NATURAL PRODUCT RADIANCE

A Bimonthly Journal on Natural Products

Total visitors: 1,015  since 01-06-07

VOLUME 6

NUMBER 2

March-April 2007

 

 

CONTENTS

 

Readers Write                                                                                                            104

Editorial                                                                                                                      105

Research Articles/Articles

 

 

Analysis of various vegetable preparations for calcium, iron and zinc intake of Punjabi urban and rural families

Kiran Bains and Shruti

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A23L 1/00, A23L 1/052                                        106

 

 

 

Antimicrobial activity of Piper fruits

Mohib Khan and Mustafa Siddiqui

IPC code; Int. cl.8— A61K 36/00, A61K 36/67, A61P 31/00                                     111

 

Antioxidant and antibacterial investigations on essential oils and acetone extracts of some spices

Gurdip Singh, Sumitra Maurya, Palanisamy Marimuthu, H S Murali and A S Bawa

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ C11B 9/00, A23L 1/22, A61K 36/00, A61P 17/18, A61P 31/04  114

 

 

Molluscicidal and mosquito larvicidal efficacy of Lantana indica Roxb. leaf extracts

Manisha Srivastava, V K Srivastava and Ajay Singh

IPC code; Int. cl.8— A61K 36/85, A01P 7/04, A01P 9/00                                          122

 

 

 

 

Free radical scavenging activity of Lagenaria siceraria (Mol.) Standl. fruit

J R Deshpande, M R Mishra, V S Meghre, S G Wadodkar and A K Dorle

IPC code; Int. cl.8— A61K 36/42, A61P 9/00, A61P 39/06                                        127

 

 

 

Medicinal properties of genus Chenopodium Linn.

Neerja Yadav, Neeru Vasudeva, Sumitra Singh and Surendra K Sharma

IPC code; Int. cl.8—A61K 36/00, A61P 17/04, A61P 33/10, A61P 37/00                  131

 

 

 

Green page: Research Articles/Articles

Cultivation prospects of German chamomile in South India

Rajeshwari Nidagundi and Laxminarayan Hegde

IPC code; Int. cl.8—A01G 9/00, A61 K36/00, C11B 9/00                                          135

 

 

 

Effect of Homoeopathic drugs on cotton plants

H U Gangar

IPC code; Int. cl.8— A01G 1/00, A01G7/04                                                                138

 

 

 

 

 

Site suitability for turmeric production in India ¾ A GIS interpretation

Utpala Parthasarthy, A K Johny, K Jayarajan and V A Parthasarathy

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A01G 1/00, A23L 1/22                                                              142

 

 

 

Explorer: Research Articles/Article

Ethnomedicinal plants of Dhule district, Maharashtra

S L Patil and D A Patil

IPC code; Int. cl.8—A61K 36/00                                                                                 148

 

 

 

 

Some herbal remedies used by the tribals of Nasik district, Maharashtra

M V Patil and D A Patil

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A61K 36/00                                                                               153

 

 

 

 

 

 

Review Articles

Centella asiatica (Linn.) Urban ¾ A Review

S Shakir Jamil, Qudsia Nizami, Mehboobus Salam

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A61K 36/00, A61K 36/23                                                         158

 

 

 

A review on Bael tree

Prabodh Chander Sharma, Vivek Bhatia, Nitin Bansal and Archana

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A61K 36/00, A61K 36/75, A23L 1/00, A23L 2/02                   171

 

Book Review                                                                                                            179

Forthcoming Conferences                                                                                        180

Guidelines to authors                                                                                               181

Subscription Form                                                                                                    183

Index                                                                                                                         184

Form IV                                                                                                                     188

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Readers Write

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.6, March-April 2007,104

 

Appreciating NPR

            I would like to thank and congratulate the team of Natural Product Radiance for their efforts in spreading scientific awareness among readers of scientific and non scientific group through a diversity of original research articles and compilation of information from various journals of international standard. The articles on “Non-saccharide natural intense sweeteners –an overview of current status” and Wild edible fruits of Tripura (NPR, 2006, Vol. 5(4), pp.270-278; pp. 302-305) really deserve appreciation.

Madhur Garg

Tikamgarh

More information on unexploited natural resources and products

 

            Your journal is for the promotion of usage and research development on natural products and resources. I have noticed that it contains topics that impart much knowledge on medicinal plants or medicinal uses either in the form of research, review article or ethnobotanical studies. But you should add and invite papers on unexploited plants, minor forest products like gum/resin, oil and rubber yielding plants. However, you have published papers on natural dyes and fibres. Under green page column you may include papers on growing various flowers and fruit plants with practical practice of cultivation. Please discourage publication of compiled information especially on cultivation. I am very happy to read information on antidiabetic properties of Pan, Piper betle Linn. and antiulcer activity of Mango flowers because both are easily available natural resources for a common person.

Jaydeep Sharma

Saharanpur

Annatto distribution

 

            I have gone through an interesting article “Annatto and its potential in international market” published in NPR, 2003, Vol.2 (2), pp.72-75. The author mentioned that Bixa orellana Linn. grows well in Southern states of India. However, I may mention that it also grows well in Manipur and other North-eastern states. In Manipur its dye is not only used for food colouring but also for colouring clothes. This is just to add some information for readers. Author of the article deserve appreciation. I wish all the success in bringing out bimonthly journal on natural products.

 

G. Akimpou K. Rongmei

Canchipur, Imphal (Manipur)

Missing issues

 

      I am regular reader of your journal and addict to it. Sorry to mention that we receive it very late and some times issues are misplaced. Please do some more efforts to bring it early and ensure its delivery. However, at the cost of its quality I can wait for 10-15 days but can not miss an issue for reading.

Deepak

Junagarh

 

 

 

Research Articles/Articles

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.6, March-April 2007, 106-110

Analysis of various vegetable preparations for calcium, iron and zinc intake of Punjabi urban and rural families

Kiran Bains* and Shruti

A study was conducted to determine the importance of traditional vegetable preparations as sources of calcium, iron and zinc among urban and rural families during winter season. Information on vegetable consumption, storage and cooking practices was collected from 60 families, 30 each from urban and rural areas of Ludhiana district, Punjab, India. The total daily vegetable consumption by urban and rural families was 411.7 and 365.9g; the contribution of vegetable preparations to the total vegetable intake being 68.7 and 85.0%, respectively. The edible portion in all kinds of vegetables was 78.9%. Ten vegetable preparations which were most frequently consumed by the families i.e. mustard saag, potato-spinach, potato-fenugreek, potato-brinjal, potato-cauliflower, potato-capsicum, potato-carrot, potato-beans, potato-peas and cabbage-pea were selected for nutritional analysis. The samples of preparations were prepared in the laboratory as per the information supplied by surveyed families. The average calcium, iron and zinc in vegetable preparations were: 81.9, 1.60 and 0.46 mg/100g fresh weight, respectively.  The average losses of calcium, iron and zinc during pre-preparation and cooking of vegetable preparations were: 12.9, 12.6 and 14.0%, respectively. The vegetable preparations provided 47.2, 12.5 and 6.6% of calcium, iron and zinc of the recommended level in case of urban families; and the corresponding percentages for rural families were 52.4, 13.9 and 7.3 per cent.

Keywords: Vegetable preparations, Recommended dietary allowances, Calcium, Iron, Zinc.

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A23L 1/00, A23L 1/052

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.6, March-April 2007, 111-113

 

Antimicrobial activity of Piper fruits

Mohib Khan* and Mustafa Siddiqui

            In this study an attempt is made to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of various extracts of fruits of different Piper species available in the Aurangabad-Marathwada (Maharashtra State) region. Twenty eight extracts prepared from the fruits of four species, viz. Piper cubeba Linn. f., P. retrofractum Vahl syn. P. chaba Hunter non Blume, P. longum Linn. and P. nigrum Linn.  were evaluated against bacterial pathogens, such as Staphylococcus albus, Salmonella typhi, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Bacillus megaterium and one fungus, Aspergillus niger. Compared to Streptomycin all the extracts exhibited a good antibacterial activity. Some of the extracts showed antifungal activity as well.

 

Keywords: Antimicrobial activity, Piper fruits, Piper cubeba, Piper retrofractum, Piper longum, Piper nigrum.

IPC code; Int. cl.8— A61K 36/00, A61K 36/67, A61P 31/00

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.6, March-April 2007, 114-121

 

Antioxidant and antibacterial investigations on essential oils and acetone extracts of some spices†

Gurdip Singh1*, Sumitra Maurya3, Palanisamy Marimuthu4, H S Murali2 and A S Bawa2

            The studies on antioxidant and antibacterial potential of essential/volatile oils and acetone extracts of various spices are presented in this paper. The antibacterial activity of the volatile oils and acetone extracts of anise, ajwain, tejpat, Chinese Cassia bark, fennel, coriander, dill, turmeric and star anise have been studied against Escherichia coli, Salmonella  typhi, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus cereus, B. subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus by disc diffusion and plate count methods. The results showed that volatile oils and extracts varied in their bioactivity. The volatile oils of ajwain, tejpat, Chinese Cassia bark and coriander were found to possess excellent activity against all the Gram positive and Gram negative bacterial strains tested. These volatile oils and extracts are equally or more effective when compared with standard antibiotics even at very low concentration. However, the acetone extract was found to be less effective as compared to volatile oils. Antioxidant activity of the oils and extracts were studied by DPPH, reducing power, conjugated diene and chelating effect assays. They exerted concentration dependent antioxidant activity in all the tested assays.

 

Keywords: Spices, Volatile oils, Antimicrobial activity, Acetone extract, Antioxidant activity.

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ C11B 9/00, A23L 1/22, A61K 36/00, A61P 17/18, A61P 31/04

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.6, March-April 2007, 122- 126

 

Molluscicidal and mosquito larvicidal efficacy of Lantana indica Roxb. leaf extracts

Manisha Srivastava, V K Srivastava and Ajay Singh*

            The aqueous and acetone extracts of Lantana indica Roxb. leaves were governed for 24 to 96 hours to the freshwater snails, Lymnaea acuminata and larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes in order to test their lethality. It was observed that the acetone extract of leaves has potent toxic effect against both the vectors in time and dose dependent manner. There was a significant negative correlation between LC values of the extracts and the exposure period, thus LC50 values decreases from 7.32 mg/l (24 hours) to 1.02 mg/l (96 hours) against L. acuminata and 10.99 mg/l (24 hours) to 5.18 mg/l (96 hours) against C. quinquefasciatus larvae. It is clear from this study that the active moiety extracted from this plant may prove to be of great promise for being used as natural pesticide for vectors control.

 

Keywords: Freshwater Snail, Lymnaea acuminata, Mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus, Molluscicide, Larvicide, Lantana indica, Verbenaceae.

 

IPC code; Int. cl.8— A61K 36/85, A01P 7/04, A01P 9/00.

 

  

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.6, March-April 2007, 127-130

Free radical scavenging activity of Lagenaria siceraria (Mol.) Standl. fruit

 

J R Deshpande*, M R Mishra, V S Meghre, S G Wadodkar and A K Dorle

 

Lagenaria siceraria (Mol.) Standl. commonly known as Bottle gourd has been widely used as vegetable in India especially by cardiac patients. Since this property may be correlated with the presence of radical scavenging activity, extracts of the fruit were evaluated for this purpose.The fruit was collected and epicarp, mesocarp and pulp containing seeds were separated. Each of them was extracted with different solvents in increasing order of polarity. Extracts were prepared using the Soxhlet apparatus by serial extraction technique and their respective extractive values were determined. All the extracts were assessed by 1, 1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. The maximum antioxidant activity was observed in the acetone extract of fruit epicarp. Chemical investigation revealed that radical scavenging activity may be due to the presence of ellagitannins present in the acetone extract of epicarp.

 

Keywords:  Lagenaria siceraria, Bottle gourd, Free radical scavenging activity, Cardiovascular diseases

 

IPC code; Int. cl.8— A61K 36/42, A61P 9/00, A61P 39/06

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.6, March-April 2007, 131-134

 

Medicinal properties of genus Chenopodium Linn.

Neerja Yadav, Neeru Vasudeva, Sumitra Singh and Surendra K Sharma*

            In Ayurveda Chenopodium Linn. is well-known for its applications in the treatment of various ailments like pectoral complaints, cough, abdominal pain, pulmonary obstruction and in nervous affections. On the basis of recent pharmacological studies some additional medicinal properties of various species of the genus have been established. In the present paper an attempt has been made to summarize the traditional uses and reported biological activities of the genus for further studies.

Keywords: Chenopodium, Traditional uses, Pharmacological properties.

IPC code; Int. cl.8—A61K 36/00, A61P 17/04, A61P 33/10, A61P 37/00

Green Page: Research Articles/Articles

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.6, March-April 2007, 135-137

Cultivation prospects of German chamomile in South India

Rajeshwari Nidagundi and Laxminarayan Hegde*

 

            German chamomile, Matricaria chamomilla Linn. is used both in traditional and modern systems of medicines. It is an ingredient of several traditional Unani and Homoeopathic medicinal preparations. Blue oil extracted from dry capitula is highly valued in international trade. It is an introduced crop in India and mainly cultivated in Jammu and Kashmir, Uttar Pradesh and Assam. It is a crop of 4-6 months mainly propagated by seeds either by transplanting or by direct sowing. It is also being grown in South India on experimental basis. In northern dry zone of Karnataka under Ghataprabha river command area, it recorded fresh flower yield of 6.35 tonnes/ha and dry flower yield of 1.88 tonnes/ha with the spacing of 30 × 20cm. The crop seems to be very hardy as there are no pests and diseases recorded in this crop during the crop growth. However, aphids are seen but not serious to reduce the crop yield significantly. The trials are underway to study the effect of different dates of planting on growth, yield and quality of chamomile under this situation. In the present paper cultivation prospects of this medicinal and aromatic crop has been discussed for encouraging commercial cultivation in South Indian region.

 

Keywords: German chamomile, Essential oil, Matricaria chamomilla, Cultivation, Karnataka, South India, Asteraceae.

 

IPC code; Int. cl.8—A01G9/00, A61K36/00, C11B9/00

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.6, March-April 2007, 138-141

 

Effect of Homoeopathic drugs on cotton plants

 

H U Gangar

 

            Detailed study to investigate the effects of Homoeopathic drugs on growth of cotton plants was initiated at Central Institute for Research on Cotton Technology, (ICAR), Mumbai. In the present paper promising results of preliminary experiments have been discussed. The results revealed that electrically neutral and pure distilled water develops internal electrical charges as soon as few drops of homoeopathic medicines are added into it. Different drugs as well as different potencies (dilutions) of same drug produce different electrical charges. Further experiments proved that such medicated water containing drugs in highest potency influence the genetic processes of cotton plants in a big way. It can accelerate germination process, can shorten the cultivation period, can enhance the yield and quality of cotton crop and also makes it possible to grow it during off-season.

 

Keywords: Homoeopathic drugs, Cotton plants, Growth, Barayta Carb, Abrotanum, Phosphorus, Iodum, Nux-Vomica, Magphos, Tuberculinum.

 

IPC code; Int. cl.8— A01G 1/00, A01G7/04.

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.6, March-April 2007, 142-147

Site Suitability for turmeric production in India ¾ A GIS interpretation

Utpala Parthasarthy*, A K Johny, K Jayarajan and V A Parthasarathy

 

            India has 1,49,410 hectares area under turmeric cultivation with a total annual production of 527,960 tonnes. The compound growth rate of turmeric area is 6.30 and production is 3.37 when comparing 2000 levels over those of 1970. It shows that the increase in area is not having significant effect over the production rate. In the present paper the suitability maps and area productivity graphs are given to show, the position of turmeric in the important turmeric growing states. It was found that site suitability is an important factor to determine the productivity of the crop. A highly suitable location may not result in larger yields than suitable or marginally suitable areas. Suitability maps are useful to determine areas which will have the greatest success for growing a particular crop in a region.

Keywords: Spice, Turmeric, Site suitability, DIVA-GIS, Compound growth rate.

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A01G1/00, A23L1/22

 

Explorer: Research Articles/Articles

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.6, March-April 2007, 148-151

Ethnomedicinal plants of Dhule district, Maharashtra

S L Patil and D A Patil*

 

Fifty plant species belonging to 32 families of angiosperms find place in ethnomedicinal utility in Dhule district (Maharashtra, India) to treat various human diseases. In present paper informations on plant and part(s) used, local name, diseases and formulations has been provided. Medicinal uses of about 37 species are unreported earlier. Further scientific evaluation is needed for these widely used herbal drugs.

 

Key words: Ethnomedicine, Medicinal Plants, Dhule District, Maharashtra, India.

IPC code; Int. cl.8—A61K 36/00

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.6, March-April 2007, 152-157

 

Some herbal remedies used by the tribals of Nasik district, Maharashtra

M V Patil1 and D A Patil2*

The native phytotherapy prevalent among the tribals and rural populace of Nasik District, Maharashtra, has been studied. The present paper communicates information on 32 species of angiosperms used to cure various ailments by tribals of Nasik district. Recent botanical and local names, parts used, medicinal use(s) and formulation along with doses and duration have been provided.

 

Keywords: Herbal remedies, Medicinal Plants, Mahdeo-Koli, Katkari, Bhils, Kunabi-Kokana, Thakur, Warli, Nasik District, Maharashtra.

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A61K 36/00

 
 
 
 
 
 
Review Articles

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.6, March-April 2007, 158-170

Centella asiatica (Linn.) Urban ¾ A Review

 

S Shakir Jamil, Qudsia Nizami* and Mehboobus Salam

           

            Centella asiatica (Linn.) Urban is valued in Indian systems of medicine for improving memory and for the treatment of nervine disorders and skin diseases. It has been used extensively as memory enhancer. The present review is an up-to-date and comprehensive literature analysis of the chemistry, pharmacology and clinical trials on Centella drug.

 

Keywords: Centella asiatica, Mandookaparni, Gotu Kola, Memory enhancer, Medicinal plant, Unani medicine.

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A61K 36/00, A61K 36/23

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.6, March-April 2007, 171-178

A review on Bael tree

Prabodh Chander Sharma*, Vivek Bhatia, Nitin Bansal and Archana Sharma

 

            Bael, Aegle marmelos (Linn.) Correa ex Roxb., a tree of Indian origin is known from pre-historic time. It has a great mythological significance for Hindus. Utilization of bael in day-to-day life has great nutritional, environmental as well as commercial importance. It has been in use from time immemorial in traditional systems of medicine for relieving constipation, diarrhoea, dysentery, peptic ulcer and respiratory infections. Important medicinal properties of bael are antidiabetic, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antipyretic, analgesic, cardioprotective, antispermatogenic, anticancer and radioprotective. The present review deals with general and chemical profile and its economic importance including medicinal and other uses.

 

Keywords: Bael, Aegle marmelos, Medicinal plant.

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A61K 36/00, A61K 36/75, A23L 1/00, A23L 2/02