Indian Journal of Experimental Biology


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ISSN : 0019-5189

            CODEN : IJEB (A6) 43(11)                                 1113-1226 (2005)

VOLUME 43

                  NUMBER 12

DECEMBER 2005

CONTENTS

 

Review Article

 

Selenium, a versatile trace element: Current research implications

1119

      M P Bansal & Parminder Kaur

 

 

 

Papers

 

Gangliosides enhance migration of mouse B16-melanoma cells through artificial basement membrane alone or in presence of laminin or fibronectin

1130

      S Saha, K C Mohanty & P Mallick

 

 

 

Modulatory effects of different doses of alpha-tocopherol on benzo(a)pyrene–DNA adduct formation in the pulmonary tissue of cigarette smoke inhaling mice

1139

      Ashwani Koul, Mona Singh & Subhash Chander Gangar

 

 

 

Kinetics of humoral immune response in pigs vaccinated against foot and mouth disease

1144

Maitri Sharma, S K Kadian, Ravindra Sharma & T S Rana

 

 

 

Effect of 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor against lipopolysaccharide-induced hypothermia

 

in mice

1150

      Vijay Pal Singh, Chandrashekhar S Patil, Manish Kumar & Shrinivas K Kulkarni

 

 

 

Antiviral profile of Nyctanthes arbortristis L. against encephalitis causing viruses

1156

      P Gupta, S K Bajpai, K Chandra, K L Singh & J S Tandon

 

 

 

Beneficial effects of Zingiber officinale Roscoe on fructose induced hyperlipidemia and hyperinsulinemia in rats

1161

      Sanjay V Kadnur & Ramesh K Goyal

 

 

 

Protective role of Spirulina feed in a freshwater fish (Poecilia reticulata Peters) exposed to an azo dye-methyl red

1165

      Shweta Sharma, Subhasini Sharma & K P Sharma

 

 

 

Identification of allergens in Indian fishes: Hilsa and Pomfret exemplified by ELISA and immunoblotting

1170

      Arpita Das, Phuljhuri Chakraborti, Urmimala Chatterjee, Gautam Mondal & Bishnu P Chatterjee

 

 

 

Modulatory influence of juvenile hormone analogue (JHa) and 20-hydroxyecdysone on lipophorin synthesis in red cotton bug, Dysdercus cingulatus Fabr.

1176

      Mohan K G & D Muraleedharan

 

(Contd)

Mode of utilization of amino acids as growth substrates by Azospirillum brasilense

1182

      Pradip Bhattacharya

 

 

 

NaCl induced changes in photosystem stoichiometry and photosynthetic activity of the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa Kütz.

1192

      S P Adhikary

 

 

 

Note

 

Effectivity of crude versus purified mycobacterial secretory proteins as immunogen for optimum antibody production

1196

      Santa Saha-Roy, Niraj Shende, Satish Kumar & B C Harinath

 

 

 

Annual Index 2005

 

 

 

Contents

1199

 

 

Keyword Index

1213

 

 

Author Index

1218

 

 

List of Experts

1222

 

 

Author Index

Adhikary S P

1192

Bajpai S K

1156

Bansal M P

1119

Bhattacharya Pradip

1182

Chakraborti Phuljhuri

1170

Chandra K

1156

Chatterjee Bishnu P

1170

Chatterjee Urmimala

1170

Das Arpita

1170

Gangar Subhash Chander

1139

Goyal Ramesh K

1161

Gupta P

1156

Harinath B C

1196

Kadian S K

1144

Kadnur Sanjay V

1161

Kaur Parminder

1119

Koul Ashwani

1139

Kulkarni Shrinivas K

1150

Kumar Manish

1150

Kumar Satish

1196

Mallick P

1130

Mohan K G

1176

Mohanty K C

1130

Mondal Gautam

1170

Muraleedharan D

1176

Patil Chandrashekhar S

1150

Rana T S

1144

Saha S

1130

Saha-Roy Santa

1196

Sharma K P

1165

Sharma Maitri

1144

Sharma Ravindra

1144

Sharma Shweta

1165

Sharma Subhasini

1165

Shende Niraj

1196

Singh K L

1156

Singh Mona

1139

Singh Vijay Pal

1150

Tandon J S

1156

 

 

 

 

Keyword Index

Absorption spectra

1192

Acute toxicity

1165

Allergen

1170

Alpha-tocopherol

1139

Amino acids

1182

Anisocytosis

1165

Anticarcinogenesis

1119

Antiviral activity

1156

Azospirillum brasilense

1182

B 16-melanoma

1130

Benzo(a)pyrene

1139

Cardiovascular system

1119

Cigarette smoke

1139

DNA adducts

1139

Dysdercus cingulatus

1176

ELISA

1170, 1196

Encephalitis causing viruses

1156

Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV)

1156

Fibronectin

1130

FMD vaccine

1144

Foot and mouth disease virus

1144

Ganglioside

1130

Gilt

1144

Glutathione peroxidase

1119

Growth

1182

Hilsa

1170

20-Hydroxyecdysone

1176

Hyperlipidemia

1161

Hypothermia

1150

IgE reactivity

1170

Immunogen

1196

Immunosuppression

1119

Insulin resistance

1161

Juvenile hormone analogue

1176

Kinetic constants

1182

Laminin

1130

Leukotriene B4

1150

Lipophorin

1176

Lipopolysaccahride

1150

5-Lipoxygenase

1150

5-LOX

1150

Male reproduction

1119

Metastasis

1130

Methyl red

1165

Microcystis aeruginosa

1192

Mycobacterial ES antigens

1196

Nyctanthes arbortristis

1156

Photosynthesis

1192

Piglet

1144

Poecilia reticulata

1165

Poikilocytosis

1165

Pomfret

1170

Prostaglandin E2

1150

PS I/PS II stoichiometry

1192

Respiration

1192

Salt stress

1192

Selenium

1119

Selenoproteins

1119

Semliki Forest Virus (SFV)

1156

SNT

1144

Spirulina

1165

Tumor

1130

Zingiber officinale

1161

 

 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology
Vol. 43, December 2005, pp. 1119-1129

 

 

 

 

Review Article

 

Selenium, a versatile trace element: Current research implications

M P Bansal & Parminder Kaur

 

Selenium (Se), a trace element, has evolved from its toxic properties to an essential element. Se was known a potent antioxidant through glutathione peroxidase (selenium being part of this molecule). Later, many other selenium-binding proteins were discovered and their functions were tried to be known with unsuccessful results in many cases. Se is known to be involved in carcinogenesis, immune function, male reproduction, cardiovascular diseases etc. The specific mechanism of the involvement of the element is still not known. Recent research with application of modern research tools viz. bioinformatics, cDNA microarray and transgenesis have revealed the mechanism of selenium involvement in various processes. This review highlights mysterious and useful roles of selenium in biological processes.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 43, December 2005, pp. 1130-1138

 

Papers

 

Gangliosides enhance migration of mouse B16-melanoma cells through artificial basement membrane alone or in presence of laminin or fibronectin

S Saha, K C Mohanty & P Mallick

 

Received 4 March 2005; revised 21 July 2005

The migration of B16LuF1 cells, B16-melanoma cells of lower metastatic potential to lung was enhanced through artificial basement membrane in presence of gangliosides of B16LuF1 cells as well as gangliosides of B16-melanoma cells of higher metastatic potential to lung, namely, B16LuF5 and B16LuF10 cells. The same concentration (50mM) of gangliosides of B16LuF1, B16LuF5 and B16LuF10 cells gradually increased the migration of B16LuF1 cells through basement membrane. Moreover, B16LuF10 cell gangliosides modified the migratory effect of laminin and fibronectin on B16LuF1 cells. Laminin alone increased migration of B16LuF1 cells whereas fibronectin alone decreased migration of the same cells. When B16LuF10 cell gangliosides were used in combination with fibronectin, gangliosides removed the migration inhibitory effect of fibronectin resulting in net enhancing effect. Gangliosides in association with laminin also increased the enhancing effect of laminin on migration of B16LuF1 cells. Thus, gangliosides showed additive enhancing effect when used in combination with laminin. However, effect of individual gangliosides were different. Out of six gangliosides isolated from B16LuF10 cells only two gangliosides corresponding to standard gangliosides GM2 and GM3 enhanced migration of B16LuF1 cells. The migration of B16LuF1 cells in presence of each of the remaining four gangliosides corresponding to GT1b, GD1b, GD1a and GM1 was not altered and was comparable to that of untreated control. Thus, gangliosides of B16 melanoma cells alone or in combination with laminin or fibronectin enhanced migration of B16 melanoma cells through artificial basement membrane, suggesting possible role of tumor gangliosides during invasion of metastatic tumor cells through basement membrane of the surrounding tissues in vivo.

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 43, December 2005, pp. 1139-1143

 

 

Modulatory effects of different doses of alpha-tocopherol on benzo(a)pyrene–DNA adduct formation in the pulmonary tissue of cigarette smoke inhaling mice

 

Ashwani Koul, Mona Singh & Subhash Chander Gangar

 

Received 4 October 2004; revised 5 July 2005

Cigarette smoke (CS) has been established as one of the major risk factors for many pathologies including lung cancer in humans and experimental animals. In view of the discrepancy about the role of alpha-tocopherol (AT) in carcinogenesis, the present study was designed to investigate the effects of different doses of AT on benzo(a)pyrene–DNA [B(a)P-DNA] adduct formation in lungs of CS inhaling mice. Extent of carcinogen-DNA adduct formation has been considered as an index for carcinogenesis. Feeding of 35 IU AT/kg body weight increased B(a)P-DNA adducts formation significantly whereas feeding of 5 IU AT/kg body weight did not altered much the B(a)P-DNA adduct levels when both were compared to the control counterparts. With CS inhalation, the B(a)P-DNA adducts formation increased in all the groups when compared to their respective sham counterparts. Interestingly, in CS exposed groups, there was least increase in B(a)P-DNA adducts formation in 5 IU AT/kg fed animals followed by the control and 35 IU AT/kg body weight fed groups respectively. The results suggest that higher doses of AT accentuate DNA adduct formation in CS inhaling mice.

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 43, December 2005, pp. 1144-1149

 

 

Kinetics of humoral immune response in pigs vaccinated against
foot and mouth disease

Maitri Sharma, S K Kadian, Ravindra Sharma & T S Rana

 

Received 3 March 2005; revised 11 August 2005

The present investigation was conducted to study the foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV)-specific humoral immune response (HIR) in pigs, following vaccination with oil adjuvanted foot and mouth disease (FMD) vaccine, upto 90 days post vaccination (dpv). For this, 40 Large White Yorkshire (LWY) pigs (20; one-year old female (gilts) and 20; three-month old piglets) were vaccinated @ 2 ml/animal, subcutaneously. Sera samples were collected at fortnight interval from all the animals. The log10 SN50 antibody titres against all the serotypes (Type O, A and Asia-1) were detected in both gilts and piglets from day 7 to 90 dpv indicating the persistence of HIR up to the last day of sampling. The maximum antibody titres were observed on 28 dpv, thereafter, titres started declining, but were present till 90 dpv against all the three FMDV serotypes. HIR was more pronounced in piglets in comparison to gilts, as group mean SN antibody titres against all the three FMDV serotypes were found to be more maintained and significantly higher in piglets.

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 43, December 2005, pp. 1156-1160

 

 

Antiviral profile of Nyctanthes arbortristis L. against encephalitis causing viruses*

P Gupta, S K Bajpai, K Chandra, K L Singh & J S Tandon

 

Received 18 June 2004; revised 8 July 2005

The ethanolic extracts, various fractions and two pure compounds isolated from the plant N. arbortristis were tested against Encephalomyocarditis Virus (EMCV) and Semliki Forest Virus (SFV). Pronounced in vitro virus inhibitory activity was observed with the ethanolic and n-butanol fractions as well as with the pure compounds arbortristoside A and arbortristoside C. In addition, ethanolic extracts and n-butanol fraction protected EMCV infected mice to the extent of
40 and 60% respectively against SFV at a daily dose of 125 mg/kg body weight.

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 43, December 2005, pp. 1161-1164

 

 

Beneficial effects of Zingiber officinale Roscoe on fructose induced hyperlipidemia and hyperinsulinemia in rats

Sanjay V Kadnur & Ramesh K Goyal

 

Received 8 September 2004; revised 4 July 2005

Fructose supplementation produced cardinal features of Syndrome-X including significant elevations in serum cholesterol, triglyceride, glucose and insulin and also in body weight. While treatment with methanolic extract of dried rhizomes of Zingiber officinale produced a significant reduction in fructose induced elevation in lipid levels, body weight, hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia, treatment with ethyl acetate extract of Z. officinale did not produce any significant change in either of the last two parameters. However, it produced a significant reduction in elevated lipid levels and body weight. The concentration of 6-gingerol was found to be higher in methanolic extract and less in ethyl acetate extract. The results suggest that the methanolic extract of Z. officinale produces better effects as compared to ethyl acetate extract in fructose induced hyperlipidemia associated with insulin resistance. The extent of activity appears to be dependent on the concentration of 6-gingerol present in the extracts.

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 43, December 2005, pp. 1165-1169

 

 

Protective role of Spirulina feed in a freshwater fish (Poecilia reticulata Peters) exposed to an azo dye-methyl red

Shweta Sharma & Subhasini Sharma

and

K P Sharma

 

Received 10 September 2004; revised 11 August 2005

Acute toxicity of an azo dye-methyl red (5-40 ppm) was examined under starving conditions, on two groups of Poecilia reticulata¾a freshwater fish, fed on different diets prior to their exposure to dye. Besides natural feed, fish of group-1 also received Spirulina feed for one month (feed population), whereas those of group-2 received only natural feed (non-feed population). The mortality data revealed non-feed population to be more tolerant to feed stress during acute toxicity study, whereas feed population exhibited better tolerance to the combined stress of both feed and methyl red; especially at higher concentrations of the latter. RBCs in methyl red treatments acquired different shapes (poikilocytosis) and an increase in their size (anisocytosis) was also noticed. Percentage of such abnormal RBCs was almost equal in both feed and non-feed populations, except at a lower concentration (5 ppm), at which percentage of poikilocytic RBCs was lesser in the feed population. RBC counts in the control non-feed fish (34.5 ´ 104/mm3) were significantly lower than control feed population (50.0 ´ 104 /mm3). Their number decreased with an increase in methyl red concentrations in non-feed population (9-26%), but percent reduction in RBC counts was almost similar (20-26%) at various concentrations of methyl red (5-30 ppm) in the feed population. Despite reduction in RBC counts, feed population did not suffer from anemia in methyl red treatments, as evident by their RBC counts which were almost equal to control fish of non-feed population. The results suggest that Spirulina feed improves tolerance of test organism towards methyl red manifested by noticeable reduction in the cytotoxic effects on RBCs and a lower mortality rate at higher concentrations of dye.

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 43, December 2005, pp. 1170-1175

 

 

Identification of allergens in Indian fishes: Hilsa and Pomfret exemplified by ELISA and immunoblotting

Arpita Das, Phuljhuri Chakraborti, Urmimala Chatterjee, Gautam Mondal & Bishnu P Chatterjee

 

Received 27 December 2004; revised 3 August 2005

Enzymed-linked immunosorbant assay of hilsa and pomfret muscle extracts showed specific IgE binding to ten allergic patients’ sera, the results corroborated to that of skin prick test. Comparison of allergen profiles of the two fish extracts by immunoblotting revealed a common antigenic protein of 50 kDa and some high molecular weight fish allergens instead of low molecular weight parvalbumin found in several fishes. Purified and well characterized fish allergens are always considered better than crude fish extracts for diagnostic use.

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 43, December 2005, pp. 1176-1181

 

 

Modulatory influence of juvenile hormone analogue (JHa) and 20-hydroxy- ecdysone on lipophorin synthesis in red cotton bug, Dysdercus cingulatus Fabr.

K G Mohan & D Muraleedharan

 

Received 10 December 2004; revised 8 July 2005

Topical supply of methoprene, a juvenile hormone analogue (JHa) caused notable morphological disturbance in insects. Topical supply of methoprene to newly emerged adult female D. cingulatus caused notable disturbance and induced a dramatic reduction in the total haemolymph protein pattern and lipophorin production in tissues like fat body, ovary and haemolymph. Total protein concentration in haemolymph also showed significant reduction in 1 day old insects but increased slightly as age advanced. Application of 20-hydroxyecdysone (20-HE) to 2-day-old adult female stimulated protein synthesis intensively. Lipophorin levels in fat body and ovary also simultaneously increased. Densitometric analysis revealed that methoprene inhibits while 20-HE stimulates lipophorin production in D. cingulatus.

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 43, December 2005, pp. 1182-1191

 

 

Mode of utilization of amino acids as growth substrates by
Azospirillum brasilense

 

Pradip Bhattacharya

 

Received 3 January 2005; revised 22 July 2005

The study was undertaken to analyze the rate of uptake and utilization of various amino acids by Azospirillum brasilense Sp81 (RG) in a basal mineral salts solution under non-nitrogen fixing condition. These amino acids including other nitrogenous compounds were tested for both N- and C-sources. The kinetic constants (Km and Vmax) of uptake of some amino acids (e.g. lysine, arginine, proline, glutamine and glutamic acid) were exploited using a Hanes-Woolf plot, and discussed in the context of nitrogen starvation or both carbon and nitrogen starvation. To summarize all the kinetic data for these amino acids strongly suggested that the mode of these amino acids utilization in this bacterium followed the same general pattern, although the quantitative differences were there. A single amino acid was able to satisfy the nitrogen needs of this bacterium in basal mineral salts solution, and this possibility could be considered for the cost-effective growth medium for this bacterium in the biotechnological industry.

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 43, December 2005, pp. 1192-1195

 

 

NaCl induced changes in photosystem stoichiometry and photosynthetic activity of the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa Kütz.

S P Adhikary

 

Received 4 November 2004; revised 11 April 2005

Exposure to 0.4 M NaCl resulted in higher PS I/PS II stoichiometry and increase in the rate of photosynthesis in planktonic cyanobacterium M. aeruginosa. Altered ratios of PS I/PS II as well as photosynthesis and respiration were stabilized within 72 hr of exposure to salt, leading to adaptation of the organism to the changed conditions.

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 43, December 2005, pp. 1196-1198

 

 

Notes

 

Effectivity of crude versus purified myco­bacterial secretory proteins as immunogen
for optimum antibody production

Santa Saha-Roy, Niraj Shende, Satish Kumar & B C Harinath

 

Received 16 December 2004; revised 11 August 2005

Monospecific antibodies have been successfully utilized in antigen detection, which is better indicator of active infection. Mycobacterium tuberculosis excretory secretory (M tb ES) antigens such as ES 31, ES 41 and ES 43 (31 kDa, 41 kDa and 43 kDa protein, respectively) have been shown to be present in Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra culture filtrate and are of diagnostic interest. To study the immunogenic potential of crude versus purified antigen, goat was immunized with M tb detergent soluble sonicate (DSS) antigen as well as purified antigen fraction (ESAS 7) containing ES 31 antigen. Both anti-DSS IgG antibody and anti ESAS 7 IgG antibody were found to be reactive with ES 31 antigen upto 1 ng concentration of antibody by ELISA. Crude DSS antigen was found to be quite effective in producing high titre antibodies and showed further high reactivity with other ES antigens (ES 41 and ES 43) of diagnostic interest.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental BiologyVol. 43, December 2005, pp 1222-1226

 

 

List of Experts

 

Thanks are due to the following experts for reviewing the manuscripts published in the Indian Journal of Experimental Biology during the year 2005.

 

 


Abraham T J

Nadia

Acharaya S B

Varanasi

Adhikary S P

Bhubaneshwar

Adithan C

Pondicherry

Ahmad Sarfaraj

USA

Ahmed Sohail

Aligarh

Ali Arif

New Delhi

Anand Kumar P

New Delhi

Anand N

Chennai

Anilkumar K R

Mysore

Anjani Kumar

Gurgaon

Archunan G

Tiruchirapalli

Aruldhas M Michael

Chennai

Arunakazan J

Chennai

Ashwani Kumar

Lucknow

Augusti K T

Kottayam

Azad I S

Kuwait

Bachawat A K

Chandigarh

Bagchi S N

Jabalpur

Bagyaraj D.J

Bangalore

Bairy K L

Manipal

Balasubramanian K A

Vellore

Balaram P

Trivendram

Balasubramanian K

Chennai

Balasubramanian M P

Chennai

Balasubramanian V

Hyderabad

Bamezai R N K

New Delhi

Bandyopadhyay Rajyashree

Kolkata

Bandyopadhyay Sandip K

Kolkata

Banerjee B D

Delhi

Banerjee P C

Calcutta

Banerjee Ranajit K

Kolkata

Banerjee Rintu

Kharagpur

Banerjee Smita

Sagar

Bansal S K

Delhi

Baranwal V K

New Delhi

Baswaraja N

Mangalore

Batra H V

Gwalior

Behari Jitendra

New Delhi

Bhat S R

New Delhi

Bhatnagar V K

Ahmedabad

Bhattacharya D

Kolkata

Bhattacharya Samir

Kolkata

Bhattacharya Shelly

Santiniketan

Bhisey A N

Mumbai

Bhonde R R

Pune

Bhosale S V

Pune

Bisen P S

Gwalior

Borker A S

Goa

Chakrabarti Reena

Delhi

Chandra Ramesha

Lucknow

Chandrasekar S

New Delhi

Chaterji Dipankar

Bangalore

Chatterji C

Lucknow

Chattopadhyay M K

Hyderabad

Chaturvedi H C

Lucknow

Chauhan R S

Pantnagar

Cherian K M

Mumbai

Chhatpar H S

Vadodara

Chinoy N J

Ahmedabad

Dangar T K

Cuttak

Das Anirudh M

Mumbai

Das Sukta

Kolkata

Dasgupta Debjani

Mumbai

Dastidar Sujata G

Kolkata

Dattamunshi J S

Kolkata

Dave S R

Ahmedabad

De M

Kolkata

Desai A J

Baroda

Deshpande S B

Varanasi

Deshpande V V

Pune

Devasagayam T P A

Mumbai

Dharanlingam K

Madurai

Dhuley JN

Pune

Dileep Kumar B S

Jorhat

Dinakaran R

Madurai

Diwan P V

Hyderabad

Dixit Aparna

New Delhi

Eapen S

Mumbai

Ellaiah P

Vishakhapatnam

Flora S J S

Gwalior

Gadre R V

Pune

Ghaskadbi S

Pune

Gayaprasad

Hisar

Ghafoorunissa

Hyderabad

Ghosh Amit

Chandigarh

Ghosh Anil K

Kolkata

Goel R K

Varanasi

Goel Sandeep

Hyderabad

 

Gomes A

Kolkata

 

Gopalkrishnakone P

Singapore

 

Goswami P P

Izatnagar

 

Goyal R K

Ahmedabad

 

Grover J K

New Delhi

 

Gunasekaran P

Madurai

 

Gupta B B P

Shillong

 

Gupta Mahesh P

USA

 

Gupta Rani

New Delhi

 

Gupta S K

New Delhi

 

Gupta Y K

New Delhi

 

Haider Shamim

Varanasi

 

Haldhar C

Varanasi

 

Jagetia G C

Manipal

 

Jamil Kaiser

Hyderabad

 

Jeganathan P S

Mangalore

 

Jeyaprakash K

Coimbatore

 

John M Basheera

Chennai

 

Joseph M V

Calicut

 

Joshi Amitabh

Bangalore

 

Joy K P

Varanasi

 

Kale R K

New Delhi

 

Kamath K S

Mangalore

 

Kanase Aruna

Kolhapur

Kanchan

Ludhiana

 

Kapadnis B P

Pune

 

Karanth N G

Mysore

 

Karunasagar Iddaya

Mangalore

 

Kasinathan R

Parangipettai

 

Kasture S B

Nasik

 

Katyare S S

Baroda

 

Kaul C L

New Delhi

 

Kaushik B D

New Delhi

 

Kavikishore P B

Hyderabad

 

Kayastha Arvind M

Varanasi

 

Khan Rahat Ali

Aligarh

 

Khanna Naresh

Jaipur

 

Khemani L D

Agra

 

Kholkute S D

Hyderabad

 

Khuller G K

Chandigarh

 

Khurana Paramjit

Delhi

 

Koul Opender

Jalandhar

 

Krishnamurthy K V

Tiruchirapalli

 

Kulkarni Chandra

Bangalore

 

Kulkarni D R

Bijapur

 

Kulkarni S K

Chandigarh

 

Kumar Rakesh

USA

 

Kumar Sandeep

Lucknow

Kundu P N

Vadodara

 

Kuruvilla Alice

Coimbatore

 

Kuttan R

Amlanagar

 

Kutty Achutan

Goa

 

Lahiri A M K

Kolkata

 

Latha P G

Thiruvanantpuram

 

Lodha M L

New Delhi

 

Lohia N K

Jaipur

 

Lokesh B R

Mysore

 

Mahdi Hasan

Lucknow

 

Maheshwari Ramesh

Bangalore

 

Mahmood Akhtar

Chandigarh

 

Maitra S K

Shanti Niketan

 

Maity B R

Kolkata

 

Majumdar U K

Kolkata

 

Majumder D K

New Delhi

 

Malhotra R K

Gurgaon

 

Mallick B B

Kolkata

 

Mandal M B

Varanasi

 

Manjunath B K

Shimoga

 

Marimuthu G

Madurai

 

Martin K P

Calicut

 

Maru G B

Mumbai

 

Maulick S K

New Delhi

 

Mediratta P K

Delhi

 

Menon Venugopal P

Annamalainagar

 

Micheal R Dinakaran

Madurai

 

Mishra A N

Vadodara

 

Misro M M

New Delhi

 

Mohankumar K P

Kolkata

 

Mohanty S N

Bhubaneshwar

 

Molan Peter

New Zealand

 

Molly Jacob

Vellore

 

Mukherjee S C

Mumbai

 

Muralidhar K

Delhi

 

Muralidharan D

Mangalore

 

Murthy P K

Lucknow

 

Muruganandan S

USA

 

Nagarajan B

Chennai

 

Nair Balakrish G

Bangladesh

 

Nair Madavan

Hyderabad

 

Nair Suresh

New Delhi

 

Nair V S K

Calicut

 

Nandedkar T D

Mumbai

 

Narayanan K

Bangalore

 

Natarajan P

Kaliakkavilai

 

Nath Panchanan

Santiniketan

 

Nautiyal C S

Lucknow

 

Niazi I A

Delhi

 

Oberoi M S

Ludhiana

 

Oommen Oommen V

Trivandrum

 

Padh Harish

Ahmedabad

 

Palit G

Lucknow

 

Pande G

Hyderabad

 

Pandhi P

Chandigarh

 

Pandian M Rajaskara

Namakkal

 

Pandian T J

Madurai

 

Paniprasad K

Mumbai

 

Parvez Iqbal

Aligarh

 

Patel P S

Ahmedabad

 

Pathipati Usharani

Hyderabad

 

Periera Ben M J

Roorkee

 

Pillai K K

New Delhi

 

Pillai Radhakrishnan M

Trivendram

 

Ponnachan P T C

Trissur

 

Poulse C S

Cochin

 

Prabhakaran P S

Bangalore

 

Pradhan A K

New Delhi

 

Prakash V

Mysore

 

Prasad G

Hisar

 

Prema P

Thiruvanantpuram

 

Prememdran S John

Sevagram

 

Purohit Ashok

Jodhpur

 

Pushpangadhan P

Lucknow

 

Radhakrishnan M

Thiruvanantpuram

 

Rahman H

Umiam

 

Raizada R B

Lucknow

 

Rajan M G R

Mumbai

 

Rajani M

Ahmedabad

 

Raju T N

Hyderabad

 

Ramachandran Anup

Vellore

 

Ramachandran H D

Madikeri

 

Ramaswamy K

Coimbatore

 

Rana S V S

Meerut

 

Randhawa G S

Roorkee

 

Rao D N

New Delhi

 

Rao Mala

Pune

 

Rao M N A

Manipal

 

Rao M V

Tiruchirapalli

 

Ravishankar G A

Mysore

 

Rawal U M

Ahmedabad

 

Ray A

Delhi

 

Reddy S R R

Pune

 

Rout G M

Bhubaneshwar

 

Sadekar R D

Akola

 

Saha Sandeep

Kolkata

 

Sahoo P K

Bhubaneshwar

 

Sainis K B

Mumbai

 

Sakhuja Vinay

Chandigarh

 

Sane R T

Mumbai

 

Sardar K K

Bhubaneshwar

 

Sarkar Dipak K

U S A

 

Savanurmath C J

Hubli

 

Sawhney S K

Hisar

 

Saxena Renu

New Delhi

 

Seenayya G

Hyderabad

 

Seethalakhmi S

Chennai

 

Sen Alok

Pune

 

Shahid Jameel

New Delhi

 

Sharma V D

Pantnagar

 

Shashidhar V R

Bangalore

 

Sheshagiri P B

Bangalore

 

Shirwaikar Annie

Manipal

 

Shivaji S

Hyderabad

 

Shiv Charan

Hisar

 

Shriniwas Usha K

Hyderabad

 

Shrivastava G C

New Delhi

 

Shrivastava P C

Pantnagar

 

Shrivastava Sheela

New Delhi

 

Shukla Yogeshwar

Lucknow

 

Singh A B

Delhi

 

Singh Aqbal

New Delhi

 

Singh B N

Varanasi

 

Singh B R

Izatnagar

 

Singh J N

Bhagalpur

 

Singh Megha

Chennai

 

Singh Rajiv

Izatnagar

 

Sreedhar A S

Hyderabad

 

Subhas M N

Bangalore

 

Sumanth Meera

Bangalore

 

Suprassana P

Mumbai

 

Suri A

New Delhi

 

Swaminathan T

Chennai

 

Tandon R K

New Delhi

 

Telang S D

Baroda

 

Tewary P D

Varanasi

 

Thakur Indu Shekhar

Pantnagar

 

Thind S K

Chandigarh

 

Thiyagarajan S P

Chennai

 

Tripathi C K M

Lucknow

 

Tyagi C S

Hisar

 

Udaykumar M

Bangalore

 

Udupa S L

Manipal

 

Umadevi P

Bhopal

 

Usharani P

Hyderabad

 

Vajreswari A

Mysore

 

Venkataraman S

Chennai

 

Venkateswerlu G

Hyderabad

 

Venkatraman B V

Bangalore

 

Verma S K

Udaipur

 

Vijayaraghawan R

Gwalior

 

Viswanathan P N

Lucknow

 

Viswanathan S

Chennai

 

Wendell Douglas L

USA

 

Yadav C L

Hisar