NATURAL PRODUCT RADIANCE

A Bimonthly Journal on Natural Products

VOL 7, No.2                                                   March-April 2008

 

C       O       N       T       E       N       T       S

 

Readers’ Write                                                                                                                      100

Editorial                                                                                                                                  101

Research Papers/General Articles

Antimicrobial activity of methanol extracts of Plumeria acuminata Ait. leaves and Tephrosia purpurea (Linn.) Pers. roots

M Gupta, U K Mazumder, P Gomathi and V Thamil Selvan

IPC code; Int. cl.8— A61K 36/00, A61K 36/24, A61K 36/48, A61P 31/00, A61P 31/04, A61P 31/10              102

 

Medium density particle board from Khimp plant

S K Bhaduri and P Mojumder

IPC code; Int. cl.8—B27N 3/00                                                                                                                             106

 

Effect of different blanching treatments on ascorbic acid retention in green leafy vegetables

Sheetal Gupta, Jyothi Lakshmi A and Jamuna Prakash

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A23L 1/00, A23L 1/052                                                                                                      111

 

Retention of colour intensity in henna paste during storage

Neeraj Verma, D S Mehra, U K Niyogi and R K Khandal

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A61K 8/97, A61Q 5/10, C09B 61/00                                                                                 117

 

Evaluation of antioxidant properties of Canthium parviflorum Lam. leaves

T Sathish Kumar, S Shanmugam, T Palvannan and V M Bharathi Kumar

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A61K 36/00, A61K 36/74, A61K 127/00, A61P 17/18                                                      122

 

Ethanol recovery from solid state fermented apple pomace and evaluation of physico-chemical characteristics of the residue

V K Joshi and A Devrajan

IPC code; Int. cl.8—C12F 3/08, C12S 3/00, C12S 3/14                                                                                        127

 

Use of natural products as biosorbent of heavy metals – An overview

Nilanjana Das, P Karthika, R Vimala and V Vinodhini

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾  C02F 1/28, C02F 1/62, C02F 3/00, C02F 3/32                                                                  133

 

Marine organisms in Indian medicine and their future prospects

Radhika Gopal, M Vijayakumaran, R Venkatesan and S Kathiroli                                         139

IPC code; Int. cl.8— A61K 38/57, A61K 45/00

 

 


Green page: Research Papers/General Articles

 


Performance of Chrysanthemum ´ morifolium Ramat. cv. ‘Chandrama’ grown at different levels of planting density and stem maintained per plant

Madhumita Mitra (Sarkar) and P Pal

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A01G 9/00                                                                                                                          146

 

In vitro establishment and maintenance of callus of Taxus wallichiana Zucc. for the production of secondary metabolites

Kuntal Das, Raman Dang, Nagesh Ghanshala and P E Rajasekharan

IPC code; Int. cl.8—A01H 4/00, A01H 7/00, A61K 36/13, A61P 35/00                                                             150

 


Explorer: Research Papers/General Articles

Traditional dye yielding plants of Uttarakhand, India

R D Gaur

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ C09B 61/00                                                                                                                         154

 

Traditional oral care medicinal plants survey of Tamil Nadu

S Ganesan

IPC code; Int. cl.8— A61K 36/00, A61P 1/02                                                                                                       166

Traditional extraction of bark tannin from the mangrove tree, Ceriops decandra (Griff.) Ding Hou and its use in treating cotton fishing nets

A J Solomon Raju, K Henry Jonathan and S Purnachandra Rao

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A61K 36/00, C09B 61/00, D 06P 1/34                                                                                173

 

Medicinal plants used against dysentery, diarrhoea and cholera by the tribes of erstwhile Kameng district of Arunachal Pradesh

A Kar and SK Borthakur

IPC code; Int. cl.8— A61K 36/00, A61P 1/00, A61P 1/12                                                                                     176

 

Medicinal properties of milk thistle with special reference to silymarin– An overview

Subir Kumar Das, Sukhes Mukherjee and D M Vasudevan

IPC code; Int. cl.8— A61K 36/00, A61K 36/28, A61P 1/16, A61P 17/18, A61P 29/00                                         182

 

Forthcoming Conferences                                                                                                         193

Book Review                                                                                                                             194

Guidelines to authors                                                                                                     195

Index                                                                                                                                           197

 

 

 

Forthcoming Conferences, Seminars, Exhibitions and Trainings

 

1. International Conference on Environmental Research and Technology (ICERT 2008), 28-30 May 2008, Penang, Malaysia; Website: http://www.usm.my/ICERT

 

2. International Livestock and Dairy Expo 2008, 22-24 August 2008, New Delhi, India, Ms. Bhawna Gupta, Pixie Consulting Solutions Ltd. Karnal, Haryana, India; Website: http://www.ildexindia.com

 

3. Algae Biofuel Summit 2008, 17-19 September 2008, Delhi, India, Ms. Tripti Sharma

Growdiesel Consortium, B-196, Surajmal Vihar, Delhi-110 092, India, Phone: 011-32904064, 65803335; Fax: 011-42404335; E-mail: info@growdiesel.com|growdiesel@gmail.com; Website: http://www.growdiesel.com.

 

4. National seminar on Recent advances in Biological Sciences, 19-20 September 2008, Mumbai, India, Dr. Suvarna Sharma / Mrs. Sejal. Rathod; E-mail: kccrabs2008@mail.com.

 

5. The 7th Asia Pacific Conference on Anti-Aging Medicine, 10-12 October 2008, Indonesia, Mr. Mel Tjandra, Nusa Dua Resort, Bali, Indonesia, Website: http://www.asiaantiaging.net.

 

6. The Second Regional Conference on Soaps, Detergents & Cosmetics, 12-15 October 2008, Kala Academy, Goa, India, Mr. S. N. Trivedi, The Secretariate, Oil Technologists'Association of India-WZ, C/o Oils, Oleochemicals & Surfactants Division,  Institute of Chemical Technology, University of Mumbai, Matunga, Mumbai-400 019; Phone: 91-22-32972206/ 24146526; Fax: 00 91-22-24124017; E-mail: strivedi@rsdc-otai.org, info@rsdc-otai.org; Website: http://www.rsdc-otai.org/contact.htm.

7. Green Energy Summit 2008, 16-19 October 2008, Bangalore, India, GES Representative, Saltmarch Media, Bangalore, Karnataka; Website: http://www.greenenergysummit.com

8. Healthcare 2008, 25 October 2008, New Delhi, India, Nazish E. Azmi, National Healthcare Foundation, E-mail: nationalhealthcarefoundation@hotmail.com

9. 5th Malaysian International Conference on Essential Oils, Fragrance and Flavour Materials (Miceoff5), 28-30 October 2008, Putra World Trade Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Institut Kimia Malaysia, No 127B, Jalan Aminuddin Baki,  Taman Tun Dr Ismail, 60000 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Phone: 603-7728 3272; Fax: 603-7728 9909; E-mail: miceoff5@ikm.org.my; Website: http://www.ikm.org.my/MICEOFF5.html

10. International Congress on Bioprocesses in Food Industries (ICBF 2008), 6-8 November 2008, Hyderabad, India, Prof. L. Venkateswar Rao, Department of Microbiology, Osmania University, Hyderabad 500 007, AP, India; Phone:+91-40-27090661 / 27682246; Fax +91-40-27090661; E-mail: icbfou@gmail.com; Website: http://www.icbf2008.com.

 

11. First Global Summit on Sustainable Development and Biodiversity, 10-12 December 2008, Raipur, Chhattisgarh, India, Prof. R. N. Pati, Conference Coordinator, International Secretariate, Gloss- 2008, Express Tower, Adarsh Nagar, Vidhansabha Road, Mowa, Raipur-492 006, Chhattisgarh, India; Phone:91-771-2284929, 2284939, 4020929, 4020939; Fax:91-771-2284919,4020919; Website: http://www.gloss2008.com

 

12. International Society of BioTechnology Conference, 20-22 December 2008, Gangtok, Sikkim, India; Website: http://www.chemenviron.org,

 

Readers Write

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, March- April 2008, pp. 100      

           

Readers’ Write

 

Herbal treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

 

            Dear Editor, I would like to share with readers about an herbal treatment for rheumatoid arthritis used by Manipuri peoples. General or rheumatoid arthritis is inflammatory disease, affecting knees, wrists, ankles and backs, etc. is increasing in all states. Many factors like tuberculosis, pneumonia, gonorrhoea, syphilis, cancer, diabetes and even HIV infection may be responsible for rheumatoid arthritis. For the relief from arthritis, Manipuri people take 20g of tender young leaves of Ficus palmata Forsk. known as Heibam mana in Manipuri dialects, thrice daily with a little common salt (2-3g) with or without salted meals for 3-6 months. Sixty gram a day for tender fresh leaves of Heibam mana must be maximum dose whereas in cases of air dried leaves 20g must be reduced to 4-5g thrice daily for 3-6 months because after drying it becomes lighter. Direct sun dried leaves are not recommended. March to April is the season for harvesting young tender leaves.

            The leaves are used by local people to cure the disease permanently. In addition to taking this powder people observe daily morning walk also. Air dried leaves can also be preserved in air-tight plastic containers and used effectively for six months. Meat, chicken, smoke dried fish, pea seeds, pea buds, etc. are contra-indicated during treatment period. However, the efficacy of this herb needs further scientific and clinical studies.

 

Ch. Binod Singh

Keinou-Thangkha, Tiddim Road

P. O. Nambol, Manipur-795 134, India

 

TB diagnosis at early stage

            Dear editor, we are the regular readers of your journal and found that a lot of papers and information is published on various diseases including tuberculosis. The medical researchers at All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi have developed a technology to detect TB at early stage. This is advanced technology which enables TB detection (Pulmonary and extra Pulmonary Infection) with high sensitivity and specificity. In old conventional detection method, the required quantity of microbes, to detect the TB, is about 1000 microbes per 1ml of sputum whereas with this advanced technology, we can detect the TB even if the microbe’s quantity is around 300 microbes per ml of sputum.

            Thus, with this technology, it will be easy to detect the TB in early stage and the remedial action can be taken at appropriate time which can save many lives and support the welfare and advancement of the society. Arbro Pharmaceuticals has taken the responsibility and committed to make it available throughout the society to protect and keep the lives healthier. For this reason, we appeal you to make available this information to your esteemed readers and to the common people with your publication at the earliest.

Manish Ranjan

Arbro Pharmaceuticals Limited

6/14 & 4/9 Kirti Nagar Industrial Area,

New Delhi - 110015, India

E-mail: mranjan@arbropharma.com

 

Research Articles/Articles

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, March- April 2008, pp. 101-105          

 

 

Antimicrobial activity of methanol extracts of Plumeria acuminata Ait. leaves and Tephrosia purpurea (Linn.) Pers. roots

 

M Gupta1*, U K Mazumder1, P Gomathi2 and V Thamil Selvan1

           

            Methanol extract of leaves of Plumeria acuminata Ait. (MEPA) and roots of Tephrosia purpurea Linn. (METP) were investigated for their in vitro antimicrobial properties by agar disc diffusion method. The crude methanolic extracts MEPA and METP inhibited the growth of both Gram positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus and Micrococcus luteus) and Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella typhimurium). The Gram positive bacteria tested appeared to be more susceptible to the extracts than the Gram negative bacteria. Both the extracts at the concentration ranging between 250mg/ml and 1000mg/ml showed inhibitory activity against all tested bacteria except which MEPA did not show activity against S. typhimurium at 250mg/ml concentration. At 100mg/ml concentration. MEPA was found neutral against M. luteus, E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. typhimurium while METP was neutral against E. coli and P. aeruginosa at same concentration. The extracts also showed significant antifungal activity against Aspergillus niger and Candida albicans. All tested microorganisms showed dose dependent susceptibility towards the methanol extracts. The antibacterial and antifungal activity of the extracts and standard drugs were statistically significant. Based on the current findings, it can be concluded that both the plants possess potent antimicrobial activity.

Keywords: Plumeria acuminata, Tephrosia purpurea, Antimicrobial activity, Agar disc diffusion method.

IPC code; Int. cl.8— A61K 36/00, A61K 36/24, A61K 36/48, A61P 31/00, A61P 31/04, A61P 31/10

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, March- April 2008, pp. 106-110          

 

 

Medium density particle board from Khimp plant

S K Bhaduri* and P Mojumder

 

            Khimp plant, Leptadenia pyrotechnica (Forsk.) Decne, is a shrub grown abundantly in the desert region of Rajasthan. In the present study plant stem was investigated for production of medium density particle boards with phenol-formaldehyde (PF) and urea-formaldehyde (UF) resins as binders in varying quantities. The chemical composition of khimp stem showed 64.30% holocellulose, 30.51% α-cellulose, 16.12% lignin and 7.93% ethanol-benzene extractives. The physical properties of the particle boards, viz. density, moisture content, water absorption, swelling values and mechanical properties like impact strength, tensile strength, flex modulus and modulus of rupture were measured by standard methods. The physical and mechanical properties of the prepared particle boards were compared with those of particle boards made from similar lignocellulosic agro-residues. The properties of particle boards prepared with PF and UF resin binders conformed to the BIS specifications for medium density particle boards for general purpose requirements.

 

Keywords: Khimp plant, Leptadenia pyrotechnica, Particle board, Binder, Phenol-formaldehyde, Urea-formaldehyde.

IPC code; Int. cl.8—B27N 3/00

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, March- April 2008, pp. 111-116          

 

 

Effect of different blanching treatments on ascorbic acid retention in green leafy vegetables

 

Blanching is a prerequisite for preservation of green leafy vegetables. However, it may cause partial destruction of some nutrients like ascorbic acid which is highly oxidizable with time in the post harvest period on atmospheric exposure. The objective of the present study is to identify a suitable blanching treatment and conditions (temperature, time and media) for commonly consumed green leafy vegetables that ensures enzyme inactivation and maximum ascorbic acid retention. Ten commonly consumed leafy vegetables, viz.  Amaranth (Amaranthus gangeticus Linn.), Ambat chuka (Rumex vesicarius Linn.), Bathua (Chenopodium album Linn.), Brahmi [Centella asiatica (Linn.) Urban], Drumstick (Moringa oleifera Linn.), Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum Linn.), Keerae (Amaranthus sp.), Kilkeerae (Amaranthus tricolor Linn.), Shepu (Anethum graveolens Linn. syn. Peucedanum graveolens Linn.), and Spinach (Spinacia oleracea Linn.) were blanched for 1, 2 and 4 min at 80, 90 and 98oC in water and chemical media, steamed for 5 and 10 min with and without chemical treatment and microwaved for 1 and 1.5 min, unblanched greens served as control. Retention of ascorbic acid was reduced as the blanching time and temperature increased in all greens. It was comparatively higher in chemically treated samples both in conventional and steam-blanched samples. Steam blanched samples (5 min) had a higher level of ascorbic acid than conventional blanched samples irrespective of blanching media. Ascorbic acid content of microwave blanched samples was better in some greens compared to conventionally blanched greens. Blanching at 80oC for 1 min, steaming for 5 min and microwaving for 1 min was sufficient to inactivate peroxidase in all except two green leafy vegetables irrespective of the blanching media. From the nutrition point of view, chemical blanching proved to be advantageous both in steam and conventional blanching for short period and it also ensured enzyme inactivation.

 

Keywords: Leafy vegetables, Ascorbic acid, Steam blanching, Chemical blanching, Microwave blanching, Peroxidase inactivation.

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A23L 1/00, A23L 1/052

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, March- April 2008, pp. 117-121

 

Retention of colour intensity in henna paste during storage

Neeraj Verma, D S Mehra, U K Niyogi and R K Khandal*

            Henna (Mehndi), Lawsonia inermis Linn. has been known as the natural source of dye, besides having medicinal properties. Henna powder is made into a paste in water and used for skin decorations, tattooing and hair dyeing. On drying, the paste imparts a dark brown -black stain. In order to help the users henna paste is supplied in the conical packing to facilitate several types of designs on the hands and other parts of the body.

 

Since the paste of henna is made in water, on storage in various types of packing especially cones loose its staining power. The present study was taken up as a case study to ascertain the reasons for loss of performance in many commercial products available in the market. The study includes the characterization and effect of various factors on the stability of henna paste and also suggests ways to ensure the desired performance during storage.  The results revealed that to maintain staining power of henna paste in cones the pH of the paste should be below 4 in aseptically sealed cones. The paste made from irradiated henna powder in combination with citric acid and sodium methyl paraben has a long storage life and good retention of colour.

 

Keywords: Henna paste, Henna cones, Colour Intensity, Gas generation, Lawsonia inermis.

 

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A61K 8/97, A61Q 5/10, C09B 61/00

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, March- April 2008, pp. 122-126

 

Evaluation of antioxidant properties of Canthium parviflorum Lam. leaves

T Sathish Kumar1, S Shanmugam1, T Palvannan2 and V M Bharathi Kumar1*

 

Ethanolic extract of Canthium parviflorum Lam. leaves was analyzed for their total antioxidant capacity, reducing power, metal chelating, ABTS+ [2, 2-azinobis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonate] radical scavenging and hydroxyl radical scavenging activities. The extract at 500mg/ml showed maximum scavenging activity (51.60%) of ABTS radical cation followed by the iron chelation (45.12%) at the same concentration. However, the extract showed only moderate hydroxyl radical scavenging activity (6.42%). Total antioxidant capacity was found to be 12.9 mg ascorbic acid equivalents at 500mg/ml extract concentration. There was a positive correlation between the total phenolic content and antioxidant capacity, R2 = 0.8313, whereas the correlation between the total flavonoids and antioxidant capacity was determined to be R2 = 0.8102. The results suggest that phenolics and flavonoids in the leaves provide considerable antioxidant activity.

Keywords: Antioxidant property, Free radical scavenging activity, Total phenolic content, Flavonoids, Canthium parviflorum.

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A61K 36/00, A61K 36/74, A61K 127/00, A61P 17/18

                                                  

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, March- April 2008, pp. 127-132

 

                                                  

Ethanol recovery from solid state fermented apple pomace and evaluation of physico-chemical characteristics of the residue

V K Joshi*and A Devrajan

            In view of the growing demand of ethanol the identification of resources and development of economical methods for its extraction are very essential. Fermented apple pomace has been identified as a rich source of ethanol especially for the Himalayan region where apple is grown at large scale. There are various methods of alcohol recovery from solid state fermented apple pomace (hot water extraction followed by distillation, vacuum distillation, hydraulic pressure and direct steam distillation) hence, present study was carried out to standardize an efficient and economical method. The physico-chemical characteristics of dried apple pomace residue after the recovery of ethanol by different methods were also evaluated for knowing loss of nutrients during extraction of ethanol. For present study two types of solid state fermented (SSF) apple pomace, obtained by two treatments (one by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and other by Candida utilis and Kloeckera spp. as sequential interactive co-cultures) were used. Out of different methods of alcohol recovery tried, steam distillation method gave the highest separation efficiency while hydraulic pressing gave the lowest separation efficiency. Evaluation of some of the physico-chemical characteristics of dried apple pomace after recovery of ethanol by different methods indicated that steam distillation resulted in minimum nutritional loss, viz. crude and soluble proteins, reducing and total sugars. The maximum nutritional loss took place in hydraulic pressing, wherein the base of distillate was not added back to the pomace, prior to drying. Steam distillation method of ethanol recovery from fermented apple pomace was the best since it gave the dried pomace with minimum loss of nutrients.

 

Keywords: Ethanol recovery, Apple pomace, Malus pumila, Physico-chemical characteristics, Steam distillation.

IPC code; Int. cl.8—C12F 3/08, C12S 3/00, C12S 3/14

 

 

Naturl Product Radiance

Vol.7, March- April 2008, pp.127-132           

 

 

Ethanol recovery from solid state fermented apple pomace and evaluation of physico-chemical characteristics of the residue

V K Joshi*and A Devrajan

            In view of the growing demand of ethanol the identification of resources and development of economical methods for its extraction are very essential. Fermented apple pomace has been identified as a rich source of ethanol especially for the Himalayan region where apple is grown at large scale. There are various methods of alcohol recovery from solid state fermented apple pomace ( hot water extraction followed by distillation, vacuum distillation, hydraulic pressure and direct steam distillation) hence, present study was carried out to standardize an efficient and economical method. The physico-chemical characteristics of dried apple pomace residue after the recovery of ethanol by different methods were also evaluated for knowing loss of nutrients during extraction of ethanol. For present study two types of solid state fermented (SSF) apple pomace, obtained by two treatments (one by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and other by Candida utilis and Kloeckera spp. as sequential interactive co-cultures) were used. Out of different methods of alcohol recovery tried, steam distillation method gave the highest separation efficiency while hydraulic pressing gave the lowest separation efficiency. Evaluation of some of the physico-chemical characteristics of dried apple pomace after recovery of ethanol by different methods indicated that steam distillation resulted in minimum nutritional loss, viz. crude and soluble proteins, reducing and total sugars. The maximum nutritional loss took place in hydraulic pressing, wherein the base of distillate was not added back to the pomace, prior to drying. Steam distillation method of ethanol recovery from fermented apple pomace was the best since it gave the dried pomace with minimum loss of nutrients.

 

Keywords: Ethanol recovery, Apple pomace, Malus pumila, Physico-chemical characteristics, Steam distillation.

IPC code; Int. cl.8—C12F 3/08, C12S 3/00, C12S 3/14

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, March- April 2008, pp. 133- 138         

 

 

Use of natural products as biosorbent of heavy metals – An overview

Nilanjana Das*, P Karthika, R Vimala and V Vinodhini

 

Industrial effluents loaded with heavy metals are a cause of hazards to human and other forms of life. Conventional methods such as precipitation, evaporation, electroplating, ion exchange, membrane processes, etc. used for removal of heavy metals from waste water however, are often cost prohibitive having inadequate efficiencies at low metal ion concentrations. Biosorption can be considered as an alternative technology which has been proved as more efficient and economical for removal of heavy metals from the industrial waste water. The most frequently used biosorbents are bacteria, fungi, algae and yeasts. But more recently, low cost natural products have also been searched as biosorbent. This paper presents an overview of the potential use of some natural products as biosorbent which could serve as a cost effective means of treating effluents charged with toxic heavy metals.

Keywords:  Biosorbent, Heavy metals, Waste water, Industrial effluent, Natural products.

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾  C02F 1/28, C02F 1/62, C02F 3/00, C02F 3/32

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, March- April 2008, pp. 139-145

 

                                                  

Marine organisms in Indian medicine and their future prospects

Radhika Gopal, M Vijayakumaran, R Venkatesan* and S Kathiroli

           

            The marine ecosystem is a rich source of both biological and chemical diversity which has been explored in the discovery of unique chemicals, having potential for industrial development as pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, nutritional supplements, molecular probes, fine chemicals and agrochemicals. In recent years, a significant number of novel metabolites with potent pharmacological properties have been discovered from marine organisms. In the present paper various research reports on some marine organisms used in different Indian systems of medicine have been discussed for further developments.

Keywords: Marine resources, Medicine, Sponges, Corals, Crustaceans, Pearl Oyster, Edible Oyster, Conch, Cowries, Cephalopods, Fishes, Turtle, Sea Mammals, Indian System of Medicine.

IPC code; Int. cl.8— A61K 38/57, A61K 45/00.

 

Green Page: Research Articles/Articles

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, March- April 2008, pp. 146-149

 

                                                  

Performance of Chrysanthemum ´ morifolium Ramat. cv. ‘Chandrama’ grown at different levels of planting density and stem maintained per plant

 

Madhumita Mitra (Sarkar)* and P Pal

 

Chrysanthemum has wide acceptability as cut flower due to its wide range of colour, types and exotic forms. Keeping in view the market demand of these flowers a study was conducted at Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalaya (BCKV), Mohanpur, Nadia to note the differences in growth habit of Chrysanthemum ´ morifolium Ramat. cv ‘Chandrama’ under the influence of different plant densities and stems maintained per plant. The results revealed that the plants under the treatment P1 (12 plants/m2) performed better in respect to all the growth and flowering parameter, however, leaves/plant was maximum in the treatment P3 (20 plants/m2). Number of stems/plant showed significant variation (on the basis of pooled data) in all the characters undertaken during the study. But the treatment failed to significantly influence plant height and leaf number. Unpinched single stemmed plants recorded greater leaf area, showed early flowering and also produced larger and heavier flowers with longer and thicker flower stalks and maximum shelf-life. Lower plant density plants were larger with respect to all the parameters.

Keywords: Chrysanthemum´ morifolium cv. ‘Chandrama’, Cut flowers, Cultivation, Plant density, Shelf-life.

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A01G 9/00

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, March- April 2008, pp. 150-153          

 

In vitro establishment and maintenance of callus of Taxus wallichiana Zucc. for the production of secondary metabolites

Kuntal Das 1*, Raman Dang2, Nagesh Ghanshala2 and P E Rajasekharan3

 

            Callus cultures have been established from needles of aseptically germinated seeds of Taxus wallichiana Zucc. The callus was initiated and maintained on different medium with phytohormones. The study showed that fully defined Gamborgs B5 medium supplemented with 2,4-D (2.0 and 5.0 μM) and Kinetin (0.5 and 1.0 μM) was effective for both initiation and sustained growth of callus tissue whereas woody plant medium was very effective in ascertaining totipotency of the callus by showing organogenesis. The HPLC chromatographic evaluation revealed the presence of taxol (0.8499 %) in callus of the species.

 

Keywords: Taxus wallichiana, Himalayan Yew, In vitro culture, Phytohormones, Taxol, Chromatography.

IPC code; Int. cl.8—A01H 4/00, A01H 7/00, A61K 36/13, A61P 35/00

 

Explorer: Research Articles/Articles

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, March- April 2008, pp. 154-165

 

 

Traditional dye yielding plants of Uttarakhand, India

R D Gaur

The present paper is based on extensive survey, collection of ethnobotanical information and review of relevant literature on the vegetable dye yielding resources of Uttarakhand Himalaya. The study reports 106 dye yielding plants (belonging to 63 families), along with their vernacular names, habit, part(s) used, nature of dye and distribution. It also describes preparation of dyeing stuffs, use of mordants and specific dye utilization to serve various purposes, including several of the new dye resources.

Keywords: Plant dyes, Mordants, Indigenous traditional knowledge, Value based uses, Conservation.

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ C09B 61/00

                                                  

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, March- April 2008, pp. 166-172          

 

 

Traditional oral care medicinal plants survey of Tamil Nadu

S Ganesan

An oral care medicinal plants survey was conducted in different districts of Tamil Nadu during the period of 2000-2004. A total of 114 plants species, distributed among 97 genera belonging to 51 families were recorded. Most of the plants are used to relieve toothache (29.82%), as toothbrush (25.43%), mouthwash/gargle (16.66%), against common dental diseases (14.03%), mouth related stomatitis/ulcer/gingivitis (12.28%) and gum bleeding/disorders (10.53%). In the present paper these plants are arranged in alphabetical order with their scientific name, family, local name, part used and existing/surveyed uses.

Key words: Oral hygiene, Dental disease, Ethnobotany, Toothbrush, Toothache, Medicinal plants, Tamil Nadu.

IPC code; Int. cl.8— A61K 36/00, A61P 1/02

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, March- April 2008, pp. 173-175

 

 

Traditional extraction of bark tannin from the mangrove tree, Ceriops decandra (Griff.) Ding Hou and its use in treating cotton fishing nets

 

A J Solomon Raju*, K Henry Jonathan and S Purnachandra Rao

 

            The bark of Ceriops decandra (Griff.) Ding Hou is a rich and cheap source of tannin for fishing community in Godavari forests of Andhra Pradesh. In the present paper traditional method practiced by fishermen for extracting tannin and its use for treating cotton fishing nets have been described.

 

Keywords: Ceriops decandra, Bark, Tannin extraction, Fishing nets, Traditional process.

 

IPC code; Int. cl.8 ¾ A61K 36/00, C09B 61/00, D 06P 1/34

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, March- April 2008, pp. 176-181

 

 

Medicinal plants used against dysentery, diarrhoea and cholera by the tribes of erstwhile Kameng district of Arunachal Pradesh

 

A Kar and S K Borthakur*

The present paper deals with 35 plant species used against dysentery, diarrhoea and cholera by the tribes of erstwhile Kameng district of Arunachal Pradesh. Personal observations on the method of utilization along with botanical names of the plants, parts used and dose regime presented here are part of the empiric knowledge confined to the ethnic groups. The paper emphasizes the conservation of the indigenous plant wealth through commercial cultivation and also for developing new and more efficacious remedies after detailed pharmacological and clinical investigations on these plants.

 

Keywords: Arunachal Pradesh, Kameng district, Medicinal Plants, Tribes, Dysentery, Diarrhoea, Cholera, Conservation.

IPC code; Int. cl.8— A61K 36/00, A61P 1/00, A61P 1/12

 
Review Article

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, March- April 2008, pp. 182-192

 

 

Medicinal properties of milk thistle with special reference to silymarin– An overview

Subir Kumar Das*, Sukhes Mukherjee and D M Vasudevan

 

            Milk Thistle, Silybum marianum Gaertn. plant has been used for centuries as a natural remedy for several diseases. Its active constituent, silymarin displays several medicinal properties, viz. antioxidant, hepatoprotective, cytoprotective, amelioration of hepatic collagen accumulation in advanced fibrosis, immunomodulatory activity, etc. Present paper summarizes various research reports on the medicinal properties of the plant with special reference to silymarin.

 

Keywords: Antioxidant, Anti-fibrotic, Anti-inflammatory, Anti-tumourogenesis, Anti-carcinogenic, Hepatoprotection, Hepatotoxicity, Silybin, Silibinin, Silymarin, Silybum marianum, Milk Thistle.

 

IPC code; Int. cl.8— A61K 36/00, A61K 36/28, A61P 1/16, A61P 17/18, A61P 29/00