NATURAL PRODUCT RADIANCE

A Bimonthly Journal on Natural Products

VOL 7, No.1                                                   January- February 2008

 

C      O      N      T      E      N      T      S

 

Readers’ Write

4

Editorial

5

Research Papers/General Articles

 

In vitro antifungal activity of Cassia alata Linn. flower extract

M N Abubacker, R Ramanathan and T Senthil Kumar

IPC code; Int. cl.8 A61K 36/00, A61K 36/482, A61P 31/10

6

Antimicrobial activity of Nigella sativa Linn. seed oil against multi-drug resistant bacteria from clinical isolates

M T Salman, R A Khan and I Shukla

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/00, A61P 31/04

10

Antiulcerogenic and antioxidant effects of Coccinia grandis (Linn.)Voigt leaves on aspirin-induced gastric ulcer in rats

Papiya Mitra Mazumder, D Sasmal and R Arivudai Nambi

IPC code; Int. cl.8 A61K 36/00, A61K 36/42, A61K 127/00, A61P 1/04

15

Wound healing activity of the ethanol extract of Terminalia bellirica Roxb. fruits

G P Choudhary

IPC code; Int. cl.8— A61K 36/00, A61P 17/02

19

Development of natural dye based sindoor

V P Kapoor, K Katiyar, P Pushpangadan  and N Singh

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A61K 8/97, A61Q 1/00, A61Q 1/12, C09B 61/00

22

Antibacterial activity of solvent fractions of crude water decoction of apical twigs and latex of Calotropis procera (Ait.) R. Br.

Farzin M Parabia, I L Kothari and M H Parabia

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A61K 36/00, A61P 31/04

30

Phytochemical composition and antioxidant potential of Desmodium gangeticum (Linn.) DC.

A Niranjan and S K Tewari

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A61K 36/00, A61P 39/06

35

Dyeing of silk with barberry bark dye using mordant combination

Neelam Pruthi, Geeta D Chawla and Saroj Yadav

IPC code; Int. cl.8— C09B 61/00, D06 P1/34

40

Formulation and evaluation of commonly used natural hair colorants

Y Madhusudan Rao, Shayeda and P Sujatha

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A61K 8/97, A61Q 5/10, C09B 61/00

45

Animal self-medication through natural sources

C P Jain, Ashok Dashora, Rahul Garg, Udichi Kataria and Bharat Vashistha

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A61K 35/64, A61K 36/00

49

Tulsi – A potential protector against air travel health problems

Narendra Singh and Marilena Gilca

IPC code; Int. cl.8— A61K 36/00, A61K 36/53

54

Unexploited botanical nitrification inhibitors prepared from Karanja plant

Deepanjan Majumdar

IPC code; Int. cl.8¾ C05C, C09K 17/00

58

Green page: Research Papers/General Articles

 

Population studies of Gaultheria fragrantissima Wall. in Darjeeling district of West Bengal

Pranay Bantawa and Tapan Kumar Mondal

IPC code; Int. cl.8¾ A61K 36/00, A61K 36/45

68

Cultivation of Shiitake mushroom – A potential agro-industry for hilly areas of North eastern India

H Birkumar Singh, R K Adhikary, R K Sharma, T C Sarma and P G Rao

IPC code; Int. cl.8 A01G 17/00, A01G 1/04, A23L 1/00, A61K 36/06            

74

Explorer: Research Papers/General Articles

 

Ethnomedicines for jaundice used in tribal areas of North Maharashtra

S B Badgujar and M B Patil

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A61K 36/00, A61P 1/16

79

Natural dye-yielding plants and indigenous knowledge of dye preparation in Achanakmar-Amarkantak Biosphere Reserve, Central India

S C Tiwari and Ajay Bharat

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ C09B 61/00

82

Book Review

88

Forthcoming Conferences

90

Guidelines to authors

91

Index

93

 

                                                                                                                                   

 

Forthcoming Conferences, Seminars, Exhibitions and Trainings

 

1. National Conference on Environmental Degradation: Challenges and Remedies, 13-14 March 2008, Haryana, India, Prof. Nitin Bhatnagar, Maharishi Markandeshwar University, Mullana, Ambala-133 203, Haryana; Phone-01731-304235 (O), Mob. +919315645151; Website: http://www.mmetmullana.com/edcr08/main1.html

2. Symposium on Exploring the Research Platform for Pharmaceutical Product and Process Development 15-16 March 2008, Tiruchirappalli, Tamil Nadu, India, Dr. A. Puratchikody, Department of Pharmaceutical Engineering and Technology, Tamil Nadu Agriculture University, Tamil Nadu, India; Website: http://www.tau.edu.in

3. National Conference on Animal Ethics and Welfare, 28-30 March 2008, Chidambaram, Tamil Nadu, India, Dr. S. Selvakumar, Annamalai University; E-mail: selvakumar1965@bsnl.in

4. 1st India Health Conclave 2008, 2-4 April 2008, Mumbai, India, Sunayana Shah, Technopak Advisors Pvt. Ltd., Mumbai, Maharashtra; E-mail: sunayana.shah@technopak.com; Website: http://www.indiahealthconclave.com

 

5. 2nd International Conference on Frontiers in Biomedical and Enviromental Health Sciences, 16-20 April 2008, China, Yuejin Hua, Hangzhou, Zhejiang University; Website: http://www.2ndic-dna-rep2008.org/

 

6. The 2nd International Conference on Bioinformatics and Biomedical Engineering, 16-18 May 2008, Shanghai, China, IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society; E-mail: submit@icbbe.org; Website: http://www.icbbe.org/

 

7. International Livestock and Dairy Expo 2008, 22-24 August 2008, New Delhi, India, Ms. Bhawna Gupta, Pixie Consulting Solutions Ltd. Karnal, Haryana, India; Website: http://www.ildexindia.com

8. The Second Regional Conference on Soaps, Detergents & Cosmetics, 12-15 October, 2008, Kala Academy, Goa, India, Mr. S. N. Trivedi, The Secretariat, Oil Technologists'Association of India-WZ, C/o Oils, Oleochemicals & Surfactants Division,  Institute of Chemical Technology, University of Mumbai, Matunga, Mumbai-400 019; Phone: 91-22-32972206/ 24146526; Fax: 00 91-22-24124017; E-mail: strivedi@rsdc-otai.org, info@rsdc-otai.org; Website: http://www.rsdc-otai.org/contact.htm.

9. Green Energy Summit 2008, 16-19 October 2008, Bangalore, India, GES Representative, Saltmarch Media, Bangalore, Karnataka; Website: http://www.greenenergysummit.com

10. Healthcare 2008, 25 October 2008, New Delhi, India, Nazish E. Azmi, National Healthcare Foundation, E-mail: ationalhealthcarefoundation@hotmail.com

11. International Congress on Bioprocesses in Food Industries (ICBF 2008), 6-8 November 2008, Hyderabad, India , Prof. L. Venkateswar Rao, Department of Microbiology in association with College of Technology, Osmania University, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India; Website: http://www.icbf2008.com

 

 

Readers Write

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, Jan.- Feb. 2008, pp. 4    

Cow urine based bioformulations for disinfection and seed germination of crops

            Dear Editor, we have prepared bioformulations using cow urine and different natural products like neem, tulsi, turmeric powder and holy river Ganga water (collected from Har ki Pauri, Haridwar) and studied its effect on the disinfection and germination of seeds of certain crops, viz. moong [Vigna radiata (Linn.) Wilczek cv ‘K -851’], groundnut (Arachis hypogaea Linn.) and wheat (Triticum aestivum Linn.) seeds. Different combinations were tried to get optimum activities. The results showed that formulations with traces of tulsi, Holy river Ganga water (1% v/v) and undiluted cow urine (99% v/v), possess maximum seed germinating efficacy. Best results, in terms of microbial growth zone inhibition (disinfection) diameter (mm) were obtained with the formulations (a) Cow urine 10 ml + Neem extract 5 ml, (b) 31.25 ml water + 7.81 ml cow urine + 0.390g of turmeric powder (c) Filtrate of 5% (w/v) tulsi leaves in undiluted (100%) cow urine and (d) Cow urine (99% v/v) + Holy river Ganga water (1% v/v).

Jaspreet Kaur and Jitendra Singh

Sardar Bhagwan Singh

PG Institute of Biomedical Sciences and

Research, Balawala, Dehra Dun–248 161

E- mail: jb_truth_honour@yahoo.com

Osteoarthritis: Ayurvedic management

            Dear Editor, I would like to share with readers about Osteoarthritis (OA) and its Ayurvedic managemet. It is a common joint condition affecting a large number of people in middle age and above. Joints commonly affected are knee, hip and small hand joints especially the distal inter phalangeal joints. Both sexes are equally affected and there is an increasing prevalence with increase of age. Main presenting features are pain in and around the affected joint and are of more concern with the movements. Signs of inflammation are usually minimal around the joint. No specific etiological reason have been found clearly associated with the occurrence of OA, however, certain risk factors have been found associated with its increased chances. These risk factors are: Obesity, Advanced age, Osteoporosis, Trauma to the joint, Long inactivation of joint, Infection of joint and Over use of joint.

Management of OA largely revolves around the joint protection and strengthening strategies. This relieves undue stress from the joint and makes more indurated. Some dietary supplements have also been investigated for their possible role in regeneration of the joints however, their final status is yet to be explored. Sandhivata is the Ayurvedic synonym for OA. Sandhivata, as the name suggests is the disease of Sandhi (Joints) caused by Vata. As the age advances, there is a physiological tendency for Kapha to decrease and for Vata to increase. As a consequence Vata becomes the predominant dosha in old age. Kapha inside the joint capsule is responsible for smooth and frictionless movement of the joint. A deficient Kapha in old age causes a reduction in joint Kapha. An increase of Vata results in increased pain sensitivity and causes pain, which is not exactly in accordance with the pathology. Ayurvedic management of Sandhivata addresses both parts of the pathogenesis simultaneously.

            It has been observed that following Ayurvedic remedies are useful in the management of OA: (i) Rasayana-Kharjur, Bala, Naga bala and Satavari may improve the joint lubrication by increasing the Kapha content of the body in general and to joints in particular; (iii) Vata samaka- Gugglu, Nirgundi, Rasna and Dasa mula are the Vata samaka drugs and can be used as powder, decoction or extract form; (iii) Local applications–Medicated oils to reduce pain (Maha visha garbha oil), or to provide nourishment to joint tissue (Maha masha oil); (iv) Swedana–is the local fomentation of the affected joint. This may be done with simple steam or with decoction of the Vata samaka herbs; (v) Life style modifications: Risk factors discussed above are to be identified and managed as per the individual situation. Weight reduction is usually recommended in obese osteoarthritics; (vi) Exercise: Regular schedule of cycling and active range of motion movements can be helpful. A common exercise, which is recommended for OA knee, is Quadriceps exercise. This can easily be practiced at home. Following is the way this drill should be performed: (a.) Lie supine on bed with knees straight and touching to the bed; (b) Lift both feet together above the bed and raise them to ½-1 ft; (c) Keep the elevated feet stable in air for 1-2 min. and then gradually come down to the original position and (d) Rest for 1-2 min and repeat the process again. This exercise can be done comfortably for 2-3 times in a day and with 8-10 repetitions at a time. Any attempt made beyond the level of comfort may harm the joints.

 

Dr. Sanjeev Rastogi, MD

Mitralaya, Opp. Turiaganj Prasuti Griha

Tulsi Das Marg, Lucknow-4

Ph.0522-6541085, Mob: 9415022955

E-mail: rastogisanjeev@yahoo.com

 

 

 

 

 

Research Articles/Articles

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, Jan.- Feb. 2008, pp. 6-9

 

In vitro antifungal activity of Cassia alata Linn. flower extract

M N Abubacker1*, R Ramanathan1 and T Senthil Kumar2

 

            The aqueous flower extract of Cassia alata Linn. (Family-Caesalpiniaceae) was investigated for antifungal activity by agar diffusion method against three distinct groups of fungi, viz. aflatoxin producing fungi, Aspergillus flavus (NCBT 101) and A. parasiticus (NCBT 128); plant pathogenic fungi, Fusarium oxysporum (NCBT 156 ) and Helminthosporium oryzae (NCBT 165); and human pathogenic fungi Candida albicans (NCBT 140) and Microsporum audouinni (NCBT 173). Total inhibition (100%) of growth was seen at 10 and 15 mg/ml concentrations for aflatoxin producing fungal strains. Whereas for plant and human pathogenic fungi at 15mg/ml concentration. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of the extract varied from 5.75 to 8.00mg/ml for these fungi. Thus, aqueous flower extract of C. alata can be used as a potential antifungal agent for these three varied groups of fungi.

 

Keywords: Antifungal activity, Cassia alata, Ringworm Senna, Aflatoxin, Plant pathogenic fungi, Human pathogenic fungi.

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/00, A61K 36/482, A61P 31/10.

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, Jan.- Feb. 2008, pp. 10-14

 

Antimicrobial activity of Nigella sativa Linn. seed oil against multi-drug resistant bacteria from clinical isolates

M T Salman1*, R A Khan1 and I Shukla2

            An alarming increase in bacterial strains resistant to existing antimicrobial agents demands a renewed effort to seek agents effective against pathogenic bacteria resistant to current antimicrobials. Nigella sativa Linn. (Black cumin) essential oil was studied for antibacterial activity against various clinical isolates of bacteria resistant to a number of antibiotics, in varying concentrations by Disc Agar diffusion technique using impregnated filter paper discs on inoculated Muellar Hinton agar plates. The oil showed pronounced dose dependant antibacterial activity which was more against Gram positive than Gram negative bacteria. Among Gram positive bacteria tested, Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, other coagulase –ve Staphylococci and Streptococcus pyogenes were sensitive to the oil and Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus agalactiae were resistant. Among Gram –ve bacteria tested, only Pseudomonas aeruginosa was sensitive to oil and rest (Acinetobacter baumannii, Citrobacter freundii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, P. vulgaris and Vibrio cholerae) were insensitive. Out of 144 strains tested, most of which were resistant to a number of antibiotics, 97 were inhibited by the oil of black cumin. To the best of our knowledge, the activity of essential oil against coagulase negative Staphylococci (except S. epidermidis) and Streptococcus pyogenes is being reported for the first time.

 

Keywords: Nigella sativa, Black cumin, Antimicrobial activity, Essential oil, Antibiotic resistance, Clinical isolates.

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/00, A61P 31/04.

 

 

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, Jan.- Feb. 2008, pp. 15-18

 

Antiulcerogenic and antioxidant effects of Coccinia grandis (Linn.) Voigt leaves on aspirin-induced gastric ulcer in rats

Papiya Mitra Mazumder*, D Sasmal and R Arivudai Nambi

 

            The effect of Coccinia grandis (Linn.)Voigt leaves powder, its methanol and aqueous extracts were investigated on aspirin-induced gastric ulcer model in rats. The leaf powder showed a significant dose related decrease in ulcer index, with significant increase in mucus secretion and decrease in level of Lipid peroxidation (LPO) and Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. Methanol extract at an equivalent dose to that of the powder also showed a significant decrease in ulcer index with significant changes in mucus secretion, LPO and SOD. However, aqueous extract was found to be non-significant in reducing ulcer index. The group, receiving standard drug Famotidine, showed no effect on the mucus secretion induced in this experimental model. These observations confirm the antiulcerogenic potential of this plant, probably due to increased mucus secretion and antioxidant property.

 

Keywords: Ivy Gourd, Coccinia grandis; Gastric ulcer; Antiulcerogenic, Antioxidant.

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/00, A61K 36/42, A61K 127/00, A61P 1/04.

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, Jan.- Feb. 2008, pp. 19-21

 

Wound healing activity of the ethanol extract of Terminalia bellirica Roxb. fruits

G P Choudhary

 

               The wound healing activity of ethanol extract of Terminalia bellirica Roxb. fruit was evaluated on excision and incision wound model, in albino rats, in the form of an ointment with two concentrations (2 and 4% w/w ointment) of fruit extract  simple ointment base. Both concentrations of the ethanol extract showed significant response in both the wound types tested when compared with the control group. Nitrofurazone ointment (0.2%w/w) was used as standard drug.

 

Keywords: Terminalia bellirica, Belliric Myrobalan, Ethanol extract, Nitrofurazone, Wound healing.

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/00, A61P 17/02

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, Jan.- Feb. 2008, pp. 22-29

Development of natural dye based sindoor

V P Kapoor1*, K Katiyar1, P Pushpangadan2 and N Singh3  

 

            In India sindoor is an important cosmetic item for married women, worship and other purposes. Prolonged use of synthetic dye-based sindoors has shown symptoms of hair loss, graying of hair, edema, erythema and even skin cancer. In view of above scenario, a process technology has been developed to produce an alternative, safe, non-toxic, eco-friendly natural dye-based sindoor. The process is novel as pharmaceutical/food grade natural ingredients are used as bulking/filler materials and no salt of any heavy metals are used. The process provides an opportunity for the preparation of different shades of sindoor like orange, red, dark red, mehroon, etc., using different dyes and their blends. As per results of Double Blind Clinical testing, the red and mehroon coloured herbal sindoor is quite safe for skin application having no adverse effect on skin. The orange coloured herbal sindoor is quite suitable for worship and other purposes. It provides an option to replace synthetic dye-based sindoor.

 

Keywords: Eco-system, Herbal sindoor, Lead poisoning, Natural dyes, Skin allergy, Toxicity.

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A61K 8/97, A61Q 1/00, A61Q 1/12, C09B 61/00

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, Jan.- Feb. 2008, pp. 30-34

 

Antibacterial activity of solvent fractions of crude water decoction of apical twigs and latex of Calotropis procera (Ait.) R. Br.

Farzin M Parabia1*, I L Kothari1 and M H Parabia2

 

Water decoction of Calotropis procera (Ait.) R.Br. is reported as a purulent wound healer in Indian System of Medicine ¾ Ayurveda. Antibacterial activity of solvent fractions derived from the crude water decoction of C. procera against pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacterial strains has been evaluated. Dried apical twigs and latex of the plant were used for getting extracts. Four solvent fractions of both the samples were tested for their antibacterial activity on eight opportunistic bacterial strains, viz. Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Serratia marcescens, Enterobacter aerogenes and Escherichia coli. Other pathogenic strains selected were Salmonella paratyphi A and S. typhi, and non-pathogenic strains were Bacillus subtilis and Micrococcus luteus. The disk diffusion method was used to determine the inhibitory effect of all the fractions of both the plant samples on twelve tested bacterial strains. Comparison of the inhibitory activity with already established eight antibiotics was carried out. The fractions of apical twigs of plant produced wider inhibition zones than the fractions of latex. The fractions of both the plant samples produced greatest inhibitory zone on Staphylococcus aureus one of the major wound infectious bacterial strain.

 

Keywords: Traditional wound healer, Calotropis procera, Antibacterial activity, Gram positive bacteria, Gram negative bacteria, crude water decoction.

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A61K 36/00, A61P 31/04

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, Jan.- Feb. 2008, pp. 35-39

 

Phytochemical composition and antioxidant potential of Desmodium gangeticum (Linn.) DC.

A Niranjan and S K Tewari*

 

Chemical examination of Desmodium gangeticum (Linn.) DC. root and aerial parts has resulted into lupeol, lauric acid and mixture of β-sitosterol and stigmasterol. The total phenolic contents (TPC) were 14.4, 13.8 mg/g GAE; antioxidant activity (AOA) 58.9, 54.8% and reducing power (RP) in terms of ascorbic acid equivalent (ASE/ml) 2.7 and 2.9 in roots and aerial parts of the plant, respectively. Free radical scavenging activity (FRSA) measured by α,α-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) showed IC50 (Inhibitory Concentration) 0.31, 0.35 mg/ml; EC50 (Efficient Concentration) 13.48, 15.22mg/mg DPPH and ARP (Antiradical Power) 7.42, 6.57 in roots and aerial parts, respectively. AOA in different assays expressed as IC50 in aforesaid plant parts ranged from 0.27-0.83 mg/ml and 0.41-1.11 mg/ml, respectively. The extract of both parts showed significant protective effect against Fenton’s reaction on supercoiled pUC 18 DNA assayed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The specific phenolic composition assayed through HPLC and MS/MS showed the presence of gallic, protocatechuic, salicylic, chlorogenic, caffeic acids, rutin, quercetin and kaempferol in both parts of plant.

 

Keywords: Desmodium gangeticum, lupeol, lauric acid,  stigmasterol, phenolic content, antioxidant activity, Oxidative DNA damage.

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A61K 36/00, A61P 39/06

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, Jan.- Feb. 2008, pp. 40-44

Dyeing of silk with barberry bark dye using mordant combination

Neelam Pruthi*, Geeta D Chawla and Saroj Yadav

               Barberry bark (Berberis aristata DC.) dye was used for dyeing of degummed pure silk yarn using four selected mordants; alum, chrome, copper sulphate and ferrous sulphate in different ratio i.e. 1:1, 1:3 and 3:1. For dyeing optimized condition used were: wave length-410 nm, dye extraction time-60 min, medium of extraction–aqueous, dye material concentration- 8%, dyeing time-45 min and pH of dyeing solution-4.0. Mordant concentration and mordanting techniques were also optimized. Analysis of fastness properties revealed that alum + chrome, alum + ferrous sulphate and chrome + ferrous sulphate in 1:3 ratio and alum + copper sulphate and chrome + copper sulphate in 3:1 ratio showed the best fastness properties with post mordanting technique. The dyed samples possess very good to excellent fastness. Improvement in brightness was observed on exposing the samples to sunlight, washing and perspiration fastness tests. Large range of shades was obtained. The mordant which was in high proportion dominated the shade.

Keywords: Barberry bark, Berberis aristata, Natural dye, Mordant, Silk yarn.

IPC code; Int. cl.8C09B 61/00, D06 P1/34

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, Jan.- Feb. 2008, pp. 45-48

 

Formulation and evaluation of commonly used natural hair colorants

Y Madhusudan Rao*, Shayeda and P Sujatha

 

Loss of colour in hair is due to varied reasons like genetic influence, effect of environmental factors, use of alcoholic preparations, etc.  Though the permanent synthetic hair dyes are available in different colour ranges and retain natural lustre, they have the chief disadvantage of producing hypersensitive reactions in some individuals. In the present investigation various combinations of powdered leaves, fruits and flowers of dye yielding and hair care plants like Henna, Indigo, Bhringraj, Amla, Catechu and Centella were evaluated for their colouring and sensitivity reactions. Henna and Indigo formulation was found to be suitable natural colorant.

 

Keywords: Natural hair colorants, Dye yielding plants, Hair care plants, Henna, Indigo.

 

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A61K 8/97, A61Q 5/10, C09B 61/00

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, Jan.- Feb. 2008, pp. 49-53

 

Animal self-medication through natural sources

C P Jain1, Ashok Dashora2*, Rahul Garg2, Udichi Kataria2 and Bharat Vashistha3

 

      The term ‘Zoopharmacognosy’ was coined to describe the process by which wild animals select and use specific plants with medicinal properties against ailments and prevention of disease. Early studies of zoopharmacognosy focused on the interactions between plants and the herbivores that consume them. The study of animal self-medication and ethno-medicinal practices may provide important leads to future sources of medicine. This paper highlights the existence, efficiency and self-medication in wild animals.

 

Keywords: Animal self-medication, Zoopharmacognosy, Dirt, Insects, Medicinal plants.

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A61K 35/64, A61K 36/00

Green Page: Research Articles/Articles

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, Jan.- Feb. 2008, pp. 54-57

 

Tulsi – A potential protector against air travel health problems

Narendra Singh1*and Marilena Gilca2

 

            In recent past aircraft cabin related many health problems have been recognized by the medical world hence it became a focus for the scientific research. Although, there are only few efficacious therapeutic solutions for many of these disturbances like cosmic radiation-induced carcinogenesis, anoxia-, noise stress- or jet lag- related symptoms. Herbal research may offer new prototypes for unsolved problems of pharmacotherapy. Tulsi, Ocimum sanctum Linn., one of the best adaptogen herbs, exhibiting various biological effects, viz. radioprotective, immunomodulator, anti-fatigue activity, etc. might help in the prevention and improvement of air travel health problems.

Keywords: Tulsi, Ocimum sanctum, Air travel health problems.

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/00, A61K 36/53.

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, Jan.- Feb. 2008, pp. 58-67

 

Unexploited botanical nitrification inhibitors prepared from Karanja plant

Deepanjan Majumdar

Karanjin, a furanoflavonoid (3-methoxy furano–2', 3', 7, 8-flavone, C18H12O4), is the non-fatty component of oil extracted from the seeds of Karanja tree (Pongamia pinnata Pierre syn. P. glabra Vent.). Karanjin content in seeds is highly variable yielding up to 1.25% (w/w). It is reported as early as in 1925, has been found to be a very potent nitrification inhibitor (NI), sometimes comparable or even more potent than a few commercialized NIs in soils but unfortunately has not been used widely in agricultural fields or commercialized as a nitrification inhibitor. It has also been found to minimize nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from soil in vitro. The use of karanjin as a nitrification inhibitor is yet to be made in field and hence, more research on karanjin in relation to cost effective extraction and purification process etc. should be given an emphasis. In the present communication an attempt has been made to give an up-to-date account of unexploited botanical nitrification inhibitors prepared from karanja plant. 

 

Keywords: Agriculture, Fertilizer, Nitrogen, Nitrification inhibitors, Karanjin, Pongamia pinnata, Karanja.

IPC code; Int. cl.8¾ C05C, C09K 17/00

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, Jan.- Feb. 2008, pp. 68-73

Population studies of Gaultheria fragrantissima Wall. in Darjeeling district of West Bengal

Pranay Bantawa and Tapan Kumar Mondal*

 

Floristic diversity of eastern Himalayas is well known which harbours many medicinally important plants also. But, unsustainable use and over exploitation have threatened existence of such valuable plants. Gaultheria fragrantissima Wall. is one of such species which is least studied. The existing status, habitat and morphological variation of the plant was studied and analyzed in Darjeeling district of West Bengal, India. Phyto-sociological studies revealed that the species preformed best in specific habitats (i.e. in mixed forest of Eurya acuminata DC. -Viburnum erubescens Wall. with ground association of Poa annua Linn.). Several morphological and environmental features were identified which have bearing on aerial biomass, the economical parts of the plants. The present study thus identified the area, which may be utilized as basis for chemical screening and also to identify an elite line for commercial cultivation of this plant. The present study also showed that the seed retention percentage at higher altitude bears low value due to high wind velocity.

 

Keywords:  Eastern Himalayas, Gaultheria fragrantissima, Indian Wintergreen, Cultivation, Habitat, Wintergreen oil.  

IPC code; Int. cl.8¾ A61K 36/00, A61K 36/45, C11B 9/00

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, Jan.- Feb. 2008, pp. 74-78

Cultivation of Shiitake mushroom – A potential agro-industry for hilly areas of North eastern India

H Birkumar Singh1*, R K Adhikary2, R K Sharma2, T C Sarma2 and P G Rao2

 

The survival and economic prosperity of various ethnic people of North eastern India largely depends upon rationale wise utilization and sustainable development of its local resources. Recently, Japanese wood mushroom commonly called as shiitake or golden oak mushroom [Lentinula edodes (Berk) Sing] has been explored for its large scale cultivation and production leading to conservation of biodiversity and economic upliftment of the local people. Shiitake mushroom is in high demand in the local markets due to its unique characteristic taste and usefulness in health care such as diabetes, hypertension, tumours, antiviral and as immuno-stimulant. On taking up its commercial cultivation one can earn a net profit of Rs. 4000 to 11,000 per annum from a mushroom cultivable shed of the size 4×4 m2.

 

Keywords: Biodiversity, Forest conservation, Japanese wood mushroom, Shiitake mushroom, Golden oak mushroom, Lentinula edodes, Rural economy, North eastern India.

IPC code; Int. cl.8A 01G 17/00, A01G 1/04, A23L 1/00, A61K 36/06

Explorer: Research Articles/Articles

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, Jan.- Feb. 2008, pp. 79-81

Ethnomedicines for jaundice used in tribal areas of North Maharashtra

S B Badgujar1* and M B Patil2

Ethnomedicinal survey was conducted in hilly area of North Maharashtra, India. Till today Bhills, Gavits, Kokanis, Mavachis, Padvis, Tadvis, Valvis and Vasaves tribes are exclusively dependent on forest. They have own system of herbal medicine. Information on 19 plant species of 18 angiosperm families which are traditionally used as medicine to cure Kavil (Jaundice) was collected. The plant part used, traditional preparation and doses for administration are given in the present paper.

Keywords:  Ethnomedicines, Medicinal plants, Tribes, Jaundice, North Maharashtra.

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A61K 36/00, A61P 1/16

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, Jan.- Feb. 2008, pp. 82-87

Natural dye-yielding plants and indigenous knowledge of dye preparation in Achanakmar-Amarkantak Biosphere Reserve, Central India

S C Tiwari* and Ajay Bharat

            The Chhattisgarh state, in the heart of India, is very rich in biodiversity as well as in the forest cover. Forests of Chhattisgarh have a number of dye yielding plants which produce different colours. The tribal folks of this region locally use different colours obtained from plants for different purposes such as ornamentation, cosmetics, decorating houses and colouring home utensils made up of mud. The present study was undertaken to assess the diversity of dye yielding plants of Chhattisgarh, the indigenous method of dye extraction and ethnic uses of dyes. This will be a step towards the biodiversity and ethnic conservation and will also be helpful in understanding the social and cultural life of tribes of this region.

 

Keywords: Dye-yielding plants, Indigenous knowledge, Tribals, Chhattisgarh.

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ C09B 61/00