Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

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VOLUME 46

NUMBER 9

SEPTEMBER 2008

CODEN: IJEB (A6) 46(9) 617-680 (2008)

ISSN: 0019-5189

 

 

  CONTENTS

 

 

Papers

 

Comparative analysis of protein profiles of wild virulent (E156) and aroA-htrA double deletion mutant vaccine strain (S30) of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Abortusequi under in vivo and in vitro growth conditions

621

Mudit Chandra, B R Singh, S K Srivastava, P Chaudhry, Ravi Kant Agrawal & Anupma Sharma

 

 

 

Amplification of rat microsatellite loci in Mastomys coucha Smith, 1836

627

Arti Gupta & Neelima Gupta

 

 

 

Comparative behavioural profile of newer antianxiety drugs on different mazes

633

Shrinivas K Kulkarni, Kulwinder Singh & Mahendra Bishnoi

 

 

 

Effect of ripe fruit pulp extract of Cucurbita pepo Linn. in aspirin induced gastric and duodenal ulcer in rats

639

Sentu Sarkar & Debjani Guha

 

 

 

Effect of Commiphora mukul extract on cardiac dysfunction and ventricular function in isoproterenol-induced myocardial infarction

646

Shreesh K Ojha, Mukesh Nandave, Sachin Arora, Raj D Mehra, Sujata Joshi,
Rajiv Narang & D S Arya

 

 

 

Hepatoprotective effect of Hibiscus hispidissimus Griffith, ethanolic extract in paracetamol and CCl4 induced hepatotoxicity in Wistar rats

653

M N Krishnakumar, P G Latha, S R Suja, V J Shine, S Shyamal, G I Anuja, S Sini,
S Pradeep, P Shikha, P K Somasekharan Unni & S Rajasekharan

 

 

 

Antidiabetic activity of aqueous extract and non polysaccharide fraction of
Cynodon dactylon Pers.

660

E E Jarald, S B Joshi & D C Jain

 

 

 

Antimutagenic activity of methanolic extract of four ayurvedic medicinal plants

668

Farrukh Aqil, Maryan Zahin & Iqbal Ahmad

 

 

 

Effect of 7Li radiation on endogenous hormonal level on developing cotton fiber

673

Kunjal Bhatt, Asiti Sarma & Vrinda Thaker

 

 

 

Identification of a amylase inhibitors from Syzygium cumini Linn seeds

677

K Karthic, K S Kirthiram, S Sadasivam , B Thayumanavan & T Palvannan

 

 

 

Announcements

 

National Workshop on Lifestyle Diseases and Occupation; National Seminar on
Cancer-Biology and Development of New Chemical Entities

620

 

 

覧覧覧覧

 

 

Announcements

 

National Workshop on Lifestyle Diseases and Occupation

National Institute of Occupational Health, Ahmedabad, 5-7 November 2008

 

Sponsored by the World Health Organization, New Delhi, and organized by the National Institute of Occupational Health, Ahmedabad, the workshop aims to congregate the experts of the relevant fields to discuss the following agenda points to arrive at an iterative consensus: (i) Workforce erosion due to life style diseases, changed nature of work, challenges emerging from globalization, competition, societal changes and its consequences in Indian context; (ii) Lessons from the industrialized countries; and
(iii) An action plan to reduce the burden of life style diseases in more efficient and effective manner. For further detail, please contact, The Workshop Coordinator, National Institute of Occupational Health (NIOH), Meghani Nagar, Ahmedabad 380 016, India. Telephone: +91-79-22686351; Fax: +91-79-22686110; E-mail: niohedu@yahoo.com

 

覧覧覧覧

 

National Seminar on Cancer-Biology and Development of New Chemical Entities

 

PSG College of Pharmacy, Coimbatore, 20-22 November 2008

 

Organised with a view to bring academia, industry and regulatory bodies engaged in cancer research including basic science, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, biotechnology and industrial R&D together, the seminar will cover following
topics: (i) Basic cancer biology and genetics, (ii) New drug development for cancer therapy (herbal, synthetic and biotechnology derived products), and (iii) Newer anti-cancer screening techniques. Intending participants may please contact Prof. A K Chandrasekharan, Principal, or Prof. M Ramanathan, Head, Department of
Pharmacology, PSG College of Pharmacy, P.B. No. 1674, Peelamedu,
Coimbatore 641 004, India. Phone: 04222570170, 4345841; Fax: 04222594400;
e-mail: principal@psgpharma.ac.in; akchandrasekharan@gmail.com; muthaiahramanathan@yahoo.co.in; cancerbiol@psgpharma.ac.in

 

 

 

 

Author Index

Agrawal Ravi Kant

621

Ahmad Iqbal

668

Anuja G I

653

Aqil Farrukh

668

Arora Sachin

646

Arya D S

646

 

 

Bhatt Kunjal

673

Bishnoi Mahendra

633

 

 

Chandra Mudit

621

Chaudhry P

621

 

 

Guha Debjani

639

Gupta Arti

627

Gupta Neelima

627

 

 

Jain D C

660

Jarald E E

660

Joshi S B

660

Joshi Sujata

646

 

 

Karthic K

677

Kirthiram K S

677

Krishnakumar N M

653

Kulkarni Shrinivas K

633

 

 

Latha P G

653

 

 

Mehra Raj D

646

 

 

Nandave Mukesh

646

Narang Rajiv

646

 

 

Ojha Shreesh K

646

 

 

Palvannan T

677

Pradeep S

653

 

 

Rajasekharan S

653

Sadasivam S

677

Sarkar Sentu

639

Sarma Asiti

673

Sharma Anupma

621

Shikha P

653

Shine V J

653

Shyamal S

653

Singh B R

621

Singh Kulwinder

633

Sini S

653

Srivastava S K

621

Suja S R

653

 

 

Thaker Vrinda

673

Thayumanavan B

677

 

 

Unni P K Somasekharan

653

 

 

Zahin Maryam

668

 

 

Keyword Index

Acorus calamus

668

Alkaline phosphatase

639

Alloxan

660

Amylase inhibitor

677

Antidiabetic activity

660

Antiepileptic

633

Antimutagenic activity

668

Anxiety

633

Aspirin

639

Atypical antipsychotic

633

 

 

Calmodulin (CALM3)

627

Carbon tetrachloride

653

Carboxypeptidase B (CBP)

627

Cardiac function

646

Cell surface protein
 (CSPMO2)

  627

Commiphora mukul

646

Cotton fiber

673

Cucurbita pepo

639

Cynodon dactylon

660

 

 

Diabetes mellitus

677

 

 

 

 

DPPH quenching

653

 

 

ELISA

673

 

 

Gastric and Duodenal ulcer

639

Guggul

646

 

 

Hemidesmus indicus

668

Hepatoprotection

653

Hibiscus hispidissimus

653

High LET radiation

673

Holarrhena antidysenterica

668

Hypoglycaemic activity

660

 

 

Insulin like growth
 factor I (IGF1)

 

627

Isoproterenol

646

 

 

Lipid peroxidation

653

Lipid profile

660

 

 

M. coucha

627

Mazes

633

Medicinal plants

668

 

 

Mucosa thickness

639

Mutant

621

 

 

Non-competitive inhibitor

677

Non-mellitus

677

 

 

Paracetamol

653

Phenolics

668

Plant extracts

668

Plumbago zeylanica

668

Porcine pancreatic
a-amylase

  677

Protein profile

621

 

 

Salmonella

621

SDS PAGE

621

Sequence tagged
 microsatellite markers

  627

Syzygium cumini

677

 

 

Ulcer index

639

 

 

Ventricular function

646

 

 

Western blot

621

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 46, September 2008, pp. 621-626

   

   

Comparative analysis of protein profiles of wild virulent (E156) and aroA-htrA double deletion mutant vaccine strain (S30) of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Abortusequi under in vivo and in vitro growth conditions

Mudit Chandra, B R Singh, S K Srivastava, P Chaudhry, Ravi Kant Agrawal & Anupma Sharma

 

Received 2 April 2008; revised 19 June 2008

In the present study, cell lysate and cell supernatant of the both strains i.e., virulent wild type (E156) and mutant (S30) vaccine strains of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Abortusequi (S. Abortusequi), grown under varied in vivo and in vitro conditions were subjected to SDS PAGE and western blotting (using rabbit hyperimmune serum). Variation in growth conditions did not have any significant effect on expression of different proteins. SDS PAGE of E156 and S30 cell lysate (CL) revealed 26 and 28 bands, respectively with 3 prominent proteins of 71, 46 and 42 kDa in cell lysate of E 156 and 4 prominent proteins 71, 65, 46 and 40 kDa in S30 strain. The cell supernatant (CS) from both the strains, subjected to SDS PAGE, exhibited similarity in protein profile among these strains, however three bands of 65, 53 and 40 kDa were more prominent in CS preparation of S30, whereas a 56 kDa protein was prominent in CS of E156. Western blotting of E156 and S30 revealed 3 unique proteins of 65, 53 and 40 kDa present in CS preparation of S30 strains which could be used for differentiation of mutant and wild strains and also in development of test for differentiating vaccinated animals from naturally infected.

   

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 46, September 2008, pp. 627-632

 

 

Amplification of rat microsatellite loci in Mastomys coucha Smith, 1836

Arti Gupta & Neelima Gupta

 

Received 1 May 2008; revised 15 July 2008

The multimammate rat M. coucha is the most widespread strain to be introduced in biomedical research and various stocks of this strain are maintained in laboratories across the globe. It is an ideal carrier of normally non-human disease to the domestic environment. In order to analyze genetic purity, strains of M. coucha were subjected to PCR-based DNA fingerprinting using sequence tagged microsatellite markers to evolve molecular signature to them. For this, 10 rats sequenced tagged microsatellite markers were used to investigate for their applicability of cross-species amplification in the genome of M. coucha. Out of 10 microsatellite primers tested, four (40%) microsatellite primer pairs [Carboxypeptidase B (CBP), Calmodulin (CALM3), Cell surface protein (CSPMO2) and Insulin like growth factor - I (IGF - 1)] could be amplified successfully with exact with product size of 159, 145, 186 and 203 bps respectively in rat. The results suggest that since the above mentioned microsatellite primers get amplified successfully in M. coucha, they may be useful for genetic characterization, evaluation, strain improvement and biomedical research.

   

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 46, September 2008, pp. 633-638

 

 

Comparative behavioural profile of newer antianxiety drugs on different mazes

Shrinivas K Kulkarni, Kulwinder Singh & Mahendra Bishnoi

 

Received 30 November 2007; revised 8 July 2008

Anxiety is associated with diverse range of psychiatric conditions. In the present study, antianxiety effect of fluoxetine, citalopram (SSRI痴), gabapentin (antiepileptic drugs), venlafaxine (SNRI), clozapine and resperidone (atypical antipsychotics) and a herbal preparation ashwagandha on elevated zero maze and elevated plus maze paradigms was examined. Anti-anxiety potentials of these drugs were compared with diazepam. The drugs tested i.e. fluoxetine (10 mg/kg), citalopram (10 mg/kg), clozapine (0.25, 0.5, 1 mg/kg), resperidone (0.5, 1 mg/kg), venlafaxine (4, 8, 16 mg/kg), citalopram (10 mg/kg), fluoxetine (10 mg/kg), gabapentin (10, 20 mg/kg) and ashwagandha (100, 200 mg/kg) significantly increased the number of open arm entries and time spent in open arm. These drugs also decreased the latency to enter in open arm as compared to control in both the paradigms. Present study confirms the antianxiety activity of different newer classes of drugs and found some of them comparable to diazepam in both the elevated zero maze and elevated plus maze paradigm.

   

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 46, September 2008, pp. 639-645

 

 

Effect of ripe fruit pulp extract of Cucurbita pepo Linn. in aspirin induced
gastric and duodenal ulcer in rats

Sentu Sarkar & Debjani Guha

 

Received 16 April 2007; revised 17 June 2008

A significant decrease in alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity and mucosal thickness and increase in ulcer index (UI) was observed in aspirin treated stomach and duodenum of albino rats. However, pretreatment with C. pepo fruit pulp extract for 14 consecutive days showed increase in AP activity and mucosal thickness along with decrease in UI, suggesting gastro-duodenal protective and anti-ulcerogenic properties of C. pepo.

   

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 46, September 2008, pp. 646-652

 

 

Effect of Commiphora mukul extract on cardiac dysfunction and
ventricular function in isoproterenol-induced myocardial infarction

Shreesh K Ojha , Mukesh Nandave, Sachin Arora , Raj D Mehra , Sujata Joshi, Rajiv Narang & D S Arya

Received 20 December 2007; revised 16 June 2008

In present study, hydroalcoholic extract of C. mukul significantly improved the cardiac function and prevented myocardial ischemic impairment manifested in the form of increased heart rate, decreased arterial pressure, increased left ventricular end diastolic pressure, and altered myocardial contractility indices. C. mukul treatment additionally also produced a significant increase in lactate dehydrogenase levels and prevented decline of protein content in heart. C. mukul preserved the structural integrity of myocardium. Reduced leakage of myocyte enzyme lactate dehydrogenase and maintenance of structural integrity of myocardium along with favorable modulation of cardiac function and improved cardiac performance indicate the salvage of myocardium with C. mukul treatment. Guggulsterones which are considered to be responsible for most of the therapeutic properties of C. mukul may underlie the observed cardioprotective effect of
C. mukul against cardiac dysfunction in isoproterenol-induced ischemic rats.

   

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 46, September 2008, pp. 653-659

 

 

Hepatoprotective effect of Hibiscus hispidissimus Griffith, ethanolic extract in paracetamol and CCl4 induced hepatotoxicity in Wistar rats

N M Krishnakumar, P G Latha, S R Suja, V J Shine, S Shyamal, G I Anuja, S Sini, S Pradeep,
P Shikha P K Somasekharan Unni & S Rajasekharan

Received 4 December 2007; revised 14 July 2008

Hibiscus hispidissimus Griff. is used in tribal medicine of Kerala, the southern most state of India, to treat liver diseases. In the present study, the effect of the ethanolic extract of Hibiscus hispidissimus whole plant on paracetamol (PCM) - induced and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) - induced liver damage in healthy Wistar albino rats was studied. The results showed that significant hepatoprotective effects were obtained against liver damage induced by PCM and CCl4 as evidenced by decreased levels of serum enzymes, glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT), glutamate pyruvate transaminase (SGPT), serum alkaline phosphatase (SAKP), serum bilirubin (SB) and an almost normal histological architecture of the liver of the treated groups compared to the toxin controls. The extract also showed significant antilipid peroxidant effects in vitro, besides exhibiting significant activity in quenching 1, 1- diphenyl 2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH ) radical, indicating its potent antioxidant effects.

   

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 46, September 2008, pp. 660-667

 

 

Antidiabetic activity of aqueous extract and non polysaccharide fraction of Cynodon dactylon Pers.

E E Jarald, S B Joshi & D C Jain

 

Received 20 February 2008; revised 15 July 2008

Petroleum ether (60o-80oC), chloroform, acetone, ethanol, aqueous and crude hot water extracts of the whole plant of C. dactylon and the two fractions of aqueous extract were tested for antihyperglycaemic activity in glucose overloaded hyperglycemic rats and in alloxan induced diabetic model at two-dose levels, 200 and 400 mg/kg (po) respectively. The aqueous extract of C. dactylon and the non polysaccharide fraction of aqueous extract were found to exhibit significant antihyperglycaemic activity and only the non polysaccharide fraction was found to produce hypoglycemia in fasted normal rats. Treatment of diabetic rats with aqueous extract and non polysaccharide fraction of the plant decreased the elevated biochemical parameters, glucose, urea, creatinine, serum cholesterol, serum triglyceride, high density lipoprotein, low density lipoprotein, haemoglobin and glycosylated haemoglobin significantly. Comparatively, the non polysaccharide fraction of aqueous extract was found to be more effective than the aqueous extract.

   

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 46, September 2008, pp. 668-672

 

 

Antimutagenic activity of methanolic extracts of four ayurvedic medicinal plants

Farrukh Aqil, Maryam Zahin & Iqbal Ahmad

 

Received 18 February 2008; revised 30 June 2008

Methanolic extracts of Acorus calamus (Rhizome), Hemidesmus indicus (Stem), Holarrhena antidysenterica (Bark) and Plumbago zeylanica (Root), were tested for their antimutagenic potential. These extracts, at tested concentrations, showed no sign of mutagenicity to Salmonella typhimurium tester strains. The extracts of the plants exhibited varying level of antimutagenicity. At a dose of 100 オg/plate, the extracts exhibited the inhibition of His+ revertants from 18.51% to 82.66 % against direct acting mutagens, methyl methanesulphonate (MMS) and sodium azide (NaN3) induced mutagenicity in Salmonella tester strains TA 97a, TA 100, TA 102 and TA 104. However, at lower concentrations (25 and 50 オg/ plate) of the plant extracts, a decrease in antimutagenic activity was recorded. Dose dependent antimutagenic activity of the extracts is also evident from linear regression analysis of the data. The over all antimutagenic potential of above four extracts was found to be in order of A. calamus > H. indicus > H. antidysenterica > P. zeylanica. Further, total phenolic content of these extracts did not correlate with its antimutagenic activity in A. calamus and P. zeylanica.  

 

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 46, September 2008, pp. 673-676

 

 

Effect of 7Li radiation on endogenous hormonal level on developing cotton fiber

Kunjal Bhatt, Asiti Sarma & Vrinda Thaker

 

Received 23 April 2008; revised 23 June 2008

Influence of radiation doses (7Li) on cellular metabolism, specially endogenous hormonal level, was studied in monolayer of cotton fibers. Changes in endogenous phytohormone level were determined with two different fluences of 7Li equivalent to radiation doses of 1 Gy and 4 Gy. To estimate the endogenous indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), phenoxy acetic acid (PAA), and abscisic acid (ABA) levels, indirect ELISA was performed with the help of antibodies raised against each hormone. In samples at later stage, dose dependent response was apparent in PAA. Results showed that in vivo content of each hormone increased with radiation treatment except ABA.

Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Vol. 46, September 2008, pp. 677-680

 

 

Identification of α amylase inhibitors from Syzygium cumini Linn seeds

K Karthic, K S Kirthiram, S Sadasivam & B Thayumanavan

and

T Palvannan

 

Received 14 September 2007; revised 14 July 2008

The aqueous extract of S. cumini or Eugenia jambolana seeds and Psidium guajava leaves showed higher inhibition against the porcine pancreatic α-amylase among the medicinal plants studied. The α-amylase inhibitors from S.cumini seeds were separated from the extract by preparative thin layer chromatography into fractions with different Rf values. The fraction with Rf value between 0.285 and 0.43, which showed maximum inhibitory activity, was eluted and analyzed through LC-MS. The compounds identified from the seed extract of S. cumini were betulinic acid and 3,5,7,4`-tetrahydroxy flavanone, which were reported earlier from S. formosanum and other plants. Dixon plot showed that the inhibition was non-competitive in nature.