NATURAL PRODUCT RADIANCE

A Bimonthly Journal on Natural Products

Total visitors: 2,970  since 02-12-08


VOLUME 7

NUMBER 5

September-October 2008

 

 

C       O       N       T       E       N       T       S

 

Readers' Write  400
   
Editorial   401
   
Research Papers  
   
Analysis of proteins, polysaccharides, glycosaponins contents of Piper sarmentosum Roxb. and anti-TB evaluation for bio-enhancing/interaction effects of leaf extracts with Isoniazid (INH) 402

Khalid Hussain, Zhari Ismail, Amirin Sadikun and Pazilah Ibrahim

IPC code; Int. cl.8 - A61K 36/00, A61K 36/67, A61P 31/06, A23L 1/22

 
   

In vitro antimicrobial and antioxidant studies on Enicostemma axillare (Lam.) Raynal.

 leaves

409

Sharada L Deore, S S Khadabadi, Lalita Bhagure and D S Ghorpade

IPC code; Int. cl.8 - A61K 36/00, A61P 31/00, A61P 31/04, A61P 31/10, A61P 17/18

 
   
Evaluation of herbal handwash formulation 413

Minakshi G Joshi, D V Kamat and S D Kamat

IPC code; Int. cl.8 - A61K 8/97, A61Q 19/10, A61K 36/00, A61P 31/00, A61P 31/04

 
   
Ovicidal and larvicidal activities of Cyperus giganteus Vahl and Cyperus rotundus Linn. essential oils against Aedes albopictus (Skuse) 416

Vivek Kempraj and Sumangala K Bhat

IPC code; Int. cl.8-A61K 36/00, A61K 36/8905, A61P 33/00

 
   
Antibacterial potential of three naked-seeded (Gymnosperm) plants 420

Sharad Bissa, Avinash Bohra and A Bohra

IPC code; Int. cl.8-A61K 36/00, A61K 36/13, A61P 31/04 

 
   

Shigellocidal activity of some medicinal plants used in folklore remedies by tribals of

Mahakoshal region of Central India

426

Anjana Sharma, Virendra Kumar Patel and Padmini Ramteke

IPC code; Int. cl.8-A61K 36/00, A61P 1/00, A61P 31/00 

 
   
Green page: Research Papers  
   

Performance of Tagetes erecta Linn. cv. ‘Siracole’ as influenced by planting time and

spacing under West Bengal conditions

437

P Ghosh and P Pal

IPC code; Int. cl.8- A01G 9/00

 
   
Spatial influence on the important bio-chemical properties of Piper nigrum Linn. leaves 444

Utpala Parthasarathy, G R Asish, T J Zachariah, K V Saji, Johnson K George, K

Jayarajan and P A Mathew

IPC code; Int. cl.8 - A61K 36/00, A23L 1/22  

 
   
Wild vegetables of Karbi-Anglong district, Assam 448

A Kar and S K Borthakur

IPC code; Int. cl.8 - A01G 1/00, A61K 36/00, A23L 1/00, A23L 1/052

 
   
Explorer: Research Papers  
   
Ethnomedicinal plants used in West Rarrh region of West Bengal 461

Ashis Ghosh

IPC code; Int. cl.8-A61K 36/00

 
   
Review Papers  
   
A Review on Anthelmintic Plants 466

Ravindra G Mali and Anita A Mehta

IPC code; Int. cl.8- A61K 36/00, A61P 33/10  

 
   
A Review on Antianxiety Plants 476

Neeraj Gilhotra and Dinesh Dhingra

IPC code; Int. cl.8- A61K 36/00, A61P 25/22  

 
   
Book Review                                                                                                                    484
   
Forthcoming Conferences                                                                                         485
   
Guidelines to authors                                                                                     486
   
Index 488

 

 

Forthcoming Conferences, Seminars, Exhibitions and Trainings

1. First Global Summit on Sustainable Development and Biodiversity, 10-12 December 2008, Raipur, Chhattisgarh, India, Prof. R. N. Pati, Conference Coordinator, International Secretariate, Gloss- 2008, Express Tower, Adarsh Nagar, Vidhansabha Road, Mowa, Raipur-492 006, Chhattisgarh, India; Phone:91-771-2284929, 2284939, 4020929, 4020939; Fax:91-771-2284919,4020919; Website: http://www.gloss2008.com

2. International Society of BioTechnology Conference, 20-22 December 2008, Gangtok, Sikkim, India; Website: http://www.chemenviron.org,  

3. Anaerobic digestion and Renewable energy through Microbes, 13-15 January 2009, Goa, India, Dr. Srikanth Mutnuri, Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani, Goa Campus; Website: http://www.Bits-Goa.Ac.In/Adrem2009

4. 12th Bangkok International Symposium on HIV Medicine, 14-16 January 2009, Bangkok, Thailand, The Netherlands, Australia, Thailand Research Collaboration,104 Rajdumri Road Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330, Thailand, Main Office Phone:+(662) 652 3040, Fax : +(662) 254 7574 Secretariat Office Phone: +(662) 652 3040 Ext. 102, Fax : +(662) 254 7574, Secretariat Bangkok Symposium: Ms. Jeerakan Janhom; E-mail: jeerakan.j@hivnat.org; Website: http://www.hivnat.org

5. Conservation of Biodiversity in Protected Areas-Opportunities and Challenges, 23-24 January 2009, Bangalore, Karnataka, India,
Dr. Anthony PU, Organizing Secretary, National Seminar on BDC, Department of Zoology, Christ University, Hosur Road, Bangalore-5600029, Karnataka; Phone: +91- 80 -40129319 +91-9886887131; E-mail: nsbdc09@cbz.christuniversity.in; Website: http://www.christuniversity.in

6. ICABE 2009–International Conference on Agricultural and Biological Engineering, 28 January 2009, Dubai; World Academy of Science,
Engineering and Technology; Website: http://www.waset.org/wcset09/dubai/icabe/

7. ICAFNS 2009– International Conference on Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Sciences, 28 January 2009, Dubai, World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology; Website: http://www.waset.org/wcset09/dubai/icafns/

8. ICFAVS 2009–International Conference on Fisheries, Animal and Veterinary Sciences, 28 January 2009, Dubai, World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology; Website: http://www.waset.org/wcset09/dubai/icfavs/

9. Young Researchers' Conference, 27-28 January 2009, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India, Institute of Chemical Technology, Deemed University, Mumbai,            Umesh Suryavanshi/Mr. Anand V Patwardhan; Website: http://sites.google.com/site/researchersconference2009/

10. BiomassWorld 2009, 9-10 February 2009 Jakarta, Jakarta, Indonesia, Ms Reema Patnaik,  

      Website: http://www.cmtevents.com/?ev=090210&st=59

11. International Conference on the Future of Oil Palm Business 2009,19-20 February 2009, Phuket, Thailand, Asif International (M) Sdn Bhd, Suite 409, 2nd Floor, Block A, Glomac Business Centre, Jalan SS6/1, Kelana Jaya47300 Petaling Jaya, Selangor, Malaysia; Phone: +60 3 7804 3423, +60 3 78043400, +60 3 7880 0413; Fax: +60 3 7880 2817; E-mail: info@icpob.com; Website: http://www.icpob.com

12. National Conference on Antimicrobial Resistance: From Emerging Threat to Reality, 23-25 March 2009, Allahabad, Uttar Pradesh, India, Dr. (Mrs.) Rubina Lawrence, Organising Secretary, Head, Dept of Microbiology & Microbial Technology, College of Biotechnology & Allied Sciences, Allahabad Agricultural Institute Deemed University, Allahabad 211007. Uttar Pradesh, Phone: 0532-3297818, 3202133, Mobile: 91-9335110219, 91-9415316986; E-mail: antimicro09@gmail.com, dr_mrsrubina@rediffmail.com

 

 

 

Readers Write

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, Sept-Oct. 2008, pp. 400                

 

 

Gaultheria fragrantissima Wall.–An untapped economic plant species of Meghalaya

 

            Dear editor, through this column I would like to disseminate some information on a commonly found plant which can be used for income generating resource by rural people in Meghalaya. Gaultheria fragrantissima Wall. (Ericaceae), known as Indian wintergreen yields essential oil of commercial value. Systematic cultivation and their processing at farm level constitutes a promising rural industry with attractive remuneration as it is found growing abundantly in most part of the North east region. Nature, in its generous abundance, had bestowed on Meghalaya a unique array of vegetation, ranging from tropical and sub-tropical to temperate or near temperate. While the importance of medicinal and aromatic plants is widely accepted, there is a serious lack of comprehensive information on the economically important and threatened species. This can be a potential provider of returns to the farmers.

            G. fragrantissima Wall. is a much-branched, evergreen, aromatic shrub, 1-3 m height, with orange-brown bark, commonly found in the Central and Eastern Himalayas, Khasi Hills and the hills of Western Ghats at altitudes of above1500m. Leaves are alternate, oblong-lanceolate to elliptic-rhomboid, serrate, gland-dotted; flowers greenish white in axillary racemes; fruits are capsular, globose enclosed in an enlarged fleshy deep blue calyx. It is also grown as an ornamental plant in the hill areas. The flowers are seen in the months of March-May and the fruits in the months of June to July in the hilly areas. Fresh leaves are observed all over the year. The fruits are eaten by birds since they are sweet to human taste. The species is very hardy and can withstand cold temperature (4oC). Seeds are dispersed by birds and humans only. Regeneration is natural by means of seeds which are treated while passing through the gut of birds. Gaultheria species grow best in sandy or peaty, somewhat moist soil and partly shaded situations. Propagation is by seeds, layers or suckers, divisions and cuttings. The species acts as a soil binder in the hilly slopes. Artificial regeneration is best achieved by means of stem cuttings during summer and coppicing during winter. Insect pests are usually absent but during flowering season Pentatomid and other bugs are seen to be closely associated with this shrub; however, fungal infection is common.

            The oil obtained from leaves is identical to the oil of Wintergreen obtained from G. procumbens Linn. a native of America. The oil is used as an anti-rheumatic, anti-sciatica, painkiller, stimulant, carminative, antiseptic, and vermicide and as ingredient in perfumery, insecticidal repellents, soft drinks and dentifrices. The oil or the chief constituent, methyl salicylate is used in all proprietary balms, liniments and ointments. The fruits of the plant are edible. The locals also use the leaves of the plant for treating rheumatism, arthritis and other joint problems and flu.

            Young leaves as well as old ones are used for extracting oil but as soon as they are brought to distillation plant. Indian wintergreen oil is distilled in small scale in the Nilgiris and Assam and the yield is more in the Assam plants which are usually obtained from Khasi Hills. If the leaves are harvested at the right season, about 10kg of leaves can be obtained. The oil yield is approximated at 6ml/kg, therefore, the expected oil yield will be 60ml per shrub. The yield is enhanced by maceration of the material with warm water for sometime before distillation. The oil is colourless and possesses an agreeable odour and flavour.

            As far as market potential of the oil is concerned methyl salicylate present in the oil is from natural source hence it is in very high demand in the market as starting material for aspirin and other medicinal compounds. The current market rate of pure methyl salicylate is Rs. 800/100g. Considering the abundance of this plant, which at some areas is considered a weed, the income generated from this source can be quite substantial. Annually net profit per shrub estimated to be approximately Rs. 375/- after paying labour charges for picking and power charges for 10kg leaves distillation.

H Kayang, B Kharbuli and D Syiem

North Eastern Biodiversity Research Cell

Bijni Complex, North Eastern Hill University

Shillong-793 022, Meghalaya, India

E-mail: hkayang@nehu.ac.in; hkayang@hotmail.com

Research Papers 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, Sept-Oct. 2008, pp. 402-408

 

 

Analysis of proteins, polysaccharides, glycosaponins contents of Piper sarmentosum Roxb. and anti-TB evaluation for bio-enhancing/interaction effects of leaf extracts with Isoniazid (INH)

Khalid Hussain, Zhari Ismail, Amirin Sadikun and Pazilah Ibrahim

 Piper sarmentosum Roxb. is a tropical plant used as a vegetable and traditional medicine to cure many ailments. Some constituents of the plant have shown antimycobacterial activity. The present study was aimed to investigate the extracts of different parts of the plant for primary metabolic contents, anti-TB evaluation for bioenhancing, interaction effects of leaf extracts with isoniazid (INH) using Mycobacterium tuberculosis. For primary metabolic contents, extracts of the plant were evaluated for total proteins, polysaccharides and glycosaponins. Aqueous and ethanol extracts of different parts of the plant have exhibited different contents of total proteins, total polysaccharides and total glycosaponins (P<0.01). Ethanol extracts have shown high contents of proteins and polysaccharides while contents of glycosaponins were high in aqueous extracts. The various extracts of the leaf, petroleum ether, chloroform and methanol exhibited anti-TB activities with MICs at 25, 25 and 12.5 μg/ml, respectively. Ethyl acetate and chloroform fractions of the methanol extract and isoniazid exhibited MICs at 3.12, 3.12 and 0.5 μg/ml, respectively. Isoniazid and both the fractions were combined at a ratio 3: 1, 1: 1 and 1: 3 and evaluated for anti-TB activity. Fractional inhibitory concentration indexes (FICIs) of the combinations were <0.5 and <4. FICI of 1: 1 combination of isoniazid and ethyl acetate fraction was 0.58, which shows that ethyl acetate fraction and isoniazid possess some synergy but it is not statistically significant. The study indicates the nutritional properties, anti-TB and some bioenhancing properties of the plant.

 

Keywords: Anti-TB; Bio-enhancing, Anti-TB drug, Isoniazid, INH, Piper sarmentosum, Proteins, Polysaccharides, Glycosaponins, Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

 

IPC code; Int. cl.8 - A61K 36/00, A61K 36/67, A61P 31/06, A23L 1/22

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, Sept-Oct. 2008, pp. 409-412

 

 

In vitro antimicrobial and antioxidant studies on Enicostemma axillare (Lam.) Raynal. leaves

Sharada L Deore, S S Khadabadi, Lalita Bhagure and D S Ghorpade

 Enicostemma axillare (Lam.) Raynal. syn. E. littorale Blume (Family ¾ Gentianaceae) is a perennial herb found throughout the greater part of India. Locally it is known as chota chirayita and used in indigenous medicines in the treatment of fevers and as bitter tonic and forms one of ingredients of many hypoglycemic marketed formulations. In the present in vitro antimicrobial activity (Well diffusion method) of aqueous, hydro alcoholic, methanolic, chloroform and ethyl acetate extract of leaves of this plant has been evaluated. Six bacterial species and two fungal strains used for study are: Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Proteus vulgaris, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shigella sonni, Aspergillus niger and Candida albicans. It was observed that chloroform, ethyl acetate and hydroalcoholic extract showed prominent antimicrobial activity against all microorganisms. In vitro antioxidant activity of each extract except ethyl acetate and the possible mechanism involved was investigated by using two different model covering nitric oxide and DPPH method. The result indicated efficacy of extracts for antioxidant activity in following sequence: methanol>hydro alcoholic>aqueous>chloroform.

 

Keywords: Enicostemma axillare, Enicostemma littorale, Chota chirayita, Antimicrobial activity, In vitro antioxidant activity, DPPH method, Nitric oxide method.

 

IPC code; Int. cl.8 - A61K 36/00, A61P 31/00, A61P 31/04, A61P 31/10, A61P 17/18

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, Sept-Oct. 2008, pp. 413-415

 

 

Evaluation of herbal hand wash formulation

Minakshi G Joshi, D V Kamat* and S D Kamat

             A herbal handwash was prepared using extracts of leaves of Terminalia catappa Linn., Couroupita guianensis Aubl. and rinds of Garcinia indica Choisy. The antibiotic sensitivity test of the prepared herbal handwash against skin pathogens was checked using Disc diffusion method and results were compared with the commercially available antiseptic soap. The results showed that the herbal hand wash gave larger inhibition zone than the commercial antiseptic soap against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The efficacy of the herbal hand wash was evaluated using Glove Juice method which revealed that the herbal hand wash is efficient in reducing higher number of organisms from the hands than the commercial antiseptic soap. Hence, due to the higher antimicrobial activity these plant materials can be used in the preparation of herbal hand wash on commercial scale.

 

Keywords: Skin pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Terminalia catappa, Couroupita guianensis, Garcinia indica, Herbal handwash.

 

IPC code; Int. cl.8- A61K 8/97, A61Q 19/10, A61K 36/00, A61P 31/00, A61P 31/04

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, Sept-Oct. 2008, pp.416-419          

 

 

Ovicidal and larvicidal activities of Cyperus giganteus Vahl and Cyperus rotundus Linn. essential oils against Aedes albopictus (Skuse)

Vivek Kempraj and Sumangala K Bhat*

            The ovicidal and larvicidal efficacy of essential oils extracted from the tubers of Cyperus giganteus Vahl and Cyperus rotundus Linn. was studied on eggs and fourth instar larvae of Aedes albopictus (Skuse). The eggs and larvae were exposed to serial concentration of the oils ranging from 5-150 ppm and kept under observation for 24 h. Both the oils showed remarkable ovicidal and larvicidal activities indicated by EC50 values of <5ppm and LC50 and LC90 values of <20 ppm. The results obtained suggest that the essential oils of these Cyperus species can serve as a potential source of natural mosquitocidal agents.

 

Keywords: Essential oil, Cyperus giganteus, Cyperus rotundus, Aedes albopictus, Mosquitocide, Ovicidal, Larvicidal.

 

IPC code; Int. cl.8- A61K 36/00, A61K 36/8905, A61P 33/00.

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, Sept-Oct. 2008, pp.420-425

 

 

Antibacterial potential of three naked-seeded (Gymnosperm) plants

Sharad Bissa, Avinash Bohra and A Bohra

                The aerial parts of three gymnosperms, Pinus roxburghii Sarg. (bark, needles and female cones), Cycas circinalis Linn. (stem and leaves) and Thuja orientalis Linn. (stem and leaves) were extracted by Soxhlet apparatus using petroleum ether, ethanol, chloroform and water as solvent. The extracts were subjected to preliminary phytochemical screening and tested against four human pathogenic bacteria (Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter aerogenes) and one plant pathogenic bacteria, Agrobacterium tumefaciens by disc diffusion method. Among these extracts, the petroleum ether was found to be most effective in all the three plants. Maximum inhibition (20 mm) was recorded for needles extract of P. roxburghii against Klebsiella pneumoniae. The study suggests that these plants are promising phytomedicine for antibacterial activity.

 

Keywords: Antibacterial, Pinus roxburghii, Cycas circinalis, Thuja orientalis.

IPC code; Int. cl.8-A61K 36/00, A61K 36/13, A61P 31/04

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, Sept-Oct. 2008, pp.426-436

 

 

Shigellocidal activity of some medicinal plants used in folklore remedies by tribals of Mahakoshal region of Central India

Anjana Sharma, Virendra Kumar Patel and Padmini Ramteke

            The present study has been conducted to evaluate the shigellocidal activity of traditional folk medicine used by tribal people of Mahakoshal region in Central India for the treatment of infectious diseases. Shigellocidal activity was detected using disc diffusion assay and TLC bioautography. In the search for bioactive compounds, aqueous, ethanol, chloroform and acetone extracts of 25 Indian folklore medicinal plants were screened for shigellocidal property. The shigellocidal activity was observed in ethanolic extract of Saraca asoca (Roxb.) De Wilde syn. Saraca indica auct non Linn., Bacopa monnieri (Linn.) Penn., Zingiber officinale Rosc., and Terminalia chebula Retz. with the MIC range of 5-10 mg/ml, 5-15mg/ml, 5-15mg/ml and 5-10mg/ml, respectively. While chloroform extract of Pimpinella anisum Linn. and Azadirachta indica A. Juss. showed shigellocidal activity with MIC range between 5-10mg/ml and 5-20mg/ml, respectively. The active antibacterial compounds analysed by bioautography, were further confirmed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). It is concluded that the crude chloroform extract of P. anisum (seed) containing saponin, exhibited maximum shigellocidal activity at 10mg/ml concentration with 8-12 mm inhibitory zone against all the isolates of Shigella dysenteriae. Thus, this plant can be used as potential source of natural antimicrobial against Shigella dysenteriae.

 

Keywords: Medicinal plants, Saraca asoca (Roxb.) De Wilde, Bacopa monnieri (Linn.) Penn., Zingiber officinale Rosc., Terminalia chebula Retz., Pimpinella anisum Linn., Azadirachta indica A. Juss., Shigella dysenteriae, Shigellocidal activity, Central India.

 

IPC code; Int. cl.8-A61K 36/00, A61P 1/00, A61P 31/00.

 

Green Page: Research Papers

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, Sept-Oct. 2008, pp.437-443

 

 

Performance of Tagetes erecta Linn. cv. ‘Siracole’ as influenced by planting time and spacing under West Bengal conditions

P Ghosh and P Pal

            The investigation was carried out to ascertain the performance of different planting time and spacing on growth and flower production of African marigold, Tagetes erecta Linn. cv. ‘Siracole’. The crop planted on 10th February showed early flower buds (35.51 days) compared to other planting dates. Larger (5.80cm) and heaviest (5.29g) sized flower with maximum flower per plant (76.22) as well as per unit area (20.01kg/5.76sqm) were recorded with 12th October planting. The flowering duration was maximum with the 12th October planting; while minimum with the 10th February and 12th April planting. Chlorophyll and anthocyanin content in leaf and petal tissues increased gradually from April to December planted crops. Maximum number of primary branches, greater average spread of the plant, size and weight of individual flower were recorded at wider spacing (40×40cm). Amongst various interactions, crop planted on 12th October at 40×20cm spacing gave the maximum yield (23.10kg/5.76sqm) of flowers per plot in comparison with all the other treatments.

 

Keywords: African marigold, cv. ‘Siracole’, Tagetes erecta Linn., Planting time, Spacing, Anthocyanin

IPC code; Int. cl.8- A01G 9/00

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, Sept-Oct. 2008, pp.444-447      

 

 

Spatial influence on the important bio-chemical properties of Piper nigrum Linn. leaves

Utpala Parthasarathy*, G R Asish, T J Zachariah, K V Saji, Johnson K George, K Jayarajan and P A Mathew

Black pepper (Piper nigrum Linn.) is available in a vast altitudinal diversity and shows great adaptability to a wide range of climatic and soil conditions. The study of leaf bio-chemical components such as chlorophyll, carotene and phenol concentration and bio-mass percentage, showed considerable intra species variation in wild black pepper collected from the Western Ghats (Karnataka and Kerala). The results plotted in map with the help of ARC-GIS software to get an idea of spatial variation, indicated that, the diversity of chlorophyll and carotene percentage is wide in a narrow geographical range, but certain patch showed high phenol concentration (between 10º48' and 12º25' latitude).

 

Keywords: Black pepper, Carotene, Chlorophyll, Phenol, Piper nigrum, Spatial influence.

IPC code; Int. cl.8 - A61K 36/00, A23L 1/22

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, Sept-Oct. 2008, pp. 448-460

 

 

Wild vegetables of Karbi - Anglong district, Assam

A Kar and S K Borthakur 

The paper deals with 57 species of wild plants used as vegetable by the Karbi tribe of Karbi - Anglong district, Assam. The scientific names of the plants, method of use, regeneration, demand and form of use of these vegetables are included. The paper also highlighted the medicinal value, market price and shelf-life of the vegetables after harvest. The conservation of the indigenous plant wealth through cultivation and further follow up investigation on these plants for chemical analysis has also been emphasized.

 

Keywords: Karbi Anglong, Karbi tribe, Market prices, Medicinal value, Shelf-life, Wild vegetables.

IPC code; Int. cl.8 - A01G 1/00, A61K 36/00, A23L 1/00, A23L 1/052

 

Explorer: Research Paper

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, Sept-Oct. 2008, pp.461-465

 

 

Ethnomedicinal plants used in West Rarrh region of West Bengal

Ashis Ghosh

Present communication brings to knowledge the traditional methods of treating human diseases and disorders using plant-based drugs recorded from tribal and rural folks in West Rarrh region of West Bengal. A total of 46 plant species belonging to 30 families of angiosperms are employed by the inhabitants in the form of infusion, decoction, oil, paste, latex, etc. either as a sole drug or in combination to treat various ailments. The dose/s, duration and method of administration are given along with botanical name, family, plant’s part/ form of recipe used and local plant names. The folk herbal formulations however, require further testing.

 

Keywords: Ethno medicine, Medicinal plants, Paschim Medinipur, West Rarrh.

IPC code; Int. cl.8 - A61K 36/00

Review Papers

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, Sept-Oct. 2008, pp. 466-475

 

 

A Review on Anthelmintic Plants

Ravindra G Mali and Anita A Mehta*

            Modern synthetic medicines are very effective in curing diseases but also cause a number of side effects. Crude drugs are less efficient with respect to cure of diseases but are relatively free from side effects. Parasites have been of concern to the medical field for centuries and the helminths considered causing considerable problems for human beings and animals. A large number of medicinal plants are claimed to possess anthelmintic property in traditional systems of medicine and are also utilized by ethnic groups worldwide. Following the folk claims, several medicinal plants have been scrutinized for this activity using various in vitro and in vivo methods. The present review summarizes some important pharmacological and preliminary studies on medicinal plants, products thereof and isolated principles from them, which can be investigated further to achieve lead molecules in the search of novel herbal drugs.

 

Keywords: Anthelmintic activity, Earthworms, Tapeworms, Hookworms, Essential oil, Medicinal Plants.

IPC code; Int. cl.8- A61K 36/00, A61P 33/10

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.7, Sept-Oct. 2008, pp. 476-483

 

 

A Review on Antianxiety Plants

Neeraj Gilhotra and Dinesh Dhingra*

Anxiety is a psychological disorder characterized by a persistent and disproportionate fear unrelated to any genuine risk. Apart from very few chemical remedies available like benzodiazepines and serotonin modulators, not much treatment options are at hand that could safely and effectively alleviate anxiety. The present paper discusses anti-anxiety potential of 56 plants with emphasis on their pre-clinical and clinical reports. Majority of these plants have been found to be acting through modulation of serotonin and γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) neurotransmitters.

 

Keywords: Antianxiety Plants, Anxiolytic herbs, Medicinal Plants

IPC code; Int. cl.8- A61K 36/00, A61P 25/22