Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Special Issue: Indigenous Knowledge of the Ethnic people of Northeast India in Bio-resources Management

VOLUME 8

NUMBER 1

JANUARY 2009

 

CONTENTS

 

Traditional Knowledge of NE people on conservation of wild orchids

11

      RP Medhi & Syamali Chakrabarti

 

 

 

Traditional knowledge systems in large cardamom farming: biophysical and management diversity in Indian mountainous regions

17

      Ghanashyam Sharma, Rita Sharma & Eklabya Sharma

 

 

 

Traditional practices of ginger cultivation in Northeast India

23

      H Rahman, R Karuppaiyan, K Kishore & R Denzongpa

 

 

 

Conservation and management of plant genetic resources of Northeast India

29

      Pramod Tandon, Suman Kumaria & Laibadaiahun Nongrum

 

 

 

Indigenous Knowledge and practices of Tengal Kachari women in sustainable management of bari system of farming

35

      Madhumita Barooah & Ajit Pathak

 

 

 

Indigenous knowledge of Nyishi tribes on traditional agroforestry systems

41

      Sourabh Deb, A Arunachalam & AK Das

 

 

 

Role of traditional home garden systems in Northeast India

47

      S Tangjang & A Arunachalam

 

 

 

Indigenous lifestyles and biodiversity conservation issues in North Sikkim

51

      Usha Lachungpa

 

 

 

Indigenous Knowledge on Bio-resources Management for livelihood of the people of Sikkim

56

      JR Subba

 

 

 

Indigenous knowledge of Lepcha community for monitoring and conservation of birds

65

      Bhoj Kumar Acharya, Basundhara Chettri & Lalitha Vijayan

 

 

 

Indigenous knowledge of silkworm cultivation and its utilization in North Eastern region of India

70

      BG Unni, Manoshi Goswami, Yelena Kakoty, Minakshi Bhattacarjee, Swalang

      B Wann, Geethashri Rajkhowa, Sangeeta Das, Basab Rani Devi &

      Anamika Das Chutia

 

 

 

Traditional livelihood based on sheep grazing in the Khangchendzonga National Park, Sikkim

75

      Sandeep Tambe & GS Rawat

 

 

 

Ethnozoology of Galo tribe with special reference to edible insects in Arunachal Pradesh

81

      Dagyom Kato & Gopi GV

 

 

 

Traditional knowledge and natural dyeing system of Manipur – with special reference to Kum dye

84

      N Rajendro Singh, N Yaiphaba, Th David, RK Babita, Ch Bino Devi &

      N Rajmuhon Singh

 

 

 

Traditional knowledge of biopreservation of perishable vegetable and bamboo shoots in Northeast India as food resources

89

      Buddhiman Tamang & Jyoti Prakash Tamang

 

 

 

Plant wealth of Northeast India with reference to ethnobotany

96

      AA Mao, TM Hynniewta & M Sanjappa

 

 

 

Traditional Knowledge of the Himalayan people on production of Indigenous meat products

104

      Arun K Rai, Uma Palni & Jyoti Prakash Tamang

 

 

 

Traditional processing of Selroti, A cereal based ethnic fermented food of the Nepalis

110

      Hannah Yonzan & Jyoti Prakash Tamang

 

 

 

Traditional fermented foods of Manipur

115

      K Jeyaram, Th Anand Singh, W Romi, A Ranjita Devi, W Mohendro Singh,

      H Dayanidhi, N Rajmuhon Singh & JP Tamang

 

 

 

Indigenous knowledge of Northeast women on production of ethnic fermented soybean foods

122

      Jyoti Prakash Tamang, Rajen Chettri & Rudra Mani Sharma

 

 

 

Traditional healthcare practices among the Tagin tribe of Arunachal Pradesh

127

      Pranjiv Goswami, Dudam Soki, Anju Jaishi, Moushumi Das & Hirendra N Sarma

 

 

 

Conference Report

131

 

 

Book Review

134

 

 

Author Index

135

 

 

Subject Index

136

 

 

Forthcoming Conferences/Seminars

137

 

 

Guidelines to Authors

138

 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 8(1), January 2009, pp. 11-16

 

 

Traditional Knowledge of NE people on conservation of wild orchids

 

RP Medhi*& Syamali Chakrabarti

National Research Centre for Orchids (ICAR), Pakyong 737 106, East Sikkim

E-mail: nrcorchids@rediffmail.com

Received 04.08.2008; Revised 12.12.2008

The paper describes the information of the traditional knowledge of the people of Northeastern region to conserve the valuable wild orchid germplasm. Northeastern region of our country is the traditional home of near about 876 orchid species in 151 genera of which many species are economically important for their ornamental and medicinal values. The people of this region have a tradition of conservation of wild orchids in nature based on various religious beliefs and herbal healthcare.

Keywords: Orchids, Traditional knowledge, Northeastern region

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 8(1), January 2009, pp. 17-22

 

 

Traditional knowledge systems in large cardamom farming: biophysical and management diversity in Indian mountainous regions

Ghanashyam Sharma*1, Rita Sharma2 & Eklabya Sharma2

1City Pharmacy, Daragoan, Tadong, Gangtok 737 102, Sikkim; 2 International
Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD), GPO Box 3226, Kathmandu, Nepal

E-mail: banstolag@yahoo.co.in

Received 10.07.2008

Large cardamom (Amomum subulatum) is a perennial cash crop grown under the Himalayan alder (Alnus nepalensis) or mix forest tree species in the hills of Nepal, Darjeeling hills, Sikkim and Bhutan. The cardamom based agroforestry system in the Himalayas has proved to be a sustainable land use practice at the landscape level supporting multiple functions and ecosystem services.  Large cardamom agroforestry is a mountain adaptive slope land management and production system that helps conserving soil and water, maintain soil fertility and high rate of carbon sequestration than any other land use systems in the region. The system is a major contributor of sustainable development in the mountain region by providing socio-ecological sustainability, watershed functions, and cultural, educational and recreational values in additional to the employment opportunities in ecotourism. Some of the ecological functions of the system are habitat and corridor for wild animals, conduit of water, energy, gene flow, seeds, etc. barrier for wind, nutrients and animals, etc. while the system also help augmenting sustainability and well being of the upstream and downstream communities.

Keywords: Cardamom agroforestry, Traditional knowledge, Alnus nepalensis, Post-harvest management

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 8 (1), January 2009, pp 23-28

 

 

Traditional practices of ginger cultivation in Northeast India

H Rahman* R Karuppaiyan, K Kishore & R Denzongpa

ICAR Research Complex for NEH Region, Sikkim Centre, Gangtok 737 102, Sikkim

E-mail: hricar@gmail.com

Received 03.10.2008; Revised 11.12.2008

Ginger is an important cash crop in Northeast region. About 3 lakhs tonnes of ginger are being produced annually from 47,641 ha land and the Northeast region is emerging as India’s organic ginger hub. A large number of tribal farmers still practice the traditional methods of cultivation. Ginger is cultivated in jhum lands, buns, Zabo lands, terraced lands and in plains. In the traditional methods of cultivation, farmers rely on organic inputs, local resources and practices. The Northeast region is rich in ginger diversity. A large number of local cultivars like Bola ada, Moran ada, Jatia ada, Keki, Bazar local, Naga shing, Thingpuri, Shing Bhoi, Shing Bhukir, Khasi local, Tura, Thinglaidum, Thingpuidum, Thingria, Jugijan, Vichii, Nagaland local, Bhaise, Gorubathane, Jorethange, Nangrey, Majhauley, etc. are still grown. Ginger is raised as sole crop as well as intercrop. About 1.5-2.0 t seed rhizome are planted during March-April and about 6-8 t of green ginger are harvested per hectare. Removal of mother rhizome is a common practice in Sikkim. Marginal and tribal farmers mostly rely on ITKs for pest and disease management.

           Keywords: Ginger, Indigenous cultivation, Northeast India

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 8(1), January 2009, pp. 29-34

 

 

Conservation and management of plant genetic resources of Northeast India

Pramod Tandon*, Suman Kumaria & Laibadaiahun Nongrum

Plant Biotechnology Laboratory, Centre for Advanced Studies in Botany,

North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong 793 022, Meghalaya

E-mail: profptandon@yahoo.com, sumankhatrikumaria@hotmail.com

Received 30.09.2008; Revised 06.12.2008

The Northeast India region is rich in biodiversity due to high rainfall and plenty of sunlight coupled with unique bio-geographical positioning. It is known as the ‘Cradle of Flowering Plants’ because of remarkably rich and diverse flora. The valuable plant genetic resources of the region are being lost at an alarming rate due to varied human activities including shifting cultivation which have in turn led to the depletion of forest cover. Therefore, there is an urgent need for conservation, sustainable utilization and management of plant genetic resources of the region so as to meet the growing requirements of food, fodder, fibre, health, water and other needs.

Keywords: Plant diversity, Conservation, In vitro technologies, Molecular methods

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 8 (1), January 2009, pp 35-40

 

 

Indigenous knowledge and practices of Thengal Kachari women in sustainable management of bari system of farming

Madhumita Barooah* & Ajit Pathak

Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, Assam Agricultural University, Jorhat 785 013, Assam

E-mail: m17barooah@yahoo.co.in

Revised Received 01.12.2008; Received 04.10.2008

The Thengal-Kacharis, belonging to the Boro-Kachari ethnic groups are one of the most ancient inhabitants of Assam with rich tradition and cultural history. The bari or homestead gardening has had great significance from the point of conservation, consumption and management of biodiversity. Women of this community have played a key role in sustainable use of bari bioresources through various practices and knowledge systems that have been passed from generation to generation. In the paper, the crops diversity and their arrangement in a Thengal Kachari’s bari along with some the traditional practices followed in sustainable management of bari- bioresources have been discussed.

           Keywords:  Thengal Kachari, Bari, Northeast India, Bioresources, Traditional knowledge, Traditional farming, Preservation

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 8(1), January 2009, pp. 41-46

 

 

Indigenous knowledge of Nyishi tribes on traditional agroforestry systems

 

Sourabh Deb1*, A Arunachalam2 & AK Das3

1North Eastern Institute of Folk Medicine (NEIFM), Dept of AYUSH, Pasighat 791 102,
Arunachal Pradesh;
2Department of Forestry, North Eastern Regional Institute of Science and Technology (NERIST), Nirjuli,
Arunachal Pradesh;
3Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Assam University, Silchar 788 011, Assam

E-mail: sourabh_debin@yahoo.co.in

Revised: 05.12.2008

The ethno-botanically important species in traditional agroforests of Nyishi community of Arunachal Pradesh was studied during the year 2004-2005. The plants used by the local people for food, medicine and other ethnobotanical purposes including the utilization and related ethnobotanical aspects were assessed during the survey. A total of 80 useful plants belonging to 45 families and 69 genera were collected from 20 randomly selected agroforestry plots. Of the plants documented under 10 major categories, 47 species are used for food, 21 species are used in medicine and 35 species are used for other purposes.

Key words: Agroforestry, Nyishi community, Ethnomedicine, Conservation, Arunachal Pradesh

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 8(1), January 2009, pp. 47-50

 

 

Role of traditional home garden systems in Northeast India

S Tangjang1* & A Arunachalam2

1Department of Botany, Rajiv Gandhi University, Rono Hills 791 112, Arunachal Pradesh;
2Restoration Ecology Laboratory,
Department of Forestry, North Eastern Regional Institute of Science and Technology, Nirjuli 791 109, Arunachal Pradesh

E-mail: sumpam@gmail.com

Received: 29.09.2008

In Northeast India, traditional home gardens have been maintained as a part of rural survival over generations, with a complex vegetational structure harbouring diverse types of local plant species with multiple functions. Nonetheless, significant difference in species selection for traditional home gardens may primarily be due to altitudinal/climatic regime and also traditional beliefs and day-to-day requirements of the farming people. In the study, the role of three different farming communities (Nyishis, Apatanis and Kalitas) in the preservation and management of their traditional values, faith and indigenous knowledge system were studied.

Keywords: Ethnic community, Indigenous beliefs, Traditional home gardens, Nyishis, Apatanis, Kalitas

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 8 (1), January 2009, pp. 51-55

 

 

Indigenous lifestyles and biodiversity conservation issues in North Sikkim

Usha Lachungpa

Department of Forest, Environment and Wildlife Management, Government of Sikkim, Deorali, Gangtok 737 102, Sikkim

E-mail: ulachungpa@gmail.com

Received 28.07.2008; Revised 5.12.2008

Sikkim is a well known treasure trove and hotspot of biodiversity with most of its macro fauna and flora well documented over the last two centuries. The ethnic populace living in remoter areas of the state relies on an intimate knowledge of the local bio-resources for their survival in a harsh high altitude environment. Over time this has been seen as the only means of their survival. Lack of any systematic documentation in written form and reliance on oral tradition along with recent development and modernization activities is leading to irretrievable loss of this ancient wisdom.

Studies of three short projects in North Sikkim to document some of the biogeographic history including some of the traditional methods of wildlife conservation and subsistence lifestyles among the truly nomadic Dokpas in the cold desert and partially trans-humant Bhutia tribals of Lachen and Lachung valleys, who practice the Dzumsa traditional system of administration were conducted. Some of the management practices now degrading rapidly were more for sustainable use than conservation per se, and thus not in harmony with the present legal systems of the state and country. It is proposed that part of this area be declared as a trans-boundary Conservation Reserve to achieve the dual objective of conservation through sustainable use and equitable sharing of both bioresources and traditional knowledge.

Keywords:   Sikkim, Dokpas, Lachen, Lachung, Dzumsa, Bhutia, Cold desert, Trans Himalaya, Biodiversity conservation

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 8(1), January 2009, pp. 56-64

 

 

Indigenous knowledge on bio-resources management for livelihood of the people of Sikkim

J R Subba

5th Mile, Tadong 737102, Sikkim

Receive 9 August 2008; revised 1 December 2008

Sikkim is not self-sufficient in food production due to limited land availability for cultivation and lower level of productivity affected by constraining mountain specificities such as inaccessibility, fragility and marginality. The people are rich in indigenous knowledge on bio-resources and supplemented their food from the wild plants and animals in the beginning. Now, fifteen types of indigenous farming systems have been identified, and these farming systems and wild boi-resource supplements have been described along with field verification study.

          Keywords: Food bio-resources, Zhum cultivation, Farming systems

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 8(1), January 2009, pp. 65-69

 

 

Indigenous knowledge of Lepcha community for monitoring and
conservation of birds

Bhoj Kumar Acharya*1, Basundhara Chettri1 & Lalitha Vijayan2

1Department of Zoology, Sikkim Government College, Tadong 737 102, Sikkim; Sàlim Ali Centre for Ornithology and Natural History, Anaikatty, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu

E-mail: acharya2skm@gmail.com

Received on 06-09.2008

The non-professional volunteers are commonly used in biodiversity assessment due to lack of experts. The bird identification skills of indigenous Lepcha community have been recognized and the accuracy of data generated by them has been assesed. Bird sampling was done using point count method along the transects in three locations in Dzongu, North Sikkim. Two observers, a trained ‘researcher’ and a local Lepcha folk referred as citizen scientist independently sampled birds (species by former and varieties by the latter). The mean number of species and varieties per point was not significantly different from each other. Gross accuracy of data collected by citizen scientist was high. These results showed that indigenous taxonomic knowledge of Lepcha community can be applied for biodiversity assessment programme provided the individual biasness of lumping and splitting is taken care.

           Keywords: Biodiversity, Birds, Dzongu, Himalaya, Indigenous knowledge, Lepcha

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 8(1), January 2009, pp. 70-74

 

 

Indigenous knowledge of silkworm cultivation and its utilization in
North Eastern region of India

 

BG Unni*, Manoshi Goswami, Yelena Kakoty, Minakshi Bhattacarjee, Swalang B Wann, Geethashri Rajkhowa,
Sangeeta Das, Basab Rani Devi & Anamika Das Chutia

Biotechnology Department (Biochemistry & Molecular Biology Laboratory), North-East Institute of Science & Technology (CSIR), Jorhat 785 006, Assam

E-mail: bgunni@rrljorhat.res.in,bgunni@yahoo.com

Received 22.09.2008; Revised 05.12.2008

The vegetation of Northeastern region is unique being characterized as one of the richest flora in the world, which produces a variety of products. Northeastern India has the highest number of endemic plants, animal and microbial species. Many sericigenous insects along with their food plants are endemic to this region. Sericulture and weaving are part of the cultural heritage of the Northeastern region and is one of the most promising income sources to this region without spending much for its cultivation.

     Keywords: Silkworm cultivation, Sericulture, Silk fiber, Northeast India

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 8(1), January 2009, pp. 75-80

 

 

Traditional livelihood based on sheep grazing in the Khangchendzonga national park, Sikkim

Sandeep Tambe* & GS Rawat

Gram Vikas Bhawan, Near Tashiling Secretariat, Gangtok 737 101, Sikkim;
Department of Habitat Ecology, Wildlife Institute of India, Dehradun 248 001, Uttarakhand

E-mail: sandeep_tambe@yahoo.com

Revised 01.12.2008

The Khangchendzonga National Park, located in Sikkim is a part of the Eastern Himalaya biodiversity hotspot. Traditional sheep herding practices in the park based on village consultations and field surveys to understand the population trend, migration pattern, fodder preferences, incomes and benefit sharing, ecological impacts and risk mitigation techniques were analysed. The study revealed that traditionally sheep in the greater Himalayas and sheep and yak in the trans-Himalaya have been grazed in the national park. However, over the last six decades, sheep population declined rapidly and has been increasingly replaced by the larger bodied livestock, yaks and horses. The shepherds traditionally performed long distance migration and timed their movement to match with seasonal fodder resource availability thus minimizing their grazing impacts. The flock size was small and the herders earned subsistence level of incomes from the sale of lambs and wool. The extant shepherd community possess immense traditional knowledge about the fodder resources, medicinal plants and wildlife. Nutrient analysis of the fodder plants was found to support the traditional wisdom of the shepherds. Recognition of their skills and making them partners in conservation by the park management has been proposed.

           Keywords:  Herding, Grazing, Forage, Sustainable development, Eastern Himalaya, Participatory conservation, Traditional knowledge

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 8(1), January 2009, pp. 81-83

 

Ethnozoology of Galo tribe with special reference to edible insects in
Arunachal Pradesh

 

Dagyom Kato* & Gopi GV

GB Pant Institute of Himalayan Environment & Development, North East Unit, Vivek Vihar, Itanagar, Arunachal Pradesh

Email: kato_d@rediffmail.com; gopigv@gmail.com

Received 29.09.2008; Revised 08.12.2008

The paper explored the diversity of edible insects, collection patterns and temporal availability in the West Siang district of Arunachal Pradesh, Northeast India. The district is inhabited by the Galo, Adi, Memba and Khamba tribes. However, the study only explored the ethnozoology of Galo tribe. The study reveals that the community consumed a total of 12 species belonging majorly to Hymenopterans and Hemipteran order, excluding 4 unidentified species belonging to 10 genera and 8 families. Consumptions of insects showed that 61.11% are at larval stage followed by mature (16.67%), and 11.11% of adult and hive, respectively. Most of the insects are available in between August to September months.

           Keywords:  Galo tribe, Edible insects, Hymenopterans, Hemipteran, Ethnozoology, Arunachal Pradesh

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 8(1), January 2009, pp. 84-88

 

 

Traditional knowledge and natural dyeing system of Manipur – with special reference to Kum dye

 

N Rajendro Singh1, N Yaiphaba2, Th David2, RK Babita2, Ch Bino Devi2 & N Rajmuhon Singh2*

1Central Agricultural University, Iroisemba, Imphal, Manipur & Manipur Development Society (Kangla Emporium), RIMS Road, Imphal, Manipur; 2Department of Chemistry, Manipur University, Canchipur 795 003, Manipur

E-mail: rajmuhon@yahoo.co.in

Revised: 05.12.2008

The Meitei women practice dyeing in Manipur using varieties of plant leaves, flowers and tree barks. However, the use of kum (Strobilanthus flaccidifolius) is more significant than any other type of vegetable dyes because of its superior quality than the others. The paper focus on the traditional knowledge and traditional dyeing system in Manipur emphasizing on the preparations of kum dye and preparation of dyes of different colours using kum.

Keywords: Manipur, Natural dyes, Kum, Traditional knowledge

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 8(1), January 2009, pp. 89-95

 

 

Traditional knowledge of biopreservation of perishable vegetable and bamboo shoots in Northeast India as food resources

Buddhiman Tamang* & Jyoti Prakash Tamang

Food Microbiology Laboratory, Department of Botany, Sikkim Government College, Sikkim University, Tadong 737102, Sikkim

E-mail: jyoti_tamang@htmail.com

Received 10.11.2008

Biopreservation of perishable vegetables is a native skill of Northeast Indian women. Lactic acid fermentation is the actual mechanism involve in the biopreservation process of perishable vegetable and bamboo shoots. Some ethnic fermented vegetables of Northeast India are gundruk, sinki, goyang, inziangsang, khalpi, anishi, etc. and ethnic fermented bamboo shoot products are mesu, soidon, soibum, soijim, ekung, eup, hiring, and lung-siej.

Keywords: Ethnic fermented vegetables, Biopreservation, LAB, Gundruk, Sinki, Goyang, Khalpi, Inziangsang, Mesu, Soidon, Soibum, Soijim, Ekung, Eup, Hirring, Lung-siej, Anishi, Northeast India

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 8(1), January 2009, pp. 96-103

 

 

Plant wealth of Northeast India with reference to ethnobotany

AA Mao1,*, TM Hynniewta2 & M Sanjappa3

1Botanical Survey of India, Arunachal Field Station, Itanagar 791 111, Arunachal Pradesh;
2Botanical Survey of India, Eastern Circle, Laitumkhrah, Shillong 793 003, Meghalaya;
3Botanical Survey of India, Kolkata 700 064

Received 27.08.2008; Revised 14.12.2008

The paper highlights the rich plant resources and the vast wealth of ethnobotanical information available with the various tribes of the region. A brief review of ethnobotanical and traditional knowledge system reports published by various workers from the region is given. It also highlights some important medicinal plants and its status in the wild and also discussed on the need for harnessing the rich bio-resources and translating it to economic products.

Keywords: Plant resources, Ethnobotanical wealth, Northeast India

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 8 (1), January 2009, pp. 104-109

 

 

Traditional knowledge of the Himalayan people on production of indigenous meat products

Arun K Rai1, Uma Palni2 & Jyoti Prakash Tamang1*

1Food Microbiology Laboratory, Department of Botany, Sikkim Government College, Sikkim University, Tadong 737102, Sikkim; 2Department of Botany, DSB Campus, Kumaun University, Nainital 263002, Uttarakhand

E-mail: jyoti_tamang@hotmail.com

Received 14.July 2008

Ethnic people of the Himalayan regions of India, Nepal, Bhutan and China (Tibet) prepare various types of indigenous meat products using their traditional knowledge. Some of these ethnic meat products such as sausages and dried or smoked meats are sold in local markets contributing to local economy. There is no literature on traditional processing of indigenous meat products of the Himalayas. The paper is aimed to document the traditional knowledge of the ethnic Himalayan people on preparation of various traditionally processed sausages and meat products such as kargyong, kheuri, satchu, suka ko masu, chilu, chartayshya, gemma and arjia.

        Keywords: Traditional knowledge, Indigenous meat products, Himalayas

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 8(1), January 2009, pp. 110-114

 

 

Traditional processing of Selroti―A cereal based ethnic fermented food of the Nepalis

Hannah Yonzan & Jyoti Prakash Tamang*

Food Microbiology Laboratory, Department of Botany, Sikkim Government College, Sikkim University,
Gangtok 737102, Sikkim

E-mail: jyoti_tamang@hotmail.com

Received on 23.07.2008

The Nepali communities of the Himalayan regions of India, Nepal and Bhutan prepare a cereal-based fermented food, Selroti using their indigenous knowledge. This paper is aimed to document the traditional knowledge of the ethnic Himalayan people on preparation of Selroti and its ethnical importance.

Keywords: Traditional knowledge, Selroti, Traditional food, Fermented food

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 8 (1), January 2009, pp 115-121

 

 

Traditional fermented foods of Manipur

K Jeyaram1*, Th Anand Singh1, W Romi1, A Ranjita Devi1,3, W Mohendro Singh1,
H Dayanidhi2, N Rajmuhon Singh2 & JP Tamang3

1Microbial Resources Division, Institute of Bioresources and Sustainable Development,
Takeylpat Institutional Area, Imphal 795001, Manipur;
2Department of Chemistry, Manipur University, Canchipur 795003, Manipur;
3Food Microbiology Laboratory, Sikkim University, Tadong 737102, Gangtok, Sikkim

E-mail: saccharomyces@rediffmail.com

Received 03.08.2008

In Manipur, traditional fermented soybean (Hawaijar), bamboo shoot products (Soibum/Soijim, Soidon), fish products (Ngari, Hentak), mustard leaf extract (Ziang Sang, Ziang Dui) and fermented beverages, viz. Atingba and fruit wines have been consumed as a regular food in different recipes over a long period of time. These household arts are handed down through generation by generation. In the study, the traditional preparation processes of fermented foods of Manipur were documented.

       Keywords:  Traditional foods, Traditional fermented foods, Manipur, Hawaijar, Soibum/ Soijim, Soidon,   Ngari,  Hentak, Hamei, Atingba,Ziang Sang

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 8(1), January 2009, pp. 122-126

 

 

Indigenous knowledge of Northeast women on production of
ethnic fermented soybean foods

 

Jyoti Prakash Tamang*, Rajen Chettri & Rudra Mani Sharma

Food Microbiology Laboratory, Department of Botany, Sikkim Government College, Sikkim University,
Tadong 737 102, Sikkim

E-mail: jyoti_tamang@hotmail.com

Received 12:11:2008

Several ethnic communities of Northeast India have invented the traditional technology of converting protein rich soybeans into flavoured fermented food with easy digestibility and bio-nutrients. This is exclusively carried out by the ethnic women in Sikkim, Manipur, Meghalaya, Nagaland, Mizoram and Arunachal Pradesh. Worth native knowledge of these women has been documented and six sticky fermented soybean foods have been listed out which include kinema, hawaijar, tungrymbai, aakhone, bekang and peruyyan.

     Keywords:   Ethnic fermented soybean foods, Fermented foods, Northeast India, Kinema, Hawaijar,  Tungrymbai, Aakhone, Bekang, Peruyyan

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 8(1), January 2009, pp. 127-130

 

 

Traditional healthcare practices among the Tagin tribe of Arunachal Pradesh

Pranjiv Goswami, Dudam Soki, Anju Jaishi, Moushumi Das & Hirendra N Sarma*

Department of Zoology, Center with potential for excellence in Biodiversity,
Rajiv Gandhi University, Itanagar
791 112, Arunachal Pradesh

Email. hnsarma@yahoo.co.in

Received 29.09.2008; Revised 04.12.2008

The Tagin tribe is an indigenous group of people living at upper Subansiri district of Arunachal Pradesh. A study on practice of Traditional Medicine (TM) was carried out among these people. The result documented 10 medicinal plants used by the Traditional Medicinal Practitioner (TMS) of Tagin tribe for use in traditional medicine. Fresh leaves, fruits, bark and stems are reported be used in TM for treatment of ailments like diarrhoea, jaundice, wound healing, fever, etc.

Keywords: Tagin tribe, Upper Subansiri, Traditional medicine, Arunachal Pradesh