co-administration on pharmacokinetics of lithium

Shabir Sidhu, Amit Kondal, Samir Malhotra, S K Garg & P Pandhi

 

In a crossover study, lithium was given orally at a dose of 56 mg/kg, prepared as suspension (0.5%) in carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and blood samples (1 ml) collected after 0-24 hr after drug administration. After a washout period of two weeks, nimesulide (10mg/kg) was administered alongwith lithium (56 mg/kg) and blood samples were drawn at the same time intervals (0-24 hr) after drug administration. Plasma was separated and assayed for lithium by M 654 Na+/K+/Li+ analyzer and various pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated. Cmax, Kel, t1/2el and AUC0-a of lithium were significantly increased when nimesulide was administered along with lithium as compared to control group.

 

 

List of Experts

Thanks are due to the following experts for reviewing the manuscripts published in the Indian Journal of Experimental Biology during the year 2004.

 

 

Abraham Premila

Vellore

Jolly C I

Thrissur

Rajan M G R

Mumbai

Acharya S B

Varanasi

Joy K P

Varanasi

Ram G C

Izatnagar

Achuthankutty C T

Goa

 

 

Rama Chaudhary

New Delhi

Adhithan C 

Pondicherry

Kale R K

New Delhi

Ramachandran H D

Madieri

Agarwal J K 

Varanasi

Kalyansunderam M 

Pondicherry

Ramaswamy K 

Pondicherry

Agrawal K P

New Delhi

Kamath Vijaylakshmi R

Mumbai

Ramawat K G

Udaipur

Akbarsha M A

Tiruchirapalli

Kapadnis B P

Pune

Ramesh Chander

Lucknow

Amla D V

Lucknow

Kapoor A K

Lucknow

Ramteke P W

Allahabad

Anand Kumar P 

New Delhi

Kapoor P 

Lucknow

Rana A C

Sagar

Andrade C 

Bangalore

Karabetsos E

Greece

Rana B D

Jodhpur

Anil Kumar

Pantnagar

Karunasagar Iddaya

Mangalore

Randhawa G S

Roorkee

Anil Kumar K R

Mysore

Karunasagar Indrani

Mangalore

Rao B S

Mumbai

Anuradha C

Annamalainagar

Kasture V S

Nasik

Rao M V

Ahmedabad

Archunan G

Tiruchirapalli

Katyare S S

Vadodra

Rao P V

Hyderabad

Ashok Kumar

Jaipur

Kavikishore P B

Hyderabad

Rao Srinivasan B 

Mangalore

Asthana O P

Lucknow

Khan A

Varanasi

Rao V D P

Pant Nagar

Augusti K T

Kottayam

Khar Ashok

Hyderabad

Ratha B K

Varanasi

 

 

Kholkute S D

Hyderabad

Ravi Prakash V 

Izatnagar

Bachawat A K

Chandigarh

Khuda-Bukhsh A R

Kalyani

Ravindranath Vijaylakshmi

Gurgaon 

Bagchi S N

Jabalpur

Khuller G K

Chandigarh

Rawal U M

Ahmedabad

Bagyaraj D J

Bangalore

Khurana Paramjit

New Delhi

Ray A 

Delhi

Bairy K L

Manipal

Kohli R K

Chandigarh

Reddy D S

USA

Bajpai R P

Shillong

Kothari I L

Vallabh Vidyanagar

Reddy S R R

Pune

Baktavasalam N

Bangalore

Koul Opender

Jalandhar

Rittal B P R

Chennai

Balasubramanian D 

Hyderabad

Koundal K R

New Delhi

 

 

Balasubramanian K 

Chennai

Koutsouris

Greece

Sahoo P K

Bhubaneshwar

Balasubramanian K A

Vellore

Koyutule Meera

Turkey

Sahu B K

Bhubaneshwar

Bamezai R N K

New Delhi

Krishna Gopal

Mangalore

Samantha T B

Kolkata

Banerjee B D

Bangalore

Krishnamurhty K V 

Pune

Sandeep Kumar

Lucknow

Banerjee Ranajit K

Kolkata

Krishnan M 

Thiruvanan-thapuram

Sane R T

Mumbai

Banerjee Smita

Sagar

Kudu B S

Kurukshetra

Saraf S K

Varanasi

Basavaraja N S

Mangalore

Kulkarni D R

Bijapur

Sardar K K

Izatnagar

Bedwal R S

Jaipur

Kulkarni S K

Chandigarh

Sarkar Kakoli

USA

Bhat S R

New Delhi

Kurup P A

Thiruvanan-thapuram

Sarkar S N

Izatnagar

Bhatia A L

Jaipur

Kushwaha Ameeta

New Delhi

Sarnath D 

Mumbai

Bhattacharya Shelly

Shantiniketan

Kuttan Ramadasan

Amalanagar

Satyatanarayana T 

New Delhi

Bhojwani S S

Agra

 

 

Savanurmath C J

Dharwar

Bhonde R R

Pune

Lakshmi Sita G 

Bangalore

Saxena Renu

New Delhi

Bhosle N B

Goa

Lodha M L

New Delhi

Selvaraj P

Chennai

Bisen P S

Gwalior

Lokesh B R

Mysore

Sen A

Pune

Biswas N M

Kolkata

 

 

Sen M R

Varanasi

Brahmachary R L

Kolkata

Madamwar Datta

Vallabh Vidyanagar

Sengupta U

Agra

 

 

Madhvan Maneesh

Gangtok

Sesikaran B 

Hyderabad

Chainy G B  N

Bhubaneshwar

Mahapatra T 

New Delhi

Sethupathy S 

Annamalai Nagar

Chakravarty A K

Siliguri

Maiti Satyabrata

Anand

Shah Gaurang B 

Gandhi Nagar

Chakrovorty Sanjib

Kalyani

Maitra Saumen Kumar

Shantiniketan

Shailajan Sunita

Mumbai

Chateerjee D K

Vadodra

Malhotra Samir

Chandigarh

Shamim Haider

Varanasi

Chaturvedi C M

Varanasi

Malik J K

Izatnagar

Sharma Arun

Delhi

Chaturvedi H C

Lucknow

Mallick B B

Kolkata

Sharma Deepak

New Delhi

Chaudhary Dipannta R

Hyderabad

Malpathak N P

Pune

Sharma V D

Pantnagar

Chaudhary V K

Hisar

Mandal M B 

Varanasi

Shastry K V

Rohtak

Che Chun Tao

Hong Kong

Mandal T K

Kolkata

Sheshadri V 

New Delhi

Cherian K M

Mumbai

Manja K S

New Delhi

Sheshagir P B

Bangalore

Chhabra S K

Delhi

Marimuthu G

Madurai

Shi Xianglin

USA

Chhatopadhyay Naibedya

USA

Mateenudin Md 

Ambajagoi

Shirwaikar Annie

Mangalore

Chhatopadhyay R R

Kolkata

Mehendale H M

USA

Shiv Kumar K 

Thiruvanan-thapuram

Chidambram K N

Bangalore

Mehrotra Shanta

Lucknow

Shiv Raman N 

Nagpur

Chinoy N J

Ahmedabad

Menon Venugopal P 

Annamalai Nagar

Shivaji S 

Hyderabad

Choudhari P Pal

Kolkata

Mishra A N

Vadodra

Shivkumar B

Hyderabad

 

 

Mishra Brahameshwar

Varanasi

Shivaraj B

Gangtok

Darokar Mahendra

Lucknow

Mishra S H

Vadodra

Shri Prakash

Gwalior

Dastidar Sujata Ghosh

Kolkata

Mishra S S

Barrackpore

Shrivastava G C

New Delhi

Datta Munshi J S 

Kolkata

Misro M M

New Delhi

Shukla Sangeeta

Gwalior

Datta Subimal

USA

Mitra S K

Bangalore

Shyamala Devi C S

Chennai

Datta Sumana

U S A

Mittal Balraj

Lucknow

Singh B R 

Izatnagar

Dave S R

Ahmedabad

Mohan Kumar K P

Kolkata

Singh H B 

Lucknow

Deepak Kumar

New Delhi

Mukherjee Prasim

Mumbai

Singh I S Bright

Cochin

Desai A J

Vadodra

Mukherjee S N

Pune

Singh Megha

Chennai

Deshpande M V

Pune

Muralidhara K

Delhi

Singh P K

New Delhi

Deshpande S B

Varanasi

Muralidharan D

Thiruvanan-thapuram

Singh S K

Varanasi

Dhawan B N

Lucknow

Murthy M Shree Rama

Bangalore

Singh U P

BHU

Dhuley J N

Pune

Murty P K

Lucknow

Sitaramam V

Pune

Diwan A D

New Delhi

Murty P S

NOIDA

Soni G L

Ludhiana

Diwan P V

Hyderabad

 

 

Sopory S K

New Delhi

Dominic C J

Alleppey

Nagabhusanan R

USA

Srivastava A K

Jammu

Dutta S K

Bhubaneshwar

Nagappa A N

Pilani

Stevenson A F G

Germany

Dwarkanath B S

Delhi

Nagaraju J 

Hyderabad

Subedar N K

Nagpur

 

 

Naidu M U R

Hyderabad

Subhash M N

Bangalore

Eapen Susan

Mumbai

Naik S R

Mumbai

Subramanian P 

Annamalai Nagar

Elliah P

Vishakha-patnam

Nair C K K

Mumbai

Sultana Sarwat

Delhi

Fahim Md

New Delhi

Natarajan M

Chennai

Sunil Kumar

Ahmedabad

Fingerman Milton

USA

Nath B K

Varanasi

Suprasama P 

Mumbai

Flora S J S

Gwalior

Nath C 

Lucknow

Swamy V 

Gwalior

 

 

Nath Panchanan

Shantiniketan

 

 

Garg S K

Mathura

Niazi I A

New Delhi

Tamhamkar A J

Mumbai

Ghafoorunissa

Hyderabad

 

 

Tandon O P 

Delhi

Ghaskabdi Surendra

Pune

Oberoi M S

Ludhiana

Tandon Pramod

Shillong

Gill K D

Chandigarh

Omkar

Lucknow

Taneja S K

Chandigarh

Girish Kumar V

Bangalore

Ommen Anna

Vellore

Tarachand U 

Mumbai

Goel R K

Varanasi

 

 

Telang S D

Vadodra

Gopalakrishnakone P 

Singapore

Padh Harish

Ahmedabad

Tembhare D B

Nagpur

Goyal R K

Ahmedabad

Paknikar K M

Pune

Thakur Indu Shekhar

Pant Nagar

Goyal S K

Delhi

Pandey Ashok

Thiruvanan-thapuram

Thengane S R

Pune

Gujar G T

Delhi

Pandey Ras B

USA

Tripathi C D

New Delhi

Gulati O D 

Vadodara

Pandian T J

Madurai

Tripathi Y B

Varanasi

Gunasekaran P 

Madurai

Pari L 

Annamalai Nagar

Tripathy B C

New Delhi

Gupta B B P

Shillong

Parmar N S

Gandhi Nagar

 

 

Gupta Malaya

Kolkata

Pati A K

Raipur

Usha Rani P 

Hyderabad

Gupta P D

Ahmedabad

Patil Subash

Kolhapur

 

 

Gupta P K

Indore

Patro I K

Gwalior

Vaidy Ashok B

Mumbai

Gupta Rani

New Delhi

Paul A V N

New Delhi

Venkatraman B V

Bangalore

Gupta S K

New Delhi

Pillai M Radhakrishna

Thiruvanan-thapuram

Venugopal P 

New Delhi

Gupta Y K

Lucknow

Podschum R

Germany

Verma S K

Udaipur

 

 

Prakash V 

Mysore

Verma Subhash

Chandigarh

Haniffa M A

Palayamkottai

Prema P 

Thiruvanan-thapuram

Verma Yogendra

Ahmedabad

Hasan Q 

Hyderabad

Premendran S J

Sevagram

Vijayraghawan R 

Gwalior

Heble M R

Mumbai

Pushpangadan P

Lucknow

Vishwanathan P N

Lucknow

 

 

 

 

Vohora D 

Delhi

Inamdar Naseeruddin

Bangalore

Radhakrishnan V V

Thiruvanan-thapuram

 

 

 

 

Raghunath M G

Chennai

Walecha Neena

Delhi

Jaiswal V S

Varanasi

Rahman M F

Hyderabad

Wayne Hodgen

Australia

Janardhanan K K

Trissur

Rai Umesh

New Delhi

 

 

Jayaprakash V

Thiruvanan-thapuram

Raina V S

Karnal

Xianglin Shi

USA

Jeganathan P S

Mangalore

Raisuddin S

New Delhi

 

 

Johri T S

Izatnagar

Raizada R B

Lucknow

Yadav R K

New Delhi

 

 

Rajamohan T

Thiruvanan-thapuram

 

 

 

 

AUTHOR INDEX

  

Ahmed Mansoor M

1153

Garg S K

1248

Pandhi P

1248

Ahuja V M

1195

Goswami C

1186

 

 

Ali M

1212

Gupta R K

1200

Raghavendra  A S

1208

Ansari S H

1212

Gupta Seema

1153

Raina Ruchira

1230

 

 

 

 

Ram  K Janaki

1235

Barik S K

1235

Harve Gauri

1216

 

 

Batra P

1245

 

 

Sakha B M

1245

Batra V K

1245

Jena J K

1235

Sambhu C

1226

Bhaskar V Vijay

1177

Joseph Mary

1230

Sen Avalokiteswar

1230

Bhat Z A

1212

 

 

Sharma R

1195

Bhatia A K

1245

Kamath Vijayalaxmi

1216

Sidhu Sabir

1248

Bindu M S

1239

Kashyap L R

1177

Singh Ajay

1220

Boro R C

1186

Khurana S C

1245

Singh S K

1220

 

 

Kondal Amit

1248

Sobha  V 

1239

Chaudhary V K

1245

 

 

Srivastava Aparna

1200

 

 

Malhotra Samir

1248

 

 

Dwivedi Padmanabh

1208

Modi M K

1186

Talukdar N C

1186

 

 

Mukhtar Hayat M

1212

Thakuria D

1186

Fahim M

1195

 

 

Tiwari Sudhanshu

1220

 

 

Naved T

1212

 

 

 

 

 

 

Verma H N

1200

 

 

 KEYWORD INDEX

 

Adventitious shoot

1200

Feed utilization

1239

Pharmacokinetics

1248

African catfish

1226

Freshwater pearl mussel

1235

Plant extracts

1216

Alloxan-induced diabetes

1212

Freshwater Snail

1220

Potato

1245

Alpha-1 adrenergic receptor

1195

 

 

Predator

1230

Alternative pathway

1208

Gene

1153

Protein profile

1186

Apoptosis

1153

Growth

1226, 1239

Protoplast

1208

Azide resistance

1177

 

 

PSB

1186

Azospirillum

1186

Indian major carp

1239

 

 

 

 

Inhibitors and therapy

1153

Radiation

1153

Baroreflex

1195

Isozyme

1186

Resistance inducing protein

1200

Beans

1212

 

 

Respiration

1208

Biowaste management

1226

Labeo rohita

1239

Rhizobium ciceri

1177

Blood glucose

1212

Lamellidens marginalis

1235

 

 

 

 

Larvicidal activity

1216

Seaweed diets

1239

Candida albicans

1195

Left ventricular performance

1195

Signal transduction pathways

1153

Chrysoperla carnea

1230

Lithium

1248

Solanum tuberosum

1245

Clerodendrum aculeatum

1200

Lymnaea acuminata

1220

Streptomycin resistant

1186

Cyamopsis tetragonoloba

1212

 

 

Symbiosis

1177

Cytochrome pathway

1208

Mantle epithelium

1235

Synergism

1216

 

 

Micropropagation

1200

Synthetic insecticides

1216

Diabetes

1212

Microtuberization

1245

 

 

Drug interaction

1248

Molluscicidal activity

1220 Temperature stress 1208
   

 

 

Terazosin

1195
Electroantennograms 1230

Nimesulide

1248

Toxicological effect

1220
Epithelium 1235 Nitrogen fixation 1177    

Euphorbia royleana

1220 Nutrient digestibility 1239 Virus resistance 1200
Explant culture 1235

 

  Volatiles 1230
   

Osmotic stress

1208