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Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

 

ISSN: 0019-5189  

CODEN: IJEB (A6)  42(5)  439-544  (2004)

VOLUME 42

NUMBER 5

MAY 2004

 

CONTENTS

 

Papers

 

Hybrid spheroids as a tool for prediction of radiosensitivity in tumor therapy

443

Bozidar Djordjevic & Christopher S Lange

[IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 A61 B]

 

 

On the sleep promoting effects of BR-16A: Interaction with GABAergic

modulators

448

Anil Kumar & S K Kulkarni

[IPC Code: Int.Cl7 A61K 38/00]

 

 

Isolation of a haemorrhagic protein toxin (SA-HT) from the Indian venomous butterfish (Scatophagus argus, Linn) sting extract

452

S Karmakar, D C Muhuri, S C  Dasgupta, A K  Nagchaudhuri & A  Gomes

[IPC Code: Int. Cl7: A01 N 63/00]

 

 

Pharmacological studies on the venomous spotted butterfish (Scatophagus argus Linn) sting extract on experimental animals

461

D Muhuri, S Karmakar, S C Dasgupta, A K Nagchaudhuri & A Gomes

[IPC Code: Int. Cl7; A61 K]

 

 

Antisnake venom activity of ethanolic seed extract of Strychnos nux vomica Linn.

468

Ipshita Chatterjee, A K Chakravarty & A Gomes

[IPC Code: Int. Cl7; A61 K]

 

 

Comparison of methylprednisolone with dexamethasone in treatment of acute spinal injury in rats

476

Alok Sharma, Rajan Tiwari, Prerna Badhe & Garima Sharma

[IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 A61K]

 

 

Influence of histamine and H1-receptor antagonists on ejaculated human spermatozoa: Role of intrasperm Ca2+

481

A Gupta, R Khosla, S Gupta & A K Tiwary

[IPC Code: Int. Cl7 A61 K]

 

 

Phospholipase A2 activation by hydrogen peroxide during in vitro capacitation of buffalo spermatozoa

486

Sanjoy Shit & S K Atreja

 

 

Influence of juvenile hormone analogue on food consumption and digestive enzyme activities in Spodoptera mauritia Boisd

491

A Sindhu & V S K Nair

 

 

Arsenic induced free radical toxicity in brain of mice

495

M V Rao & G Avani

 

 

Neuropharmacological actions of Panchagavya formulation containing Emblica officinalis Gaerth and Glycyrrhiza glabra Linn in mice

499

Girish S Achliya, Sudhir G Wadodkar & Avinash K Dorle

[IPC Code: Int Cl7 A61K 35/00]

 

 

Hypolipidemic activity of silver preparations in chicks, Gallus serregineus

504

D C Sharma, Ragini Budania, Mili Shah, Priyanka Jain & B L Gaur

[IPC Code: Int.Cl7 A61K 38/00]

 

 

Characterization of outer membrane proteins of Yersinia pestis and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis strains isolated from India

508

Rekha Khushiramani, Urmil Tuteja, Jyoti Shukla & Harsh Vardhan Batra

 

 

Purification and characterization of a small size protease from Bacillus sp.

APR-4

515

D Kumar & T C Bhalla

[IPC Code: Int.Cl.7 C12N/A21/A23J 1/00]

 

 

Biological process of arsenic removal using selected microalgae

522

A C Samal, G Bhar & S C Santra

[IPC Code: Int.Cl.7 C12S]

 

 

Extraction of heparin and heparin-like substance from marine mesogastropod mollusc Turritella attenuata (Lamarck, 1779)

529

M Arumugam & A Shanmugam

[IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 A61K]

 

Expression of m-opioid receptors in developing rat spinal cord: An autoradiographic study

533

Subrata Basu Ray & Shashi Wadhwa

 

 

Notes

 

Antioxidant and nitric oxide synthase activation properties of Auricularia auricula

538

Krishnendu Acharya, Krishnendu Samui, Manjula Rai, Bani Brata Dutta &
Rupa Acharya

[IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 A61B]

 

 

Characterization and identification of chitinase producing Streptomyces venezuelae P10

541

G Mukherjee & S K Sen

[IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 A01N; C12N]

 

Author Index

Keyword Index

 

 

 

Papers

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 42, May 2004, pp. 443-447

 

 

Hybrid spheroids as a tool for prediction of radiosensitivity in tumor therapy

Bozidar Djordjevic & Christopher S Lange

 

Optimization in radiotherapy may be conceivably achieved by individualized treatment regimens. For this, the radiosensitivity of the tumor cells to be treated must be known. A method is presented to show that the effect of radiation on tumor cells in spheroids can be quantitatively evaluated without complicated cell determinations of spheroid composition. This evaluation is based on the dynamics of inactivation of the colony forming ability of whole spheroids composed chiefly of non-transformed diploid fibroblasts and a minority of HeLa "test" cells. Here, spheroids of identical composition, but of different sizes are inactivated proportional to their sizes, thus obviating the need for tedious single cell procedures. The use of spheroids of different sizes permits the deduction of dose-effect relationships, and the innate radiosensitivity of tumors cells. This is a novel method for measuring the radio and chemosensitivity of tumors in primary culture, i.e. cells directly isolated from tumors.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

 Vol. 42, May 2004, pp. 448-451

  

On the sleep promoting effects of BR-16A: Interaction with
GABAergic modulators

Anil Kumar & S K Kulkarni

 

Pentobarbitone-induced hypnosis test was used as an animal model to explore the role of BR-16A, a polyherbal formulation in sleep. Pentobarbitone produces quick sleep latency (onset) and prolongation of total sleep time (duration). Sleep latency and total sleep time were used as a parameters for the evaluation. BR-16A potentiated the effect of triazolam (0.1 mg/kg, ip) and alprazolam (0.25 mg/kg, ip). Melatonin (5.0 mg/kg, ip) and zolpidem (0.5 mg/kg, ip) did not produce any significant effect on sleep parameters. However, alprazolam (0.25mg/kg, ip) potentiated the effect of BR-16A (100 mg/ kg, po) in higher dose only. Sleep promoting effect of BR-16A in combination with GABAergic drugs (triazolam and alprazolam,) suggested that these drugs have common mechanism in sleep promoting effect of pentobarbitone and could be used along with other GABAergic hypnotics for the treatment of insomnia. This may reduce the dose of the latter drug(s). BR-16A can be used for the treatment of sleep and sleep-related disorders.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

 Vol. 42, May 2004, pp. 452-460

 

Isolation of a haemorrhagic protein toxin (SA-HT)
from the Indian venomous butterfish
(Scatophagus argus, Linn) sting extract

S Karmakar, D C Muhuri, S C  Dasgupta, A K  Nagchaudhuri & A  Gomes

 

A haemorrhagic protein toxin (SA-HT) was isolated and purified from the spine extract of the Indian venomous butterfish, S. argus Linn, by two step ion exchange chromatography. The toxin was homogeneous in native and SDS-PAGE gel. SDS-molecular weight of the toxin was found to be 18.1 0.09 kDa. SA-HT produced severe haemorrhage on stomach wall but devoid of cutaneous haemorrhage. UV, EDTA, trypsin, protease, cyproheptadine, indomethacin, acetylsalicylic acid and BW755C treatment significantly antagonized the haemorrhagic activity of SA-HT. The toxin produced dose and time dependent oedema on mice hind paw, which was significantly encountered by cyproheptadine, indomethacin and BW755C. SA-HT increased capillary permeability on guineapig dorsal flank. On isolated guineapig ileum, rat fundus and uterus, SA-HT produced slow contraction which was completely antagonised by prostaglandin blocker SC19220. On isolated rat duodenum, SA-HT produced slow relaxation. SA-HT significantly increased plasma plasmin, serum MDA level and decreased serum SOD level indicating the possible involvement of cyclooxygenase and lipooxygenase pathway.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 42, May 2004, pp. 461-467

 
Pharmacological studies on the venomous spotted butterfish (Scatophagus argus Linn) sting extract on experimental animals

D Muhuri, S Karmakar, S C Dasgupta, A K Nagchaudhuri & A Gomes

 

A sting of the fish S. argus, a venomous edible spotted butterfish, produces tremendous local pain, severe swelling, rise of body temperature, throbbing sensation etc. To establish the pharmacological activities of S. argus sting extract, the present investigation, was carried out on experimental animals. The LD50 of extract was found to be 9.3 mg/kg (iv) in male albino mice. The extract showed loss of sensation, urination and salivation in mice. It potentiated pentobarbitone induced sleeping time in male albino mice and produced hypothermia. Extract produced a fall of cat and guinea pig blood pressure, which was completely abolished by mepyramine. It produced a transient reduction of respiratory rate in rat, but decreased respiratory amplitude in cat, which was abolished after vagotomy. On isolated toad heart, the extract increased both the amplitude and rate of contraction. On isolated guinea pig heart, the sting extract decreased both the rate and amplitude of contraction leading to cardiac arrest, but it had no effect on isolated guinea pig auricle. The extract produced a reversible blockade of electrically induced twitch response of isolated chick biventer cervices preparation, but it had no effect on the isolated rat phrenic nerve diaphragm preparation. It produced a slow contractile response on isolated guinea pig ileum, rat uterus and rat fundal strip preparations but produced slow relaxation on isolated rat duodenum preparation. The contractile response on isolated guinea pig ileum and rat fundal strip was antagonised by SC19220. It did not produce any significant cutaneous haemorrhage in mice and did not produce any haemolysis on saline washed erythrocytes. The sting extract significantly increased capillary permeability of guinea pig dorsal flank and produced oedema in mice hind paw.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

 Vol. 42, May 2004, pp. 468-475

 

Antisnake venom activity of ethanolic seed extract of Strychnos nux vomica Linn.

Ipshita Chatterjee, A K Chakravarty & A Gomes

 

 

The whole seed extract of S.nux vomica (in low doses) effectively neutralized Daboia russelii venom induced lethal, haemorrhage, defibrinogenating, PLA2 enzyme activity and Naja kaouthia venom induced lethal, cardiotoxic, neurotoxic, PLA2 enzyme activity. The seed extract potentiated polyvalent snake venom antiserum action in experimental animals. An active compound (SNVNF) was isolated and purified by thin layer chromatography and silica gel column chromatography, which effectively antagonised D. russelii venom induced lethal, haemorrhagic, defibrinogenating, oedema, PLA2 enzyme activity and N. kaouthia induced lethal, cardiotoxic, neurotoxic, PLA2 enzyme activity. Polyvalent snake venom antiserum action was significantly potentiated by the active compound. Spectral studies revealed it to be a small, straight chain compound containing methyl and amide radicals. Detailed structure elucidation of the compound (SNVNF) is warranted before its clinical trials as a snake venom antagonist.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 42, May 2004, pp. 476-480

  

Comparison of methylprednisolone with dexamethasone in treatment of  acute spinal injury in rats

Alok Sharma, Rajan Tiwari, Prerna Badhe & Garima Sharma

 

Effect of methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MPSS) and its comparison with dexamethasone in experimentally induced acute spinal cord compression in adult rats was studied. The rats were divided into group A (control) and group B, which was subdivided into B1, B2, B3 where MPSS was given after 1, 8 and 24 hr and B4 where dexamethasone was given  after 1 hr of cord injury respectively. Proper neurological evaluation was done with mobility, running and climbing score. Recovery index was evaluated for 7 days. After sacrificing the rats, spinal cord was observed histopathologically. Mean recovery index and microscopic findings based on hemorrhage in gray and white matter, neuronal degeneration, hematomyelia and edema in white matter were recorded. The results suggested that MPSS was effective in promoting post-traumatic clinical and histological recovery and to a greater extent, when given 1 hr after trauma. MPSS is more effective than dexamethasone in reducing edema when both are given after interval of 1hr.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 42, May 2004, pp. 481-485

  

Influence of histamine and H1-receptor antagonists on
ejaculated human spermatozoa: Role of intrasperm Ca2+

A Gupta, R Khosla, S Gupta & A K Tiwary

 

Histamine reduced sperm viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner, accompanied by rise in intrasperm Ca2+. Further, 2', 4'-dichlorobenzamil hydrochloride (DBZ), a Na+-Ca2+ exchange inhibitor, known to elevate intrasperm Ca2+, potentiated both, elevation of intrasperm Ca2+ and spermicidal action of histamine. Pretreatment of sperm with very low doses of H1-receptor antagonists (chlorpheniramine, promethazine or diphenhydramine) prevented the histamine-induced elevation of intrasperm Ca2+ as well as its spermicidal action. However, pretreatment with famotidine, a H2-receptor antagonist did not produce such a protective action. The results strongly suggest that histamine elicits its spermicidal action via H1-receptors present on sperm cells.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 42, May 2004, pp. 486-490

  

Phospholipase A2 activation by hydrogen peroxide during in vitro capacitation of buffalo spermatozoa

Sanjoy Shit & S K Atreja

 

Progressively motile, washed buffalo spermatozoa (50106 cells in 0.5 ml) were in vitro capacitated in HEPES containing Bovine Gamete Medium 3 (BGM3) in presence of heparin (10 mg/ml), and different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (10 to 100 mM). Spermatozoa (60%) were capacitated in presence of heparin compared to 56% in presence of 25 mM H2O2 (optimally found suitable for capacitation). The extent of capacitation was measured in terms of acrosome reaction (AR) induced by lysophosphatidyl choline (100 mg/ml). The acrosome reacted cells were counted after triple staining. Catalase (100 mg/ml) significantly reduced the sperm capacitation to 16-18% when added with H2O2, or alone in the capacitation medium. Phospholipase A2 activity of spermatozoa increased linearly up to 50 mM H2O2 concentration included in the assay system. Moreover, significant increase in phospholipase A2 activity was observed after capacitation by both, the heparin and 25 mM H2O2. The activity was always higher in acrosome reacted cells.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 42, May 2004, pp. 491-494

 

Influence of juvenile hormone analogue on food consumption and digestive enzyme activities in Spodoptera mauritia Boisd

 

A Sindhu & V S K Nair

 

Final instar larvae of S. mauritia treated topically on day 0, 1, 2 and day 3 with a daily dose of 20 mg juvenile hormone analogue (JHA) showed an increase in most of the nutritional parameters such as approximate digestibility, efficiency of conversion of ingested food, consumption index and growth rate. Also, the activities of digestive enzymes amylase, invertase, trehalase and protease increased significantly in JHA treated larvae.  The supernumerary larvae formed after JHA treatments showed an increase in the activities of digestive enzymes. Neck-ligated larvae treated with 10 mg JHA exhibited a significant increase in the activities of trehalase and protease. The results demonstrate that treatments of JHA increase the activities of digestive enzymes in the last instar larvae of S. mauritia.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 42, May 2004, pp. 495-498

 

Arsenic induced free radical toxicity in brain of mice

M V Rao & G Avani

 

The present study was designed to investigate the in vivo effects of oral administration of arsenic trioxide (As2O3; 0.5 and 1 mg/kg body weight/day for 45 days) on cerebral hemispheres and cerebellum in male mice, Mus musculus. Arsenic reduced the concentration of glutathione (GSH) in cerebral hemisphere and cerebellum at both the dose levels; while increased lipid peroxidation (LPO) in cerebral hemisphere and cerebellum regions. Further, the activities of antioxidant enzymes viz., superoxide dismutase and catalase also declined in these two regions with dose indicating oxidative stress. This effect is caused by the action of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by arsenic exposure.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 42, May 2004, pp. 499-503

 

Neuropharmacological actions of Panchagavya formulation containing Emblica officinalis Gaerth and Glycyrrhiza glabra Linn in mice

Girish S Achliya, Sudhir G Wadodkar & Avinash K Dorle

 

A panchagavya Ayurvedic formulation containing E. officinalis, G. glabra, and cows ghee was evaluated for its effect on pentobarbital-induced sleeping time, pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures, maximal electroshock-induced seizures, spontaneous motor activity, rota-rod performance (motor coordination) and antagonism to amphetamine in mice. The formulation (300, 500 mg/kg, po) produced a significant prolongation of pentobarbital-induced sleeping time and reduced spontaneous locomotor activity. The formulation also significantly antagonised the amphetamine induced hyper-locomotor activity (500, 750 mg/kg, po) and protected mice against tonic convulsions induced by maximal electroshock (500, 750 mg/kg, po). The formulation slightly prolonged the phases of seizure activity but did not protect mice against lethality induced by pentylenetetrazole. The formulation did not show neurotoxicity. The results suggest that the panchagavya formulation is sedative in nature.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 42, May 2004, pp. 504-507

 

Hypolipidemic activity of silver preparations in chicks, Gallus serregineus

D C Sharma, Ragini Budania, Mili Shah & Priyanka Jain and B L Gaur

 

Three silver preparations (Varak or foil, ash or Raupya bhasma and sol or colloidal solution) were fed to three groups of young, male chicks for 10 days. There was significant fall in all the plasma lipid fractionstotal lipids, phospholipids, triglycerides and total cholesterol. There was a marked rise in silver content of plasma and whole blood, ranging from 4 to 13 times, suggesting that the observed hypolipidemic action may be due to silver. The administration of the three silver preparations did not cause any retardation in growth, toxic manifestation, side effect or untoward reaction.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 42, May 2004, pp. 508-514

 

Characterization of outer membrane proteins of
Yersinia pestis and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis strains isolated from India

Rekha Khushiramani, Urmil Tuteja, Jyoti Shukla & Harsh Vardhan Batra

 

The majority of virulence factors including the 12 Yersinia outer membrane proteins (Yops), 29 Yop secretion proteins (Ysc) and few specific Yop chaperone (Syc) are contributed by the 70 kb LCR middle plasmid of Yersinia pestis. Yersinia pestis isolates recovered during 1994 plague outbreak and rodent surveillance samples of Southern states of India were studied for the presence of important Yops by the conventional procedure of partially purifying outer membrane proteins (Omps) after cultivation in calcium deficient media. Prominent bands numbering 4-5 between 34-42 kDa region corresponding to important Yops were seen in all the isolates as well as in other Yersinia and non-Yersinia species by SDS-PAGE. Western blotting with the polyclonal antisera raised against these Omp preparations revealed few immuno-reactive bands that appeared to be shared among Y. pestis, Y. pseudotuberculosis, Y. enterocolitica, Y. fredrocksenii, Y. intermedia, Y. kristensenii and E. coli. Three recombinant Yop proteins namely, YopM, YopB and LcrV were produced and antisera to these proteins could reveal presence of these Yops in the Y. pestis Omp preparations. In order to further characterize the important Yops among Omps, attempts were made to generate monoclonal antibodies against Omp preparation. Three of the 4 stable reactive clones that were obtained, when tested, had extensive cross-reactions among pathogenic Yersinia species, Y. pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis isolates, other Yersinia species and the members of Enterobacteriaceae in dot-ELISA and Western blotting. One of the monoclonal antibodies, YP1, exhibited reaction to all the pathogenic Yersinia species and the isolates, with restricted cross-reactivity to Y. intermedia, Y. kristensenii, K. pneumoniae. None of the 4 monoclonal antibodies had reactions with the 3 recombinant Yop proteins. It appears that under low calcium response, the Y. pestis not only activates secretion of Yops but also a large number of other proteins, which as per the present observations are cross-reactive within the family Enterobacteriaceae.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 42, May 2004, pp. 515-521

 

Purification and characterization of a small size protease from Bacillus sp. APR-4

D Kumar & T C Bhalla

 

A thermostable extracellular protease of Bacillus sp. APR-4 was purified by size-exclusion and ion-exchange chromatographic methods and its properties were studied. The purified enzyme had a specific activity of 21,000 U/mg of protein and gave single band on SDS/PAGE with a molecular mass of 16.9 KDa. This protease had an optimal pH of 9 and exhibited its highest activity at 60C. The enzyme activity was inhibited by EDTA, suggesting the presence of metal residue at the active site. Ca2+ (5 mM) had stabilising effect on the activity of protease, but Cu2+ (5 mM) had inhibitory effect. The enzyme exhibited highest specificity towards casein (1%) and had a Km of 26.3 mg/ml and a Vmax of 47.6 U/mg with casein as a substrate. The stability of this enzyme was evaluated in the presence of some organic solvents and the enzyme was stable in methanol, petroleum ether and ethanol. Detergents (Wheel, Farishta) had stimulatory effect on the activity of this enzyme.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 42, May 2004, pp. 522-528

 

Biological process of arsenic removal using selected microalgae

A C Samal, G Bhar & S C Santra

 

In the present investigation, growth of the organisms was reduced due to presence of arsenic (III) and (V) in the culture medium. In comparison to arsenic (V), arsenic (III) had more toxic effect on microalgae. Among the different algal strains, blue green algal species Oscillatoria-Lyngbya mixed culture showed maximum efficiency in removing arsenic (64%) after 21 days of incubation and the same algal species could remove arsenic (III), but 60% after 21 days when incubated in 0.l mg/l arsenic (III) containing medium. Maximum removal was observed at their exponential growth phase and also sometime extended to the stationary phase.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 42, May 2004, pp. 529-532

 

 

Extraction of heparin and heparin-like substance from marine mesogastropod mollusc Turritella attenuata (Lamarck, 1779)

M Arumugam & A Shanmugam

 

Heparin was extracted from marine gastropod T. attenuata through the sequential precipitation with methanol and ethanol. The metachromatic dye method using toluidine blue was used to estimate colorimetrically the amount of heparin present in the sample. The anticoagulant activity of the sample was calculated as per United States of Pharmacopoeia standard procedure using sheep blood. After the purification, samples were analyzed, for the presence of heparin, with agarose-gel electrophoresis and HPLC and the mobility of the sample and the peak respectively were compared with standard heparin. The results of the present study shall help in finding out alternate source.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 42, May 2004, pp. 533-537

 

Expression of m-Opioid receptors in developing rat spinal cord: An autoradiographic study

Subrata Basu Ray & Shashi Wadhwa

 

The expression of m-opioid receptors in the developing rat spinal cord (Postnatal days 7, 14, 30) was studied by autoradiography using [3H]DAMGO. When compared to camera lucida drawings, the receptor was noted over the entire gray matter and dorsal root ganglia at postnatal days 7 and 14. At postnatal day 30, the receptor expression decreased over the gray matter except the superficial laminae (laminae I and II). At all age groups studied, a higher expression of the receptor was noted over the superficial laminae. The study shows that m-opioid receptors appears early in postnatal development and attains mature receptor distribution relatively late in ontogeny, suggesting a possible role in the normal development of nervous system. This is affirmed by an impairment of psychomotor development in babies born to mothers, addicted to opiates.

 

 

Notes

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 42, May 2004, pp. 538-540

 

Antioxidant and nitric oxide synthase
activation properties of Auricularia auricula

Krishnendu Acharya, Krishnendu Samui, Manjula Rai, Bani Brata Dutta & Rupa Acharya

 

In vitro evaluation of antioxidant activities of Auricularia auricula showed significant inhibition of lipid peroxidation, and potent hydroxyl radical scavenging activity when compared with standard drug catechin. IC50 value of crude, boiled and ethanolic extracts of A. auricula represented 403, 510, and 373 g/ml respectively in case of hydroxyl radical scavenging activity and 310, 572 and 398 g/ml respectively in case of lipid peroxidation. Furthermore, crude, boiled and ethanolic extracts also increase significantly nitric oxide production (664, 191 and 850 pmole/mg dry wt/hr respectively) over the control. The present results revealed that A. auricula had potential therapeutic use.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 42, May 2004, pp. 541-544

 

Characterization and identification of chitinase producing
Streptomyces venezuelae P10

G Mukherjee & S K Sen

 

In an attempt to isolate chitinase producers from soil, a streptomycete strain was found potent using natural chitin as the substrate. Chitinolytic activity was tested directly on agar plates, also with crude enzyme. Chitinase assay showed that the isolate could produce 0.8 U/ml of the enzyme. The morphological, cultural, physiological and biochemical characters of the isolate P10 were studied, and identified as Streptomyces venezuelae P10.

 

 
 
Author Index

 

Acharya Krishnendu

538

Gaur B L

504

Samal A C

522

Acharya Rupa

538

Gomes A

452,461, 468

Samui Krishnendu

538

Achliya Girish S

499

Gupta A

481

Santra S C

522

Anil Kumar

448

Gupta S

481

Sen S K

541

Arumugam M

529

 

 

Shah Mili

504

Atreja S K

486

Jain Priyanka

504

Shanmugam A

529

Avani G

495

 

 

Sharma Alok

476

 

 

Karmakar S

452,461

Sharma D C

504

Badhe Prerna

476

 

 

Sharma Garima

476

Batra Harsh Vardhan

508

Lange Christopher S

443

Shit Sanjoy

486

Bhalla T C

515

 

 

Shukla Jyoti

508

Bhar G

522

Muhuri D C

452

Sindhu A

491

Budania Ragini

504

Muhuri D

461

 

 

 

 

Mukherjee G

541

Tiwari Rajan

476

Chakravarty A K

468

 

 

Tiwary A K

481

Chatterjee Ipshita

468

Nagchaudhuri A K

452,461

Tuteja Urmil

508

 

 

Nair V S K

491

 

 

Dasgupta S C

452,461

 

 

Wadhwa Shashi

533

Djordjevic Bozidar

443

Rai Manjula

538

Wadodkar Sudhir G

499

Dorle Avinash K

499

Rao M V

 495

 

 

Dutta Bani Brata

538

Ray Subrata Basu

495

 

 

 

Keyword Index

 

Acetylglucosamine (N)

541

Fish envenomation

461

Panchagavya

499

Ankiostrodesmus convolutes

522

Fish sting extract

461

Pentobarbitone-induced hypnosis

448

Anticonvulsants

499

Food consumption

491

Phospholipase A2

486

Antioxidant activity

538

Free Radical Toxicity

495

Phospholipids

504

APR-4

515

 

 

Protease

515

Arsenic removal

522

GABAergic

448

Purification of protease

515

Arsenic

495

Glycyrrhiza glabra

499

 

 

Auricularia auricula

533

 

 

Rat, Spinal injury

476

 

 

H1-receptor antagonists

481

Raupya bhasma

504

Bacillus sp.

515

Haemorrhagic toxin

452

m-Receptor

533

BR-16A

448

Heparin

529

 

 

Brain

495

Histamine

481

Scatophagus argus

452

Buffalo

486

Human sperm motility

481

Scatophagus argus

461

Butterfish

452

Hydrogen peroxide

486

Scenedesmus bijuga

522

Butterfish

461

 

 

Sedative

499

 

 

Insomnia

448

Silver sol

504

Capacitation

486

Intrasperm calcium

481

Silver varak

504

Chitin

541

 

 

Sleep

448

Chitinase

541

Juvenile hormone analogue

491

Snake venom

468

Chlorellavulgaris

522

 

 

Spermatozoa

486

Cholesterol

504

Lipids

504

Spheroids

443

Clonogenic survival

443

 

 

 Spinal cord

533

CNS

499

Mesogastropod mollusc

529

Spirulina platensis

522

Colloidal  chitin

541

Methylprednisolone

476

Spodoptera mauritia

491

 

 

Microalgae

522

Streptomyces venezuelae

541

[3H]DAMGO

533

 

 

Strychnos nux vomica

468

Daboia russelii

468

Naja kaouthia

468

 

 

Dexamethasone

476

Neuropharmacological activity

499

Triglycerides

504

Dichlorobenzamil

481

Nitric oxide synthase

533

Tumor treatment

443

Digestive enzyme

491

 

 

Turritella attenuata

529

 

 

Ontogeny

533

 

 

Emblica officinalis

499

Oscillatoria-Lyngbia combination

522

Venomous fish

452

Euglena gracilis

522

Outer membrane proteins

508

 

 

 

 

Oxidative Stress

495

Yersinia pestis

508

 

 

 

 

Yersinia pseudotuberculosis

508