Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

 

ISSN:0972-5938    

VOLUME 2

NUMBER 1

JANUARY 2003

 

CONTENTS

 

Editorial Board

1

Editorial

3

Papers

 

Traditional Chinese medicines: An assessment

7

M D Nair

 

 

 

Importance of indigenous knowledge

11

  Suman Sahai

 

 

 

Ancient traditional technology for preparing bhasmas of metals and minerals with special reference to  preparation of tamra bhasma

 

15

  Rajiva Kumar Rai and S K Dixit

 

 

 

Bees make medicine for mankind

22

  P Banerjee, KN Sahoo, T K Biswas, SK Basu, J Chatterjee, A K Hui
N C Chakraborty and P K Debnath

 

 

 

Traditional uses of plant biodiversity from Aravalli hills of Rajasthan

27

  S S Katewa, B L Chaudhary, Anita Jain and Praveen Galav

 

 

 

Indigenous animal health care practices in Indian Central Himalaya: Empirical evidences

 

40

  Prasanna K Samal, Anubha Shah, Sushil Tiwari, Bhupender Mehra and Devendra K Agrawal

 

 

 

A review on ginger (Zingiber officinale): Pre-clinical and clinical trials

51

  A C Suthar, M M Banavalikar and M K Biyani

 

 

 

Medicinal plants for skin and hair care

62

  Laxmikant Sharma, Gaurav Agarwal and Ashwani Kumar

 

 

 

A folkloric account of selection of cattle: An ethnobiological study

69

  R B Mohanty

 

Plants used in traditional phytotherapy for hair care by tribals in Sabarkantha district, Gujarat, India

 

74

  Bhasker l Punjani and Vimal Kumar

 

 

 

Phytochemical and pharmacological evaluation of leaves of Abutilon indicum

79

  Lakshmayya, Narasimha Rao Nelluri, Pramod Kumar, Nanda Kishor Agarwal, T Shivaraj Gouda and S Ramachandra Setty

 

 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 2(1) January 2003, pp 7-10

 

Traditional Chinese medicines: An assessment

M D Nair

 

A comparative assessment of traditional Chinese system of medicine and Indian systems of medicine is presented in this paper.

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 2(1) January 2003, pp 11-14

 

Importance of indigenous knowledge

Suman Sahai

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 2(1), January 2003, pp 15-21

 

Ancient traditional technology for preparing bhasmas of metals and minerals with special reference to  preparation of tamra bhasma

Rajiva Kumar Rai and *S K Dixit

 

 

This paper deals with the ancient technologies used for preparing Ayurvedic drugs from minerals,metals and poisonous raw materials. For preparing ayurvedic drugs from the above raw materials the process of Shodhana (Detoxification and Purification), Marana (Incineration), Amritikarana (Nectorisation), use of earthen crucible, heat devices and its technologies, ancient technology for testing properly prepared Bhasmas for therapeutic purposes, ancient chemical anylitical technologies with special reference to preparation of Tamra Bhasma have been described in detail.

 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 2(1) January 2003, pp 22-26

 

Bees make medicine for mankind

 P. Banerjee, K.N. Sahoo, T.K. Biswas, S.K. Basu, J. Chatterjee, A.K. Hui

N.C. Chakraborty & P.K. Debnath

 

Honey, as a product from bees, has multiple properties, and is being therapeutically used since time immemorial. Its antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and wound healing properties are promising. Detailed discussion on honey is made in present review for its various biological properties.    

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 2(1) January 2003, pp 27-39

 

 

Traditional uses of plant biodiversity from Aravalli hills of Rajasthan

 

S S Katewa, B L Chaudhary, Anita Jain and Praveen Galav

 

A large number of tribals living in remote thick forest areas of the Aravalli hills of Mewar region depend on nature for their basic necessities of life. These people, especially belonging to primitive or aboriginal culture possess a good deal of information about properties and uses of plants. In the present paper an attempt has been made to document the precious traditional knowledge about the uses and properties of wild plants, which the aboriginals of Aravalli hills of Mewar region possess. The paper also discusses the current role of plants in the manufacture of traditional goods, and outlines some of the specialist skill, which is involved in the production of such items.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 2(1) January 2003, pp 40-50

 

 

Indigenous animal health care practices in Indian Central Himalaya: Empirical evidences

 Prasanna K Samal, Anubha Shah, Sushil Tiwari,   Bhupender Mehra & Devendra K Agrawal

 

 The Indian Central Himalaya supports about four million livestock population, which play a vital role in the livelihood of the natives. In this remote ecosystem, where modern veterinary infrastructure is very poor both quantitatively and qualitatively, the locals have evolved indigenous health care practices to maintain their livestock population. The practices, based on locally available bioresources, are effective in healing diseases, do not have financial cost and are easily administrable. Through a survey covering eight settlements located within altitude ranging from 900 m to 1800 m in the region, an effort was made to document the indigenous animal health care practices interviewing 350 knowledgeable respondents drawn from both the sexes.

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge 

Vol. 2(1) January 2003, pp 51-6

 

 

A review on ginger (Zingiber officinale): Pre-clinical and clinical trials

A C Suthar, M M Banavalikar & M K Biyani

 

Ginger (Zingiber officinale) is used in folk medicine for relief from many ailments, especially nausea, motion sickness, and other gastrointestinal disorders. This paper reviews various aspects of ginger, like chemical constituents, different pharmacological activities, which have been proved in pre-clinical and clinical trials along with its therapeutic uses and side effects.

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

 Vol. 2(1) January 2003, pp 62-68

 

 

Medicinal plants for skin and hair care

Laxmikant Sharma, Gaurav Agarwal and Ashwani Kumar

 

Traditional preparations for herbal beauty care contain several recipes, which may be applied in cosmetic industry without any side effects but with fruitful results. Emblica officinalis Gaertn. (Amla); Acacia concinna DC. (Shikakai); Callicarpa macrophylla Vahl (Priyangu); Curcuma longa Linn. (Haldi); Rubia cordifolia Linn. (Manjith) and Curcuma amada Roxb. (Amhaldi) are strongly suggested for skin and hair care. This paper provides information on uses of Ayurvedic medicinal plants for cure of skin and hair problems and also on herbal cosmetics. Soap-like plants with their source and essential oils are also reported.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge 

Vol. 2(1) January 2003, pp 69-73

 

A folkloric account of selection of cattle: An ethnobiological study

R B Mohanty

 

Fifteen folklores concerning fifteen physical behavioral characters of cattle basing on which a farmer can select a bullock befitting his farming necessity are highlighted. The scientific basis of this selection procedure and their present relevance are analysed.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 2 (1), January 2003, pp 74-78

 

Plants used in traditional phytotherapy for hair care by tribals in Sabarkantha district, Gujarat, India

Bhasker l. Punjani  & Vimal Kumar

 

During ethnobotanical field trips in different villages of Sabarkantha district, the information about utilization of natural plant resources for hair care was gathered from tribal informants and Bhagats / Vaidya. Information on 21 plant species belonging to 18 families of angiosperms are reported along with plant parts and some formulations of plant parts used medicinally for the treatment of hair ailments and hair care, such as hair fall, hair growth, baldness (Tal), lice (Ju) problems, dandruff (Khodo), itching (Khanjvad), hair tonic, hair dye and hair washing.

 
 
 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

 Vol. 2(1) January 2003, pp 79-83

 

 

Phytochemical and pharmacological evaluation of leaves of
Abutilon indicum

 Lakshmayya, Narasimha Rao Nelluri, Pramod Kumar, Nanda Kishor Agarwal, T Shivaraj Gouda  and S Ramachandra Setty

 

The leaves of Abutilon indicum Linn. were traditionally used to treat bronchitis, gonorrhoea, and as mouthwash in toothache, etc. However local practitioners have claimed that the leaves are highly useful in controlling diabetes mellitus. Hence the present study was planned to verify this claim and also to screen for the analgesic property. In addition, an attempt was made to identify the class of phytochemicals present in the leaves and also attribute the pharmacological property of the leaves to the particular type of phytochemicals. The results revealed that the leaves contain steroids, sapogenins, carbohydrates and flavonoids. It was also observed that different extracts have shown significant hypoglycaemic activity at 400 mg/kg dose, but aqueous extract was most potent in reducing the blood glucose levels. Similarly pet. ether extract and benzene extract were found to possess very good analgesic property. In addition all the extracts have shown CNS depressant activity. The results revealed that the use of leaves in controlling diabetes mellitus is justifiable. However present study failed to attribute this property to any class of the phytoconstituent present in the leaves.