NATURAL PRODUCT RADIANCE

A Bimonthly Journal on Natural Products

Total visitors: 2,219  since 05-11-09

 

VOLUME 8

NUMBER 5

September-October 2009

 

 

                          C          O       N       T       E       N       T       S

 

Readers’ Write

 

 

 

How to get honey in off-season from detached plants?

477

   

Allelopathic susceptibility of some climbers       

477

 

 

Research Papers

 

 

 

Hypoglycaemic effect of Ficus arnottiana Miq. bark extracts on streptozotocin induced diabetes in rats

 

Papiya Mitra Mazumder, Mamta Farswan and V Parcha

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/60

 

478

 

 

In-vitro antioxidant activity of hot aqueous extract of Helicteres isora Linn. fruits

 

P K Basniwal, M Suthar, G S Rathore , R Gupta, V Kumar, A Pareek and D Jain

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/00, A61P 39/06

 

483

 

 

Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of

Leea indica (Burm. f.) Merr. flowers

 

G V Srinivasan, P Sharanappa, N K Leela, C T Sadashiva and K K Vijayan

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/00, A61P 31/04

 

488

 

 

Bioassay guided isolation of antibacterial homoisoflavan from Dragon’s blood resin (Dammul-akhwain)

 

Deepika Gupta, Bruce Bleakley and Rajinder K Gupta

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/00, A61P 31/04

 

494

 

 

In vitro antidiarrhoeal activity and toxicity profile of Aegle marmelos Correa ex Roxb. dried fruit pulp

 

 P V Joshi, R H Patil and V L Maheshwari

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/75, A61K 131/00, A61P 1/12, A61P 31/00    

 

498

 

 

In vitro antimicrobial study of root extract of Chlorophytum arundinaceum Baker

 

Gugulothu Valya, Ajmeera Ragan and Vatsavaya S Raju

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/896, A61K 125/00, A61P 31/00         

 

 503

 

 

Nutritive value of some indigenous plant rhizomes resembling Ginger

 

A K Indrayan,Pragya Agrawal, Anuj K Rathi, Ajat Shatru, Nitin K Agrawal and 

Durvesh K Tyagi

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/906, A61K 125/00, A61P 31/00, A23L 1/00, A23L 1/29

 

 

 

507

 

 

Evaluation of hepatoprotective activity of Capparis brevispina DC. stem bark

 

M J Anju Aniyathi, P G Latha, P Manikili, S R Suja S Shyamal, V J Shine, S Sini, G I Anuja,

P Shikha, M K Vidyadharan and S Rajasekharan

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/00, A61K 129/00, A61P 1/16, A61P 39/06    

 

 

514

 

 

Pharmacognostic investigations on the leaves of Viburnum coriaceum Blume

 

K Prabhu, K Ponnudurai, S Hemalatha and P K Karar

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/35, A61K 127/00

 

520

 

 

Green page: Research Papers

 

   

Senna uniflora (Mill.) Irwin & Barneby (Caesalpiniaceae)-A new record for Rajasthan

KL Meena and BL Yadav

IPC code; Int. cl.8—A01G 9/00

 

 

525

 

 

Effect of spacing on the performance of Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis Linn.) blue flowered genotype (NIC-23416) in mid hills of Uttarakhand under rainfed conditions

A C Mishra, K S Negi , H Y Shukla and A K Sharma

IPC code; Int. cl.8—A01G 9/00, A61K 36/537

 

 

 

528

 

 

Studies on somatic cell variability in Commiphora wightii (Arnott) Bhandari for guggulsterone production

Suchismita Dass and K G Ramawat

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/00, A01G 31/00

 

 

 

532

 

 

Explorer: Research Papers

 

 

 

Studies on ethnomedicinal plants used by traditional practitioners, Jhankri, Bijuwa and Phedangma in Darjeeling Himalaya

Pranay Bantawa and Ritu Rai

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/00, A61 K 35/78

 

 

 

537

 

 

Indigenous knowledge on natural dyeing of Korai grass mat in Pattamadai, Tirunelveli district, Tamil Nadu

A Saravana Ganthi, M Yogaraj and M Padma Sorna Subramanian

IPC code; Int. cl.8—C09B 61/00

 

 

 

542

 

 

Ethnobotany of Dillenia pentagyna Roxb. in Vindhya region of Madhya Pradesh, India

P C Dubey, R L S Sikarwar , K K Khanna and Arjun P Tiwari

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/00

 

 

546

 

 

Review Paper

 

 

 

A phyto- pharmacological overview on Adhatoda zeylanica Medic. syn. A. vasica (Linn.) Nees

Sayeed Ahmad, Madhukar Garg, Maksood Ali, Mhaveer Singh, Md Tanwir Athar and Shahid Husain Ansari

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/00, A61K 127/00, A61P 11/00, A61P 31/00  

 

 

 

 

549

 

 

Book Review

555

 

 

Forthcoming Conferences, Seminars, Exhibitions and Trainings

556

 

 

Guidelines to authors

557

 

 

Index

560

                                                           

                                                                                                                                                           

 

 

Forthcoming Conferences, Seminars, Exhibitions and Trainings

 

1. International Conference on Horticulture, 9-12 November, 2009, Bangalore, India. Chairman, Organizing Committee, International Conference on Horticulture, P N Agricultural Science Foundation, #9, 1st Cross, 1st Main, 1st Block, Rajmahal Vilas Extension II stage, Bangalore-560 094, Karnataka, India; Phone: +91-80-3415188; Fax: +91-80-23511555; E-mail: drpremnath@vsnl.net/pnasf@rediffmail.com/pnasfoundation@gmail.com/pnasf@vsnl.net; Website: www.pnasf.org, www.pnasf.org/news&events.htm

 

2. International Exhibition and Conference for the Food and Beverage Industry (Annapoorna-World Food India), 25-27 November 2009, Mumbai, India; Website: http://www.worldoffoodindia.com/

 

3. National Conference on Biotechnology for Human Development, 27-28 November 2009 Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India; Mr. Karthikeyan Sivashanmugam/Dr. K.M. Gothandam, Organizing Secretaries, SBTI-2009, School of Bio Sciences & Technology, Vit University, Vellore - 632 014, Tamil Nadu; E-mail: sbti09@vit.ac.in; Phone: 0416 2202616, Mobile: 94862 51937/99403 28474; Website: www.vit.ac.in/sbti09.

 

4. BIOSYM 2009, 27-28 November 2009, Bangalore, Karnataka, India, Secretariat, C/o Winmedia Communications Private Limited , 120, G-Floor, Cunningham Road, Bangalore-560052; Phone: +91 80 2234 2611/12, Mob.+91 96322 25660, +91 90360 36022; E-mail: pmr@biosym.in; Website: http://www.biosym.in.

 

5. Bhartiya Vigyan Sammelan, 1-3 December 2009 Indore, Madhya Pradesh, India, Dr. S.P. Singh, Secretary General, Bhartiya Vigyan Sammelan School of Energy and Environmental Studies Devi Ahilya Vishwavidyalaya, Takshshila Parisar, Indore-452010; Phone: 0731 2462366; Fax: 0731 2467378; E-mail : bvsindore@gmail.com; Website: http://www.bvsindia.org.

 

6. 46th Annual Convention of Chemists 2009 and the International Conference on Recent Research Trends in Chemical Sciences, 2-6 December 2009, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India; Website: http://www.vit.ac.in/events2009/chemsite/index.html.

 

7. Industrial Green Chemistry Workshop (IGCW-2009), 4-6 December 2009, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India; Website: http://www.industrialgreenchem.com.

 

8. Agritech India 2009, 5-7 December 2009, Bangalore, Karnataka, India, Syed MK, Media Today Pvt. Ltd; Website: http://www.agritechindia.com.

 

9. 64th Annual convention & International Conference on Oils, Fats, Fuels & Surfactants,

9-11 December 2009 New Delhi, India; Website: http://www.icoffs09.com.

10. International Conference on Food Security and Environmental Sustainability – FSES 2009, 17-19 December 2009, Kharagpur, India, B S Das, Associate Prof and Organizing Secretary, Department of Agricultural and Food Engineering, IIT Kharagpur W.B. 721302, India; Phone: +91 3222 283162, Mobile: +91 9434025413; Fax: +91 3222 282244; E-mail: fses2009@gmail.com, bsdas@agfe.iitkgp.ernet.in; Website: http://www.agri.iitkgp.ernet.in/fses2009/index.html.

 

11. Biotechnology for the 21st Century: New Horizons, 18-19 December 2009, Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh, India; Website: http://pinkusingh.t35.com.

 

12. International Symposium on Natural Resource Management in Agriculture (NARMA-II), 18-19 December 2009, Bikaner, Rajasthan, India; Website: http://www.raubikaner.org

13. First International Conference on Conservation, Marketing and Patenting of Medicinal Plants (ICCMP), 18-20 December 2009, Raipur, Chhattisgarh, India, Dr. R. N. Pati, Director of the Conference; E-mail: drpati54@gmail.com.

 

14. International Conference on Ethno-Veterinary Practices, 4-6 January 2010, Thanjavur, Tamil Nadu, India, Dr. Natesan Punniamurthy, EVM Centre for Research and Training of TANUVAS, Thanjavur; Website: http:// www.tanuvas.ac.in/nea_icevp.html. /

 

 

 

Readers Write

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.8, Sept- Oct 2009, pp.477

 

 

How to get honey in off-season from detached plants?

 

Dear editor, I am a regular reader of Natural Product Radiance and want to share information with fellow readers of the journal about getting honey from detached plants in the off-season. For the management of bees and getting more honey by instant process in the off seasons (rainy and autumn) bee-keepers practice this procedure in West Bengal. To get a particular quality of honey the flower or leaf extract of that particular plant is added to the sugar solution to attract bees. The flower/leaf extract is prepared and processed with sugar solution (100g/lt of water), flower/leaf extract (25g) and one drop kerosene oil. This solution is used as artificial regular diet for 25 bee keeping boxes and create a general affinity for bees. Locally available plants are used and honey thus produced is tested in palynology laboratory for their medicinal value. To meet the particular type of honey this process is effective and in this way unifloral honey is made which is usually distinct in colour, flavour and taste. Some plants suitable for this practice are:

(i) Daucus carota Linn.–Honey produced from roots prevent the eye diseases.

(ii) Rosa ´ centifolia Linn. Honey from petal extract is good for skin care.

(iii) Ocimum basicilicum Linn. and O. sanctum Linn.– Honey from leaf extract is good for cough, cold, sore throat, peptic ulcer, etc.

(iv) Psidium guajava Linn. and Syzygium cuminii (Linn.) Skeels Honey from leaf and flower extracts is used as diabetic drink.

(v) Nymphaea rubra Roxb.–Honey from flower extract is effective in eye diseases.

 

This may provide new sources of honey in off-season when profuse flowering is lacking and bee keepers should be encouraged to practice the same for sustainable production of the same.

 

 

Allelopathic susceptibility of some climbers

 

 

            Allelopathy is a biological phenomenon in which some plants produce certain biochemicals that influence the germination, growth and development of other plants especially climbers growing near their root system. Although allelopathic science is a relatively new field of study, it exists in traditional knowledge of farmers who select the plants accordingly to cultivate some climbers especially cucurbits. Fish- tail palm, papaya and yellow oleander are some trees which farmers do not use as supporters of cucurbits. They do not get good yield when grown within circumference of these plants. For confirming this observation we conducted a preliminary study and found that aqueous extracts of both shoot and root exhibit inhibitory effect on seed germination and growth. Hence these trees can not be used for raising gourds, bitter gourd and dioscorea species, as practiced by farmers.

 

 

Ashis Kumar Ghosh

Swamiji Eco-club, C/o-Tushar Dutta,

1/E-5, Mitra Compound,

 P.O.+Dt.-Paschim Medinipur,

Pin code-721 101, W.B.

 

 

Research Papers
 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.8, Sept- Oct 2009, pp.478- 482

 

 

Hypoglycaemic effect of Ficus arnottiana Miq. bark extracts on streptozotocin induced diabetes in rats

 

Papiya Mitra Mazumder1, Mamta Farswan2* and V Parcha2

1Birla Institute of Technology, Ranchi-835 215, Jharkhand, India.

2Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences

SBS (PG) Institute of Biomedical Sciences

Balawala, Dehra Dun-248161, Uttarakhand, India.

*Correspondent author, E-mail: mamta_fr2002@yahoo.co.in

Received 20 June 2008; Accepted 17December 2008

 

            Different species of the genus Ficus Linn. such as Ficus bengalensis Linn., F. glomerata Roxb. and Ficus cunia Buch.-Ham. have been studied for their antidiabetic potential and used in folklore system of medicine for diabetes. In the present study, the effect of different extracts of F. arnottiana Miq. bark was evaluated on fasting and posts prandial blood sugar in normal and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) rats. Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin in neonates. Oral administration of petroleum ether, chloroform, acetone and methanol extracts of the bark (100 mg/kg, p.o.) for 21 days caused a decrease in fasting blood sugar (FBS) in diabetic rats. Among all the extracts, acetone extract was found to lower the FBS significantly (P<0.001) in diabetic rats. Acetone extract also caused a significant decrease (P<0.01) in post prandial blood sugar level in diabetic rats. Results of the test were compared with the standard antidiabetic drug glibenclamide (5mg/kg, p.o). Thus the present study indicates that the acetone extract of F. arnottiana possess antidiabetic potential.

 

Keywords: Blood glucose, Diabetes, Ficus arnottiana, Paras Pipal, Streptozotocin.

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/60

 

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.8, Sept- Oct 2009, pp. 483-487

 

 

In-vitro antioxidant activity of hot aqueous extract of Helicteres isora Linn. fruits

 

P K Basniwal1*, M Suthar1, G S Rathore1, R Gupta1, V Kumar1,

A Pareek2 and D Jain3

1L B S College of Pharmacy, Udai Marg, Tilak Nagar, Jaipur-302 004, Rajasthan, India

2L M College of Science and Technology (Pharmacy Wing), Shastri Nagar

Jodhpur-342 003, Rajasthan.

3School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Rajiv Gandhi Technological University

Bhopal-462 036, M P, India

*Correspondent author, E-mail: pawanbasniwal@gmail.com; Tele Fax : 0141-2620517

Received 30 June 2008; Accepted 22 May 2009

           

            The antioxidant activity of the aqueous (hot) extract of Helicteres isora Linn. (AEHI) (Family--Sterculiaceae) fruits was investigated in various in vitro models. The total polyphenolic content of the extract was found 7.04% of AEHI, when compared to gallic acid and total flavonoids content was 2.4 mg/g of AEHI, when compared to rutin. Hydrogen peroxide radicals were inhibited at IC50 =165 μg/ml, while ascorbic acid inhibited at 187.33μg/ml. AEHI inhibited the nitric oxide radical at IC50 = 820 μg/ml, when it was compared with rutin as standard antioxidant with IC50 = 68.52 μg/ml. Superoxide (SO) radical’s inhibition was compared with quercetin and IC50 value was found more than 1000μg/ml. Moreover, the results were observed in a concentration dependent manner. Present in vitro studies clearly indicated that the aqueous (hot) extract of H. isora has significant antioxidant activity.

 

Keywords: Helicteres isora, Indian Screw Tree, Total flavonoids, Superoxide, Antioxidant.

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/00, A61P 39/06.

 

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.8, Sept- Oct 2009, pp. 488-493

 

 

Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of

Leea indica (Burm. f.) Merr. Flowers

 

G V Srinivasan1, P Sharanappa2, N K Leela3, C T Sadashiva4 and K K Vijayan1*

1Organic Chemistry Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry

University of Calicut, Calicut-673 635, Kerala, India

2P G Centre, Department of Bioscience, University of Mysore, Hemagangothri

Hassan-573 220, Karnataka, India

3Division of Crop Production and Post Harvest Technology

Indian Institute of Spices Research, Kozhikode -673 012, Kerala, India

4Department of Studies in Chemistry, University of Mysore, Mysuru-570 006

Karnataka-, India

*Correspondent author, E-mail: prof.kkvijayan@yahoo.co.in; Phone: 9447954511

Received 4 July 2008; Accepted 24 April 2009

The chemical compounds present in the essential oil obtained from the flowers of Leea indica (Burm. f.) Merr. were analyzed by GC-MS technique. More than 95% of the oil consisted of the esters of phthalic acid. Di-isobutylphthalate (>75%), di-n-butylphthalate (>7%), n-butylisobutylphthalate (>6%), butylisohexylphthalate (>3.5%) were identified as major constituents of the essential oil. Monobutyl carbonotrithioate, a sulphur compound was also identified in trace amount (0.01%). The essential oil showed moderate antibacterial activity against three Gram positive and two Gram negative bacteria and three pathogenic fungi.

 

Keywords: Leea indica, Leeaceae, Flower, Essential oil, GC-MS, Antibacterial, Antifungal.

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/00, A61P 31/04.

 

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.8, Sept- Oct 2009, pp. 494-497

 

 

Bioassay guided isolation of antibacterial homoisoflavan from

Dragon’s blood resin (Dammul-akhwain)

 

Deepika Gupta1, Bruce Bleakley2 and Rajinder K Gupta1*

1 University School of Biotechnology, GGS Indraprastha University

Kashmiri Gate, Delhi-110 006, India

2 Department of Biology & Microbiology, South Dakota State University

Brookings, South Dakota, USA 57007

*Correspondent author, E-mail: rkg67ap@yahoo.com

Phone: +91-11-9871263252 (Mob.); Fax: +91-11-23865941-42

Received 30 July 2008; Accepted 1 December 2008

 

There is a great need of a simple, cost effective bioassay guided method for screening the antibacterial and antifungal properties of plants as novel drugs continue to be developed through research from these plants. In this short report, an antibacterial homoisoflavan using a simple method based on thin layer chromatography (TLC) from Dracaena cinnabari Balf f. resin has been isolated.

 

Keywords: Antibacterial, Antifungal, Dammul-akhwain, Dracaena cinnabari, Dragon’s Blood,  

 resin, TLC

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/00, A61P 31/04

 

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.8, Sept- Oct 2009, pp. 498-502

 

 

In vitro antidiarrhoeal activity and toxicity profile of Aegle marmelos Correa ex Roxb. dried fruit pulp

 

P V Joshi1, R H Patil2 and V L Maheshwari 3*

1R C Patel College of Pharmacy, Shirpur, 2R.C. Patel Arts, Commerce and

Science College, Shirpur-425 405, Maharashtra, India

3Department of Biochemistry, School of Life Sciences

North Maharashtra University, Jalgaon 425 001, Maharashtra

*Correspondent author, E-mail: vlmaheshwari@hotmail.com, Fax: +91 257 2258403

Received 12 August 2008; Accepted 31 March 2009

 

The antidiarrhoeal effect of ethanolic extract of the dried fruit pulp of Aegle marmelos Correa ex Roxb. was studied on various intestinal pathogens. It showed excellent activity against Shigella boydii, S. sonnei and S. flexneri whereas the activity was found to be moderate against S. dysenteriae. The minimum inhibitory concentration against the strains of Shigella was recorded between 250 to 500µg/ml.  Preliminary phytochemical tests of extract demonstrated the presence of common phytochemicals including phenols, tannins and flavonoids as major active constituents. Spectrophotometric study showed presence of a compound with overlapping spectrum with the marker standard Umbelliferone- a coumarin glycoside which was further confirmed by the TLC and HPTLC studies of the ethanolic extract. LD50 of >1250 mg/kg body weight, no change in the behaviour and physiological activity was recorded (at this dose) in the acute oral toxicity test in mice with the ethanolic extract of A. marmelos dried fruit pulp.

 

Keywords: Aegle marmelos, Antidiarrhoeal activity, Bael tree, HPTLC, Oral acute toxicity,

 Umbelliferone

IPC code; Int. cl.8 A61K 36/75, A61K 131/00, A61P 1/12, A61P 31/00

 

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.8, Sept- Oct 2009, pp. 503-506

 

 

In vitro antimicrobial study of root extract of Chlorophytum arundinaceum Baker

 

Gugulothu Valya, Ajmeera Ragan* and Vatsavaya S. Raju

Phytochemistry Laboratory, Department of Botany

Kakatiya University, Warangal-506 009, Andhra Pradesh, India

*Correspondent author, E-mail: raganajmeera@yahoo.co.in; Phone: 98494 62614 (Mob.)

Received 28 July 2008; Accepted 23 February 2009

 

The tubers of Chlorophytum arundinaceum Baker of Liliaceae family is a traditionally used medicinal plant with ethnic and/or folk claims like immunomodulatory, antidiabetic, anti-arthritic,  aphrodisiac, etc. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of its root extract was evaluated against six bacterial species (Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shigella sonnei and Staphylococcus aureus) and four fungal species (Aspergillus fumigatus, A. niger, Candida albicans and Trichophyton rubrum). The root extracts in solvents like petroleum ether/benzene, ethyl acetate, hydro-alcoholic, methanol and chloroform showed moderate microbial activity whereas the aqueous root extract evinced no antimicrobial activity. None of the solvent extracts tested showed any activity against B. subtilis. The methanolic extract has shown maximum antibacterial as well as antifungal activity of the five solvent systems tried except A. fumigatus.

 

Keywords: Antimicrobial activity, Chlorophytum arundinaceum, Safed musli, Root tubers

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/896, A61K 125/00, A61P 31/00

 

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.8, Sept- Oct 2009, pp. 507-513

 

 

Nutritive value of some indigenous plant rhizomes resembling Ginger

 

A K Indrayan*, Pragya Agrawal, Anuj K Rathi, Ajat Shatru, Nitin K Agrawal and

Durvesh K Tyagi

Natural Products Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Gurukula Kangri University

Hardwar-249 404, Uttarakhand, India

*Correspondent author, E-mail: akindrayan@yahoo.co.in, Phone: + 91 1334 232465

Received 15 April 2008; Accepted 3February 2009

Rhizomes of certain Ginger like species, viz. Alpinia officinarum Hance, A. galanga Willd., A. zerumbet (Pers.) Burtt & R M Smith (syn. A. speciosa K. Schum.), A. calcarata Rosc. and Kaempferia galanga Linn. have high medicinal value belonging to family Zingiberaceae. These rhizomes have a good nutritive value also (350.9 Cal per 100 g) and are quite rich in protein and carbohydrate, but low in fat. Rhizomes of A. officinarum, A. zerumbet and A. calcarata have high iron content with a moderate and balanced content of carbohydrate, protein, fat and crude fibre. Rhizomes of A. galanga are lowest in fat content but richest in carbohydrate. A. calcarata is lowest in Mn, Ni and K but richest in Ca and Na. Study shows the biologically important metals Cr, Mn, Cu, Zn, Ca and Na to be sufficient in rhizomes of K. galanga. All these studied materials have a moderate to good antimicrobial activity.

 

Keywords: Alpinia galanga, Alpinia calcarata, Alpinia officinarum, Alpinia speciosa, Alpinia zerumbet, Kaempferia galanga, Antimicrobial activity, Mineral elements, Nutritive value, Trace elements, Zingiberaceae

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/906, A61K 125/00, A61P 31/00, A23L 1/00, A23L 1/29

 

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.8, Sept- Oct 2009, pp. 514-519

 

 

Evaluation of hepatoprotective activity of Capparis brevispina DC. stem bark

 

MJ Anju Aniyathi1, PG Latha2*, P Manikili1, SR Suja2 S Shyamal2, VJ Shine2, S Sini2, GI Anuja2, P Shikha2, MK Vidyadharan3 and S Rajasekharan 2

1 J. J. College of Arts and Science, Tiruchirappalli, Pudukkottai – 622 404, Tamil Nadu, India

2 Tropical Botanic Garden and Research Institute, Palode, Thiruvananthap

3Uthamabagh Estate, Thonnakkal, Thiruvananthapuram – 695 317

*Correspondent author, E-mail: lathagopalakrishnan@yahoo.com

Tel.: +91-472-2869226(O), 0471 – 2443503 (R); Fax: +91-472-2869646

Received 14 July 2008; Accepted 28 November 2008

 

The effect of the ethanol extract of the stem bark of Capparis brevispina DC. (CB) was studied against paracetamol (overdose) induced hepatotoxicity in Wistar rats. Significant hepatoprotective effects were obtained against liver damage induced by overdose of paracetamol (Acetaminophen) as evident from decreased serum levels of glutamate pyruvate transaminase (SGPT), glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT), alkaline phosphatase (SAKP) and bilirubin (SB) in the CB treated groups (250, 500 mg/kg), compared to the intoxicated controls. The hepatoprotective effect was further confirmed by histopathological studies of the liver, which showed improved architecture, absence of nuclear pycnosis, hepatocyte congestion and necrosis, when compared with the liver of the toxin group of animals. CB extract also showed significant free radical scavenging activity in vitro. Thus, the present study provides a scientific rationale for the traditional use of this plant in the management of liver disorders.

 

Keywords: Capparis brevispina, Free radical scavenging activity, Hepatoprotection, Histopathology of liver, Paracetamol.

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/00, A61K 129/00, A61P 1/16, A61P 39/06.

 

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.8, Sept- Oct 2009, pp. 520-524

 

 

Pharmacognostic investigations on the leaves of Viburnum coriaceum Blume

 

K Prabhu1*, K Ponnudurai1, S Hemalatha2 and P K Karar1

1Department of Pharmacognosy, Nandini Nagar Mahavidyalaya College of Pharmacy

Nawabganj, Gonda – 271 303, Uttar Pradesh, India

2Department of Pharmaceutics, IT-BHU, Varanasi - 221005, Uttar Pradesh

*Correspondent author, E-mail: prabhu.cognosy@gmail.com

Phone: +91-9935745590 (Mob.); Fax No: +91-5260-275000

Received 20 June 2008; Accepted 5 December 2008

 

Viburnum coriaceum Blume (syn. V. cylindricum Buch.-Ham. ex D. Don) of family Caprifoliaceae is of medicinal value. In the present study pharmacognostical investigations such as morphology, microscopy including leaf constant, measurements and other applicable physico-chemical parameters are carried out on its leaves. The findings may provide useful information with regards to its identification and standardization in future.

 

Keywords: Viburnum coriaceum, Viburnum, Caprifoliaceae, Pharmacognostic studies, Leaves.

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/35, A61K 127/00

 

Green Page: Research Paper
 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.8, Sept- Oct 2009, pp. 525-527

 

 

Senna uniflora (Mill.) Irwin & Barneby (Caesalpiniaceae)-A new record for Rajasthan

 

KL Meena and BL Yadav*

Department of Botany

MLV Government College, Bhilwara-311 001, Rajasthan, India

*Correspondent author, E-mail: drblyadav@yahoo.com

Received 14 July 2008; Accepted 26 December 2008

            Senna uniflora (Mill.) Irwin & Barneby belonging to the family Caesalpiniaceae has been recorded for the first time from Mangrol and Laxmipura villages, 24km away in the South East of Chittorgarh, Rajasthan. The specimens were found growing along road sides intermingled with Senna tora (Linn.) Roxb. Morphological features, time of flowering-fruiting, ecological notes and key characters of this species have been reported in present paper.

 

Keywords: Senna uniflora, New record, Rajasthan.

IPC code; Int. cl.8A01G 9/00

 

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.8, Sept- Oct 2009, pp. 528-531

 

 

Effect of spacing on the performance of Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis Linn.) blue flowered genotype (NIC-23416) in mid hills of Uttarakhand under rainfed conditions

 

A C Mishra, K S Negi*, H Y Shukla and A K Sharma

National Bureau of Plant Genetic Resources (NBPGR), Regional Station

Bhowali 263 132, Niglat, District-Nainital, Uttarakhand

*Correspondent author, E-mail: officerinchargebhowali@yahoo.com

Phone: 91-5942-220027, 09411166201 (Mob.)

Received 24 April 2008; Accepted 14 August 2008

            The present study was conducted under rainfed field conditions at Bhowali, Uttarakhand. Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis Linn.) was planted at three spacings, viz. 30×20cm, 40×30cm and 60×30cm between row to row. The results indicated that widest spacing of 60×30cm was the most favourable for plant height, plant spread, number of branches, stem diameter and herbage yield per plant in first, year whereas 40×30cm spacing was the best for these traits except herbage yield per plant in second year. But, spacing of 20 ×30 cm was the best for herbage yield and essential oil yield per hectare. On the basis of analysis of essential oil at 12 and 14 months after planting it was concluded that optimum harvesting time of the crop lies in between these periods.

 

Keywords: Rosemary, Rosmarinus officinalis, Mid hills, Essential oil.

IPC code; Int. cl.8A01G 9/00, A61K 36/537

 

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.8, Sept- Oct 2009, pp. 532-536

 

 

Studies on somatic cell variability in Commiphora wightii (Arn.) Bhandari for guggulsterone production

 

Suchismita Dass1 and K G Ramawat2*

1 Miranda House, University of Delhi, Patel Chest Marg, Delhi-110 007, India

2Laboratory of Bio-Molecular Technology, Department of Botany

M. L. Sukhadia University, Udaipur-313 001, Rajasthan, India

*Correspondent author, E-mail: kg_ramawat@yahoo.com

Telefax: +91-294-2425010

Received 8 August 2008; Accepted 26 May 2009

More than 125 clones were established in Commiphora wightii (Arnott) Bhandari by aggregate cloning from stock cultures maintained on MS medium supplemented with 0.25 mg/l 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid and 0.1 mg/l kinetin. A few high productive clones were isolated while majority (>80%) were low productive. In the present paper, the somatic cell variability in callus cultures of C. wightii and their growth in shake flasks and bioreactor for high yield of guggulsterones has been reported. A high productive clone yielded 80 μg/l guggulsterones when grown in cell suspension culture in shake flasks and 2 litre stirred tank bioreactor. The colour variations of the cultures (due to anthocyanin accumulation) were also explored to isolate high guggulsterone producing lines; however, no correlationship could be established between anthocyanin accumulation and guggulsterone contents of the clones.

 

Keywords: Anthocyanin, Callus culture, Cell culture, Guggulsterone, Somatic cell variability.

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/00, A01G 31/00

 

 

Explorer: Research Paper

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.8, Sept- Oct 2009, pp. 537-541

 

 

Studies on ethnomedicinal plants used by traditional practitioners, Jhankri, Bijuwa and Phedangma in Darjeeling Himalaya

 

Pranay Bantawa1* and Ritu Rai2

1Biotechnology Laboratory, Faculty of Horticulture, Uttar Banga Krishi Viswavidyalaya

P.O. Pundibari, Cooch Behar-736 165, West Bengal

2Department of Botany, Kurseong College, P.O. Kurseong-734 203, Darjeeling, West Bengal

*Correspondent author, E-mail: bantawapranay@rediffmail.com

Received 5 September 2007; Accepted 24 April 2009

 

            Biodiversity of eastern Himalayas including Sikkim and Darjeeling is well known. Many ethnic groups reside in this beautiful Himalayan region. Although the modern medicinal facilities are available in the urban areas of Darjeeling yet local population of far flung places still prefers to use traditional plant resources. An ethnobotanical study was conducted among the traditional practitioners: Jhankri, Bijuwa and Phedangma. Mostly they rely on locally available plant materials to cure many diseases and disorders. In this paper a total of 41 species of plants as used by traditional practitioners of this area are listed alphabetically by botanical names, followed by family (in parenthesis) and medicinal uses.

 

Keywords: Ethnomedicinal plants, Jaributy, Jhankri, Bijuwa, Phedangma, Darjeeling Himalaya.

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/00, A61K 35/78

 

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.8, Sept- Oct 2009, pp. 542-545

 

 

Indigenous knowledge on natural dyeing of Korai grass mat in Pattamadai, Tirunelveli district, Tamil Nadu

 

A Saravana Ganthi1*, M Yogaraj1 and M Padma Sorna Subramanian2

1Rani Anna Govt. College for Women, Tirunelveli - 627 008, Tamil Nadu, India

2 Survey of Medicinal Plants Unit (S), CCRAS, Govt. Siddha Medical College Campus

Palayamkottai-627 002, Tamil Nadu

* Correspondent author, E-mail: saran_gan@rediffmail.com; Phone: 0462-2580418

Received 31 March 2008; Accepted 11 November 2008

 

Mat weaving is an important traditional handicraft of Tamil Nadu which is famous for its korai dry-grass mats. Mat weavers from here not only create intricate patterns and designs, but mats are multicolored and often represent the ornate pallav of traditional silk sari from Tamil Nadu. Mats made with korai /sedge grass are extremely delicate and highly valued. Korai grass (Cyperus corymbosus Rottb.) is found in abundance along the banks of the rivers and in marshy areas in Tamil Nadu. Pattamadai village in Tirunelveli district of Tamil Nadu is famous for its fine quality mats. Here the local reed is split into nearly hundred pieces and are woven on a loom with a cotton warp. The mats are so fine that they can be rolled and placed into a small box. The weaving also takes enormous time and patience on the part of the weaver. Men and women of the Lebbai Muslim community weave these famous mats only in this village. The mat weaving industry of Pattamadai, which hitherto used synthetic dyes for colouring its internationally acclaimed rugs, is all set to use an eco-friendly colorant, extracted from a plant. The study involved field works and interviews. The present work was undertaken to collect the information about the mat weaving art, and also study the natural dye yielding plants and their extraction methodology as well as dyeing properties in mat weaving.

 

Keywords: Cyperus corymbosus, Korai grass, Mat weaving, Natural dye, Pattamadai pai, Pattu pai

Silk mat, Pattamadai village, Tirunelveli, Tamil Nadu.

IPC code; Int. cl.8C09B 61/00

 

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.8, Sept- Oct 2009, pp. 546-548

 

 

Ethnobotany of Dillenia pentagyna Roxb. in Vindhya region of

Madhya Pradesh, India

 

P C Dubey1, R L S Sikarwar2*, K K Khanna3 and Arjun P Tiwari1

1Conservator of Forest, Research and Extension Circle, Rewa-486 001, Madhya Pradesh, India

2Arogyadham, Deendayal Research Institute, Chitrakoot, Satna-485 331, Madhya Pradesh

3Botanical Survey of India, Central Circle, Allahabad-211 002, Uttar Pradesh, India

* Correspondent author, E-mail: rlssikarwar@rediffmail.com

Received 6 February 2008; Accepted 16 February 2009

 

An ethnobotanical study among the various tribal and folk communities of Vindhya region of Madhya Pradesh was carried out during the year 2004-2007. Detailed first hand information on ethnobotanical uses of Dillenia pentagyna Roxb., an endangered tree species, was collected, which accounts for many ethnical uses in the study area. The tribal and folk communities use the various parts of it for the treatment of their different ailments and diseases, viz. delivery (bark), bone fracture (leaf), body pain (root), piles (leaf), diabetes (bark), diarrhoea and dysentery (bark), etc.

 

Keywords: Dillenia pentagyna, Karkat, Ethnobotany, Medicinal uses, Madhya Pradesh, Vindhya region.

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/00      

 

 

Review Paper

 

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.8, Sept- Oct 2009, pp. 549-553

 

 

 

A phyto-pharmacological overview on Adhatoda zeylanica Medic. syn. A. vasica (Linn.) Nees

 

Sayeed Ahmad*, Madhukar Garg, Maksood Ali, Mhaveer Singh, Md Tanwir Athar and Shahid Husain Ansari

Department of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy

Jamia Hamdard, Hamdard Nagar, New Delhi -110 062, India

*Correspondent author, E-mail: sahmad_jh@yahoo.co.in; Phone no. +91-9891374647

Received 25 August 2008; Accepted 1December 2008

 

Adhatoda zeylanica Medic. syn A. vasica (Linn.) Nees (Vasaka), a popular Indian medicinal plant, has long been used commonly in Ayurvedic system of medicine. The plant has been found to possess diverse number of pharmacological activities. The present paper gives an account of updated information on its phytochemical and pharmacological activities. The review reveals that wide range of phytochemical constituents have been isolated from the plant and it possesses important activities like antitussive, antibacterial, abortifacient, anti-inflammatory and antiulcer. Various other activities like radiomodulation, hypoglycaemic, cardiovascular protection, antitubercular, antiviral, hepatoprotective, antimutagenic and antioxidant have also been reported. These reports are very encouraging and indicate that herb should be studied more extensively for its therapeutic benefits. Clinical trials using vasaka for a variety of combinations in different formulations should also be conducted.

 

Keywords: Adhatoda zeylanica, Adhatoda vasica, Arusa, Malabar Nut, Vasaka, Vasicine, Phytoconstituents, Pharmacological activities.

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/00, A61K 127/00, A61P 11/00, A61P 31/00            

 

 

 

Book Review

 

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.8, Sept- Oct 2009, pp. 555

 

 

Phytochemicals- A Therapeutant for Critical Disease Management

 

D. R. Khanna, A. K. Chopra, G. Prasad, D. S. Malik and R. Bhutiani (Eds), Daya Publishing House, 1123/74, Deva Ram Park, Tri Nagar, Delhi-110 035, India, 2008, Hardbound, ISBN10 81-7035-549-4; ISBN13 978-81-7035-549-6, pp. 383 +xi

            Ayurveda is the medical system which promotes knowledge about the effect of everything existing in the universe with reference to their qualities and pharmacological activities and whether beneficial to the life or otherwise. Drug or dravya being one of the requisites of treatment is considered to be genuine, not just by its identification but also by its availability in abundance, manifold activities and enabling the vaidyas to use it in multiple dosage forms. Currently, the country is facing problems in ensuring quality of drugs hence, we need standardization of drugs and medicines to control and maintain their qualities in international market.

           

            The present book, Phytochemicals: A Therapeutant for Critical Diseases Management is the compilation of over 60 papers (published as separate 60 chapters), mostly dealt with the pharmacy and pharmaceutical aspects of the medicinal plants. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of Cissampelos pareira, qualitative analysis of Aloe vera, clinical studies on Acorus calamus, functional role of Asoka tree in female reproduction, phytochemical and antimicrobial studies on Caesalpinia bonducella, Azadirachta indica, Ficus racemosa, etc are discussed in various papers. There are also some papers on traditional herbal formulations used in different parts of the country for various ailments. Standardization and therapeutic potential of Trikatu and turmeric and Sida spinosa, Pongamia pinnata, etc. are also discussed in many papers.

 

            In chapter six, entitled as utility of Chirayat complex in the treatment of Chickengunia: A painful disease of recent origin, authors have presented a compilation of information on 23 plants used by tribal people of west Nirmar, Madhya Pradesh for the treatment of Chickengunia and its various symptoms. Out of these 23 plants 13 have been called a Chirayat complex i.e. the plants belonging to family Gentianaceae (11 species) and Acanthaceae (2 species); these plants have shown very good results against this disease, however, scientific validation is till required. Another interesting paper (Chapter 27) is on altitudinal variation of phytochemical constituents in essential oil of Rosa brunonii Linn. The results obtained by authors revealed that the variation of compounds and their percentage composition differ as per the type of soil and time of collection. The paper may be taken as an example for the study on variation in medicinal properties of various plants as per altitude, season and time of collection. Solanum pseudocapsicum Linn., a little known medicinal undershrub needs detailed pharmacological studies to establish its traditional uses by Vaidyas of Pauri Garhwal. The medicinal uses of this plant have been discussed in Chapter 48 of the book.

           

            An index of botanical names, pharmacological activities, common names, etc. is appended for the convenience of readers. The book compiled and edited by eminent scientists of multidisciplinary research and teaching experiences will be immensely useful to students, teachers, scientists and pharmaceutical industries interested in plant based medicine and drug development. The hardbound size of the book is handy and printing and production of the book is excellent.

 

 

 

Dr (Mrs) Sunita Garg