NATURAL PRODUCT RADIANCE

A Bimonthly Journal on Natural Products

Total visitors: 840  since 15-09-06

 

VOLUME 5

NUMBER 4

July -August  2006

 

 Contents

 

Editorial                                                                                                                261

 

Research Articles/Articles

Antibacterial activity of Athyrium pectinatum (Wall.) Presl.
Pradeep Parihar, Leena Parihar
and Achaleshwar Bohra
IPC code; Int. cl.7  ¾ A61K 35/78, A61P 31/04                                                       262

 

 

Antitussive effect of Cuminum cyminum Linn. in guinea pigs

Mohammad Hossin Boskabady, Sahar Kiani, Hoda Azizi and Tahereh Khatami

IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾ A61K 35/78, A61P 11/14                                                   266

 

 

Non-saccharide natural intense sweeteners – An overview of current status

S J Surana, S B Gokhale, R A Rajmane and R B Jadhav

IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾ A61K 35/78, A23L 2/60                                                     270

 

 

Tulsi: The Indian holy power plant

Subir Kumar Das and D M Vasudevan

IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾ A61K 35/78, A61P, A61P 3/00, A61P 29/00, A61P 31/04, 

A61P 37/02, A61P 39/00                                                                                     279

 

 

Zinc in Ayurvedic herbo-mineral products

Ashok Kumar Panda and Suvendu Rout

IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾ A61K 33/30                                                                       284

 

 

Solid state fermentation of apple pomace for the production of value added products

V K Joshi and Devender Attri

IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾ C12F 3/00, C12S 3/00, C12S 3/14                                   289

 

 

Some pteridophytes of medicinal importance from Rajasthan

Pradeep Parihar and Leena Parihar  
IPC code; Int. cl.7  ¾ A61K 35/78                                                                        297     

 

Green page: Research Articles/Articles

 

Wild edible fruits of Tripura

M Sankaran, Jai Prakash, N P Singh and A Suklabaidya

IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾ A23L 1/00                                                                        302

 

 

Morels (Morchella spp.) in Kumaun Himalaya

Chandra Singh Negi

IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾A01G 1/04, A61K 35/84, A23L 1/00                                306

 

 

Establishment and Economic evaluation of micropropagated Jeewanti  

(Leptadenia reticulata Wight & Arn.) plants in field

N S Shekhawat, A Kackar, M S Rathore, M Singh, H R Dagla and Vinod Arya

IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾ A01H 5/04, A61K 35/78                                                  311

 

 

Explorer: Research Articles/Article

Herbal abortifacients used in North Maharashtra

R G Mali, J C Hundiwale, R S Gavit, D A Patil and K S Patil

IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾ A61 K 35/78, A61P 15/04                                               315

 

 

Folk medicines for some diseases prevalent in Lakhimpur district of Brahmaputra valley, Assam

Dilip Kalita and Bikash Deb

IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾  A61K 35/78                                                                    319

 

 

Ethnobotany of Butea monosperma (Lam.) Kuntze in North Maharashtra, India
M V Patil, Shubhangi Pawar and DA Patil
IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾ A61 K 35/78                                                                      323

 

 

Review Article

Plants as natural antioxidants

Vivek Kumar Gupta and Surendra Kumar Sharma

IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾ A61 K 35/78, A61P 39/06                                               326

 

 

Readers Write                                                                                                 260

Book Reviews                                                                                                  335

Forthcoming Conferences                                                                                336

Guidelines to Authors                                                                                       337

Subscription Form                                                                                             339

Index                                                                                                                 340

 

 

Readers Write

Herbal treatment for HIV infection

 

Dear Editor, through this column I would like to popularize my findings on the treatment of HIV infection and AIDS. I have pleasure to claim for the first time that eating fresh, young and tender leaves of Heibam/Heipal (Ficus palmata Forsk.; Family Moraceae) or its decoction preferably at a dose of 50g thrice daily with plain water and cooked peas for 4 to 6 months with out potato and interruption can inactivate HIV, checking mobility of the virus by action of gummy secretion of the Heibam. It is very effective and also cures AIDS related cancer. Hopefully, people who are in active research would like to do further research. The information has already been sent to TIFAC, Patent office, Kolkata and published in English dailies in the interest of the public.

Ch. Binod Singh

Keinou (Thongkha), Tiddim Road

P. O. Nambol, Manipur-795134

 

Healthy ‘Pan-drink’

 

Dear Editor, through this column I would like to share my findings on the preparation of a healthy and natural drink from Pan i.e. Betel leaves (Piper betle Linn.) for further studies. Generally people of Bengal carry the betel leaves with them and chew the same to get relief from indigestion. Besides treating indigestion the leaves are used locally to stimulate the appetite and relieve flatulence and act as a general tonic. Since there is no doubt about its palatability, preparation of a health drink was attempted. The method and ingredients are very simple and homely. Freshly collected leaves were washed thoroughly with cold and hot water both. The juice was extracted by crusher machine and then the juice was dechlorophyllated by the centrifuged machine. For making it tasty ingredients like citric acid, cumin, ginger, pepper, rock salt and sugar were added proportionately. This is a poor mans drink useful as a blood purifier, for reduction of body fat, cold, cough, toothache, bad smell of mouth, etc. This drink may be prepared commercially after further research.

 

Dr Ashis Ghosh

C/o Tushar Dutta

I/E-5, Mitra Compound

PO & Dt. Paschim Medinipur-721 101

West Bengal

 

 

                       

 
 
 
Research Articles/Articles

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.5, July- Aug 2006, 262-265

 

Antibacterial activity of Athyrium pectinatum (Wall.) Presl.

Pradeep Parihar1*, Leena Parihar1 and Achaleshwar Bohra2

Aqueous and alcoholic extracts of plant parts of Athyrium pectinatum (Wall.) Presl. were tested against the growth of some human and plant pathogenic bacteria like, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Escherichia coli, Salmonella arizonae, Salmonella typhi and Staphylococcus aureus. Nearly all the extracts were found effective against these bacteria. The positive results so obtained were compared with that of the reference standard antibiotic (Tetracycline). It was found that extracts when mixed in equal proportion with the antibiotic were more effective against bacteria than the antibiotic alone.

Key words: Antibacterial activity, Athyrium pectinatum, Ferns, Pteridophytes.

IPC code; Int. cl.7  ¾  A61P 31/04

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.5, July- Aug 2006, 266-269

 

Antitussive effect of Cuminum cyminum Linn. in guinea pigs
Mohammad Hossin Boskabady*, Sahar Kiani, Hoda Azizi and Tahereh Khatami

       

        Several therapeutic effects including the effect on asthma and dyspnoea have been described for the seeds of cumin, Cuminum cyminum Linn. In the present study the antitussive effect of this plant was evaluated. The antitussive effects of aerosols of two different concentrations of aqueous and macerated extracts, Codeine and saline were tested  on guinea pigs by counting the number of coughs produced due to aerosol of citric acid 10 minutes after exposing animal to aerosols of different solutions (n=5 for each solution). The results showed significant reduction of cough number in the presence of both concentrations of aqueous and macerated extracts and Codeine (P<0.01 to P<0.001). The cough number observed in the presence of higher concentrations of aqueous and macerated extracts were not significantly different than those of lower concentrations. In addition, there was no significant difference between cough numbers observed in the presence of both concentrations of extracts with that of Codeine. These results indicated an antitussive effect of cumin which was comparable to that of Codeine.

Keywords: Cuminum cyminum, Cumin, Antitussive, Citric acid, Codeine.

IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾ A 61 K 35/78, A61P 11/14

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.5, July- Aug 2006, 270-278

 

Non-saccharide natural intense sweeteners – An overview of current status
S J Surana, S B Gokhale, R A Rajmane and R B Jadhav*

 

The global consumption of herbs as medicine, nutraceuticals, food additives, cosmaceuticals, etc. is increasing rapidly. One of such area of high commercial potential is non-saccharide sweeteners. Numerous compounds of plant origin are reported to have different degree of sweetness. In the light of limitations of currently marketed synthetic sweeteners as well as drastic reduction of high-calorific sugar consumption especially in developed countries, an area of low-calorific, non-saccharide natural sweeteners is gaining tremendous commercial significance. However, in recent past non-saccharide natural sweeteners gone through several ups and downs, therefore, before commercialization of non-saccharide natural sweeteners for both pharmaceutical as well as food industry, it needs to undergo rigorous evaluations. The present paper is a compilation of information on non-saccharide intense natural sweeteners derived from plant metabolites.

 

Key words: Plant metabolites, Non-nutritive intense sweeteners, Natural sweeteners, Intense sweeteners.

IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾ A61K 35/78, A23L 2/60

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.5, July- Aug 2006, 279-283

 

Tulsi: The Indian holy power plant
Subir Kumar Das* and D M Vasudevan

Tulsi (Ocimum sanctum Linn.) herb has been known from as early as the Vedic period. Its extract has numerous pharmacological activities like hypoglycaemic, immunomodulatory, antistress, analgesic, antipyretic, anti-inflammatory, anti-ulcerogenic, antihypertensive, CNS depressant, radioprotective, antitumour and antibacterial. The active constituents of the herb include volatile oil chiefly eugenol and b-caryophyllene, flavonoids and a number of other components present in fixed oil. This article outlines the present knowledge of pharmacological and other studies on this plant.

 

Keywords: Ocimum sanctum, Tulsi, Holy Basil, Medicinal plant, Antimicrobial, Hypoglycaemic, Hypolipidemic, Immunomodulatory, Anti-stress, Antioxidant, Anti-inflammatory, Anti-ulcerogenic, Chemopreventive.

 

IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾  A61K 35/78, A61P 3/00, A61P 29/00, A61P 31/04, A61P 37/02, A61P 39/00

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.5, July- Aug 2006, 284-288

 

Zinc in Ayurvedic herbo-mineral products
Ashok Kumar Panda1* and Suvendu Rout2

 

Zinc is a trace element and plays a vital role in all physiological processes in human. It has been introduced as a drug in the prevention and treatments of diseases since last two decades. The Ayurvedic physicians have practiced both oral and topical applications of zinc after sodhana (purification) and marana (calcification) before 14th century A.D. Rasaka or Kharpara (zinc ore or zinc carbonate), Yasada (zinc metal), Puspanjana (zinc oxide) and Pittala (brass) are zinc-containing minerals used as therapeutic agents in Ayurveda. Rasaka or Kharpara are found in most (20 i.e. 66.66%) of the formulations, Yasada (zinc metal) in 5 (16.66%), Pittala (brass) in 4 (13.33%) and Puspanjana (zinc oxide) is used in one formulation. Therapeutic uses of zinc in Ayurveda and modern system of medicine have been discussed in this paper.

 

Keywords: Alchemy, Bhasma, Yasada, Zinc metal, Puspanjana, Zinc oxide, Pittala, Brass, Rasaka or Kharpara, Zinc ore, Zinc carbonate.

IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾ A61K 33/30

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.5, July- Aug 2006, 289-296

 

Solid state fermentation of apple pomace for the production of value added products
V K Joshi* and Devender Attri

 

Food industry in general, generates a large quantity of waste (i.e. peel, seed, pomace, rags, kernels, etc.) which is biodegradable in nature. Due to richness in carbohydrates, dietary fibres and minerals, such wastes have the potential to support the growth of microorganisms involved in the production of various products. Laboratory scale solid state fermentation (SSF) of waste from apple processing industry revealed the possibility of production of several value added products. Solid state fermentation of apple pomace by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and removal of ethanol followed by drying increase the nitrogen and fat content in the fermented and dried apple pomace for use as an animal feed. S. cerevisiae, in sequential interactive culture improve the soluble protein content of the fermented apple pomace. The product (animal feed) could successfully be fed to the poultry after mixing with standard feed in the ratio of 1:1. SSF of apple pomace using Aspergillus niger yield pectin esterase enzyme much more than submerged fermentation. Production of different biocolours by fermentation with Chromobacter sp., Sarcina sp., Rhodotorula sp. and Micrococcus sp. is possible along with citric acid production in SSF by A. niger, all having commercial value. Apple pomace utilization can become a model for the value addition of similar wastes and development of solid state fermenter and downstream processing will go a long way in developing technology from laboratory to pilot scale. In present paper authors have summarized various research reports and their work on solid state fermentation of apple pomace and the production of value added products.

 

Keywords: Apple pomace, Solid State Fermentation, Ethanol, Animal feed, Pectinases, Microbial colours, Microorganisms, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Aspergillus niger, Sarcina, Chromobacter, Micrococcus, Rhodotorula.

 

IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾ C12F 3/00, C12S 3/00, C12S 3/14

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.5, July- Aug 2006, 297-301

 

Some pteridophytes of medicinal importance from Rajasthan
Pradeep Parihar* and Leena Parihar

 

Pteridophytes (fern and fern allies) by virtue of their possessing great variety and fascinating foliage have drawn the attention and admiration of horticulturists and plant lovers for centuries. They are represented by about 305 genera, comprising more than 10,000 species all over the world. About 191 genera and more than 1000 species are reported from India. Medicinal value of pteridophytes is known to man for more than 2000 years. In the present article an attempt has been made to compile the pharmacological, clinical and medicinal uses of some common pteridophytes available in Rajasthan. This group of plants has least been exploited for the medicinal purpose, hence this article may be useful for further exploration of ferns and fern allies found in this area.

 

Keywords: Pteridophytes, Medicinal plants, Pharmacological use.

IPC code; Int. cl.7  ¾ A61K 35/78

 

Green Page: Research Articles/Articles

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.5, July- Aug 2006, 302-305

 

Wild edible fruits of Tripura
M Sankaran*, Jai Prakash, N P Singh and A Suklabaidya

 

                Tripura is one of the eight jewels of the North-Eastern States and the state weather is characterized by subtropical, warm and humid condition, which favours the luxuriant growth of various edible fruit crops. In addition to the major fruits grown (Mango, Litchi, Pineapple, Orange, Banana and Jackfruit) in this state, there are many edible fruits exist naturally in forest as well as in cultivable areas. These fruit plants are playing a vital role in providing nutritional and economic security to the poor masses in rural areas but the commercial importance and market value of these wild fruits is unknown to them.  This paper lists the wild edible fruits and their uses for further exploration.

 

Keywords: Fruits, Wild edible fruits, Genetic resources, Tripura.

IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾ A23L 1/00

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.5, July- Aug 2006, 306-310

 

Morels (Morchella spp.) in Kumaun Himalaya
Chandra Singh Negi

 

Morels, also known as sponge mushrooms, belong to the genus Morchella Dill. The present paper deals with the most commonly exploited species of this genus in the Darma valley, district Pithoragarh, Kumaun Himalaya with an aim to improve upon the knowledge base about these macrofungi for further exploration.

 

Key words: Morels, Morchella spp., Kumaun Himalaya, Edible fungi, Medicinal fungi, Sponge Mushrooms.

IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾A01G 1/04, A61K 35/84, A23L 1/00.

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.5, July- Aug 2006, 311-314

 

Establishment and Economic evaluation of micropropagated Jeewanti (Leptadenia reticulata Wight & Arn.) plants in field 
N S Shekhawat*, A Kackar, M S Rathore, M Singh, H R Dagla and Vinod Arya

            Leptadenia reticulata Wight & Arn. is an important medicinal plant. There is heavy demand of the plant and its biomass which can not be fulfilled by the natural/ present practices of propagation. Natural propagation of this plant is poor and the plant is threatened in nature. Thus, there is a need for applying biotechnological methods for large scale propagation. Micropropagation studies were carried out by the authors on explants. Multiple shoots were differentiated on Murashige and Skoog’s (MS) medium containing 5.0 mg/litre 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP). The shoots further multiplied on MS medium + 1.5 mg/litre BAP and 0.5 mg/litre kinetin (KN) and the cloned shoots, treated with 200 mg/litre of Indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), rooted ex vitro. The plantlets were transferred to bottles containing soilrite moistened with half-strength MS macro salts. The hardened plants were transferred to polybags and kept in shade house for acclimatization. Subsequently field trials were carried out at villages Manai (Jodhpur) and Kachholi (Sirohi) of Rajasthan. In the present paper establishment of micropropagated plants, cultivation, growth and net profit from biomass produced has been reported for environmental conditions of Rajasthan. Total dry biomass harvested was 2800 kg/acre/ for first year and 3000 kg/acre/for second year.

 

Keywords: Leptadenia reticulata, Jeewanti, Micropropagation, Medicinal plant, Nodal segments, Ex vitro, Field trials, Economic evaluation.

IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾ A01H 5/04, A61K 35/78

 

 

Explorer: Research Articles

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.5, July- Aug 2006, 315-318

Herbal abortifacients used in North Maharashtra

R G Mali1*, J C Hundiwale1, R S Gavit1, D A Patil2 and K S Patil3

 

Present study was carried out to document plant-based preparations used as abortifacient in three district of North Maharashtra. Data were collected by interviewing local traditional medicinemen, tribals as well as rural people of different villages. A total of twenty claims were obtained. Information on local names, plant parts and different forms of preparations used were also recorded and are reported in the present paper.

Keywords: Abortifacient, Medicinal plants, Ethnomedicine, North Maharashtra.

IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾ A61 K 35/78, A61P 15/04.

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.5, July- Aug 2006, 319-322

Folk medicines for some diseases prevalent in Lakhimpur district of Brahmaputra valley, Assam

Dilip Kalita1* and Bikash Deb2

An attempt has been made to prepare a list of folk medicines invariably used by Bejes (medicine men) and Bejinis (medicine women) for treating 10 different diseases namely abdominal pain, abscess, allergy, amebiasis, asthma, backache, fungal infection of nail, lice control, piles and pinworm infection which are prevalent in some rural areas of Lakhimpur district of Brahmaputra valley, Assam. Information on twenty two plant species is given in this paper for further studies.

 

Keywords: Folk medicines, Bejes, Bejinis, Brahmaputra valley, Barak valley, Lakhimpur, Assam.

IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾  A61K 35/78

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.5, July- Aug 2006, 323-325

 

Ethnobotany of Butea monosperma (Lam.) Kuntze in North Maharashtra, India

M V Patil1, Shubhangi Pawar2 and DA Patil3*

Butea monosperma (Lam.) Kuntze, is an important multipurpose tree used for medicine, food, fibre and few other miscellaneous purposes. In North Maharashtra it is employed  in about for total 26 different uses, of which nearly 18 are hitherto unreported from other parts of India. The plant parts are used in the form of extract, juice, infusion, powder and gum. These uses are noteworthy for further studies on modern scientific lines.

Keywords: Ethnobotany, Butea monosperma, Flame of Forest, Palas, Dhak, North Maharashtra.

 

IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾ A61 K 35/78

 

Review Article

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.5, July- Aug 2006, 326-335

Plants as natural antioxidants

Vivek Kumar Gupta1 and Surendra Kumar Sharma2*

                Oxygen free radicals induce damage due to peroxidation to biomembranes and also to DNA, which lead to tissue damage, thus cause occurrence of a number of diseases. Antioxidants neutralise the effect of free radicals through different ways and may prevent the body from various diseases. Antioxidants may be synthetic or natural. Synthetic antioxidants such as butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) have recently been reported to be dangerous for human health. Thus, the search for effective, non-toxic natural compounds with antioxidative activity has been intensified in recent years. The present review includes a brief account of research reports on plants with antioxidant potential.

 

Keywords: Reactive Oxygen Species, Antioxidant, Free radicals, Oxidative stress, Natural antioxidants.

 

IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾ A61 K 35/78, A61P 39/06.