NATURAL PRODUCT RADIANCE

A Bimonthly Journal on Natural Products 

Total visitors: 260  since  31-10-07

VOLUME 6

NUMBER 5

September - October 2007

 

CONTENTS 

 

 

Readers Write                                                                                                           364

Editorial                                                                                                                      365

 

Research Articles/Articles

 

Antimicrobial activity of a medicinal plant Hybanthus enneaspermus (Linn.) F. Muell.

K Raveendra Retnam and A John De Britto

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/00, A61P 31/04                                                           366

 

Evaluation of the antipyretic potential of methanol extract of the leaves of Abies spectabilis (D. Don) Spach.

Satya Prakash Visnoi, Anindya Basu, S K Mahasin Alam, Soma Samantaand Tarun Jha

IPC code; Int. cl.8— A61K 36/00, A61K 36/15, A61K 127/00, A61P 29/00             369

 

Evaluation of antifungal activity of Salvadora persica Linn. leaves

Sarvesh Paliwal, Rajani Chauhan, Anees A Siddiqui, Shailendra Paliwal and Jaiprakash Sharma

IPC code; Int. cl.8—A61K 36/00, A61K 127/00, A61P 31/10                                    372

 

New record of Baculovirus in Buzura suppressaria Guen. in India

A Mukhopadhyay, D De, M Sarker and O M Bambawale

IPC code; Int. cl.8 A01P 15/00                                                                                 375

 

Anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anti-lipid peroxidation studies on stem bark of Ficus religiosa Linn.

R Sreelekshmi, P G Latha, M M Arafat, S Shyamal, V J Shine, G I Anuja, S R Suja and S Rajasekharan

IPC code; Int. cl.8—A61K 36/00, A61K 129/00, A61P 29/00                                    377

 

Bactericidal activity of Lagenandra ovata (Linn.) Thw. rhizome oil

P Annie Sulochana Selvakumari and A John De Britto

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A61K 36/00, A61K 36/888, A61K 125/00, A61P 31/04          382

 

Pharmacognostical study of Hybanthus enneaspermus (Linn.) F. Muell.

K Raveendra Retnam and A John De Britto

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A61K 36/00                                                                               386

 

Management of gram pod borer, Helicoverpa armigera (Hubner) in chickpea with biorationals

M P Gupta

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A01N 65/00, A01N 63/00                                                         391

 

Utilization of whey protein concentrate in processed cheese spread

Suneeta Pinto, Rathour AK, J P Prajapati, A H Jana and M J Solanky

IPC code; Int. cl.8—A23C 1/00, A23C 19/06, A23C 19/09, A23C 19/097                 398

 

Green page: Research Articles/Articles

Cultivation prospects of Exacum bicolor Roxb. —An endangered, ornamental and anti-diabetic herb

U Sreelatha, T S Baburaj, C Narayanan Kutty, P A Nazeem  and Jyothi Bhaskar

IPC code; Int. cl.8—A61K 36/00, A01G 17/00                                                           402

 

Effect of N6-Benzyl amino purine and Naphthalene acetic acid on camptothecin production through in vitro propagation of Ophiorrhiza rugosa Wall. var. decumbens (Gardn. ex Thw.) Deb & Mondal

V R Vineesh, C L Jelly, P V Fijesh, V K Jaimsha and J Padikkala

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A01H 4/00, A01H 5/04, A01H 5/06                                          405

 

Wild edible plants of Meghalaya, North-east India

Jasmine Therese Sawian, Solomonnadar Jeeva, Febreena Grace Lyndem, Bhanu Prakash Mishra and Roytre Christopher Laloo

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A23L 1/00, A01G 17/00                                                            410

 

Explorer: Research Articles/Article

Gymnocladus assamicus Kanjilal ex P.C. Kanjilal fruit—A soap substitute

B I Choudhury, M L Khan, A Arunachalam and K Arunachalam

IPC code; Int. cl.8— A61K 8/00, A23L 1/00                                                               427

 

Traditional medicinal practices among the tribal people of Malkangiri district, Orissa, India

Chiranjibi Pattanaik, C Sudhakar Reddy, Rasmita Das and P Manikya Reddy

IPC code; Int. cl.8—A61K 36/00, A61P 7/17, A61P 17/00, A61P 29/00                    430

 

Medicinal plants used by Paliyan tribes of Sirumalai hills of southern India

S Karuppusamy

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾A61K 36/00                                                                                436

 

Forthcoming Conferences                                                                                         443

Guidelines to authors                                                                                                444

Subscription Form                                                                                                      446

Index                                                                                                                           447

 

  

Readers Write

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.6, Sept- Oct. 2007, 364

 

Bright printing

       Dear Editor, we are grateful for publishing our paper entitled 'Site suitability for turmeric production' in Nat Prod Rad, 2007, 6(2), 142-147. We appreciate keen observations, detailed editing, good formatting and bright printing of the same. Our Institute library has subscribed to this journal, so kindly ensure its regular dispatching from your end.

Dr. (Mrs) Utpala Parthasarathy

Indian Institute of Spices Research

Calicut, Kerala

Impact Factor of NPR

       Dear Editor, thank you very much for publishing our paper entitled ‘Development of cow dung based herbal mosquito repellent’ in Nat Prod Rad, 2005, 4(4), 270-272. Our work has been recognized by International Universities including Delware State University USA and we have received queries from them. May, I know the Impact factor and foreign circulation of Natural Product Radiance?

Dr. Sachin A Mandavgane

Priyadarshini Institute of Engineering

and Technology

Nagpur-440 022

(Natural Product Radiance is not included in SCI but it is being abstracted by various journals of CABI and MANTIS and many other websites. It is subscribed by foreign institutes/libraries and we have foreign referees and authors – Editor)

 

Giloe for curing psoriasis

 

          Dear Editor, based on my ethnobotanical studies on Bhil tribes of Madhya Pradesh, I would like to share information on Tinospora cordifolia (Willd.) Miers ex Hook. f. & Thoms. (Family– Menispermaceae) which is commonly known as Amrita or Giloe in Hindi. In Ayurveda the plant is used for the treatment of psoriasis but it was found interesting when noted that Bhil tribes also use stem of this plant for same purpose. These tribal people call Limbvel to this species and showed effective results in psoriasis. The method of preparation and administration of the crude drug is as follows:

 

About 10cm long fresh or shade dried stem piece is crushed and kept in a full cup (mud bowl) of water for whole night. Next day early in the morning its extract is prepared. The extract is given to the patient twice a day before sunrise and sunset for a period of 2-3 months, depending upon the condition of the patient. Sometimes 1g of stem powder is taken orally with water on empty stomach for a period of 2-3 months.

Dr. Dinesh Jadhav

Kasturba Nagar, Ratlam

Madhya Pradesh

 

 

Meaningful in today's context

            Recently, I consulted this journal and found it very useful for both researchers as well as common man. I am very much delighted and it is gratifying to know that this is a publication from NISCAIR, CSIR, New Delhi, which is a premier institute of scientific publication in India. I think this journal will be helpful in gathering scattered information and knowledge on natural products and resources which is confined to big libraries and internet. The theme of this journal is also very meaningful in today's context where everybody is enthusiastic in using plant based medicines instead of allopathic. I found this journal very informative in the form of research papers on conservation of nature. I congratulate and appreciate editor and the team’s efforts to put together variety of information particularly applied aspects. I strongly recommend this journal for all college and university libraries where it will help students in selecting plants or products for research projects.

Dr. Vipin Parkash

Kurukshetra, Haryana, India.

 

 

Research Articles/Articles

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.6, September- October, 2007, 366-368

 

Antimicrobial activity of a medicinal plant Hybanthus enneaspermus (Linn.) F. Muell.

K Raveendra Retnam* and A John De Britto

Present investigation deals with the antimicrobial activity of a medicinal plant Hybanthus enneaspermus (Linn.) F. Muell., against two Gram positive bacteria, viz. Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis and five Gram negative bacteria, viz. Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi and Citrobacter freundii. Two active fractions were isolated from the benzene extract of the plant. The antimicrobial activity justifies its use in traditional medicine.

Keywords: Hybanthus enneaspermus, Antimicrobial activity, Antibacterial activity, Gram positive bacteria, Gram negative bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi, Citrobacter freundi.

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/00, A61P 31/04

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.6, September- October, 2007, 369-371

Evaluation of the antipyretic potential of methanol extract of the leaves of

Abies spectabilis (D. Don) Spach.

Satya Prakash Visnoi1, Anindya Basu2, S k Mahasin Alam2, Soma Samanta2 and Tarun Jha2*

 

            Methanol extract of leaves of Abies spectabilis (D. Don) Spach. (MEAS) was evaluated for the antipyretic potential on normal body temperature and yeast induced pyrexia in rats. MEAS showed significant activity at intraperitonial (i.p.) doses of 200 and 400mg/kg body weight. The extract, when administered at a dose of 200mg/kg body weight caused significant lowering of body temperature up to 3h. With 400 mg/kg body weight dose it caused significant lowering of body temperature up to 6h after administration. In the model of yeast induced elevation of body temperature MEAS showed dose-dependant lowering of the body temperature up to 4h at both the doses. The results obtained, were comparable to that of paracetamol, a standard antipyretic agent.

Keywords: Abies spectabilis, Antipyretic, Methanol extract, Yeast-induced pyrexia.

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/00, A61K 36/15, A61K 127/00, A61P 29/00

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.6, September- October, 2007, 372-374

Evaluation of antifungal activity of Salvadora persica Linn. leaves

Sarvesh Paliwal1*, Rajani Chauhan1, Anees A Siddiqui2, Shailendra Paliwal3 and

Jaiprakash Sharma4

         Invasive fungal infections are significant causes of morbidity and mortality, particularly in immuno-compromised patients. In vitro antifungal activity of dried leaf extract of Salvadora persica Linn. was assessed against Aspergillus niger, A. flavus, A. xylinium and Candida albicans by zone of inhibition method using Clotrimazole as a positive control. The leaf extract was found active against all three species of Aspergillus but the extract did not show significant activity against C. albicans.

 

Keywords: Salvadora persica, Tooth Brush Tree, Barapilu, Antifungal activity, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus xylinium and Candida albicans.

 

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/00, A61K 127/00, A61P 31/10

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.6, September- October, 2007, 375-376

New record of Baculovirus in Buzura suppressaria Guen. in India

A Mukhopadhyay1*, D De1, M Sarker1 and O M Bambawale2

            The looper caterpillar, Buzura suppressaria Guen. is one of the major defoliating pests of tea plantations of North-East India, causing heavy crop losses. The pest is of endemic nature, with four to five broods, each of 50-60 days duration in a year. Maximum damage takes place during pre-monsoon period (March to June) followed by a reduction in monsoon months and again a slow pickup during the winter months. A large-scale mortality of B. suppressaria is known during rainy season since many years in the tea plantations of the Darjeeling foothills. Natural mortality of the pest, reported earlier, was suspected to be due to bacterial infection only but our studies have confirmed that it can also be due to Baculovirus, which is being reported from Darjeeling Terai of India for the first time.

Keywords: Buzura suppressaria, Looper caterpillar, Baculovirus, Tea plantations, Darjeeling.

IPC code; Int. cl.8A01P 15/00

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.6, September- October, 2007, 377-381

Anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anti-lipid peroxidation studies on stem bark of

Ficus religiosa Linn.

R Sreelekshmi1, PG Latha1*, M M Arafat2, S Shyamal1, V J Shine1, G I Anuja1, S R Suja1 and S Rajasekharan1

            The methanol extract of the stem bark of Ficus religiosa Linn., The Peepal tree, was screened for its anti-inflammatory activity in Wistar albino rats and analgesic effects in Swiss albino mice. A significant inhibition of carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema, comparable to that produced by indomethacin, the standard anti-inflammatory drug, was obtained with all the three doses of the extract, tested in the present study. A significant inhibition of acetic acid-induced writhing in mice was observed with two doses of the extract. The analgesic effect was comparable to that caused by the standard drug, aspirin. The methanol extract also showed significant anti-lipid peroxidant effects in vitro.

Keywords: Ficus religiosa, Peepal tree, Stem bark, Anti-inflammatory, Analgesic, Lipid peroxidation.

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/00, A61P 29/00, A61K 129/00

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.6, September- October, 2007, 382-385

Bactericidal activity of Lagenandra ovata (Linn.) Thw. rhizome oil

P Annie Sulochana Selvakumari1* and A John De Britto2

 

Lagenandra ovata (Linn.) Thw. syn. L. toxicaria Dalz. of Araceae family was evaluated for antibacterial activity against the Gram positive bacterium, Staphylococcus aureus and the Gram negative bacteria, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, P. vulgaris and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.  Methanol extract of the rhizome and the oil fractions obtained from the methanol extract through column chromatography were screened.  The rhizome oil was found to be active against the pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae and this activity was compared to the standard antibiotic, Chloramphenicol.  The rhizome oil of L. ovata possesses potential antibacterial activity and can be exploited as an antiseptic agent against the susceptible organisms. 

Keywords: Lagenandra ovata, Antibacterial activity, Gram positive bacteria, Gram negative bacteria, Methanol extract, Rhizome oil.

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A61K 36/00, A61K 36/888, A61K 125/00, A61P 31/04

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.6, September- October, 2007, 386-390

Pharmacognostical study of Hybanthus enneaspermus (Linn.) F. Muell.

K Raveendra Retnam* and A John De Britto

Present paper deals with the pharmacognostical study of leaf, stem and root of Hybanthus enneaspermus (Linn.) F. Muell., for its identification and to distinguish it from the co-existing weeds and adulterants. The study includes macroscopic, microscopic and preliminary physico-chemical investigation.

Keywords: Hybanthus enneaspermus, Pharmacognostic characterization, Microscopic characters, Fluorescence characters, Physico-chemical characters.

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A61K 36/00

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.6, September- October, 2007, 391-397

Management of gram pod borer, Helicoverpa armigera (Hubner) in chickpea with biorationals

M P Gupta

Present study was carried out on Chickpea, Cicer arietinum Linn. cv. ‘JG-322’ to find out the efficacy of indigenous products like neem leaf and seed kernel extract, neem oil, cow and buffalo butter milk, garlic and red pepper extract and biological pesticide, Bacillus thuringiensis as compared to chemical pesticide against the incidence of gram pod borer, Helicoverpa armigera Hubner at College of Agriculture, Tikamgarh (Madhya Pradesh) during rabi seasons of 2001-02, 2002-03 and 2003-04. The results revealed that indigenous products, garlic + red pepper (0.5, 1.0%), cow butter milk (4-8%), buffalo butter milk (8%) and biological insecticide, Bacillus thuringiensis (0.2%) were highly effective and statistically at par with chemical pesticides Quinolphos (0.05%) and Cypermethrin (0.01%) not only in reducing the larval population and % pod damage caused by H. armigera but also in increasing the grain yield of chickpea.

 

            Net profit was found to be quite closer to chemical pesticides. The incremental cost benefit ratio was highest with Garlic+Red pepper extract -0.5% (19.4) and Cow butter milk- 4% (19.3). Thus, these indigenous products can be employed effectively, economically and safely in controlling the incidence of gram pod borer in Chickpea.

 

Keywords: Chickpea, Cicer arietinum, Gram pod borer, Helicoverpa armigera, Bacillus thurigiensis, Cow butter milk, Buffalo butter milk, Neem leaf extract, Neem seed kernel extract, Neem oil, Cow urine, Garlic, Red pepper.

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A01N 65/00, A01N 63/00

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.6, September- October, 2007, 398-401

Utilization of whey protein concentrate in processed cheese spread

Suneeta Pinto1, Rathour AK2*, J P Prajapati1, A H Jana1 and M J Solanky1

 

            Blends of cheddar cheese comprising of 66% of 2-3 months old and 34% of 4-5 months old cheddar cheese were used to prepare processed cheese spread. Cheese solids were partially replaced by whey protein concentrate (WPC) (38.00 per cent protein) solids at different levels, viz. 1.5, 3.0 and 4.5 per cent. Incorporation of WPC resulted in a significant improvement in body and texture score of spread particularly at 3.0 and 4.5% level. However, addition of WPC at higher levels imparted a milder flavour to the product. Processed cheese spread with good melt ability, desired characteristics with improved spread ability can be prepared by using dried WPC at levels up to 4.5% of cheese solids.

Keywords: Whey protein concentrate, Cheddar cheese, Cheese spread, Buffalo skim milk, Dairy food product.

IPC code; Int. cl.8A23C 1/00, A23C 19/06, A23C 19/09, A23C 19/097

 

Green Page: Research Articles/Articles

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.6, September- October, 2007, 402-404

Cultivation prospects of Exacum bicolor Roxb. —An endangered, ornamental and

anti-diabetic herb

U Sreelatha 1*, T S Baburaj1, C Narayanan Kutty2, P A Nazeem3 and Jyothi Bhaskar3

 

Exacum bicolor Roxb. is a perennial herb with attractive flowers and medicinal properties. The plant is endemic to Peninsular India and now it is placed under endangered species. Its ornamental value and medicinal properties are yet to be fully exploited; non-lodging nature of plant, bi-coloured flower bunches with a long flowering period and good field life offer great future for this plant. In present paper field observations and cultivation trials on this plant are reported for its proper utilization, conservation and cultivation as a beautiful medicinal herb in tropical regions.

 

Key words: Exacum bicolor, Country kreat, Gentianaceae, Endemic, Garden plant, Medicinal plant, Endangered species, Peninsular India.

IPC code; Int. cl.8—A61K 36/00, A01G 17/00

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.6, September- October, 2007, 405-409

Effect of N6-Benzyl amino purine and Naphthalene acetic acid on camptothecin production through in vitro propagation of

Ophiorrhiza rugosa Wall. var. decumbens (Gardn. ex Thw.) Deb & Mondal

                          V R Vineesh, C L Jelly, P V Fijesh, V K Jaimsha and J Padikkala*     

In vitro production of camptothecin (CPT) was achieved by the establishment of multiple shoot and root cultures of Ophiorrhiza rugosa Wall. var. decumbens (Gardn. ex Thw.) Deb & Mondal. The maximum multiple shoots were obtained in Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 5mg/l N6-benzyl amino purine (BA) along with 0.5mg/l naphthalene acetic acid (NAA). Optimal root generation was observed in Murashige and Skoog medium with 2mg/l NAA and 0.05mg/l BA. However, CPT content found to be elevated in shoot and root cultures where growth hormones imposed growth inhibition. The maximum amount of CPT in multiple shoots was 0.039% while shoots of plant grown in the field showed 0.002 per cent. In root cultures, CPT content was 0.065% whereas roots of intact plant showed only 0.024 per cent.

 

Keywords: Ophiorrhiza rugosa var. decumbens, Camptothecin, 10-Hydroxycamptothecin, Multiple shoot cultures, Root cultures, N6-Benzyl Amino Purine, Naphthalene acetic acid.

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A01H 4/00, A01H 5/04, A01H 5/06

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.6, September- October, 2007, 410-426

Wild edible plants of Meghalaya, North-east India

Jasmine Therese Sawian1, Solomonnadar Jeeva1, Febreena Grace Lyndem1, Bhanu Prakash Mishra2 and Roytre Christopher Laloo1*

The people of Meghalaya are very close to nature, and forests are one of the important natural resources in the state. The tribes of the state largely depend on forests for their livelihood and have acquired a vast knowledge about plant wealth and utilization of forest products. The present communication aims to document the traditional knowledge about wild edible plants used by tribal people of Meghalaya.  During present investigation, a total of 249 species of wild edibles belonging to 153 genera and 82 families were inventorised. Among them 129 are trees, 54 shrubs, 37 herbs and 29 climbers. The majority of the species were fruits bearing (125). Some edible plants have great economic value and are highly linked with socio-economic development of tribal communities of the state.  A few such species may be introduced in agroforestry systems, which could be potential genetic resources for tree breeding programmes in other areas of the country and also to provide edible plant resources to the communities in addition to creating photosynthetic pool to counter environmental degradation. 

Keywords: Wild edible plants, Traditional knowledge, Meghalaya, North-east India, Agroforestry, Genetic resources.

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A23L 1/00, A01G 17/00

Explorer: Research Articles/Articles

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.6, September- October, 2007, 427-429

Gymnocladus assamicus Kanjilal ex P.C. Kanjilal fruit—A soap substitute

B I Choudhury, M L Khan*, A Arunachalam and K Arunachalam

 

            Gymnocladus assamicus Kanjilal ex P.C. Kanjilal, a leguminous tree endemic to North-East India, bears fleshy pods with tempting smell. Monpa tribal community living in Dirang circle of West Kameng District of Arunachal Pradesh utilizes its pods as a substitute for soap/detergent required for removing sticky adhesives and consumes roasted seeds as substitute for groundnut and coffee. Peoples also make use of the pods for removing/expelling leeches of their domestic animals. The present paper highlights different ethnobotanical uses of this plant and suggests further study and conservation strategies to revive its natural population.

 

Keywords: Arunachal Pradesh, Endangered, Conservation, Ethnobotany, Gymnocladus assamicus, Monpa, Seeds, Coffee, Groundnut, Pods, Soap, Adhesives, Substitute, Torgen, Torma.

IPC code; Int. cl.8 A61K 8/00, A23L 1/00

  

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.6, September- October, 2007, 430-435

 

Traditional medicinal practices among the tribal people of Malkangiri district, Orissa, India

Chiranjibi Pattanaik1*, C Sudhakar Reddy2, Rasmita Das3 and P Manikya Reddy4

 

           An ethnobotanical survey of some tribal areas revealed that 34 plant species are used by tribal people of Malkangiri district, Orissa. The use of traditional medicine was observed to be wide-spread and prevalent over modern medicine in the study area. In present paper plants for various diseases have been discussed along with their uses, botanical names with family, local names, plant parts used and medicinal preparation along with dosage and mode of administration.

Keywords: Traditional medicine, Bonda, Didayi, Koya, Paroja, Bhatoda, Khondh, Ethnobotany, Malkangiri district, Orissa.

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/00, A61P 7/17, A61P 17/00, A61P 29/00

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.6, September-October, 2007, 436-442

 

Medicinal plants used by Paliyan tribes of Sirumalai hills of southern India

S Karuppusamy

An ethnobotanical survey was carried out to collect information on the use of medicinal plants by Paliyan tribes in Sirumalai hills of Eastern Ghats. About 90 medicinal plants are used in17 various health problems; highest being for wound healing (12%). The majority of the remedies are prepared from freshly collected plant parts especially leaves from single species only. The treatment mode is usually oral, but some pastes using ingredients such as honey, common salt and milk are also applied.

Keywords: Ethnobotany, Sirumalai hills, Paliyan tribes, Medicinal plants.

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾A61K 36/00