Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

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VOLUME 45

NUMBER 12

DECEMBER 2007

CODEN: IJEB (A6) 45(12) 1009-1106 (2007)

ISSN: 0019-5189

 

CONTENTS

Papers

 

Thyroid status alters gill ionic metabolism and chloride cell morphology as evidenced by scanning electron microscopy in a teleost Anabas testudineus (Bloch): Short and long term in vivo study

1015

P Sreejith, R S Beyo, G Prasad, F Sunny & O V Oommen

 

 

 

Reversible male sterility in transgenic tobacco carrying a dominant-negative mutated glutamine synthetase gene under the control of microspore-specified promoter

1022

A N K Mamun

 

 

 

Hepatoprotective effect of tocopherol against isoniazid and rifampicin induced hepatotoxicity in albino rabbits

1031

Vandana Tayal, Bhupinder Singh Kalra, Sarita Agarwal, Nita Khurana &
Usha Gupta

 

 

 

Effect of monothiol along with antioxidant against mercury-induced oxidative
stress in rat

1037

Varsha Singh, Deepmala Joshi, Sadhana Shrivastava & Sangeeta Shukla

 

 

 

Antioxidant DL-alpha lipoic acid as an attenuator of adriamycin induced hepatotoxicity in rat model

1045

Padmavathi Pandi Anandakumar, Saroja Palanichamy Malarkodi, Thylambal Rajagopalan Sivaprasad & Gandhimathi Dhravidamani Saravanan

 

 

 

Role of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in the piracetam induced blockade of
opioid effects

1050

Ashish K Rehni, Nirmal Singh & Seema Jindal

 

 

 

Regeneration of b cells in islets of Langerhans of pancreas of alloxan diabetic rats by acetone extract of Momordica charantia (Linn.) (bitter gourd) fruits

1055

Neera Singh & Manushma Gupta

 

 

 

Effect of chemical factors on production of isoflavonoids in Pueraria tuberosa (Roxb. Ex. Willd.) DC suspension culture

1063

Shaily Goyal & K G Ramawat

 

 

 

Antibacterial and toxicological evaluation of -lactams synthesized by immobilized -lactamase-free penicillin amidase produced by Alcaligenes sp.

1068

Jiaur R Gayen, Sutapa B Majee, Shuvendu Das & Timir B Samanta

 

 

 

Mitochondrial citrulline synthesis from ammonia and glutamine in the liver of ureogenic air-breathing catfish, Clarias batrachus (Linnaeus)

1073

Zaiba Y. Kharbuli, Kuheli Biswas & Nirmalendu Saha

 

 

 

Book Review

 

Herbal Drugs A Twenty First Century Perspective

1080

Gian Singh

 

 

 

Announcement

 

National Symposium on Plant Biotechnology for Conservation, Characterization and Crop Improvement and 29th Annual Meeting of Plant Tissue Culture Association (India); National Seminar on Novel Tools of Nano-technology, Material Science and Geological techniques in Standardization of Ayurvedic Bhasma

1013

 

 

Annual Index

 

Contents

1081

Keyword Index

1095

Author Index

1099

 

 

List of Experts

1103

 

 

Announcements

 

National National Symposium on Plant Biotechnology for Conservation,
Characterization and Crop Improvement

and

29th Annual Meeting of Plant Tissue Culture Association (India)

 

810 February 2008, Udaipur

 

Organised by the Department of Biotechnology, M L Sukhadia University, the Symposium will have following two sessions: (i) Commercialization of Biotechnologies in India, and (ii) Medicinal and Aromatic Plants Research in India. For further details please contact,
Prof. Sunil D Purohit, Organizing Secretary, Post Box No. 100, Department of Biotechnology, Vigyan Bhawan Block B, New Campus, M L Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313 001.
Telefax: 0294-2410300, 2811861 (O) 2410200 (R). Mobile: 094141-56200, 099285-52367.
E-mail: sdp_56@hotmail.com

 

 

National Seminar on Novel Tools of Nano-technology, Material Science and
Geological techniques in Standardization of Ayurvedic Bhasma

 

28 and 29 December 2007, Varanasi

 

Organizes by Prof. S N T Memorial Foundation, the objective of the Seminar is to design effective methodology to understand the structure and biological response of Bhasma. For details please visit www.sntmf.org or write to Dr Pratibha Tripathi, Chief Coordinator, Research and Development Centre, Prof S N Tripathi Memorial Foundation (NGO), 1, Gandhi Nagar, Naria, Varanasi , 221005. E-mail: pratibhaybt30@yahoo.com

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 45, December 2007, pp. 1015-1021

 

 

Thyroid status alters gill ionic metabolism and chloride cell morphology as evidenced by scanning electron microscopy in a teleost Anabas testudineus (Bloch): Short and long term in vivo study

P Sreejith, R S Beyo, G Prasad, F Sunny & O V Oommen

 

Received 8 June 2007; revised 28 September 2007

Gill is the main organ of osmotic regulation in teleosts and chloride cells are the sites of ion transport across gill epithelium. Thyroid hormones are implicated in the regulation of osmotic balance in teleosts also. Treatment with 6-propyl thiouracil (6-PTU) inhibited the membrane bound enzyme Na+K+ ATPase in the gill while triiodothyronine (T3) injection stimulated it in a short-term in vivo study in the teleost Anabas testudineus. Na+, K+ and Ca2+ ions were also decreased in the 6-PTU treated fish and the T3 treatment increased their concentrations in the gill lamellae. The gill morphology also changed according to the thyroid status in the long term study. 6-PTU treatment altered the typical serrated morphology of the gill lamellae, while the T3 treatment reversed it. T3 injection increased the density of pavement and chloride cells as evidenced by scanning electron microscopy. The results demonstrate that physiological status of the thyroid influences gill Na+ pump activity and chloride cell morphological changes. Further, the study suggests a regulatory role of T3 on gill ions (Na+, K+ and Ca2+), Na+K+ and Ca2+ ATPase activity and the different gill cell types in A. testudineus.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 45, December 2007, pp. 1022-1030

 

 

 

Reversible male sterility in transgenic tobacco carrying a dominant-negative mutated glutamine synthetase gene under the control of
microspore-specific promoter

 

A N K Mamun

 

Received 12 December 2006; revised 9 August 2007

Metabolic engineering was used to disrupt glutamine metabolism in microspores in order to block pollen development. We used a dominant-negative mutant (DNM) approach of cytosolic glutamine synthetase (GS1) gene under the microspore-specific promoter NTM19 to block glutamine synthesis in developing pollen grains. We observed partial male sterility in primary transgenic plants by using light microscopy, FDA, DAPI and in vitro pollen germination test. Microspores started to die in the early unicellular microspore stage, pollen viability in all primary transgenic lines ranged from 40-50%. All primary transgenics produced seeds like control plants, hence the inserted gene did not affect the sporophyte and was inherited through the female germline. We regenerated plants by in vitro microspore embryogenesis from 4 individual lines, pollen viability of progeny ranged from 12 to 20%, but some of them also showed 100% male sterility. After foliage spray with glutamine, 100% male-sterile plants were produced viable pollen and seed set was also observed. These results suggested that mutated GS1 activity on microspores had a significant effect on normal pollen development. Back-cross progenies (T2) of DH 100% male-sterile plants showed normal seed set like primary transgenics and control plants.

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 45, December 2007, pp. 1031-1036

 

 

 

Hepatoprotective effect of tocopherol against isoniazid and rifampicin induced hepatotoxicity in albino rabbits

Vandana Tayal, Bhupinder Singh Kalra, Sarita Agarwal, Nita Khurana & Usha Gupta

 

Received 3 July 2007; revised 5 September 2007

Antitubercular drug induced hepatotoxicity is a major hurdle for an effective treatment of tuberculosis. The present study was undertaken to assess the hepatoprotective potential of tocopherol (50 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg, ip) and to compare it with cimetidine (120 mg/kg, ip). Hepatotoxicity was produced by giving isoniazid (INH, 50 mg/kg, po) and rifampicin (RMP, 100 mg/kg, po) combination to albino rabbits for 7 days. Assessment of liver injury was done by estimating levels of alanine transaminase (ALT) and argininosuccinic acid lyase (ASAL) in serum and by histopathological examination of liver. Results revealed that pretreatment with high dose of tocopherol (100 mg/kg) prevented both biochemical as well as histopathological evidence of hepatic damage induced by INH and RMP combination. Moreover, tocopherol (100 mg/kg) was found to be a more effective hepatoprotective agent as compared to cimetidine.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 45, December 2007, pp. 1037-1044

 

 

 

Effect of monothiol along with antioxidant against mercury-induced oxidative stress in rat

Varsha Singh, Deepmala Joshi, Sadhana Shrivastava & Sangeeta Shukla

 

Received 28 May 2007; revised 21 September 2007

Efficacy of thiol chelators viz. N-acetyl cysteine and D-penicillamine (NAC and DPA) along with nutritional supplements viz. zinc acetate, sodium selenite and magnesium sulphate (Zn, Se and Mg) in the treatment of mercury intoxication was investigated in rats. This is of particular interest since high bonding affinity between mercuric ion and the thiol group exits. The mutual antagonism of mercury and selenium is one of the strongest examples of the interaction in the trace element field. Adult rats of Sprague-Dawley strain were administered a bolus dose of dimethyl mercury (10 mg/kg) orally. A significant rise in the aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, serum alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase, gamma glutamyltranspeptidase, bilirubin and creatinine were observed. Single mercury exposure also resulted in a significant increase in lipid peroxides with a concomitant decrease in reduced glutathione level in liver, kidney and brain. A decrease in the enzymatic activities of acetyl cholinesterase in different regions of the brain was observed. These parameters were restored considerably with chelating agents along with nutritional supplementation, but NAC+Se and DPA+Mg offered significant protection in comparison with other combinations.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 45, December 2007, pp. 1045-1049

 

 

 

Antioxidant DL-alpha lipoic acid as an attenuator of adriamycin induced hepatotoxicity in rat model

Padmavathi Pandi Anandakumar, Saroja Palanichamy Malarkodi, Thylambal Rajagopalan Sivaprasad &
Gandhimathi Dhravidamani Saravanan

 

Received 22 December 2006; revised 24 September 2007

Protective efficacy of DL-alpha lipoic acid on adriamycin induced hepatotoxicity was evaluated in rats. Adriamycin toxicity, induced by a single injection (ip; 15 mg/kg body wt), was expressed by an elevation in alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, bilirubin levels in serum and alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase, alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase activity in hepatic tissue. Adriamycin produced significant increase in malondialdehyde levels indicating tissue lipid peroxidation and potentially inhibiting the activity of antioxidant, reduced glutathione and antioxidant enzymes, catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glutathione-S-transferase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. The present results showed that pretreatment with lipoic acid [75 mg/kg body wt/day (ip), 24 h prior to administration of adriamycin] significantly restored various cellular activity suggesting the antioxidant potential of lipoic acid in ameliorating the hepatotoxicity induced by adriamycin.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 45, December 2007, pp. 1050-1054

 

 

 

Role of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in the piracetam induced blockade
of opioid effects

Ashish K Rehni, Nirmal Singh & Seema Jindal

 

Received 2 April 2007; revised 6 August 2007

The present study has been designed to investigate the effect of piracetam on morphine/ buprenorphine-induced antinociception in rats and effect of piracetam on morphine or minoxidil induced relaxation in KCl-precontracted isolated rat aortic ring preparation. Nociceptive threshold was measured by the tail flick test in rats. The cumulative dose responses of morphine or minoxidil were recorded in KCl-precontracted isolated rat aortic ring preparation. Piracetam attenuated buprenorphine-induced antinociception in rats. Piracetam significantly reduced the morphine and minoxidil induced relaxation in KCl precontracted isolated rat aortic ring preparation suggesting that piracetam interferes with opioid receptor and ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KATP) opener mediated responses in vitro. Thus, it may be suggested that piracetam attenuates opioid effects by an opioid receptor-KATP channel linked mechanism.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 45, December 2007, pp. 1055-1062

 

 

 

Regeneration of β cells in islets of Langerhans of pancreas of alloxan diabetic rats by acetone extract of Momordica charantia (Linn.) (bitter gourd) fruits

Neera Singh & Manushma Gupta

 

Received 14 June, 2006, revised 13 September, 2007

Acetone extract of whole fruit powder of M. charantia (bitter gourd) in doses 25, 50 and 75 mg/100 g body weight lowered the blood glucose from 13.30 to 50% after 8 to 30 days treatment in alloxan diabetic albino rats, confirming antihyperglycemic effect of this plant in diabetic animals and humans. Histological observations with acetone extract showed different phases of recovery of β cells of the islets of Langerhans of pancreas, which in the untreated diabetic rats were less in number and showed varied degree of atrophy. The most important finding of the present study was observation of the presence of small scattered islets among the acinar tissue in some experimental animals, which may reflect neoformation of islets from pre-existing islet cells. The liver of alloxan diabetic rats showed hydropic degeneration, fatty change and necrosis at some places but liver of extract treated animals was normal. Glycogen localization in liver of diabetic rats was faint but after 30 days treatment with different doses of extract, normal to heavy glycogen localization was observed.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 45, December 2007, pp. 1063-1067

 

 

 

Effect of chemical factors on production of isoflavonoids in Pueraria tuberosa (Roxb.ex.Willd.) DC suspension culture

Shaily Goyal & K G Ramawat

 

Received 25 July 2007; revised 28 September 2007

Suspension cultures of Pueraria tuberosa, a woody legume, have been established and using different concentrations of growth regulators, sucrose, ammonium and nitrate nitrogen, attempts have been made to improve their isoflavonoid content. The cell cultures grew well on all the treatments. Up to ~8 folds increased isoflavonoids content was recorded in the cultures grown in MS medium modified with nitrogen and supplemented with 1mg l-1 of kinetin.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 45, December 2007, pp. 1068-1072

 

 

Antibacterial and toxicological evaluation of -lactams synthesized by immobilized -lactamase-free penicillin amidase produced by Alcaligenes sp.

Jiaur R Gayen, Sutapa B Majee, Shuvendu Das & Timir B Samanta

 

Received 21 February 2007; revised 3 October 2007

Search for anti--lactamase and synthesis of newer penicillin were suggested to overcome resistance to penicillin in chemotherapy. It was found that clavulanic acid, an ant--lactamase was ineffective due to its structural modification by bacteria. Thus, there is a need for the synthesis of newer pencillins. Retro-synthesis was inspired by the success of forward reaction i.e.conversion of penicillin G to 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6-APA) by biological process. In the present study a better enzymatic method of synthesis of newer pencillin by a -lactamase-free penicillin amidase produced by Alcaligenes sp. is attempted. Antibacterial and toxicological evaluation of the enzymatically synthesized -lactams are reported. Condensation of 6-APA with acyl donor was found to be effective when the reaction is run in dimethyl formamide (DMF 50% v/v) in acetate buffer (25 mM pH 5.0) at 37C. Periplasm entrapped in calcium alginate exihibited the highest yield (~34%) in synthesis. The minimum inhibitory concentration of the synthetic products against Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella typhi varied between 2080 g/ml. Some of the products exhibited antibacterial activity against enteric pathogens. It was interesting to note that product A was potent like penicillin G. LD50 value of three products (product A, B and C) was more than 12mg/kg. Furthermore, these synthetic -lactams did not exihibit any adverse effect on house keeping enzymes viz., serum glutamate oxalacetate-trans-aminase, serum glutamate pyruvate -trans-aminase, acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase of the test animals. The hematological profile (RBC and WBC) of the test animals also remained unaffected.

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 45, December 2007, pp. 1073-1079

 

 

 

 

Mitochondrial citrulline synthesis from ammonia and glutamine in the liver of ureogenic air-breathing catfish, Clarias batrachus (Linnaeus)

Zaiba Y. Kharbuli, Kuheli Biswas & Nirmalendu Saha

 

Received 26 December 2006; revised 27 September 2007

The possible synthesis of citrulline, a rate limiting step for urea synthesis via the ornithine-urea cycle (OUC) in teleosts was tested both in the presence of ammonia and glutamine as nitrogen-donating substrates by the isolated liver mitochondria of ureogenic air-breathing walking catfish, C. batrachus. Both ammonia and glutamine could be used as nitrogen-donating substrates for the synthesis of citrulline by the isolated liver mitochondria, since the rate of citrulline synthesis was almost equal in presence of both the substrates. The citrulline synthesis by the isolated liver mitochondria requires succinate at a concentration of 0.1 mM as an energy source, and also requires the involvement of intramitochondrial carbonic anhydrase activity for supplying HCO3 as another substrate for citrulline synthesis. The rate of citrulline synthesis was further stimulated significantly by the isolated liver mitochondria of the fish after pre-exposure to 25 mM NH4Cl for 7 days. Due to possessing this biochemical adaptational strategy leading to the amelioration of ammonia toxicity mainly by channeling ammonia directly and/or via the formation of glutamine to the OUC, this air-breathing catfish could succeed in surviving in high external ammonia, which it faces in its natural habitat in certain seasons of the year.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 45, December 2007, pp. 1080

 

 

Book Review

 

Herbal DrugsA Twenty First Century Perspective

Dr Gian Singh

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 45, December 2007, pp. 1103-1106

 

List of Experts

Thanks are due to the following experts for reviewing the manuscripts submitted for publication in the Indian Journal of Experimental Biology during the year 2007.

 

 


Acharya S B
Dehradun

Adhikary S P
Bhubaneswar

Agarwal Krishna
USA

Agarwal R K
Izatnagar

Agarwal Rakesh
Lucknow

Akbarsha M A
Tiruchirappalli

Andallu B
Anantpur

AnilaKumar K R
Mysore

Anjani Kumar
Gurgaon

Anuradha C V
Annamalai Nagar

Archunan G
Tiruchirappalli

Arumugam A
Chennai

Asad M
Bangalore

Augusti K T
Palayad

Bagchi S N
Jabalpur

Bagyaraj D J
Bangalore

Balaraman R
vadodra

Balkrish Nair G
Bangladesh

Balsara J J
Karad

Bamezai R N K
New Delhi

Bandopadhyay Rajyashree
Kolkata

Bandyopadhyay Sandip
Kolkata

Bansal S K
Delhi

Batish V K
Karnal

Bhandari Uma
Delhi

Bhargava V K
lucknow

Bhat Surekha
Manipal

Bhatnagar A
Delhi

Bhatnagar Maheep
Udaipur

Bhattacharya S K
Nepal

Bhattacharya Samir
Santiniketan

Bhattacharya Shelly
Santiniketan

Bhattacharya D K
Japan

Bhonde R R
Pune

Bhopale G M
Pune

Bisaria V
Delhi

Bodhankar S L
Pune

Chakrabarti Ranjan
Hyderabad

Chattapar H S
Vadodra

Chattopadhyay R R
Kolkata

Chaturvedi H C
Lucknow

Chauhan M S
Karnal

Chhabra S K
Delhi

Chibber Sanjay
Chandigarh

Chopade C T
Nagpur

Chopra Kanwaljit
Chandigarh

Chowdhuri Keya
Kolkata

Dandekar Sucheta
Mumbai

Das N
Hyderabad

Dastidar Sujata G
Kolkata

Desai Chetna
Ahmedabad

Deshpande S B
Varanasi

Devasagyam T P A
Mumbai

Dhawan B N
Lucknow

Dhawan D K
Chandigarh

Diwan A D
New Delhi

Dwarkanath B S
Delhi

Fahim M
Delhi

Firoz Ahmed M
Ranch

Flora S J S
Gwalior

Ganguly Munia
Delhi

Gaur Y D
New Delhi

Ghule B V
Wardha

Goel R K
Varanasi

Gomes A
Kolkata

Gopal Nath
Varanasi

Goyal R K
Ahmedabad

Goyal S K
Delhi

Gujar G T
New Delhi

Gulati Kavita
New Delhi

Gunasekaran P
Madurai

Gupta R S
Jaipur

Gupta S K
New Delhi

Gupta Y K
New Delhi

Haider Shamim
Varanasi

Harinath B C
Wardha

Hoti S L
Pondicherry

Ignacimuthu S
Chennai

Indap Madhavi
Mumbai

Jacob Molly
Vellore

Jain P C
Sagar

Jain S C
Jaipur

Jameel Shahid
New Delhi

Jayachandran S
Pondicherry

Jolly C I
Mumbai

Joshi H
Dharwar

Joy K P
Varanasi

Juvekar A S
Navi Mumbai

Kale R K
New Delhi

Kalyansundaram M
Pondicherry

Kamar R
Jaipur

Karmapuri S
Warangal

Karunasagar I
Mangalore

Katoch V M
Agra

Kavi Kishor P B
Hyderabad

Khan Rahat Ali
Aligarh

Khanduja K L
Chandigarh

Khanna Madhu
Delhi

Kholkute S D
Belgaun

Khuller G K
Chandigarh

Kirubaharan John
Chennai

Krishna Kumar
Allahabad

Krishna Malini
Mumbai

Kulkarni S K
Chandigarh

Kundu B S
Hisar

Kundu S
Varanasi

Kuruvila Alice
Coimbatore

Kuttan Ramasadan
Trissur

Latha P G
Trivandrum

Lodha M L
New Delhi

Lokesh B R
Mysore

Madhvan Nair K
Hyderabad

Maitra S K
Santiniketan

Majumdar D K
New Delhi

Majumder A C
Izatnagar

Malpathak N P
Pune

Martin K P
Calicut

Mediratta P K
Delhi

Mehrotra Shanta
Lucknow

Mishra A N
Vadodra

Mishra S H
Vadodra

Mishra S S
Barrackpore

Misro M M
New Delhi

Mohanan P V
Trivandrum

Mukherjee P K
Mumbai

Mukherjee S N
Pune

Muralidhara K
Delhi

Murthy K Radhakrishna
Kurnool

Murthy P K
Lucknow

Murthy P S
NOIDA

Naidu M U R
Hyderabad

Naik S R
Mumbai

Nair G M
Thiruvananthapuram

Nandedkar T D
Mumbai

Narayanan R B
Chennai

Nayak Shivananda
Trinidad

Omkar
Lucknow

Oommen O V
Trivandrum

Padikkala J
Trissur

Pakhale S S
Navi Mumbai

Pal Chiranjib
Kolkata

Pandey Ashok
Trivandrum

Pathak Promila
Chandigarh

Patil K S
Belgaum

Pereira Ben M J
Roorkee

Pradhan D
Bhubaneswar

Priyadarsini Indira K
Mumbai

Puri S K
Lucknow

Raghunath M
Hyderabad

Rahman H
Izatnagar

Rajan M G R
Mumbai

Rajan M V
New Delhi

Rajani M V
Mumbai

Rajani M
Ahmedabad

Ramanathan M
Coimbatore

Ramawat K G
Udaipur

Ramesh K V
Mangalore

Ramesh S R
Mysore

Rana A C
Udaipur

Randhawa G S
Roorkee

Rao M N A
Hyderabad

Rao M V
Ahmedabad

Rao V D P
Pantnagar

Ravindran B
Bhubaneswar

Ravishankar G A
Mysore

Reddy G Bhanuprakash
Hyderabad

Reddy S R R
Pune

Rehni Ashish K
Patiala

Rout G M
Bhubaneswar

Sahoo P K
Bhubaneswar

Sainis K B
Mumbai

Sandeep Kumar
Lucknow

Sankranarayana Rao B S
Bangalore

Saraf M N
Mumbai

Sarkar S N
Izatnagar

Sashidhara K V
Lucknow

Sastry K V R
Bangalore

Satish Rao B S
Manipal

Satyanarayana T
Delhi

Saxena A K
Jammu

Selvaraj P
Chennai

Sen A
Pune

Seshagiri Rao C S
Hyderabad

Shah Ashok
Delhi

Shankar K M
Mangalore

Sharma K K
Delhi

Shetty H Shekar
Mysore

Shetty Somashekar
Malaysia

Shylaja Dharmesh
Mysore

Siddiqui M K J
Lucknow

Sil P C
Kolkata

Singh B N
Varanasi

Singh Bhoj Raj
Hissar

Singh Dileep Kumar
Delhi

Singh Man Mohan
Lucknow

Singh Megha
Chennai

Singh Sheo Kumar
Varanasi

Sinha Pratima
Kolkata

Sridhara Shakuntala
Bangalore

Srinivasa Rao B
Bangalore

Srivastava Archana
Lucknow

Srivastava G C
New Delhi

Srivastava P S
Delhi

Srivastava S K
Izatnagar

Subhash M N
Bangalore

Subhash Peter M C
Trivandrum

Sunil Kumar
Ahmedabad

Talwar G P
New Delhi

Tamhankar A J
Mumbai

Taneja S K
Chandigarh

Teni Tanuja R
Navi Mumbai

Tenpe C R
Nagpur

Thakur I S
New Delhi

Tiwari R P
Chandigarh

Totey Satish
Bangalore

Tripathi C K M
Lucknow

Tyagi Akhilesh
New Delhi

Tyagi Manoj
Vellore

Uma Devi P
Trivandrum

Veeranjaneyulu A
Pune

Vemuganti Geeta
Hyderabad

Venkataraman B V
Malaysia

Venkataraman S
Chennai

Verma A K
NOIDA

Verma S K
Udiapur

Verma S K
Udaipur

Vijayaraghavan R
Gwalior

Vinod Bihari
Lucknow

Virdi J S
New Delhi

Vyas S P
Sagar

Yogesh Chandra
Chandigarh

Zutshi Bela
Bangalore