NATURAL PRODUCT RADIANCE

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VOLUME 5

NUMBER 2

March-April 2006

 

 

CONTENTS

 

Editorial                                                                                                                      89

Research Articles/Articles

Production of fermented cereal powders

    D I Olorunfemi, A P O Dede and M Idu
    IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾ A23L 1/10, A23L 1/105                                                             90

 

Survival and infectivity of entomopathogenic nematodes in alginate gel formulations

 against rice meal moth larva, Corcyra cephalonica Stainton

    R Umamaheswari, M Sivakumar and S Subramanian

    IPC code; Int. cl.7 — A01N 1/00, A01N 63/00                                                           95

 

Wound healing activity of Cordia dichotoma Forst. f. fruits

    I J Kuppast and P Vasudeva Nayak

    IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾ A61K 35/78, A61P 17/02                                                          99

 

Protective effect of Syzygium cuminii (Linn.) Skeels seed extract on lipid peroxidation in alloxan induced diabetic rats

    P Krishnamoorthy, S Vaithinathan and A Bhuvaneswari

    IPC code; Int. cl.7 — A61K 35/78, A61P 3/10, A61P 39/06                                       103

 

Little known uses of common aquatic plant, Hydrilla verticillata (Linn. f.) Royle

    D K Pal and S B Nimse

    IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾ A61K 35/78, A23L 1/00                                                           108

 

An avowal of importance of endangered tree Oroxylum indicum (Linn.) Vent.

M Gokhale and Y K Bansal

IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾ A61K 35/78, A01G 23/00                                                             112

 

Coastal vegetation ––An underexplored source of anticancer drugs

    K Kathiresan, N Sithranga Boopathy and S Kavitha

    IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾ A61K 35/78, A61P 35/00                                                          115

                                                  

Green Page: Research Articles/Articles

 

Effect of varying levels of nitrogen and phosphorus on growth and yield of the 

medicinal plant, Alpinia galanga Willd.

    S Hussain, A Sharma, P K Singh and D K Hore

    IPC code; Int. cl.7 — A01G 1/00, A61K 35/78, C11B 9/00                                       120

 

 

Acokanthera oppositifolia (Lam.) Codd.— An ornamental poisonous plant

    Sandeep Kumar and H.B. Singh

    IPC code; Int. cl. — A61K 35/78, A01G 1/00                                                            124

 

 


Explorer: Research Articles/Articles

Medicinal uses of plants by tribal medicine men of Nandurbar district in Maharashtra

    H M Patil and V V Bhaskar

    IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾ A61K 35/78                                                                             125

 

Daphne papyracea Wall. ex Steud. —A traditional source of paper making in Arunachal Pradesh

    Ashish Paul, A Arunachalam, M L Khan and K Arunachalam

    IPC code; Int. cl.7 — D21B 1/00, D21B 1/02, D21B 1/04                                        133

 

A survey of medicinal plants in Kollimalai hill tracts, Tamil Nadu

    R M Anand, N Nandakumar, L Karunakaran, M Ragunathan and V Murugan

    IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾ A61K 35/78                                                                            139

 

Little known use of Haloxylon spp. in traditional food

    Harchand R Dagla and N S Shekhawat

    IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾ A23K 1/00, A23L 1/00, C10L 5/44                                       131

 


Review Articles 

A review on antidepressants plants              

    Dinesh Dhingra and Amandeep Sharma

    IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾ A61K 35/78, A61P 25/24                                                                       144

 

A review on gastric ulcer remedies used in Unani system of medicine

Anwar Jamal, Aisha Siddiqui, Tajuddin and M A Jafri

IPC code; Int. cl.7 —A61K 35/78, A61P 1/04                                                                           153

                                                                                                  

Readers write                                                                                                             88

Forthcoming conferences                                                                                         160

Guidelines to authors                                                                                               161

Subscription form                                                                                                     164

Index                                                                                                                         164

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research Articles/ Articles

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.5, March – April 2006, 90-94

 

Production of fermented cereal powders

D I Olorunfemi, A P O Dede and M Idu

The white and yellow varieties of maize (Zea mays Linn.), millet [Pennisetum typhoides (Burm.f.) Stapf & C.E. Hubbard] and sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (Linn.) Moench] were used to produce durable and storable dry powders using a fluidized drying technique at 70°C for 40 minutes. The powders were blended with fruit extracts essentially to provide flavours. Microbial counts of the powders indicated presence of scanty growth of non-pathogenic colonies and these were significantly lower than data obtained for locally prepared wet pastes. The proximate composition of the dry powdery products obtained from the cereals did not change significantly after a shelf-life of 12 months. The relative advantages of the products over the wet pastes are discussed.

 

Keywords: Fermented cereal powder, Wet flour-paste, Maize, Millet, Sorghum, Zea mays, Pennisetum typhoides, Sorghum bicolor, Shelf-life.

 

IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾ A23L 1/10, A23L 1/105

 

Natural Product Radiance

 vol.5, March – April 2006, 95-98

 Survival and infectivity of entomopathogenic nematodes in alginate gel formulations against rice meal moth larva, Corcyra cephalonica Stainton

                      
R Umamaheswari
, M Sivakumar and S Subramanian

 

Entomopathogenic nematodes, viz. Steinernema glaseri, S. siamkayai and Heterorhabditis indica were formulated in alginate gel capsules and tested in vitro at two temperatures (5ºC and 25ºC) for their storage and infectivity against rice meal moth larva, Corcyra cephalonica Stainton. The nematode S. glaseri survived longer up to 24 weeks and 100 per cent survival was observed up to 4 weeks at 5°C. However, their infectivity was 100 per cent up to 4 weeks at 5°C. It was followed by S. siamkayai which survived up to 22 weeks at 5°C and 14 weeks at 25°C. H. indica revealed 100 per cent infectivity up to 2 weeks at 5°C and 25°C.

 

Keywords: Alginate gel formulation, Entomopathogenic nematodes, Heterorhabditis indica, Steinernema glaseri, Steinernema siamkayai, Rice meal moth larva, Corcyra cephalonica, Bioinsecticides

 

IPC code; Int. cl.7 — A01N 1/00, A01N 63/00

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

 Vol.5, March – April 2006, 99-102 

Wound healing activity of Cordia dichotoma Forst. f. fruits

I J Kuppast and P Vasudeva Nayak

The extraction of fruits of Cordia dichotoma Forst. f. was carried out using ethanol. This extract was further fractionated using petroleum ether (40-60%), solvent ether, ethyl acetate, butanol and butanone in succession. These fractions were screened for wound healing activity using three different models, viz. excision, incision and dead space wound models on either sex of albino rats of Wistar strain. All the fractions showed significant (P<0.001) activity on the chosen models.

 

Keywords : Cordia dichotoma, Ethanol extract, Flavonoids, Wound healing activity.

 

IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾ A61K 35/78, A61P 17/02

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.5, March – April 2006, 103-107

 

Protective effect of Syzygium cuminii (Linn.) Skeels seed extract on lipid peroxidation in alloxan induced diabetic rats

 

P Krishnamoorthy*, S Vaithinathan and A Bhuvaneswari

 

The effect of Black plum, Syzygium cuminii (Linn.) Skeels (syn. S. jambolanum DC.) seed extract on lipid peroxidation in alloxan induced diabetic rats was studied. Alloxan 150mg (mg/kg body weight) increased significantly the glucose level in blood and induced the Lipid Peroxidation (LPO) in liver. The antioxidant enzymes Catalase (CAT), Reduced Glutathione (GSH), Glutathione peroxidase (GPx), Superoxide dismutase (SOD) in liver were decreased. Oral administration of the extract for 15 days to alloxan treated animals showed remarkable increase in the level of antioxidant enzymes and reduced the level of lipid peroxidation activity and blood glucose. The results suggest that seed extract of the plant is an antioxidant and acute hyperglycaemic drug and might be used in the regulation of lipid peroxidation without detectable adverse side effects.

 

Key words: Black plum, Jamun, Syzygium cuminii, Syzygium jambolanum, Seed extract, Antioxidant, Alloxan, Diabetes, Lipid peroxidation, Oxidative stress.

 

IPC code; Int. cl.7 —A61K 35/78, A61P 3/10, A61P 39/06

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.5, March – April 2006, 108-111

 

Little known uses of common aquatic plant, Hydrilla verticillata (Linn. f.) Royle

D K Pal* and S B Nimse

 

            Plants have been associated with health, nutrition and overall care of mankind since time immemorial. Hydrilla verticillata (Linn.f.) Royle is credited with numerous biological activities. The plant is the rich source of variable nutrients and chemical constituents like saponins, vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, amino acids, detoxifying agents, etc. Hydrilla is especially valuable to true vegetarians. Besides its other uses, therapeutically this plant may be used to provide complete nutrition, to improve digestion and gastrointestinal function, circulation, neurological health, blood sugar control, to strengthen immunity and increase endurance. The paper highlights various medicinal uses of the plant and different nutrients and chemical constituents present in it.

 

Keywords : Hydrilla verticillata, Aquatic plant, Medicinal uses, Nutrients, Antioxidants, Detoxifying agents.

IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾ A61K 35/78, A 23L 1/00

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.5, March – April 2006, 112-114

 

An avowal of importance of endangered tree Oroxylum indicum (Linn.) Vent.

M Gokhale and Y K Bansal*

 

A small deciduous tree Oroxylum indicum (Linn.) Vent. of family Bignoniaceae, also known as Shivnak, Sonapatha, Shyonaka or Midnight horror possesses economic as well as medicinal importance. The tree was distributed throughout the greater part of India but now it is listed amongst endangered species in many areas in the country. Its conservation is urgently required.

 

Keywords: Shivnak, Sonapatha, Shyonaka, Midnight horror, Oroxylum indicum, Medicinal plant, Endangered tree, Conservation.

IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾ A61K 35/78, A01G 23/00

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.5, March – April 2006, 115-119

Coastal vegetation —An underexplored source of anticancer drugs

K Kathiresan, N Sithranga Boopathy and S Kavitha

Some plants found in coastal region have been discussed as possible source of anticancer drugs, based on traditional uses and preliminary scientific works. Further investigation for various other medicinal properties of coastal vegetation is required to explore these natural resources.

 

Keywords:  Coastal plants, Anticancer drugs, Mangroves, Salt-marsh, Sand-dune.

IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾ A61K 35/78, A61P 35/00

Green page: Research Article/Article

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.5, March – April 2006, 120-123

 

Effect of varying levels of nitrogen and phosphorus on growth and yield of the medicinal plant, Alpinia galanga Willd.

S Hussain, A Sharma, PK Singh and DK Hore

                An experiment was conducted during kharif season of 2000 and 2001 to study the response of Alpinia galanga Willd. to nitrogen and phosphorus in upland terraces under mid altitude conditions of Meghalaya. The results indicated that increasing levels of nitrogen and phosphorus application significantly increased fresh rhizome yield up to 100 Kg N/ha and 80 Kg P2O5/ha. Thereafter, non significant effects were noticed. Application of 100 Kg N/ha has also resulted in highest oil content (0.37%), which was at par with oil contents observed from the application of 80 Kg P2O5/ha (0.34%) and 120 Kg P2O5/ha (0.36%). The interaction effects were significant for plant height and fresh rhizome yield, recording highest values at 150 Kg N and 120 Kg P2O5/ ha. These values were at par with the values obtained from the application of 100 Kg N/ ha and 80 Kg P2O5/ ha for these two characters.

 

Keywords: Medicinal plant, Alpinia galanga, Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Interaction effects, Galangal oil

IPC code; Int. cl.7 —A01G 1/00, A61K 35/78, C11B 9/00

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.5, March – April 2006, 124

 

Acokanthera oppositifolia (Lam.) Codd. – An ornamental poisonous plant

Sandeep Kumar and HB Singh

 

Out of total five species of Acokanthera G. Don, two South and East African species, Acokanthera oblongifolia (Hochst.) Codd. and A. oppositifolia (Lam.) Codd are grown as ornamental shrub or small trees in Indian gardens. The flowers are sweet scented and fruits are attractive like black plum but whole plant is highly poisonous. The paper highlights the reported medicinal and poisonous properties of latter species and suggests not growing this species in school premises or public places.

 

Keywords: Acokanthera oblongifolia, Acokanthera oppositifolia, Poisonous, Medicinal, Ornamental, Sarp, Bushman poison bush, Poison bush.

 

IPC code; Int. cl.7 —A61K 35/78, A01G 1/00

 

Explorer: Research Article/Article

Natural Product Radiance 

 vol.5, March – April 2006, 125-130

Medicinal uses of plants by tribal medicine men of Nandurbar district in Maharashtra

H M Patil and V V Bhaskar

            The tribals of Nandurbar district have their own system of herbal medicine. Many of their herbal preparations for various ailments are different from Ayurvedic and Unani system of medicine. The paper provides some interesting therapeutic uses of plants ranging from emetic to anti-diabetic. The knowledge system of Nandurbar tribes in herbal medicine shall be useful for phytochemists and pharmacologists for further exploration.

Keywords: Ethnobotany, Tribal medicine, Medicinal plants, Nandurbar, Maharashtra.

IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾ A61K 35/78

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.5, March – April 2006, 131-132

 

Little known use of Haloxylon spp. in traditional food

 

Harchand R Dagla and N S Shekhawat

 

An account of gathered information on traditional uses of Haloxylon salicornicum (Moq.) Bunge and H. recurvum (Moq.) Bunge ex Boiss. in food preparations by the local people of Jaisalmer and Barmer districts of Western Rajasthan has been communicated in this manuscript. Other uses of these plants as a source of fuel, food, fodder and in agricultural practices have also been discussed.

 

Keywords: Haloxylon salicornicum, Haloxylon recurvum, Lana, Khar, Food, Fuel, Fodder, Traditional uses, Western Rajasthan, Thar Desert.

 

IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾ A23K 1/00, A23L 1/00, C10L 5/44

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.5, March – April 2006, 133-138

 

Daphne papyracea Wall. ex Steud. – A traditional source of paper making in Arunachal Pradesh

 

Ashish Paul, A Arunachalam, M L Khan and K Arunachalam

 

         Non-timber forest products (NTFPs) in recent years have been attracting attention of institutions and industries concerned with natural products development. In this context, traditional knowledge and practices are important in prudent resource use and biodiversity conservation. Currently, wood is by far the major raw material for the global pulp and paper industry and non-wood fibres are a minor part of raw material supply. China and India are leaders in the utilization of non-woods for paper making. Daphne papyracea Wall. ex Steud., locally called as ‘Shuksheng’ is a NTFP which is traditionally used as paper making material by Monpas tribe of West Kameng and Tawang districts of Arunachal Pradesh. The traditional paper making technique of this tribes is described in this paper.

 

Keywords: Daphne papyracea, Shuksheng, Non-timber forest products (NTFP), Nonwood fibres, Paper, Monpas, Indigenous paper making technique, Arunachal Pradesh

 

IPC code; Int. cl.7 — D21B 1/00, D21 B 1/02, D21B 1/04

 

 

 

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.5, March – April 2006, 139-143

A survey of medicinal plants in Kollimalai hill tracts, Tamil Nadu

 

R M Anand, N Nandakumar, L Karunakaran, M Ragunathan and V Murugan

 

A survey of Kollimalai hill tracts of Tamil Nadu, India was conducted to record the plants known in the tribal pockets and mentioned in the present paper. Inhabitants utilize a number of medicinal plants for the treatment of various ailments. The present study aims to draw the attention of phytochemists and pharmacologists to the need of further critical study. If the efficacy of each plant is scientifically established then these plant drugs can be recommended to rural people who are within the reach of these potential drugs.

 

Key words: Ethno-medicinal uses, Medicinal plants, Tribals, Kollimalais, Tamil Nadu.

IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾ A61K 35/78

 

Review Articles

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.5, March – April 2006, 144-152

 

A review on antidepressant plants

 

Dinesh Dhingra and Amandeep Sharma

 

Depression is a heterogeneous mood disorder that has been classified and treated in a variety of ways. Although a number of synthetic drugs are being used as standard treatment for clinically depressed patients, they have adverse effects that can compromise the therapeutic treatment. Thus, it is worthwhile to look for antidepressants from plants with proven advantage and favourable benefit-to-risk ratio. A number of medicinal plants per se and medicines derived from these plants have shown antidepressant properties by virtue of their medicinal constituents. The causes of depression are decreased brain levels of monoamines like noradrenaline, dopamine and serotonin. Therefore, drugs restoring the reduced levels of these monoamines in the brain either by inhibiting monoamine oxidase or by inhibiting reuptake of these neurotransmitters might be fruitful in the treatment of depression. The present review is focused on the medicinal plants and plant-based formulations having antidepressant activity in animal studies and in humans.

 

Keywords: Depression, Medicinal plants, Antidepressants, Herbal medicine.

IPC code; Int. cl.7 ¾ A61K 35/78, A61P 25/24

Natural Product Radiance 

Vol.5, March – April 2006, 153-159

A review on gastric ulcer remedies used in Unani System of medicine

Anwar Jamal, Aisha Siddiqui, Tajuddin and M A Jafri

Peptic ulcer is the erosion in lining of stomach or duodenum. The word ‘Peptic’ refers to pepsin, a stomach enzyme that break downs proteins. Peptic ulcer located in the stomach is called gastric ulcer. Normally the linings of the stomach and small intestine have protection against the irritating acid produced in stomach. For a variety of reasons, the protective mechanism may become faulty, leading to a breakdown of the lining. The result is inflammation (gastritis) or an ulcer.

It is believed that adults in high stress jobs are mostly affected by gastric ulcer, but people of any age even children are found affected by this problem. Ulcer is curable with the combination of different kind of antibiotics, an acid reducer and H2 receptor blockers, proton pump inhibitors, etc., which are expensive to a common man and have prolong side effects also. In Unani system of medicine plants, animals as well as mineral origin drugs are being used clinically for the treatment of this disease without any side effect. These are time tested, centuries old, safe for use and cost effective. However, there is a need to maintain their purity, quality and safety by subjecting to scientific validation. Experimentally studied as well as potential medicinal plants used for gastric ulcer in Unani system of medicine are being discussed in this paper.

Key words: Peptic ulcer, Gastric ulcer, Unani system of medicine, Unani drugs.

IPC code; Int. cl.7 —A61K 35/78, A61P 1/04