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Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

 

 

VOLUME 3

NUMBER 4

OCTOBER 2004

 

 

CONTENTS

 

Papers

 

Ethnomedicinal survey of Uri, Kashmir Himalaya

351

Z S Khan, A A Khuroo and G H Dar

 

[IPC Int. Cl.7: A61K35/78, A61P1/4, A61P1/10, A61P11/10, A61P13/00, A61P13/02, A61P15/06, A61P15/14, A61P17/02, A61P17/10, A61P19/02, A61P27/02, A61P27/12, A61P33/10].

 

 

 

Folk herbal remedies from Meghalaya

358

A K Dolui, H K Sharma, Theresia Breen Marein, T C Lalhriatpuii

 

[IPC Int. Cl.7: A61K35/78, A61P1/10, A61P29/00, A61P9/00, A61P11/10, A61P27/02, A61P39/02, A61P17/02, A61P1/12, A61P25/08].

 

 

 

Folklore medicinal plants of Mahmora area, Sivasagar district, Assam  

365

B K Acharyya and H K Sharma

 

[IPC Int. Cl.7: A61K35/78, A61P1/04, A61P1/14, A61P15/02, A61P19/02, A61P33/08, A61P1/16, A61P31/06].

 

 

 

Preparation of rice beer by the tribal inhabitants of tea gardens in terai of West Bengal

373

Chandra Ghosh and A P Das

 

[IPC Int. Cl.7: C12C11/00, C12C7/00, C12C1/00, C12C3/00, C12C5/00].

 

 

 

Traditional uses of plants by tribals of Amarakantak region, Madhya Pradesh

383

Ramesh Kumar, Nand Ram Suman and S S Dash

 

[IPC Int.Cl.7: A61K35/78, A61P25/08, A61P11/04, A61P9/02, A61P1/04, A61P15/02, A61P15/08, A61P17/10, A61P11/06, A61P19/02].

 

 

 

Hepatoprotective effect of few Ayurvedic herbs in patients receiving anti  tuberculus treatment

391

Y K Sharma, Harbans Singh and B L Mehra

 

[IPC Int. Cl.7: A61K35/78, A61P31/06, A61P1/16].

 

 

Traditional veterinary practices in southeastern part of Chamoli district, Uttaranchal

397

Lalit Tiwari and P C Pande

 

[IPC Int. Cl7: A61K35/78, A61P1/10, A61P3/02, A61P11/04, A61P15/04, A61P17/02, A61P19/02, A61P33/10, A61P29/00, A61P13/02, A61P15/14, A61P15/08].

 

 

 

Folk herbal veterinary medicines of southern Rajasthan

407

H K Takhar and B L Chaudhary

 

[IPC Int. Cl.7: A61K35/78, A61P13/04, A61P17/00, A61P17/02, A61P29/00, A61P19/02, A61P33/14, A61P11/04].

 

 

 

Documentation of folk knowledge on edible wild plants of North Karnataka

419

A H Rajasab and Mahamad Isaq

 

[IPC Int. Cl. 7: A61K35/78, A61P1/12, A61P9/02, A61P13/04, A61P13/02, A61P1/04, A61P1/06, A61P11/08, A61P17/02, A61P1/02, A61P15/08].

 

 

 

Ethno-medico-botany of the Zeme tribe of North Cachar Hills district of Assam

430

P Tamuli and R Saikia

 

[IPC Int. Cl.7: A61K35/78, A61P1/06, A61P1/04, A61P1/16, A61P9/12, A61P1/12, A61P25/02, A61P13/04, A61P33/10, A61P39/02].

 

 

 

Observations on folkloric medicinal plants of Jalgaon district, Maharashtra

437

Shubhangi Pawar and D A Patil

 

[IPC Int. Cl.7: A61K35/78, A61P33/10, A61P19/02, A61P1/10, A61P1/16, A61P1/06, A61P13/02, A61P15/02, A61P11/08, A61P13/04, A61P15/08, A61P1/12, A61P17/02].

 

 

 

Ethno-entomological practices in Tirunelveli district, Tamil Nadu

442

Ranjit Singh A J A and C Padmalatha

 

[IPC Int. Cl.7: A61K35/56, A61K35/64, A61P19/02, A61P15/08, A61P27/12, A61P11/06, A61P25/20, A61P11/14, A61P25/08].

 

 

 

Conference Report

447

 

 

Author Index

449

 

 

Subject Index 449
   
Explanatory note on IPC Int. Cl.7

450

 

 

Annual Author Index

451

 

 

Annual Subject Index

453

 

 

Annual Title Index

455

 

 

List of Referees

459

 

 

Instructions to Contributors

461

 

 

Subscription Order Form

463

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol.3 (4), October 2004, pp.351-357

 
Ethnomedicinal survey of Uri, Kashmir Himalaya

Z S Khan, A A Khuroo* and G H Dar

 

In the contemporary global milieu, the documentation of the biological resources and the associated indigenous knowledge existing within a country has assumed highest priority. The present paper records ethnomedicinal value of 27 plant species belonging to 20 families, in vogue, from the study area. Each plant species included, contains information regarding crude drug preparation and its method of use. Such documentation would be helpful in terms of commercial production of drugs, readily accessible health care to larger population, sustainable use and above all, safeguard from bio-piracy.

 

Keywords: Indigenous knowledge, Medicinal plants, Ethnomedicine, Kashmir.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol.3 (4), October 2004, pp.358-364

 

Folk herbal remedies from Meghalaya

A K Dolui*, H K Sharma1, Theresia Breen Marein, Tc Lalhriatpuii

 

Traditional methods of treatment using plants and animals are predominant in rural societies of Meghalaya, a northeastern state of India. As a result of an ethnobotanical survey conducted during 1999-2002, information on 46 such plant species belonging to 44 genera and 34 families are presented.

 

Keywords: Folk herbal remedies, Traditional medicine, Meghalaya, Ethnomedicine.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol.3 (4), October 2004, pp.365-372

 

Folklore medicinal plants of Mahmora area, Sivasagar district, Assam

B K Acharyya and H K Sharma*

 

Traditional methods of treatment using plants and animals are followed in Mahmora region of Sivasagar district, Assam. The plants, either single or as multi component preparations are used to treat various ailments. An attempt has been made to study 35 plant species, from 35 genera belonging to 30 families along with the method of preparation and mode of use.

 

Keywords: Folk medicine, Traditional medicine, Sivasagar, Assam, Medicinal plants, Ethnomedicine.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

 Vol.3 (4), October 2004, pp.373-382

 

Preparation of rice beer by the tribal inhabitants of tea gardens in Terai of West Bengal

Chandra Ghosh and A P Das*

 

The ingredients and the method of preparing starter mixture (Rānu Dābāi ) and the fermentation of boiled rice for production of rice beer (Jhārā or Hārhiā) have been recorded as it is practiced by the Oraon and Santhal workers in Terai Tea Gardens. In addition to the use of five core plants (Oryza sativa, Coccinia grandis, Plumbago zeylanica, Vernonia cinerea and Clerodendrum viscosum), tribals use quite a few more plants to modify the taste and/or colour of Jhārā.

 

Keywords : Jhārā, Hārhiā, Oraons, Santhals, Rānu Dābāi, Rice beer.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

 Vol. 3(4), October 2004, pp. 383-390

 

Traditional uses of plants by tribals of Amarakantak region, Madhya Pradesh

 Ramesh Kumar, Nand Ram Suman1 and S S Dash*

 

The paper reports the traditional medicinal uses of 20 plants belonging to 16 families, for 24 different diseases and use of one plant for medico-religious belief by four different tribes of Amarakantak region of Madhya Pradesh. The paper also has taken into account the perception of the local people about the effectiveness of the plants for specific diseases for which they are prescribed.

 

Keywords: Tribal Knowledge, Medicinal plants, Amarkantak, Madhya Pradesh, Ehtnomedicine.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

 Vol.3 (4), October 2004, pp.391-396

 

Hepatoprotective effect of few Ayurvedic herbs in patients
receiving antituberculus treatment

Y K Sharma*, Harbans Singh and B L Mehra

 

Under the antituberculosis treatment (ATT) drug therapy, inclusion of a hepatoprotective drugs is not mandatory but in Indian scenario these are prescribed by most of the physicians. In present clinical trial three groups of patients receiving antituberculosis treatment have been studied to evaluate the hepatoprotective effect of few Ayurvedic herbs. The first group of 10 patients was given capsules Liv-600 containing hydroalcoholic extract of Daruharidra (Berberis aristata) roots, Kakmachi (Solanum nigrum) whole plant, Ghritakumari (Aloe vera) ariel parts. Second Group was given a standardized decoction of herb Bhumyamalaki (Phyllanthus fraternus). Third group was kept on ATT and a placebo starch capsule for equal duration. The trial was conducted for 12 weeks from initiation of ATT and liver functions were periodically evaluated to assess the hepatoprotective effect of drugs under trial. At the end of trial, Group first and second exhibited their hepatoprotective efficiency over the placebo.

 

Keywords: Hepatitis, Ayurveda, Hepatoprotective activity, Tuberculosis

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

 Vol. 3(4), October 2004, pp. 397-406

 

Traditional veterinary practices in south-eastern part of Chamoli district, Uttaranchal

Lalit Tiwari* and P C Pande

 

Most of the people of southeastern part of the Chamoli district, Uttaranchal live in remote areas and usually depend on the traditional medicines. The present investigation has brought to light some popular and frequently used prescription for domestic animals. In all, 72 plants important in ethnoveterinary, their mode of preparations and applications to the diseases and disorders are given.

 

Keywords: Ethnoveterinary medicine, Chamoli, Garhwal, Uttaranchal.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

 Vol.3 (4), October 2004, pp.407-418

 

Folk herbal veterinary medicines of southern Rajasthan

H K Takhar*and B L Chaudhary

 

Survey of southern Rajasthan was carried out during 1999-2001 for ethnoveterinary  herbal medicines. The study area included five districts of this region namely Banswara, Dungarpur, Chittorgarh, Udaipur and Rajsamand. The study area covers 10.78% of total area of the state and harbours 4.19% of the livestock population of the state. The information is based on the exhaustive interviews with local persons with traditional knowledge of ethnoveterinary, and other elderly persons who prescribe herbal preparation for the treatment of domestic animals. During the study, 37 plants species belonging to 25 families used for various diseases of skin, tumours, wounds, sores, swelling, lice, ticks, bone fracture, urinary and kidney stone problem, foot and mouth diseases have been recorded. A list of plant species along with their botanical name, family, local name, habit, phenology, plant part used, herbarium number and the mode of administration for effective control of ailments in domestic animals has been enumerated.

 

Keywords:   Ethnoveterinary herbal medicines, Southern Rajasthan, Medicinal Plants.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol.3 (4), October 2004, pp.419-429

 

Documentation of folk knowledge on edible wild plants of North Karnataka

A H Rajasab* and Mahamad Isaq

 

In North Karnataka, fifty-one species of wild plants belonging to forty-six genera are edible. Local people use leaves, stem, flowers, fruits, seeds and roots as a part of their diet. Of the fifty one species, twenty-seven species belonging to twenty four genera produce edible fruits (eaten raw or cooked), sixteen species belonging to fourteen genera produce edible leaves and stem, four species belonging to four genera produce edible flowers, three species belonging to three genera produce edible seeds. The root extract of one species (Hemidesmus indicus) was used to prepare soft drink. Some of these species serve as food during famine. It is necessary to preserve the diversity of wild edible plants, as they possess an immense nutritional and medicinal value.

 

Present study reveals the importance of twenty-two species of plants as they are eaten substantially by village folk as well as by city dwellers. It is desirable to bring these plants under organized agriculture as new crops to increase their production and utilization.

 

Keywords: Edible wild plants, Folk knowledge, Karnataka, Tribal diet.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

 Vol.3 (4), October 2004, pp.430-436

 

Ethno-medico-botany of the Zeme tribe of North Cachar Hills district of Assam

P Tamuli1 and R Saikia*

 

Folklore medicinal uses of 33 plant species belonging to 22 families for various ailments among the Zeme Nagas, one of the prominent ethnic tribes of North Cachar Hills district of Assam, India is reported. The study was undertaken during1999-2000 covering the area of Zeme inhabiting villages of N. C. Hills district of Assam.

 

Keywords: Ethno-medicine, Zemes, Herbal remedies, Folk medicines, Assam.

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledg

 Vol.3 (4), October 2004, pp.437-441

 

Observations on folkloric medicinal plants of Jalgaon district, Maharashtra

Shubhangi Pawar and D A Patil1*

 

The paper communicates 30 angiospermic species from Jalgaon district, Maharashtra, useful for different human ailments. The folk medicines consist of a sole drug or a principal drug, in combination with other drugs. The correct botanical name, local name/medicinal preparation, mode of administration, etc. are reported as gathered from the aborigines such as Bhil, Pawara, Tadvi, Vanjara, etc., apart from non-tribal rural folks. The work aims at preservation of this folklore, valuable for herbal drug industry.

 

Keywords : Folk medicine, Jalgaon, Ethnomedicine, Maharashtra

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

 Vol.3 (4), October 2004, pp.442-446

 

Ethno-entomological practices in Tirunelveli district, Tamil Nadu

Ranjit Singh A J A* and C Padmalatha1

 

Insect based traditional knowledge on medicinal importance, although in usage from ancient times, is still less explored. Ancient palm leaf literature reveals that numerous insect species were advantageously utilized by tribal and village physicians for medicine. Kanikars and Paliyars, the tribal people living in Western Ghats of Tirunelveli district and village physicians use insects to prepare medicine. In the present investigation, 11 species of insects used to prepare traditional medicine were identified and details about their therapeutic value are enumerated. Insects are used as medicine to cure various ailments like urinary diseases, neurological problems, hair loss, skin diseases, respiratory illness, etc. Also insects like termites are consumed as healthy food.

 

Keywords: Ethno-entomology, Medicinal insects, Termites, Beetles.

 

 

 

Conference Report

 

World Congress on Vedic Sciences

Bangalore, 9-13 August, 2004

 

India has a rich tradition in science and technology right from Vedic period.  Vedas are the oldest of world’s literature in the oldest of human language. In India, physical science and spiritual sciences progressed hand in hand. Fusion of mind and matter has been well understood by our ancestors. This approach has been the foundation to all branches of Indian Systems of Knowledge like, Ayurveda, Yogavidya, Vastuvidya, Vaimaniki Sastra, Jyoti Sastra, etc. It is hoped that a synergic effort generated amongst the scientists, technologists and masses will equip India to get transformed into a brighter future.

A five-day World Congress on Vedic sciences was organized by Vijnana Bharati at Prasanti Kutiram in Bangalore, during 9-13th August, 2004 to focus attention on the progress India had made in Sciences in the Vedic period. More than five hundred delegates from various organizations, from various corners of the country and globe as well, participated in the Congress. 

Four concurrent sessions were held daily. About one hundred papers (twenty five papers in each venue) were presented daily. There were 260 papers in 32 sessions grouped into 12 themes in addition to 3 keynote lectures, 6 plenary lectures and 2 special lectures.The delegates were from UK, South Africa, Thailand, Canada, USA and Australia, in addition to over 100 Postgraduate and Research Scholars of the SVYASA University. The papers were presented in Sanskrit, Hindi and English. Following subjects were covered in the congress: Vedas and its origin, Vedic Sciences and its interface with the modern sciences, Spiritual sciences, harmonizing the world through Vedas, Philosophy and Science interface, language and Vedic interpretations, philosophy, religion and scientific symbolism, mathematical sciences, Ayurveda and health sciences, cosmology and cosmogony, environment and ecology, mind and consciousness, applied science & technology, their interpretations and relevance.

The origin, essential message of Vedas, the relevance of Vedas to the modern times, future of Vedic traditions in comparison with other traditions was discussed in detail. Critical reviews and analyses were done on the science of Vedic practices and sciences in Vedas in the plenary sessions. It was emphasized that the Vedas enunciate the science of nature, the art of living and the harmony in the universe.

Speakers in various sessions maintained that the Vedas contain the seeds and roots of of all sciences, traditional as well as modern. Vedas being the oldest literature of the world, remain the authentic sources of all knowledge systems, including all the physical, social and spiritual sciences. The whole field of sustainable agriculture, organic farming and animal husbandry has its beginning from Vedic period.  Dhanurveda (science of weaponry) was in advanced stage during Vedic period.  The Vedas form the basis of Indian Systems of Medicine, Ayurveda, Siddha, Yogic therapy, etc.

The Congress emphasized the need to demystify the Vedas and to project as an all-inclusive world heritage and an authentic record of intellectual evolution. It was hoped that the Vedic research would promote a rationale and scientific understanding of the original passages in Samhitas, Brahmanas, Aranyakas, Upanishads and the Darshanas.

An exhibition of books, periodicals, multimedia on various aspects of Vedas and related fields was organised during the Congress at the Congress venue.

For further details contact:

        Prof K I Vasu

        President, Vijnana Bharati

        Guru Narayan Vidyavihar

        Shivashankara Block, Hebbal

        Bangalore 560 024

        Karnataka

        Fax: (080) 2354 4619

        E-mail: vasu@vijnanabharati.com

        vasuvijnanabharati@yahoo.co.in

 

Editor

 
 
AUTHOR INDEX

 

Acharyya B K

365

Khan Z S

351

Rajasab A H

419

 

 

Khuroo A A

351

Ranjit Singh A J A

442

Chaudhary B L

407

Kumar Ramesh

383

 

 

 

 

 

 

Saikia R

430

Dar G H

351

Lalhriatpuii TC

358

Sharma H K

358,

365

Das A P

373

 

 

Sharma Y K

391

Dash S S

383

Marein Theresia Breen

358

Singh Harbans

391

Dolui A K

358

Mehra B L

391

Suman Nand Ram

383

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ghosh Chandra

373

Padmalatha C

442

Takhar H K

407

 

 

Pande P C

397

Tamuli P

430

Isaq Mahamad

419

Patil D A

437

Tiwari Lalit

397

 

 

Pawar Shubhangi

437

 

 
 
SUBJECT INDEX
 

Ethnoentomology

442

Maharashtra

437

Fermented Drink

373

 

 

Madhya Pradesh

383

 

 

Edible Wild Plants

419

Meghalaya

358

Hepatitis

391

 

 

North Cachar Hills

365

 

 

Ethnomedicine

 

Rajasthan

407

Hepatoprotective Activity

391

Amarkantak

383

Sivsagar

365

 

 

Assam

365,430

Tamil Nadu

442

Jhara Preparation

373

Chamoli

397

Terai Region

373

 

 

Himalaya

351

Tirunelveli

442

Tea Gardens

373

Jalgaon

437

Uttaranchal

397

Tuberculosis

391

Karnataka

419

West Bengal

373

 

 

Kashmir

351

Veterinary Medicine

397,407

 

 

ANNUAL AUTHOR INDEX

 

Acharyya BK

365

Jina Devi Heisnam

154, 231

Ranjith Singh AJA

198, 442

Aggarwal KK

182

Rao RR

59

Agrawal Devendra K

12

Kalita B

192

Roy PS

287

Amilkanthawar RH

177

Kar A

305

 

 

Atul Kumar

240

Kasture AV

247

Saikia R

430

Ayyasamy S

168

Kesaven

299

Samal PK

12

 

 

Khan Z S

351

Samvatsar Swati

96

Babu CR

182

Khanuja SPS

257

Sastry KVH

208

Badami S

187

Khuroo A A

351

Satturwar PM

247

Behera Sumit K

72

Kumar R

383

Savitri

325

Bhalla Tek Chand

325

Kunzru ON

314

Shah Anubha

12

Biradar RS

27

 

 

Sharma Diwakar

51

 

 

Lalhriatpuii TC

358

Sharma GRK

208

Charde MS

247

Lalla JK

86

Sharma HK

358, 365

Chaudhary BL

407

 

 

Sharma SB

162

Chauhan AS

66

Mahesh T

37

Sharma YK

391

Chhetri DR

271

Madhu SV

162

Shivanna MB

37

Choudhury M

192

Maity D

66

Singh H

391

 

 

Malhotra V

152

Singh J

257

Dar GH

351

Mamania HM

86

Singh KP

162

Das AK

80

Manandhar NP

101

Singh RK

276

Das AP

373

Mandape MK

314

Singh S

162

Dash SS

383

Marein Theresia Breen

358

Sinha Kirti

257

Datt Bhaskar

59

Mehra B L

391

Sontakki BS

27

Devi Heisnam

231

Metar Santosh Y

27

Solavan A

198

Diwanji VB

96

Mishra NP

257

Sudha R

168

Dolui AK

358

Misra MK

72

Suman N R

383

Dorjey A

276

Mohanty RB

92

Suresh B

187

 

 

 

 

Suresh N

299

Fulzele SV

247

Nagendra HR

154, 231

Swamy NVC

154, 231

 

 

Nayak Sobhagini

72

 

 

Ganesan S

299

Nirmale VH

27

Tag Hui

80

Garbyal SS

182

 

 

Takhar HK

407

Gavali Deepa

51

Ojha SN

192

Tamuli P

430

Ghosh Chandra

373

 

 

Tandon OP

162

Gogoi P

294

Padmalatha C

442

Teron R

294

Gupta P

162

Pande P C

397

Thakur N

325

Gupta Stutee

287

Pandey HP

206

Tiwari Lalit

397

Gurmeet Padma

212

Parinitha M

37

Tiwari SC

12

 

 

Patil D A

437

Tripathi Hema

314

Hamrapurkar PD

86

Paulmurugan R

198

 

 

Harish GU

37

Pawar Shubhangi

437

Umdor M

253

Hemke AT

247

Porwal MC

287

 

 

 

 

Pradhan N

66

Vivek NC

37

Isaq Mahamad

419

 

 

 

 

Rai Sujay R

187

Wilsanand V

198

Jain SK

137

Rajasab A H

419

Jegadeesan M

168

Rana TS

59

 

 

ANNUAL SUBJECT INDEX

 

Agnihotra

231

Kalahandi District, Orissa

72

Palm Leaf Manuscripts

168

Amchi System of Medicine

212

Karnataka

37,

419

Review

 

Antioxidant Activity

 

Kashmir

351

Guduchi

257

Paan

187

Kumaon

12,

182

Tinospora cordifolia

257

Arunachal Pradesh

 

Maharashtra

437

Rural Economy

182

Ethnobotany

80

Madhya Pradesh

383

 

 

Ayurveda

 

Meghalaya

358

Siddha System of Medicine

 

Cough & Bronchitis

240

North Cachar Hills

407

     Amuri

168

Kasa Roga

240

Orissa

72, 105

Soor

59

Manahshila

240

Sikkim

66

Spectral Analysis

 

Realgar

240

Sivsagar

365

Vedic Mantra

154

Urethral Stricture Mgmt.

177

Tamil Nadu

198,

299,

442

 

 

Uttarbasti

177

Terai Region

373

Tea Gardens

373

Wound Healing activity

247

Tirunelveli

442

Tibetan Medicine

212

 

Tilvadi Ghrita

247

Uttaranchal

397

Traditional Alcoholic Beverages

59

 

 

Uttar Pradesh

314

Traditional Knowledge

 

Betel Leaves

 

West Bengal

373

Arecanut Protection Practices

253

Antioxidant activity

187

Ethnozoology

198

Communication

294

Biodiversity

 

 

 

Credibility

137

     Conservation

5,51

Fermented Drink

373

Fermented Foods

314

 

 

Fever Treatment

96

Fermented Beverages

314

Conservation

 

Folk Proverbs

 

Fisher Folk

27

     Biodiversity

5

Farming

276

Fish Health Management

192

     Bioresource

12

Live Stock

92

Fish Seed Transportation

192

 

 

Orissa

92

Greater Mumbai

27

Edible Wild Plants

419

 

 

Maharashtra

27

Ethnobotany

 

Garhwal Himalayas

 

Moulting Practices

208

Arunachal Pradesh

80, 305

     Trad. Alcoholic Beverages

59

Pond Construction

192

Hill Miri Tribe

80

Gujarat

 

Poultry

137

Ethnoentomology

442

Biodiversity Conservation

51

Primary Healthcare

314

Ethnomedicine

 

 

 

Sindhu Durg

27

Amarkantak

383

Hepatitis

391

Tooth & Gum Disorders

206

Assam

365,

430

Hepatoprotective Activity

391

Triphala Churna

86

Bhadra Wild Life Sanctuary

37

 

 

Tuberculosis

391

Bhil Tribes

96

Incense

101

 

 

Car Nicobar Island

287

 

 

Vedic Ritual Sacrifice

231

Central Himalayas

12

Jhara Preparation

373

Vedic Mantra

154

Chamoli

397

 

 

Veterinary Medicine

397, 407

Darjeeling

271

Orissa

 

Vishnu Samhita

5

Gandhamardan Hills, Orissa

105

     Ethnomedicine

72, 92, 105

 

 

Garhwal

12

 

 

Yoga

 

Himalaya

351

Paan

 

 Diabetes

162

Jalgaon

437

Antioxidant activity

187