Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

 

 

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VOLUME 5

NUMBER 2

APRIL 2006

  

CONTENTS

 


Papers

 

An insight into the  traditional     handloom of Kinnal, Karnataka

173

 Shailaja D N, Jyoti V, Suvarnagouri Y & Sunita S

 

 

 

Effect of Vedic chanting on memory and sustained attention

177

Sripad Ghaligi, H R Nagendra and Ramachandra Bhatt

 

 

 

Physiological effects of transcendental meditation and physical exercise

181

Vinay Agarwal & Bhavyesh Gupta

 

 

 

Traditional alcoholic beverage, Yu of Meitei communities of Manipur

184

P K Singh & K I Singh

 

 

 

Bukhari-An indigenous method of brooding in remote and rural areas

191

R K Chaurasia, B Prakash, P V K Sasidhar & V B Sharma

 

 

 

Antihypertensive activity of Amuri from Musa paradisiaca L.

197

Jaiprakash B, Habbu P V, Karadi R V, Lavalhe M S, Savadi R V, Sudha R & Joshi S D

 

 

 

Indigenous veterinary practices of Darma valley of Pithoragarh district, Uttaranchal

201

Lalit Tiwari & P C Pande

 

  Ethnomedicinal uses of certain plants from Bay Islands

207

Sonali Das, T E Sheeja & Asit B Mandal

 

 

 

Commercial non timber forest products collected by the tribals in the Palni hills

212

S M John Kennedy

 

 

 

Ethnomedicinal practices among Khonds of Visakhapatnam district, Andhra Pradesh

217

V L N Rao, B R Busi, B Dharma Rao, Ch Seshagiri Rao, K Bharathi & M Venkaiah

 

 

 

Clinical evaluation of the efficacy of polyherbal Unani formulations in scabies

220

Syed Mahtab Ali, Mahe Alam & Anwar Jamal

 

 

 

Tradition of Clan names and conservation among the Oraons of Chhattishgarh

224

Amia Tirkey & S K Jain

 

 

 

Peptic ulcer healing properties of Shatavari (Asparagus racemosus Willd.)

227

Anil Mangal, Debashis Panda & M C Sharma

 

 Biological activities of ethnomedicinal claims of some plant species of Assam

 229

Jubilee Purkayastha and Subhan C Nath

 

 

 

Medicinal flora of Madhya Pradesh and Chattisgarh A Review

237

Jitendra B Jain, Sheetal C Kumane & S Bhattacharya

 

(Contd)

Traditional dairy herd management practices during pregnancy and calving

243

Shobha Nagnur, Geeta Channal & Channamma N

 

 

 

Medicinal plants used by ethnic group Thottianaickans of Semmalai hills (reserved forest), Tiruchirappalli District, Tamil Nadu

245

Ganesan S, Venkateshan G & Banumathy N

 

 

 

Indigenous animal healthcare practices in district Porbandar, Gujarat

253

B A Jadeja, N K Odedra, K M Solanki & N M Baraiya

 

 

 

Preparation and testing of herbal adamantine glue as described in Brhatsamhita

259

P S Atalkar, Y B Baraskar, P P Holey, J Y Deopujari & S A Mandavgane

 

 

 

Ethnomedicinal plants used by Bhil tribe of Bibdod, Madhya Pradesh

263

Dinesh Jadhav 

 

Dicentra scandens (D.Don) Walp. - A highly potent ethnomedicinal plant against

268

malaria, high blood pressure and diabetes

 

Neli Lokho Pfoze & D Ngolo Chiezou

 

 

 

Sandha- A herboprobiotic veterinary elixir

271

Hari Prakash Pandey

 

 

 

Ethnomedicinal uses of trees among Bachama tribe of Adamawa state, Nigeria

273

Idu M, Gill L S, Omonhinmin C A & Angela Ejale

 

 

 

Effect of a polyherbal Unani formulation on chronic urticaria 

279

  Yasmeen Shamsi, Harendra Kumar, S A Tamanna & E A Khan

Customs and beliefs of Raika pastoralists of Rajasthan associated with camel husbandry

284

Hema Tripathi & Devi Singh Rajput

 

 

 

Author Index

287

 

 

Subject Index

288

 

 

Forthcoming Conferences / Seminars

289

 

 

Guidelines for Submission of Manuscript

290

The Papers published in Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge are covered by

 

         CAB International, UK

        NAPRALERT, USA

        MANTIS Database, USA

        Food Science and Technology Abstracts, UK

        Medicinal and Aromatic Plants Abstracts, India

        Indian Science Abstracts, India

 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(2), April 2006, pp. 173-176

 

 

An insight into the traditional handloom of Kinnal, Karnataka

 

Shailaja D N*, Jyoti V, Suvarnagouri Y & Sunita S

Department of Textiles and Apparel Designing, College of Rural Home Science,
University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad-5 Karnataka

Received 17 May 2004; revised 15 February 2006

The Handloom Industry plays a dominant role in the economic development of the rural mass. Handlooms are scattered in the rural and semi-urban areas. The Handloom Industry is an important sector in providing large-scale employment and result in the upliftment of the rural mass development. Handloom is perhaps one of the oldest industries. Even the tribal people scattered throughout the country, produce their own cloths with the elegant designs, unique colour combinations and lasting texture. Traditional handloom industry of Kinnal village of northern district of Karnataka has been discussed.

Key words: Traditional weaving, Traditional handloom, Karnataka

IPC Int. Cl.8: D02G1/00, D02G3/00, D02J1/00, D02J3/00

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(2), April 2006, pp. 177-180

 

Effect of Vedic chanting on memory and sustained attention

 

Sripad Ghaligi*, H R Nagendra & Ramachandra Bhatt

Swami Vivekananda Yoga Anusandhana Samsthana, 19 Eknath Bhawan, Givipuram Circle, Kempegowda Nagar,
Bangalore 560019, Karnataka

E-mail: sripadghaligi@rediffmail.com

Received 7 January 2005; revised 6 January 2006

Researches and studies have shown that Yogasanas, Pranayama and meditation help in enhancing memory and improving attention, but no study is available on the effect of traditional Vedic chanting on memory and sustained attention, which is one of the important features of cognitive abilities. The present study compared the effect of chanting group, who had minimum two-years experience on memory and sustained attention with that of non-chanting group who had no exposure to such type of chanting. Data was analyzed using non-parametric Mann Whitney U test. Chanting group showed significant increased scorings in both the memory tests and considerable reduction in total error and total time taken for cancellation tests compared to non-chanting practitioners.

Key Words: Vedic chanting, Memory enhancing activity, Sustained attention, Pranayama

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61P25/00

 

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(2), April 2006, pp. 181-183

 

Physiological effects of transcendental meditation and physical exercise

Vinay Agarwal* & Bhavyesh Gupta**

Departments of Physiology and **Pharmacology

LLRM Medical College, Meerut 250004, Uttar Pradesh

E-mail: beaegi@rediffmail.com

Received 30 December 2004; revised 24 June 2005

Physical fitness can be improved by regular physical activity and transcendental meditation. A comparative study between them is elusive. Thirty young adults were divided into three groups of 10 each serving as control, exercise and meditating subjects doing respective techniques for 12 weeks. A significant fall was observed only in heart rate, vital capacity and PEFR. Changes, though insignificant, in respiratory rate, blood pressure, maximum oxygen consumption, haemoglobin and cholesterol were also observed indicating the role of both the techniques in physical fitness.

Key words: Physical fitness, Physical exercise, Transcendental meditation

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61P9/02, A61P9/10, A61P9/12

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(2), April 2006, pp. 184-190

 

 

Traditional alcoholic beverage, Yu of Meitei communities of Manipur

 

P K Singh* & K I Singh

Ethnobotany and Plant Physiology Laboratory, Department of Life Sciences, Manipur University,
Canchipur, Imphal 795 003, Manipur

E-mail: potksingh@indiatimes.com

Received 10 December 2004; revised 4 February 2005

From time immemorial the people of Manipur use Yu for medicine, relaxant and offerings. It is a distilled product of the fermented local rice. The technology of the preparation of Yu is a traditional one and the product is a source of income generation to the poorer sections of people. The technology is amenable for upgradation in a scientific way. Yu is a strong solvent for many important active constituents of medicinal plants, whose actions play a potent role in the traditional medicine. The paper deals with the uses of 12 plant species belonging to 12 families, their mode of action and applications collected from traditional healers.

Key words: Yu, Traditional beverage, Alcoholic beverage, Meitei tribe, Manipur

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K36/00, C12G3/00, C12G3/08, C12H1/00

 

 

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(2), April 2006, pp191-196

 

Bukhari-An indigenous method of brooding in remote and rural areas

R K Chaurasia1, B Prakash1, P V K Sasidhar*2 & V B Sharma3

1National Research Center on Mithun, Jharnapani, Nagaland

2Technology Transfer Section, Central Avian Research Institute, Izatnagar, Uttar Pradesh

3Department of Animal Production and Management, Nagaland Central Agricultural University, Medziphema, Nagaland

E-mail: pvksasidhar@yahoo.com

Received 2 February 2005; revised 28 June 2005

An investigation was carried out in order to evaluate Bukhari, an indigenous method of brooding in the remote and hilly areas of rural India. A total of 400 chicks, divided into four groups of 100 each were used for the experiment. Three groups were used for Bukhari brooding and rest 100 were under conventional brooding method. The chicks were brooded for a period of three weeks under similar managemental conditions. At the end of brooding period, the body weight, weight gain, feed consumption and conversion efficiency were 5611.80 gm and 518.304.68 gm; 265.201.80 and 268.703.38 gm; 1153 gm and 1054.99 gm; and 2.33 and 2.10 respectively for conventional and Bukhari brooded groups. However, at the age of six weeks they were in the order of 1656.565.81 gm and 1614.797.34 gm; 413.682.92 gm and 382.423.10 gm; 3721 gm and 3736.25 gm; 2.33 and 2.72 respectively, for conventional and Bukhari brooded groups. The dressing and mortality percentage in both the groups were found to be 74.680.24 and 73.920.31; 2.00 and 3.34 respectively, showing no significant difference in performance between Bukhari and conventionally brooded chicks. The study recommends Bukhari as a safe, economic and suitable indigenous method of brooding to conventional brooder in remote and rural areas having no or limited availability of power/electricity supply.

Key words: Bukhari, Indigenous brooding method

IPC Int. Cl.8: A01K41/02, A01K41/04, A01K41/06

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5 (2), April 2006, pp. 197-200

 

Antihypertensive activity of Amuri from Musa paradisiaca L.

Jaiprakash B1, Habbu P V2*, Karadi R V1, Lavalhe M S3, Savadi R V3, Sudha R4 & Joshi S D

1Department of Pharmacognosy, K L E Ss College of Pharmacy, Belgaum, Karnataka; *2Department of Pharmacognosy,
S E Ts college of Pharmacy, Dharwad 580 002, Karnataka; 3Department of Pharmacognosy, K L E Ss College of Pharmacy,
Hubli, Karnataka; 4Department of Siddha Medicine, Tamil University, Thanjavur, Tamil Nadu

E-mail: prasherbs@ yahoo.com

Received 30 December 2004; revised 14 March 2005

Amuri is a Kayakarpam preparation in Siddha System of Medicine for treatment of many diseases. In the present investigation, an attempt has been made to study the antihypertensive activity of Amuri from plantain (Banana tree (Musa paradisiaca L.) through animal models. The drug was screened for all possible mechanisms that alter blood pressure like diuretic activity in albino rats, antianxiety activity in mice, calcium channel blocking activity and b-adrenoreceptor blocking activity on isolated frog heart. Amuri from Banana tree exhibited significant diuretic activity (p<0.001) at a dose level of 8ml and 10ml/kg bw, and was comparable to hydrochlorthiazide. Treatment with Amuri did not have any antianxiety activity. Amuri also produced significant positive ionotropic and negative chronotropic effect similar to that of digoxin on isolated frog heart. This action was not antagonized by propranalol. Pretreatment with verapamil significantly reduced the cardiotonic activity. Amuri produced a significant increase in the force of contraction and heart rate (p<0.001). The action of Amuri on isolated frog heart was not dose dependent.

Keywords: Amuri, Kayakarpam, Musa paradisiaca, Antihypertensive activity

IPC Int. Cl8: A61K36/00, A61P9/12


 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(2), April 2006, pp. 201-206

 

Indigenous veterinary practices of Darma valley of Pithoragarh district, Uttaranchal

Lalit Tiwari* & P C Pande1

Pharmacognosy & Ethnopharmacology Division, NBRI, Rana Pratap Marg, Lucknow 226 001, Uttar Pradesh; 1Department of Botany, Kumaon University, SSJ Campus, Almora, Uttaranchal

E-mail: ltherbal@rediffmail.com

Received 29 September 2004; revised 12 December 2005

The people residing in Darma valley known as Darmi or Darmi Bhotiyas have great wisdom of traditional knowledge about the animal husbandry and veterinary practices. They cure their animals with the help of surrounding natural resources such as plants, animals, minerals, etc. They produce traditionally hybrids of yak and local cow. However, these practices are in danger of extinction because of the rapid modernization. The paper documents the traditional veterinary practices and animal husbandry of Darmies of Pithoragarh district of Uttanachal.

Keywords: Animal husbandry, Darma valley, Darmi, Darmi Bhotiyas , Ethnoveterinary practices, Veterinary medicines, Uttaranchal,

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K35/00, A61K36/00, A61P1/04, A61P1/12, A61P11/10, A61P15/10, A61P17/00, A61P19/00, A61P33/00

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(2), April 2006, pp. 207-211

 

Ethnomedicinal uses of certain plants from Bay Islands

Sonali Das, T E Sheeja & Asit B Mandal*

Biotechnology section, Central Agricultural Research Institute,

Post Box No 181, Port Blair 744101, Andaman & Nicobar Islands

E-mail: amandal2@rediffmail.com

Received 25 November 2004; revised 15 March 2005

Andaman and Nicobar Islands represent a biological paradise for plant biodiversity. Medicinal plants of these islands also represent a typical Malayan flora. About 52 medicinal plants are found to be endemic. The present article encompasses a glimpse of a few important medicinal plants from Bay Islands along with the folk knowledge gleaned through recurrent survey. Enormous prospect in drug discovery is discernible from these species.

Keywords: Nicobarese tribe, Shompen tribe, Jarawas tribe, Sentinels tribe, Ongese tribe, Great Andamanese tribe, Medicinal plants, Ethnomedicine, Bay Islands

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K36/00, A61P1/04, A61P1/12, A61P11/06, A61P13/00, A61P17/00, A61P19/02, A61P33/06, A61P33/10

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(2), April 2006, pp. 212-216

 

 

Commercial Non-timber forest products collected by the tribals in the Palni hills

 

S M John Kennedy

St Xaviers College, Palayamkottai 627 002, Tamil Nadu

E-mail: kennedy-john@mailicity.com

Received 29 November 2004; revised 28 March 2005

This study documents the commercial Non Timber Forest Products (NTFPs), collected and marketed by the tribals in the Palni hills. Commercial non-timber forest products are those that are leased out by the Forest Department and the tribals are involved in the collection and sale of these products. The tribals in the Palni hills are collecting a total of 30 products as commercial non-timber forest products.

Key words: Non timber forest products, Palni hills, Palliyans tribe, Pulayans tribe, Tamil Nadu

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K36/00, A01f25/00

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5 (2), April 2006, pp. 217-219

 

 

Ethnomedicinal practices among Khonds of Visakhapatnam district,
Andhra Pradesh

V L N Rao, B R Busi, B Dharma Rao, Ch Seshagiri Rao, K Bharathi & M Venkaiah*

Department of Anthropology and *Department of Botany, Andhra University, Visakhapatnam 530 003, Andhra Pradesh

E-mail: vithala_narasimharao2000@yahoo.com

Received 4 March 2005; revised 12 May 2005

The paper provides information on 11 medicinal plants belonging to 10 families, used by Khonds for treatment of various ailments. The local names, method of preparation and administration of medicine are mentioned. Khonds largely depend on herbal medicines for primary healthcare and the prevalent ethnomedical system is attributed to their cultural framework.

Key words: Ethnomedicine, Medicinal plants, Khond tribe, Andhra Pradesh

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K36/00, A61P1/12, A61P1/16, A61P15/04, A61P25/08, A61P39/02

 

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(2), April 2006, pp. 220-223

 

 

Clinical evaluation of the efficacy of polyherbal Unani formulations in scabies

Syed Mahtab Ali*, Mahe Alam & Anwar Jamal1

Department of Anatomy and Physiology, Faculty of Medicine (U), Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi 110062; 1TKDL,
NISCAIR, Dr K S Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012

Received 6 June 2005; revised 5 October 2006

Scabies is a contagious skin disease caused by a burrowing mite. Intense itching is induced by the mite burrowing into the skin to lay eggs, generally in the area of the wrist, fingers, genitals or feet. The disease is spread by close contact with infected person or from contaminated clothes. It affects hands and wrist (63%), extensor aspect of elbow (10%) and other sites (27%). It is commonly found in densely populated areas and especially in low socioeconomic groups. In Unani System of Medicine, an oral formulation consisting of Shahtra (Fumaria indica Pugsley), Chiraita (Swertia chirayita Roxb. ex Flem. Karst), Sarphonka (Tephrosia purpurea Linn. Pers.), Gul-e-mundi (Sphaeranthus indicus Linn.), and Unnab (Ziziphus jujuba Mill.) along with local formulation of Gandhak (Sulphur), Murdaarsang (Letharg) and Kaphoor (Cinnamomum camphora Linn.) is evaluated in patients fulfilling the diagnostic criteria. The study showed significant reduction in the signs and symptoms of scabies after 15 days of treatment. The objective of the study was to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of polyherbal formulations in scabies with a view to find a cheaper and effective treatment, free from side effects.

Keywords: Polyherbal formulations, Unani medicine, Scabies, Herbal formulation

IPC Int. Cl8: A61K36/00, A61P17/00

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(2), April 2006, pp. 224-226

 

Tradition of Clan names and conservation among the Oraons of Chhattishgarh

Amia Tirkey* & S K Jain

*School of Life Sciences, Pt R S University, Raipur 492010, Chhattishgarh;

A-26, Mall Avenue Colony, Lucknow 226001, Uttar Pradesh

E-mail: skjain1926@rediffmail.com

Received 11 August 2005; revised 19 December 2005

The Oraons of Chattisgarh have a tradition of totemism; name their clans after plants, animals, and other objects of their daily needs or environment. They attach some special significance like faith, taboos or other practices to emphasize the importance of these things in their survival and the need for their conservation. The folk of those clans do not harm these species, and protect them from any damage. Examples of names of some animals, plants, and other objects common among the Oraons of Chattisgarh are given. Such traditions helping in conservation of biodiversity, and natural resources have been discussed.

Keywords: Clan names, Chattisgarh, Oraons, Conservation, Totemism

IPC Int. Cl.8: A01K1/00

 

 

 

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(2), April 2006, pp. 227-228

 

Peptic ulcer healing properties of Shatavari (Asparagus racemosus Willd.)

Anil Mangal*, Debashis Panda & M C Sharma

Department of Dravya Guna Vigyana, National Institute of Ayurveda, Jaipur 302002, Rajasthan

Received 8 September 2004; revised 22 June 2005

Today people are very much concerned about maintenance of their physical health. Stress, strain and anxiety have gifted mankind with many life style related disorders among which, peptic ulcer is the most common. Psychological stress and faulty food habits are the key factors for causing and complicating the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer. Thus, peptic ulcer is fast becoming an alarming social problem in developing countries like India. Shatavari (Asparagus racemosus Willd.) root powder was found to be effective in chronic peptic ulcer.

Key words: Shatavari, Peptic ulcer, Ayurveda

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K36/00, A61P1/04

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(2), April 2006, pp. 229-236

 

Biological activities of ethnomedicinal claims of some plant species of Assam

 

Jubilee Purkayastha & Subhan C Nath*

Division of Medicinal, Aromatic and Economic Plants, Regional Research Laboratory, Jorhat 785 006, Assam;
E-mail: scnath2004@yahoo.co.in

Received 15 December 2004; revised 2 August 2005

Folklore medicinal uses and biological activities of some plant species growing wild in Assam of North-East India were studied based on the review of literature reports. An account of 65 plant species indicating positive correlation between their folklore claims and biological activities were reported in this communication. For each plant species described botanical name, local name(s), parts used and folklore claims, and biological activities were given. The present study not only revealed the authenticity of traditional knowledge of the ethnic people of Assam on utilitarian aspects of these plant species but also indicated the possibility of utilizing them for greater economic use.

Keywords: Folk medicine, Ethnomedicine, Assam

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K36/00, A61P1/04, A61P1/16, A61P9/00, A61P11/6, A61P13/02, A61P15/06, A61P17/00, A61P31/04

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(2), April 2006, pp. 237-242

 

Medicinal flora of Madhya Pradesh and Chattisgarh A Review

Jitendra B Jain*, Sheetal C Kumane & S Bhattacharya

Rajiv Gandhi Proudyogiki Vishwavidyalaya, Airport Bypass Road, Gandhi Nagar, Bhopal 462036, Madhya Pradesh
E-mail: jinendrabjain@yahoo.co.in

Received 26 October 2004; revised 7 March 2005

Plants are natural industries, which provide high quality food and raw material for pharmaceutical, cosmetic and perfumery industries without causing environmental degradation. Medicinal plants as a group comprise approximately 8000 species and account for around 50% of all the higher flowering plant species of India. India possesses almost 8% of the estimated biodiversity of the world with around 0.126% million species. In India, Madhya Pradesh & Chattisgarh are known to harbour a rich wealth of medicinal plants. Studies have shown that these two states are pool of dozens of pharmaceutically important plants. Medicinal activity of few such plants has already been reported but a good number of plants still used by local folklore are yet to be explored. A detailed survey was carried out by the authors to collect information on both reported and unreported medicinal plants of this region. The present article represents statistical data of the medicinal plants of this region.

Keywords: Medicinal plants, Madhya Pradesh, Chattisgarh

IPC Int. Cl8: A61K36/00, A61P11/06, A61P11/08, A61P13/00, A61P19/00, A61P21/00, A61P29/00, A61P35/02

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(2), April 2006, pp. 243-244

 

Traditional dairy herd management practices during pregnancy and calving

Shobha Nagnur*, Geeta Channal & Channamma N

All India Coordinated Research Project on Home science (Extension Component),
College of Home Science, Dharwad 580 005, Karnataka

E-mail: shoba_nagnur@yahoo.co.in

Received 28 September 2004; revised 8 December 2005

Indigenous knowledge is extensively prevalent in traditional Indian lifestyle and rural women possess a wealth of knowledge related to cattle rearing. Livestock owners have developed technologies, approaches, production systems and livestock breeds based on knowledge gained through generations of experiences, keen observations, needs, market demand, etc. The present paper documents this traditional wisdom with special reference to pregnancy and delivery of dairy animals. A combination of techniques and tools were used for generating information. These included conversational interviews with individuals, key informants and participant observations of local practices. Indigenous practices were recorded for heat detection, breeding, insemination, care during pregnancy, facilitating delivery, expulsion of placenta, care during parturition and postnatal care. The validation of database was carried out in order to derive correct conclusions. The scientific community is likely to be benefited by assessing the rationality of indigenous knowledge and by merging the scientific reasoning with modern stream of knowledge.

Key words: Cattle rearing, Livestock breeding, Dairy herd management, Animal husbandry

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61D11/00, A01K21/00

 

 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(2), April 2006, pp. 245-252

 

Medicinal plants used by ethnic group Thottianaickans of Semmalai hills (reserved forest), Tiruchirappalli district, Tamil Nadu

 

Ganesan S*, Venkateshan G & Banumathy N

Centre for Research & PG Department of Botany, Thiagarajar College (Autonomous), Madurai 625009, Tamil Nadu

E-mail: sganesan76@yahoo.com

Received 5 January 2005; revised 7 March 2005

The Thottianaickans are a community distributed in various places in Tamil Nadu. During the course of this study, a total of 115 species of medicinal plants distributed among 104 genera belonging to 52 families were listed from the area inhabited by Thottianaickans in the Semalai reserved forest. Usage practices of these plants have also been reported.

Key words: Thottianaickans, Medicinal plants, Semalai reserved forest, Tamil Nadu

IPC Int. Cl8: A61K36/00, A61P1/16, A61P11/06, A61P11/10, A61P15/02, A61P17/00, A61P19/02, A61P39/02

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(2), April 2006, pp. 253-258

 

Indigenous animal healthcare practices in district Porbandar, Gujarat

 

B A Jadeja*, N K Odedra, K M Solanki & N M Baraiya

Botany Department, M D Science College, Porbandar 360575, Gujarat

Received 2 February 2005; revised 21 August 2005

The paper describes the indigenous knowledge of local communities on the traditional healthcare system in district Porbandar. A total of about 573 individuals from 42 villages across district Porbandar were interviewed. Of the total interviewed persons, 41% claimed to have the ethnoveterinary knowledge. Respondents listed a total of 74 plant species that are used for treating ailments in the animals. Leaves, seeds, fruits and in some cases whole plant were used for medicinal purposes. The plant parts are fed to sick animal for treating rheumatism, fever, bloat, foot and mouth diseases, constipation, stomach pain, mastitis, swellings, sprains, gastric problems and to expel the placenta after delivery in cattle. The emphasis has been laid on scientific validation of medicinal properties of the plants used in traditional medication system, and also to recognize and reward the traditional wisdom of the local communities.

Keywords: Indigenous knowledge, Animal healthcare, Medicinal plants, Traditional knowledge, Ethnoveterinary medicine, Porbandar, Gujarat

IPC Int. Cl.8: A01J7/04, A01K11/00, A61K35/00, A61K36/00, A61P1/04, A61P17/00, A61P19/00

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(2), April 2006, pp. 259-262

 

 

Preparation and testing of herbal adamantine glue as described in Brhatsamhita

P S Atalkar1, Y B Baraskar1, P P Holey2, J Y Deopujari3 & S A Mandavgane1*

1Priyadarshini Institute of Engineering & Technology, Near CRPF, Shivangaon, Nagpur 440 019, Maharashtra;

2Laxminarayan Institute of Technology, Nagpur 440010;3Dhanvantari Hospital, Dharampeth, Nagpur 440 010, Maharashtra

E-mail: mandavgane@rediffmail.com

Received 16 December 2004; revised 28 May 2005

Brhatsamhita of Varaha-Mihira (5-6th century AD) describes the materials and methods of cementing material in chapter Vajralepa. This chapter describes three different ways of adamantine glue preparations using either metal alloys or animal matters using herbal components. Although detailed information about the procedure and composition of adamantine glue from metal alloys or animal matters is given, no such detailed information is available regarding preparation of herbal adamantine glue. In this study, an attempt has been made to get the optimum composition and efficient procedure for preparation of herbal glue. The methodology suggested is found to give maximum bond strength of 97 KPa. The adamantine glue is ecofriendly and hygienic. The study may provide useful insight into the chemistry of green cement. There were ample uses of glue in the temple architecture of that period, the remains of which bear testimony to the strength of these cements.

Key words: Brhatsamhita, Varaha-Mihira, Adamantine glue, Green cement, Herbal glue

IPC Int. Cl.8: C09H3/00, C09J11/00

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(2), April 2006, pp. 263-267

 

Ethnomedicinal plants used by Bhil tribe of Bibdod, Madhya Pradesh

 

Dinesh Jadhav

8, Daulat Ganj, Ratlam 457 001, Madhya Pradesh;
E-mail: dinj2ad@yahoo.com

Received 4 March 2005; revised 23 June 2005

The paper provides information on the use of plant crude drugs for various diseases prevalent in Bhil tribe of Bibdod village of Ratlam district, Madhya Pradesh. The paper deals with 62 plant species belonging to 57 genera of 40 families used for different diseases by the tribe. For each species, the information regarding botanical names, local names, parts used and ethnomedicinal uses have been provided.

Keywords: Bhil tribe, Medicinal plants, Madhya Pradesh, Ethnomedicine

IPC Int. Cl8: A61K36/00, A61P1/12, A61P7/00, A61P13/04, A61P15/08, A61P17/00, A61P19/02, A61P257/08,
A61P33/14

 

 

 

 

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(2), April 2006, pp. 268-270

 

Dicentra scandens (D.Don) Walp.A highly potent ethnomedicinal plant against malaria, high blood pressure and diabetes

 

Neli Lokho Pfoze* & D Ngolo Chiezou

*SEDCORM/FAD, Hill Bird Building, Senapati, Manipur; North Eastern Region Community Resource Management Project (NERCRMP), Shillong1, Meghalaya; Khezhakeno, District Phek, Nagaland

E-mail: nlpmaoifad@yahoo.co.in; nelsanze@yahoo.co.in

Received 24 January 2005; revised 30 May 2005

Dicentra scandens (D.Don) Walp. syn Dicentra thalictrifolia (Wall.) Hook. f. & Thoms. is a climbing perennial herb, belonging to the family Fumariaceae. The plant thrives well in moist sandy loam or loamy or forest soils very rich in organic matter. The plant has been used for years by Naga ethnic tribal communities living in eastern Nagaland state for treating various diseases including a number of fatal diseases like malaria, high blood pressure and diabetes. Therefore, it is warranted that step needs to be taken up for laboratory research to probe for validity test as claimed by herbalists and ultimately evolve a system for bio-prospecting and bio-partnership in bringing about cultivation.

Key words: Malaria, High blood pressure, Diabetes, Ethnomedicine, Nagaland

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K36/00, A61P3/10, A61P7/12, A61P9/02

 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(2), April 2006, pp. 271-272

 

Sandha- A herboprobiotic veterinary elixir

Hari Prakash Pandey

Duthie Herbarium, Ethnobotany Cell, Department of Botany,

University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002, Uttar Pradesh

Received 10 August 2004; revised 15 February 2006

Sandha is a unique blend of traditional herbs and fermentation technology. Rural and tribal people of Gonda, Balrampur, Bahraich and adjoining districts of Terai region of Uttar Pradesh locally prepare it. This veterinary elixir of natural ingredients and probiotics is a proven adaptogenic, comprehensive tonic, systemic and metabolic corrective, which promotes appetite and growth of cattle.

Keywords: Ethnobotany, Fermentation, Probiotics, Sandha, Veterinary elixir

IPC Int. Cl.8: C12C 1/00, C12C 7/00, C12C 11/00, A61P 1/00, A61P 1/12, A61P 1/14, A61P 1/16

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(2), April 2006, pp. 273-278

 

Ethnomedicinal uses of trees among Bachama tribe of Adamawa state, Nigeria

 

Idu M*, Gill L S, Omonhinmin C A & Angela Ejale

Department of Botany, University of Benin, PMB 1154, Benin City, Nigeria

E-mail: mcdonald@uniben.edu

Received 2 November 2004; revised 24 March 2005

Bachama tribe inhabits most parts of Numan Local Government Area. They utilize many plants for medicinal purposes from their surroundings for the treatment of ailments and diseases. The present communication deals with 21 trees species used by the Bachama people.

Key words: Ethnomedicine, Medicinal plants, Bachama tribe, Nigeria

IPC Int. Cl8: A61K36/00, A61P1/12, A61P9/02, A61P15/02, A61P21/00, A61P33/00

 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(2), April 2006, pp. 279-283

 

Effect of a polyherbal Unani formulation on chronic urticaria

 

1Yasmeen Shamsi*, 2Harendra Kumar, 3S A Tamanna & 4E A Khan

1Faculty of Medicine, Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi; 2Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi;
3Majeedia Hospital, New Delhi; 4Faculty of Science, Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi

E-mail: yasmeenshamsi@yahoo.co.in

Received 1 December 2004; revised 15 February 2005

The present study was carried out in the Clinical Research Unit of Majeedia Hospital, Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi during 1996-1998. The aim and objective of the study was to develop safe and effective treatment of urticaria from herbal sources. In this double blind study, patients of chronic urticaria were randomly allocated to receive either Pitkirya, a poly herbal formulation or placebo, two capsules daily for 4 weeks. Pitkirya treatment significantly reduced all the symptoms of chronic urticaria without producing any serious side effects. Statistically significant difference was found between the results of Pitkirya and placebo, Pitkirya was found to be much superior over the placebo. Clinical and laboratory parameters showed the efficacy and safety of Pitkirya, which was found to be highly effective and safe drug for the treatment of urticaria.

Key words: Unani medicine, Urticaria, Pitkirya, Unani system of medicine

IPC Int. Cl8: A61K36/00, A61P17/00, A61P17/02, A61P31/00

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(2), April 2006, pp. 284-286

 

Customs and beliefs of Raika pastoralists of Rajasthan associated with
camel husbandry

Hema Tripathi* & Devi Singh Rajput

Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Indian Veterinary Research Institute,

Izatanagar 243 122,Bareilly, Uttar Pradesh

E-mail: hematripathi1@yahoo.co.in; hematripathi@ivri.up.nic.in

Received 6 December 2004; revised 14 February 2005

The paper provides an overview on some customs and beliefs of Raika pastoralists related to camel husbandry. Qualitative information was collected from 60 camel owning Raika families from 4 selected villages of Bikaner district of Rajasthan. Camels play a central and identifying role in various rituals, customs, traditions and ceremonial functions. Camel rearing has influenced the culture life of the Raikas to a great extent. Their knowledge was based on practical experiences and superstitions. Traditionally, Raika neither sell camel milk nor other products like hair and hide. Sacrificing of camel for meat was found totally prohibited among them. Thus, relationship with camel was found to be more cultural rather than purely economic.

Key words: Raika pastoralists, Rabari tribe, Camel husbandry, Rajasthan

IPC Int. Cl.8: A01K11/00, A01K13/00, A61K35/00, A61K36/00