Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

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VOLUME 46

NUMBER 11

NOVEMBER 2008

CODEN: IJEB (A6) 46(11) 744-798 (2008)

ISSN: 0019-5189

 

CONTENTS

 

Papers

 

Oral contraceptive-induced high blood pressure is prevented by rennin-angiotensin suppression in female rats but not by sympathetic nervous system blockade

749

L A Olatunji & A O Soladoye

 

 

 

Vasosensory responses elicited by Indian red scorpion venom last longer than capsaicin-induced responses

755

Sanjeev K Singh & Shripad B Deshpande

 

 

 

Processing of multimer FMD virus VP1-2A protein expressed in E. coli into monomers

760

H J Dechama, C Ashok Kumar, G Nagarajan & V V S Suryanarayana

 

 

 

In vitro brain tyrosine hydroxylase activation in catfish Heteropneustes fossilis (Bloch): Seasonal changes in involvement of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A and CA2+-dependent protein kinase C

764

R Chaube & K P Joy

 

 

 

Possible role of citalopram and desipramine against sleep deprivation-induced anxiety like-behaviour alterations and oxidative damage in mice

770

Ruchika Garg & Anil Kumar

 

 

 

Wound healing activity of Sesamum indicum L seed and oil in rats

777

Kotade Kiran & Mohammed Asad

 

 

 

Screening of natural phenolic compounds for potential to inhibit bacterial cell division protein FtsZ

783

Neerja Rastogi, Prerna Domadia, Sangeeta Shetty & Debjani Dasgupta

 

 

 

Efficacy of 4-methyl-7-hydroxy coumarins derivatives against vectors Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus

788

Madhavi Deshmukh, Pushpa Pawar, Mary Joseph, Usha Phalgune,

Rajashree Kashalkar & Nirmala R Deshpande

 

 

 

Note

 

Assembly of recombinant coat protein of sugarcane streak mosaic virus into potyvirus-like particles

793

M Hema, Ch V Subba Reddy, H S Savithri & P Sreenivasulu

 

 

 

Announcements

 

International Conference on Technologies for Mitigation of Environmental Pollution and their Applications in Conservation of Aquatic Ecosystem; Second SERC School in Neurosciences; National Symposium on Non-Chemical Insect Pest Management; International Congress of Global Warming on Biodiversity of Insects: Management and Conservation

797

 

 

 

 

 

Author Index

Asad Mohammed

777

Ashok Kumar C

760

 

 

Chaube R

764

 

 

Dasgupta Debjani

783

Dechamma H J

760

Deshmukh Madhavi

788

Deshpande Nirmala R

788

Deshpande Shripad B

755

Domadia Prerna

783

 

 

Garg Ruchika

770

 

Hema M

793

 

 

Joseph Mary

788

Joy K P

764

 

 

Kashalkar Rajashree

788

Kiran Kotade

777

Kumar Anil

770

 

 

Nagarajan G

760

 

Olatunji L A

749

 

 

Pawar Pushpa

788

Phalgune Usha

788

 

 

Rastogi Neerja

783

 

 

Savithri H S

793

Shetty Sangeeta

783

Singh Sanjeev K

755

Soladoye A O

749

Sreenivasulu P

793

Subba Reddy Ch V

793

Suryanarayana V V S

760

 

 

 

Keyword Index

Aedes aegypti

788

Anxiety

770

 

 

BT venom

755

Burn wound

777

 

 

Caffeic acid

783

Capsaicin

755

Cardiac hypertrophy

749

Catfish

764

Citalopram

770

Culex quinquefasciatus

788

Cyclic AMP

764

Cytokinesis

783

 

 

Dead space wound

777

Desipramine

770

 

 

Eugenol

783

Excision wound

777

 

 

Expression

760

 

 

Foot and mouth disease

760

FtsZ

783

 

 

Hypertension

749

Hypothalamus

764

 

 

Incision wound

777

 

Larval mortality

788

Locomotor activity

770

 

4-Methyl-7-hydroxy coumarin

788

Multigene

760

 

 

Oral contraceptive

749

Ovicidal activity

788

Oxidative stress

770

 

2A Peptide

760

Potyvirus-like particles

793

Protein kinase A

764

Protein kinase C

764

Proteolysis

760

 

 

Recombinant coat protein

793

Renin-angiotensin systems

749

 

 

Sesamum indicum L.

777

Sleep deprivation

770

Sugarcane streak mosaic virus

793

Sympathetic nervous system

749

 

 

Telencephalon

764

Trans-cinnamic acid

783

Tyrosine hydroxylase

764

 

Vasosensory reflexes

755

 

 

 

 

 

Announcements

 

International Conference on

Technologies for Mitigation of Environmental Pollution and their Applications in
Conservation of Aquatic Ecosystem

11-13 December 2008, Aurangabad, India

 

Organized by the Department of Zoology, Dr Babasaheb Ambedkar Marathwada University, Aurangabad, in collaboration with European Union Research Network, Poland and Indian Scientific Associations, the Conference will cover following areas: (i) Environmental pollution and mitigation strategies, (ii) Aquatic toxicology and resource management, (iii) Aquaculture and fisheries, (iv) Biodiversity and bio-conservations, (v) Ecology and resoration management, (vi) Diseases and immunology, (vii) Animal biotechnology, (viii) Applications of nano technology, and (ix) Genetic manipulations in animal. For details, kindly contact, Prof. Y K Khillare, Convener, Department of Zoology, Dr Babasaheb Ambedkar Marathwada University, Aurangabad 431 002, India. Telefax: +91-0240-2401962; E-mail:ykkhillare@rediffmail.com

 

 

覧覧覧覧覧蘭末

 

 

Second SERC School in Neurosciences

1-16 February 2009, Bangalore

 

Sponsored by the Department of Science and Technology, Govt. of India, New Delhi, the IInd SERC School in Neurosciences will be held at the Center for Neurosciences, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 during 116 February, 2009. The School aims at imparting intense training (courses as well as lab work) in Neuroscience specifically on the physiology of nerve cells. In addition to some of the most renowned workers from India, outstanding scientists from abroad like Prof. John Nicholls will serve as faculty at the School. Young researchers, Ph.D.students, and faculty members in the universities and colleges who are keen to participate in the School should write to Prof. M K Mathew, (National Centre for Biological Sciences, TIFR), University of Agricultural Sciences萌KVK Campus, Bangalore 560065, India, Telephone: 080-23666170; Fax: 080-23636662; E-mail: mathew@ncbs.res.in, with a copy to Prof. N K Subhedar, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), 1st Floor, Central Tower, Sai Trinity Building, Garware Circle, Sutarwadi, Pashan, Pune 411 021; Telephone: 020-25881725; Fax: 020-25899790;
E-mail; nksubhedar@hotmail.com

 

 

覧覧覧覧覧蘭末

 

 

National Symposium on Non-Chemical Insect Pest Management

5 and 6 February, 2009, Loyola College, Chennai

 

The Symposium aims to discuss the developments, methods, economics and efficacy of non-chemical methods to manage field and storage pests and vector mosquitoes. The topics to be discussed are (i) Plant based pesticides葉echniques, preparation and application, (ii) Microbial pesticides, (iii) Biological control葉echniques for mass rearing of natural enemies and their biocontrol potential, (iv) Cultural control measures, and (v) Field efficacy and economics of phetromones, taps and attractants. For further details, please contact Dr S. Ignacimuthu, s.j., Director, Entomology Research Institute, Loyola College, Chennai 600 034, India. Telephone: 044-28174644, E-mail: eri_lc@hotmail.com, website: www.entomology-loyolo.com; loyolacollege.edu/entomology

 

 

覧覧覧覧覧覧

 

 

International Congress of Global Warming on Biodiversity of Insects:
Management and Conservation

912 February 2009, Coimbatore, India

 

Organized under the auspices of the Department of Zoology, School of Life Sciences, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore, India, the focus and aim of the conference is to foster the advancement in the field of global warming on bio-diversity of insects and other animals. The Congress shall cover following themes: (i) impact of global warming on insect migration and behavior, (ii) impact of global warming on biodiversity/management of agricultural insects, (iii) impact of global warming on conservation/management of forestry insects, (iv) impact of global warming on management of medical and veterinary insects, (v) impact of global warming on mosquito and its transmitted diseases, (vi) global warming on biotechnological advancement in insects, and (vii) global information system (GIS) and remote sensing (RS) on insects. For further details, please contact: Dr. K. Murugan, Organizing Secretary, GW-BIMC, 09, Department of Zoology, School of Life Sciences, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046, India. Telephone (office): 91-422-2422 222, ext. 483, (home): +91-422-2425 015; Fax: +91-422-2422 387, 2425 706, Mobile: +91-9894832849; E-mail: kmvvk@yahoo.com, kmvvk@rediffmail.com; kmvvkg@ gmail.com. Website: www.b-u.ac.in

 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 46, November 2008, pp. 749-754

 

 

Oral contraceptive-induced high blood pressure is prevented by renin-angiotensin suppression in female rats but not by sympathetic nervous system blockade

L A Olatunji & A O Soladoye

 

Received 13 June 2008

The use of oral contraceptive (OC) steroids is associated with high blood pressure, although mechanisms responsible are still unclear. This study sought to investigate the possible roles that renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and sympathetic nervous system (SNS) may play in the development of OC-induced hypertension. Administration of OC led to significant increases in blood pressure, heart weight and significant decrease in urinary output in OC-treated and OC+clonidine-treated groups but not in OC+captopril-treated group. The pressor response to angiostensin II was significantly greater in the OC-treated rats than in the control rats. However, the pressor responses induced by norepinephrine were not significantly affected by OC administration. The results of the present study demonstrate that OC-induced high blood pressure is associated with cardiac hypertrophy, enhanced pressor response to angiotensin II and preserved pressor response to sympathetic activation. The study also suggests that the development of the OC-induced hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy is mediated by RAS, but not by SNS.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 46, November 2008, pp. 755-759

 

 

Vasosensory responses elicited by Indian red scorpion venom last longer than capsaicin-induced responses

Sanjeev K Singh & Shripad B Deshpande

 

Received 20 June 2008; revised 21 August 2008

The present study was conducted to compare the time-related cardiorespiratory changes occurring after the injection of Mesobuthus tamulus (BT; 1 mg/kg) venom and capsaicin (1.2 ng/kg) in the peripheral end of femoral artery in urethane anaesthetised rats. Blood pressure (BP), electrocardiogram (for heart rate; HR) and respiratory movements were recorded for 60 min after venom/capsaicin intra-arterially. Minute ventilation (MV) was computed by using appropriate calibrations. After intraarterial injection of BT venom, there was immediate (within 2 sec) increase in respiratory rate (RR) and MV which reached to 40% within 30 sec, followed by a 40% decrease in RR without any change in MV. Further, there was sustained increase in RR (50%) and MV (65%) up to 60 min. The BP began to increase at 40 sec, peaking at 5 min (50%) and remained above the initial level up to 60 min. The bradycardiac response began after 5 min which peaked (50% of the initial) at 25 min and remained at that level up to 60 min. In capsaicin treated group, there was immediate hyperventilatory (increase in RR and MV) changes within 2 sec which returned to the initial level within 2 min and remained at that level up to 60 min. The capsaicin-induced hypotensive response began within 5 sec which returned to the initial level by 5 min and remained at that level throughout. Capsaicin did not produce any change in HR. These observations suggest that intraarterial injection of BT venom produces prolonged cardiorespiratory alterations as compared to the capsaicin-induced responses.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 46, November 2008, pp. 760-763

 

 

Processing of multimer FMD virus VP1-2A protein expressed in E. coli into monomers

H J Dechamma, C Ashok Kumar, G Nagarajan & V V S Suryanarayana

 

Received 21 November 2007; revised 21 August 2008

Expressions of several genes in bacteria were carried out by independent promoter. However, in case of eukaryotes ribosome skipping and introduction of IRES are employed as alternative to multiple translation initiation. Foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) 2A peptide has been widely used for co-expression of multiple genes in eukaryotic, plant and mammalian systems. The 18 amino acid 2A peptide of FMDV facilitates efficient co-translational dissociation of the polyprotein into discrete protein products. To study the role of 2A in multimeric protein production a construct consisting of tandem repeat of 4 units of C- terminal VP1 linked through 2A sequence was made and expressed in E. coli. Along with tetramer protein, trimer, dimer and monomer proteins were produced. Stability studies showed that the tetramer protein was cleaved to smaller monomer on storage. The results provide scope for using FMDV 2A for expressing multiple genes under a single promoter in prokaryotes.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 46, November 2008, pp. 764-769

 

 

In vitro brain tyrosine hydroxylase activation in catfish Heteropneustes fossilis (Bloch): Seasonal changes in involvement of cAMP謀ependent protein kinase A and Ca2+-dependent protein kinase C

R Chaube & K P Joy

 

Received 2 June 2008; revised 26 August 2008

In the present in vitro study, the involvement of cAMP dependent-protein kinase A (PKA) and calcium謀ependent protein kinase C (PKC) in the regulation of forebrain (telencephalon and hypothalamus) tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity was demonstrated during the reproductive seasons of the female catfish H. fossilis. In the concentration studies conducted in prespawning phase, cAMP (0.05 nM, 0.5 nM, 1 mM and 2.0 mM) or the phosphodiesterase inhibitor isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX-0.5-2.0mM) stimulated enzyme activity. Likewise, the incubation of the enzyme preparations with the cAMP dependent-protein kinase A inhibitor H-89 (1 and 10 mM) and PKC inhibitor calphostin C (cal C; 1 and 10 mM) inhibited enzyme activity in a concentration-dependent manner. In seasonal studies, the incubation of the enzyme preparations with cAMP (1 mM), IBMX (1 mM), H-89 (10 mM) and cal-C (10 mM) produced season謀ependent effects on enzyme activity. The stimulatory effect of cAMP and IBMX and the inhibitory effect of H-89 and cal C were greater in the resting and spawning phases. The results suggest the involvement of both signal transduction pathways in TH activation vis--vis catecholaminergic activity with a more dominant role by the cAMP-PKA pathway.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 46, November 2008, pp. 770-776

 

 

Possible role of citalopram and desipramine against sleep deprivation-induced anxiety like-behavior alterations and oxidative damage in mice

Ruchika Garg & Anil Kumar

 

Received 11 February 2008; revised 4 September 2008

Sleep is an essential physiological process for maintaining physical, mental, and emotional health. Sleep deprivation and associated disorders like depression and anxiety are one of the major problems now-days. The present study was designed to explore the neuroprotecitve effect of citalopram and desipramine on 72 hr sleep deprivation-induced behavioral alterations and oxidative damage in mice. Various behavioral tests (plus maze, zero maze, mirror chamber, actophotometer), body weight followed by oxidative parameters (malondialdehyde level, glutathione, catalase, nitrite and protein) were assessed. Treatment with citalopram (5 and 10mg/kg, ip) and desipramine (10 and 20 mg/kg, ip) for 5 days significantly improved locomotor activity, anti-anxiety like behavior in all paradigms tasks (mirror chamber, plus maze, zero maze) as compared to control (72 hr sleep-deprived). Biochemically, citalopram and desipramine treatment significantly restored depleted reduced glutathione, catalase activity, attenuated raised lipid peroxidation and nitrite level as compared to control (72 hr sleep-deprived) animals. Results of present study suggest that citalopram (5 and 10mg/kg, ip) and desipramine (10 and 20 mg/kg, ip) have neuroprotective effect against sleep deprivation-induced behavior alteration and oxidative damage in mice

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 46, November 2008, pp. 777-782

 

 

Wound healing activity of Sesamum indicum L seed and oil in rats

Kotade Kiran & Mohammed Asad

 

Received 20 February 2008; revised 8 September 2008

The seeds of S. indicum L (Pedaliaceae) are used traditionally in the folklore for the treatment of various kinds of wounds. The present study was undertaken to verify the effect of S. indicum seeds and its oil on experimentally induced excision wound, incision wound, burn wound and dead space wound models in rats. Aloe vera was used as standard wound healing agent. A formulation of seeds and oil was prepared in carbopol at 2.5% and 5% concentrations and applied to the wounds. In the excision and burn wound models, the so treated animals showed significant reduction in period of epithelization and wound contraction (50%). In the incision wound model a significant increase in the breaking strength was observed. Seeds and oil treatment (250 mg and 500 mg/kg; po) in dead space wound model, produced a significant increase in the breaking strength, dry weight and hydroxyproline content of the granulation tissue. The results suggest that S. indicum seeds and oil applied topically or administered orally possesses wound healing activity.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 46, November 2008, pp. 783-787

 

 

Screening of natural phenolic compounds for potential to inhibit bacterial
cell division protein FtsZ

Neerja Rastogi, Prerna Domadia, Sangeeta Shetty & Debjani Dasgupta

 

Received 4 December 2007; revised 27 August 2008

FtsZ plays an important role in bacterial cell division by polymerizing to form the Z ring at the site of cytokinesis. Phytochemicals are known to disrupt bacterial cell division through inhibition of FtsZ assembly. In the present study phytochemicals like eugenol, trans-cinnamic acid, 4-formyl cinnamic acid, naringenin and caffeic acid were were tested for their potential to inhibit cell division. Effect of these antimicrobial compounds on the growth of E. coli was determined and the inhibition of FtsZ assembly in vitro was investigated. The present study revealed trans-cinnamic acid as the most potent inhibitor of FtsZ assembly.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 46, November 2008, pp. 788-792

 

 

Efficacy of 4-methyl-7-hydroxy coumarin derivatives against vectors Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus

Madhavi Deshmukh, Pushpa Pawar, Mary Joseph, Usha Phalgune, Rajashree Kashalkar &
Nirmala R Deshpande

 

Received 25 April 2008, revised 20 August 2008

4-Methyl-7-hydroxy coumarin is considered as a lead molecule as a biopesticide. Its mono bromo and tribromo derivatives were synthesized. Two more derivatives were synthesized by acylation. Compound 1 (3,6,8-tribromo-7-hydroxy-4-methyl-chromen-2-one) was found to be the most potent against IVth instar larvae of C. quinquefasciatus and A. aegypti the LC50 being 1.49 and 2.23 ppm respectively. It showed 100% larval mortality at 25 ppm against A. aegypti and at 10 ppm against C. quinquefasciatus. Compounds 1 and 2 (3,6,8-tribromo-7-hydroxy-4-methyl-chromen-2-oxo-2H-chromen-7-yl acetate) showed remarkable ovicidal activity. Significant reduction of 80-85% hatching of eggs of both mosquito species was observed at the highest dose of 100 ppm. The hatched larvae showed 100% mortality in the successive instars. Compounds 3 and 4 (3-bromo-7-hydroxy-4-methyl-chromen-2-one and 3-bromo-4-methyl-2-oxo-2H-chromen-7-yl acetate) showed moderate activity against both mosquito species.

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 46, November 2008, pp. 793-796

 

 

Assembly of recombinant coat protein of sugarcane streak mosaic virus into
potyvirus-like particles

M Hema, Ch V Subba Reddy, H S Savithri & P Sreenivasulu

 

Received 11 March 2008; revised 22 August 2008

Coat protein (CP) gene of sugarcane streak mosaic virus-AP isolate (SCSMV-AP) was expressed in E. coli and recombinant CP (SCSMV-AP rCP) was purified by linear sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Observation of purified SCSMV-AP rCP under electron microscope revealed the presence of potyvirus-like particles (PVLPs). The assembled particles were shown to encapsidate CP gene transcripts by slot-blot hybridization.