Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

 

Total visitors: 1,448  since 15-11-06

VOLUME 44

NUMBER 12

DECEMBER 2006

CODEN : IJEB (A6) 44(12) 943-1052(2006)

ISSN : 0019-5189

 

CONTENTS

 

Papers

 

Influence of transcranial magnetic stimulation on spike-wave discharges in a genetic model of absence epilepsy

949

     Leonid S Godlevsky, Evgeniy V Kobolev, Egidius L J M van Luijtelaar, Antony M L Coenen, Konstantin I Stepanenko & Igor V Smirnov

 

 

 

PEG-induced fusion of phosphatidylcholine-liposomes with protoplasts and post-fusion evaluation of plating efficiency and enrichment in plasmamembrane phosphatidylcholine of protoplasts in Datura innoxia Mill

955

     Kumariah Manoharan, Rajendra Prasad & Sipra Guha-Mukherjee

 

 

 

Effects of oxidizing and reducing agents on ovine pulmonary artery responses to nitric oxide donors, sodium nitroprusside and 3-morpholino-sydnonimine

964

       K K Sardar, S N Sarkar, D U Bawankule, S K Mishra & V Raviprakash

 

 

 

Effect of gold on stimulation of reproductive function in immature female albino rats

971

       Alok Chattopadhyay, Mahitosh Sarkar & Narendra M Biswas

 

 

 

Impact of feeding ethanolic extract of root bark of Cananga odorata (Lam) on reproductive functions in male rats

976

       P Anitha & M Indira

 

 

 

Effect of Aerva lanata on calcium oxalate urolithiasis in rats

981

       P Soundararajan, R Mahesh, T Ramesh & V Hazeena Begum

 

 

 

Antihyperglycemic, antistress and nootropic activity of roots of Rubia cordifolia Linn

987

       Rupali A Patil, Swati C Jagdale & Sanjay B Kasture

 

 

 

In vitro antioxidant studies of Sphaeranthus indicus (Linn)

993

       Annie Shirwaikar, Kirti S Prabhu & I S R Punitha

 

 

 

Cytogenetic effects of a mixture of selected metals following subchronic exposure through drinking water in male rats

997

       S H Jadhav, S N Sarkar & H C Tripathi

 

 

 

Phage typing of indigenous soybean-rhizobia and relationship of a phage group strains for their asymbiotic and symbiotic nitrogen fixation

1006

       C Appunu & B Dhar

 

 

 

Isoflavonoids production in callus culture of Pueraria tuberosa, the Indian kudzu

1012

       Kamlesh Vaishnav, Shaily Goyal & K G Ramawat

 

 

Affinity purification and partial characterization of IgM-like immunoglobulins of African catfish, Clarias gariepinus (Burchell, 1822)

1018

       Gaurav Rathore, T Raja Swaminathan, Neeraj Sood, B N Mishra & D Kapoor

 

 

 

Short communication

 

Antigenic competition among different ‘O’ antigens of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovars during hyperimmunization in pony mares

1022

       B R Singh, Mudit Chandra, Ravi Kant Agrawal & Babu Nagrajan

 

 

 

Book Review

 

Women Empowerment in Fisheries

1026

       Modadugu V Gupta

 

 

 

Announcement

 

National Seminar on Frontiers in Biotechnology and Bioinformatics

948

 

 

Annual Index

 

 

 

Contents

1027

 

 

Keyword Index

1041

 

 

Author Index

1045

 

 

List of Experts

1049

 

 

 

Announcement

 

National Seminar on Frontiers in Biotechnology and Bioinformatics

02 – 03 February, 2007, Navi Mumbai.

 

To be held at Dr. D. Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Nerul, Navi Mumbai, the seminar will cover following topics: (a) agribiotechnology, (b) chemiinformatics, (c) computational biology, (d) genetically modified organisms, (e) marine and environmental biotechnology, (f) molecular cell signaling, (g) molecular endocrinology, (h) molecular medicine, drug designing and delivery systems, (i) nanoscience, (j) process engineering, (k) stem cell research, (l) system biology, and (m) transcriptomics. For details kindly contact: Prof. D. A. Bhiwgade, Convenor, NS-FIBB-2007, Dr. D. Y. Patil Institute for Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, Plot No. 50, Sector No. 15, CBD Belapur, Navi Mumbai 400 614, India. Tel No: + 91 22 2756 3600 / 1900. Fax: + 91 22 39286176.
E-mail : seminar2007@dypatil.edu

 

Author Index

 

Agrawal Ravi Kant

1022

Anitha P

976

Appunu C

1006

Bawankule D U

964

Begum V Hazeena

981

Biswas Narendra M

971

Chandra Mudit

1022

Chattopadhyay Alok

971

Coenen Antony M L

949

Dhar B

1006

Godlevsky Leonid S

949

Goyal Shaily

1012

Gupta Modadugu V

1026

Indira M

976

Jadhav S H

997

Jagdale Swati C

987

Kapoor D

1018

Kasture Sanjay B

987

Kobolev Evgeniy V

949

Mahesh R

981

Manoharan Kumariah

955

Mishra B N

1018

Mishra S K

964

Mukherjee Sipra Guha

955

Nagrajan Babu

1022

Patil Rupali A

987

Prabhu Kirti S

993

Prasad Rajendra

955

Punitha I S R

993

Ramawat K G

1012

Ramesh T

981

Rathore Gaurav

1018

Raviprakash V

964

Sardar K K

964

Sarkar Mahitosh

971

Sarkar S N

964, 997

Shirwaikar Annie

993

Singh B R

1022

Smirnov Igor V

949

Sood Neeraj

1018

Soundararajan P

981

Stepanenko Konstantin I

949

Swaminathan T Raja

1018

Tripathi H C

997

Vaishnav Kamlesh

1012

van Luijtelaar Egidius L J M

949

 

 

Keyword Index

Absence epilepsy

949

Aerva lanata

981

Antifertility

976

Antigenic competition

1022

Antihyperglycemic activity

987

Antioxidant

993

Antistress

 

Bradyrhizobia

1006

Callus culture

1012

Cananga odorata

976

Chromatography

1018

Clarias gariepinus

1018

Datura innoxia Mill

955

Equines

1022

Ex planta nitrogenase activity

1006

Fish

1018

Free radicals

993

Genotoxicity

997

Gold

971

Groundwater contaminants

997

Immunoglobulin

1018

Isoflavonoids production

1012

Liposomes

955

Metal mixture

997

Nitric oxide

964

Nootropic activity

987

‘O’ antigens

1022

Ovine pulmonary artery

964

Oxalate synthesizing enzyme

981

Oxidative stress

997

PEG

955

Phage typing

1006

Phosphatidylcholine

955

Plasmamembrane phospholipids

955

Plating efficiency

955

Protoplasts

955

Pueraria tuberosa

1012

Rat

971, 997

Redox regulation

964

Reproductive function

971

Root extract

987

Rubia Cordifolia

987

Salmonella

1022

Soybean

1006

Spermatotoxic

976

Sphaeranthus indicus

993

Spike-wave discharges

949

Stone forming contitutents

981

Symbiotic effectiveness

1006

Testis

976

Testosterone

976

Transcranial magnetic stimulation

949

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Papers

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 44, December 2006, pp. 949-954

 

 

Influence of transcranial magnetic stimulation on spike-wave discharges in a genetic model of absence epilepsy

Leonid S Godlevsky, Evgeniy V Kobolev, Egidius L J M van Luijtelaar, Antony M L Coenen,
Konstantin I Stepanenko
& Igor V Smirnov

 

Received 23 September 2005; revised 12 September 2006

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) impulses, (0.5 Hz, 3 impulses) were presented at threshold intensity to male WAG/Rij rats. One group received stimuli, which involved motor responses of hindlimbs, rats of the second group received sham stimulation. Electrocorticograms (ECoG) were recorded before and up to 2 hr from the moment of transcranial magnetic stimulation. It was established that such stimulation engendered a reduction of spike-wave discharge (SWD) bursts duration. This effect was most pronounced in 30 min from the moment of cessation of stimulation, when a decrease of 31.4% was noted in comparison with sham-stimulated control group. The number of bursts of spike-wave discharges was reduced, but did not reach significant difference when compared both with pre-stimulative base-line level and with sham- stimulated control rats. Bursts of spike- wave discharges restored up to pre-stimulative level in 90-150 minutes from the moment of cessation of transcranial stimulation. It can be concluded that transcranical magnetic stimulation possessed an ability to engender short- time suppression of bursts of spike-wave discharges in WAG/Rij rats.

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 44, December 2006, pp. 955-963

 

 

PEG-induced fusion of phosphatidylcholine-liposomes with protoplasts and
post-fusion evaluation of plating efficiency and enrichment in plasmamembrane phosphatidylcholine of protoplasts in Datura innoxia Mill

Kumariah Manoharan, Rajendra Prasad & Sipra Guha-Mukherjee

 

Received 3 July 2006; revised 29 September 2006

Liposomes entrapping fluorescein diacetate were fused with protoplasts of Datura innoxia Mill by employing polyethylene glycol (PEG) as the fusogen. Factors that influence liposome-protoplast fusion were optimized as a function of PEG-concentration and incubation duration, liposome composition and surface charge and liposome:protoplast ratio. Phosphatidylcholine-liposomes were found ideal for the objectives of the study. Fusion index based on per cent fluorescing protoplasts varied among the protoplast types. PEG-incubation duration in the fusion assay and growth ability of protoplasts to form microcalli subsequent to liposome-protoplast fusion was determined based on protoplast plating-efficiency. Plating efficiency of post-fusion protoplasts increased due to incorporation of liposome-phosphatidylcholine in the plasmamembrane of protoplasts. Results are discussed in relation to the application of liposome-protoplast fusion system in selective modification of plasmamembrane phospholipids of protoplasts.

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 44, December 2006, pp. 964-970

 

 

Effects of oxidizing and reducing agents on ovine pulmonary artery responses to nitric oxide donors, sodium nitroprusside and 3-morpholino-sydnonimine

K K Sardar, S N Sarkar D U Bawankule, S K Mishra & V Raviprakash

 

Received 20 October 2005; revised 11 September 2006

Nitrovasodilators-sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 10-9-10-4 M) and 3-morpholino-sydnonimine (SIN-1; 10-9-10-4 M) produced concentration-dependent relaxation of the fourth generation sheep pulmonary artery, preconstricted with 5-hydroxytryptamine (1 mM). Oxidizing agents [oxidized glutathione (GSSG, 1 mM) and CuSO4 (5 and 20 mM)] and reducing agents [dithiothreitol (DTT, 0.1 mM), ascorbic acid (1 mM) and reduced glutathione (GSH, 1 mM)] caused opposite effects on nitric oxide (NO)-induced vasodilation in the artery. Ascorbic acid and GSH potentiated the NO responses, while GSSG and CuSO4 inhibited relaxation caused by the nitrovasodilators. DTT, however, reduced the relaxant potency and efficacy of SNP and SIN-1. Pretreatment of the pulmonary artery strips with DTT (0.1 mM) inhibited SNP (10 µM)-induced Na+-K+-ATPase activity, while ascorbic acid (1 mM) and GSH (1 mM) had no effect either on basal or SNP (10 µM)-stimulated 86Rb uptake, an index of Na+-K+-ATPase activity, in ovine pulmonary artery. The results suggest that reducing agents like ascorbic acid may have beneficial effect in improving the vascular function under oxidative stress.

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 44, December 2006, pp. 971-975

 

 

Effect of gold on stimulation of reproductive function in
immature female albino rats

 

Alok Chattopadhyay, Mahitosh Sarkar & Narendra M Biswas

 

Received 15 June 2005; revised 9 August 2006

Significant increase in ovarian and uterine weight and stimulation of ovarian D5-3b- hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (D5-3b-HSD) activity and elevation of serum estradiol level were observed following gold chloride (0.2 mg/kg body weight/day), sc administration in immature female albino rats. Moreover, normal cyclic changes of estrus were found in vaginal smears of these rats whereas the rats of other groups showed diestrus phase throughout the period of experiment. Histological study of ovary also showed Graafian follicle with ovum in rats treated with 0.2 mg/kg/day of gold proving stimulation of reproductive function, which was not found in the ovarian histological study of other groups including controls. Thus, the results suggest a significant stimulatory effect of gold chloride on female reproductive activity in immature rats. Further, since the above-mentioned changes were evident at a specific dose of gold chloride, the data may have some clinical implications on stimulation and enhancement of fertility in immature female rats.

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 44, December 2006, pp. 976-980

 

 

Impact of feeding ethanolic extract of root bark of Cananga odorata (Lam) on reproductive functions in male rats

P Anitha & M Indira

 

Received 3 March 2006; revised 28 August 2006

The 50% ethanolic extract of the root bark of C. odorata administered orally at the dose of 1g/kg body weight /day for 60 days resulted in decreased epididymal sperm motility and sperm count in male albino rats. Morphological abnormalities were also observed in the sperms. The testicular glycogen, the activities of 3β hydroxy steroid dehydrogenase, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, malic enzyme, sorbitol dehydrogenase in seminal vesicle, fructose in seminal plasma and serum testosterone were significantly decreased in treated group. While testicular cholesterol level, the concentration of the fecal bile acids, urinary excretion of 17 ketosteroids, the activities of 17β hydroxy steroid dehydrogenase, epididymal lactate dehydrogenase and that of testicular HMG CoA reductase were increased in treated group when compared to control. The results suggest that the ethanolic extract of C. odorata possesses the spermatotoxic effects in male albino rats.

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 44, December 2006, pp. 981-986

 

 

Effect of Aerva lanata on calcium oxalate urolithiasis in rats

P Soundararajan, R Mahesh, T Ramesh & V Hazeena Begum

 

Received 25 April 2005; revised 2 August 2006

Calcium oxalate (CaOx) stone was induced in rats using 0.75% of ethylene glycol in drinking water for 28 days. Ethylene glycol treated rats showed significant increase in the activities of oxalate synthesizing enzymes such as glycolic acid oxidase (GAO) in liver and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in liver and kidney. CaOx crystal deposition, as indicated by increased excretion of stone-forming constituents in urine, such as calcium, oxalate, uric acid, phosphorus and protein and decreased concentration of inhibitors, such as citrate and magnesium was observed in ethylene glycol induced urolithic rats. Histopathological studies also confirmed the deposition of CaOx crystals. Administration of Aerva lanata aqueous suspension (2g/kg body wt/dose/day for 28 days) to CaOx urolithic rats had reduced the oxalate synthesizing enzymes, diminished the markers of crystal deposition in the kidney. The results of the present study confirmed that A. lanata can be used as an curative agent for urolithiasis.

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 44, December 2006, pp. 987-992

 

 

Antihyperglycemic, antistress and nootropic activity of roots of
Rubia cordifolia Linn

Rupali A Patil, Swati C Jagdale, & Sanjay B Kasture

 

Received 24 October 2005; revised 14 June 2006

Effect of alcoholic extract of roots of Rubia cordifolia was studied on elevated blood glucose level in alloxan treated animals. The extract reduced the blood sugar level raised by alloxan. Effect of alcoholic extract was also investigated on cold restraint induced stress and on scopolamine-induced memory impairment. Alcoholic extract enhanced brain γ-amino-n-butyric acid (GABA) levels and decreased brain dopamine and plasma corticosterone levels. Acidity and ulcers caused due to cold restraint stress were inhibited by alcoholic extract. Animals treated with alcoholic extract spent more time in open arm in elevated plus maze model. It also antagonized scopolamine induced learning and memory impairment. Baclofen induced catatonia was potentiated by alcoholic extract.

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 44, December 2006, pp. 993-996

 

 

In vitro antioxidant studies of Sphaeranthus indicus (Linn)

Annie Shirwaikar, Kirti S Prabhu & I S R Punitha

 

Received 1 May 2006; revised 19 September 2006

The free radical scavenging potential of the plant S.indicus was studied by using different antioxidant models of screening. The ethanolic extract at 1000 mg/ml showed maximum scavenging of the radical cation, 2,2-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonate) (ABTS) observed upto 41.99 % followed by the scavenging of the stable radical 1,1-diphenyl, 2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) (33.27 %), superoxide dismutase (25.14 %) and nitric oxide radical (22.36 %) at the same concentration. However, the extract showed only moderate scavenging activity of iron chelation (14.2 %). Total antioxidant capacity of the extract was found to be 160.85 nmol/g ascorbic acid. The results justify the therapeutic applications of the plant in the indigenous system of medicine, augmenting its therapeutic value.

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 44, December 2006, pp. 997-1005

 

 

Cytogenetic effects of a mixture of selected metals following subchronic exposure through drinking water in male rats

S H Jadhav, S N Sarkar & H C Tripathi

 

 

Received 1 May 2006; revised 11 September 2006

The current study examines the genotoxic effects of subchronic exposure via drinking water to a mixture of eight metals (arsenic, cadmium, lead, mercury, chromium, nickel, manganese and iron) found as contaminants of water sources in different parts of India and its possible association with oxidative stress. Male rats were exposed to the mixture at 0, 1, 10 and 100 times the mode concentration of each metal daily for 90 days. Another dose group at concentration equivalent to maximum permissible limit (MPL) for each metal and a reference group given ip cyclophosphamide were incorporated. The mixture at 100´ level significantly increased chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei induction (2.4 folds) in bone marrow cells and reduced the ratio of polychromatic to normochromatic erythrocytes by 25%. The mixture significantly increased sister chromatid exchange in bone marrow (1.67 and 2.3 folds) and spleen (1.57 and 1.98 folds) cells with both 10´ and 100´ doses. Cyclophosphamide was more potent than the mixture in causing cytogenetic damage in these parameters. In rat spleen, the mixture at 10´ and 100´ doses caused dose-dependent increase in lipid peroxidation (25.95 and 52.71%) and decrease in the activities of superoxide dismutase (20.36 and 40.62%), catalase (18.24 and 35.50%), glutathione peroxidase (22.33 and 36.12%) and glutathione reductase (19.22 and 31.35%) and in the level of GSH (19.76 and 35.15%). The results suggest that the mixture induced genotoxicity in rat bone marrow and spleen cells at concentrations relatively higher than that found in groundwater sources and the genotoxic effect could relate to induction of oxidative stress. However, observations with lower doses indicate that additive or synergistic interactions following exposure to metal components at MPL levels or at mode concentrations of contemporary groundwater levels in India may not result in clastogenicity in male rats.

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 44, December 2006, pp. 1006-1011

 

 

Phage typing of indigenous soybean-rhizobia and relationship of a phage group strains for their asymbiotic and symbiotic nitrogen fixation

C Appunu & B Dhar

 

Received 6 July 2006

A total of 354 indigenous bradyrhizobia were isolated from soybean nodules collected from five major crop grown regions. Host-specific 12 phages, each active on particular strains were selected. Factors, which influence the interaction between the host and phage, were examined. Four different types of plaques were detected. Nearly 17% of isolates were found resistant to all phages. Phage sensitivity patterns revealed a total of 32 distinct phage genotype groups. Different set of phage combinations expressed variation in specificity for parasitizing against particular group of rhizobia. Distributions of isolates in each phage types differed markedly between regions. Interestingly, nine strains belonging to phage group 16 exhibited high ex planta nitrogenase activity in culture. However, no correlation could be established between high ex planta nitrogenase activity and their symbiotic effectiveness with soybean cultivars. Soybean cv. JS335 showed relatively superior performance than Bragg and Lee with indigenous bradyrhizobial strains. Phage typing revealed the existence of large genetic diversity among native rhizobia and selection of the superior bradyrhizobial strains can also be possible for a given soil-climate-cultivar complex.

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 44, December 2006, pp. 1012-1017

 

 

Isoflavonoids production in callus culture of Pueraria tuberosa, the Indian kudzu

Kamlesh Vaishnav, Shaily Goyal & K G Ramawat

 

Received 30 May 2006; revised 28 September 2006

Isoflavonoid contents of different plant parts and callus tissues of the Indian Kudzu, Pueraria tuberosa (Roxb.ex.Willd.) DC are presented. The initial cultures were slow growing, associated with browning of the tissues. The production of four isoflavonoids (puerarin, genistin, genistein and daidzein) in the callus cultures of P. tuberosa was studied by manipulating the plant growth regulators and sucrose concentration in the medium. Organogenesis was not recorded in callus on any of these treatments. Tuber and stem accumulated puerarin, a glycoside of daidzein, at high amounts, 0.65% and 0.054% respectively. However, the daidzein content of the callus tissues grown on Murashige and Skoog medium containing BA (20.9 µM) and sucrose (60 gl-1) was significantly higher (0.056%) than in vivo plant material (0.02%) and other comparable culture systems like Genista and Pueraria lobata.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 44, December 2006, pp. 1018-1021

 

 

Affinity purification and partial characterization of IgM-like immunoglobulins of African catfish, Clarias gariepinus (Burchell, 1822)

Gaurav Rathore, T Raja Swaminathan, Neeraj Sood, B N Mishra2 & D Kapoor

 

Received 9 February 2005; revised 19 September 2006

IgM like macroglobulin from bovine serum albumin (BSA)-immunized African catfish C. gariepinus was purified by affinity chromatography and partially characterized. The molecular weight of this macroglobulin was 840 kDa, as estimated by gel filtration chromatography. Purified macroglobulin was analyzed using SDS-PAGE under reducing and non-reducing conditions. The molecular weight (MW) of heavy and light chain was 74.8 kDa and 27.2 kDa respectively, in presence of a reducing agent. In non-reducing SDS-PAGE, a single high MW band was observed representing tetrameric form.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 44, December 2006, pp. 1022-1025

 

 Notes

 

Antigenic competition among different ‘O’ antigens of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovars during hyperimmunization in pony mares

B R Singh, Mudit Chandra, Ravi Kant Agrawal &
Babu Nagrajan

 

Received 29 May 2006; revised 15 September 2006

The present study on antigenic competition among somatic ‘O’ antigens of different Salmonella groups (A, B, C1, C2, D and E1) in mares revealed that the immune response to most of the antigens was not (A, B, C2) or little (C1, D) affected by antigenic competition. However, E1 group antigen, which induced high antibody titres (Avg. 12967.3) when given alone, produced almost 3.5 log2 lower antibody titres on giving with other antigens, indicating the antigenic competition among some Salmonella group antigens. The antigenic competition varied for different antigens even of the similar chemical nature. Therefore, antigens belonging to different somatic groups should not be given together for the purpose of raising polyvalent serum or for immunization using multivalent Salmonella vaccines prepared from strains of different ‘O’ groups revealing antigenic competition.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 44, December 2006, pp. 1026

 

 

Book Review

    Women Empowerment in Fisheries

Modadugu V Gupta

 

Indian Journal of Experimental BiologyVol. 43, December 2006, pp 1049-1052

 

 

List of Experts

 

Thanks are due to the following experts for reviewing the manuscripts published in the Indian Journal of Experimental Biology during the year 2006.


Adhikari S P

Bhubaneswar

 

Aggarwal Ramesh K

Hydrabad

 

Ahuja Y R

Hyderabad

 

Akbarshah M A

Tiruchirappalli

 

Ali Mohd

New Delhi

 

Ali Sher

N Delhi

 

Amla D V

Lucknow

 

Anand Kumar T C

Bangalore

 

Anila Kumar K R

Mysore

 

Aruldhas Michael

Chennai

 

Arunakarn J

Chennai

 

Asad Mohammed

New Delhi

 

Audi S S

Goa

 

Augusti K T

Thiruvananthapuram

 

Bachhawat A K

Chandigarh

 

Bagchi S N

Jabalpur

 

Bairy K L

Manipal

Balasubramaniam M P

Chennai

 

Balasubramanian K

Chennai

 

Bamezai R N K

New Delhi

 

Bandyapadhyay Rajyashree

Kolkata

 

Banerjee B D

Delhi

 

Banerjee Rintu

Kharagpur

 

Banerjee Smita

Sagar

 

Bansal S K

Delhi

 

Bapna J S

Jaipur

 

Batra H V

Gwalior

 

Begum V Hazeena

Thanjavur

 

Bhandari Uma

Meerut

 

Bhat K Gopalkrishana

Mangalore

 

Bhat S R

N Delhi

 

Bhattacharya Shelly

Santiniketan

 

Bhole B D

Pune

 

Bhopale G M

Pune

Bilqees Bano

Aligarh

 

Bodhankar S L

Pune

 

Chakravaty A K

Siliguri

 

Chandra Amar K

Kolkata

 

Chattopadhyay M K

Hydrabad

 

Chaturvedi H C

Lucknow

 

Chauhan R S

Izatnagar

 

Chhabra S K

Delhi

 

Chhatpar H S

Vadodara

 

Christina A J M

Madurai

 

D’Souza S F

Mumbai

 

Dandekar Sucheta P

Jaipur

 

Das Sukta

Kolkata

 

Dastidar Sujata G

Kolkata

 

Devasagayam T P A

Mumbai

 

Dharmesh S

Mysore

 

Dhawan B N

Lucknow

Dhuley J N

Pune

 

Flora S J S

Gwalior

 

Gadre R V

Pune

 

Ghildiyal M C

New Delhi

 

Ghosh A K

Kolkatta

 

Gill K D

Chandigarh

 

Godlevsky Leonis S

Ukrain

 

Goel R K

Varanasi

 

Goel Sandeep

Hydrabad

 

Gomes A

Kolkata

 

Goyal R K

Ahmedabad

 

Goyal S K

New Delhi

 

Gunasekaran P

Madurai

 

Gupta Malaya

Kolkata

 

Gupta R S

Jaipur

 

Gupta Rani

New Delhi

 

Gupta Y K

New Delhi

 

Hadi S M

Aligarh

 

Haider Shamim

Varanasi

 

Hasan Mahdi

Lucknow

 

Hoque M

Izatnagar

Inamdar Md. Naseeruddin

Bangalore.

 

Janardhanan K K

Thrissur

 

Jeevaratnam K

Mysore

 

Jeganathan P S

Mangalore

 

Jha S

Kolkata

 

Joseph Lebana J

Mumbai

 

Joshi A

Bangalore

 

Juvekar Archana R

Mumbai

 

Kalyansundaram M

Pondicherry

 

Kapadnis B P

Pune

 

Karunasagar Iddya

Mangalore

 

Katyare S S

Vadodara

 

Kaushal Nuzhat A

Lucknow

 

Kaushik B D

New Delhi

 

Kela A

New Delhi

 

Kesavan P C

Chennai

 

Khanduja K L

Chandigarh

 

Khanna Madhu

Delhi

 

Khole Vrinda

Mumbai

 

Kholkute S D

Belgaum

 

Khuda Bukhsh A R

Kalyani

Khurana Paramjit

New Delhi

 

Kothari S L

Jaipur

 

Kulandaivelu G

Madurai

 

Kulkarni D R

Hubli

 

Khuller G K

Chandigarh

 

Kumar Anil

Indore

 

Kurup P A

Trivendram

 

Kuttan Ramdasan

Trichur

 

Lakshimi Sita G

Bangalore

 

Latha P G

Trivandrum

 

Lokesh B R

Mysore

 

Majumdar A C

Izatnagar

 

Malakar Dhruba

Karnal

 

Malik J K

Izatnagar

 

Mallick B B

Kolkata

 

Manjunath B K

Shimoga

 

Maru G B

Mumbai

 

Mazumdar U K

Kolkata

 

Mendiratta K K

Delhi

 

Menon Venugopal P

Annamalai Nagar

 

Misro M M

N Delhi

Mohanan P V

Trivandrum

 

Molly Jacob

Vellore

 

Muralidhar K

Delhi

 

Murthy P S

Noida

 

Nagappa A N

Pilani

 

Naik S R

Mumbai

 

Nair G B

Bangladesh

 

Nair Suresh

New Delhi

 

Nandedkar T D

Mumbai

 

Narayan Rao B S Sankar

Bangalore

 

Naseeruddin Md.

Bangalore

 

Nautiyal C S

Lucknow

 

Oommen Oommen V

Trivendrum

 

Padh Harish

Ahmedabad

 

Pandian M Rajsekara

Nammakkal

 

Parija S C

Bhubaneswar

 

Patel P S

Ahmedabad

 

Patro I

Gwalior

 

Prakash A

Lucknow

 

Prakash H S

Mysore

 

Prakash V

Mysore

Priyadarsini Indira K

Mumbai

 

Rai Umesh

Delhi

 

Raisuddin S

N Delhi

 

Raizada R B

Lucknow

 

Rajani M

Ahemdabad

 

Ramachandran Anup

Vellore

 

Ramamurthy T

Kolkata

 

Ramanathan M

Coimbatore

 

Ramaswamy K

Pondicherry

 

Ramesh K V

Mangalore

 

Ranade Dilip

Pune

 

Randhawa G S

Roorkee

 

Rao G P S

Bangalore

 

Rao M N A

Hyderabad

 

Rao M V

Ahmedabad

 

Ravi K

Delhi

 

Ravishanker G A

Mysore

 

Rawal U M

Ahemdabad

 

Ray A

Delhi

 

Ray S B

New Delhi

 

Reddy A R

Hyderabad

 

Reddy S R R

Pune

 

Reddy V S

New Delhi

 

Saha Bhaskar

Pune

 

Sahu A P

Lucknow

 

Saidapur S K

Dharwar

 

Sainis K B

Mumbai

 

Sandhu H S

Ludhiana

 

Sane R T

Mumbai

 

Santosh Vani

Bangalore

 

Saraf S K

Varanasi

 

Sardar K K

Bhubaneswar

 

Sardesai Sandeep

Goa

 

Sarkar S N

Izatnagar

 

Satheesh Kumar K

Trivendrum

 

Satyanarayana T

N Delhi

 

Sawhney R C

Delhi

 

Seeni S

Thiruvananthapuram

 

Selvam G S

Madurai

 

Sen Alok

Pune

 

Sengupta Arnab

Kolkata

 

Shanker K M

Mangalore

 

Sharma Arun

Delhi

 

Sharma M K

Karnal

 

Sharma Sheel

Banasthali

 

Sharma Sushma

Shimla

 

Sharma V D

Pantnagar

 

Shetty H Shekar

Mysore

 

Shirwaikar A

Mangalore

 

Shivcharan

Hisar

 

Shrivastava Sheela

New Delhi.

 

Singh B N

Hisar

 

Singh Gajendra

Varanasi

 

Singh Megha

Chennai

 

Singh Rameshwar

New Delhi

 

Singh Sajjan

Hisar

 

Singh Shio Kumar

Varanasi

 

Singh Swarnjit

Chandigarh

 

Sritharan Manjula

Hyderabad

 

Srivastava G C

New Delhi

 

Srivastava S K

Lucknow

 

Subedar N K

Nagpur

 

Subhas M N

Bangalore

 

Sultana S

New Delhi

 

Suprasanna P

Mumbai

 

Susantharajan N

Chennai

 

Tiwari Ashok K

Izatnagar

 

Totey S M

Bangalore

 

Tripathi C K M

Lucknow

 

Tripathi K D

New Delhi

 

Tyagi Manoj G

Vellore

 

Uma Devi P

Bhopal

 

Unnikrishnan M K

Manipur

 

Vankitaraman P R

Ernakulam

 

Varma Sishendra

Pantnagar

 

Verma S K

Udaipur

 

Vijayaraghvan R

Gwalior

 

Vijaylaxmi K K

Mangalagangotry

 

Vijyan K K

Cochin

 

Viswanathan P N

Lucknow

 

Vittal B P R

Chennai

 

Wadhwa R

New Delhi