Total visitors:5,501 since 25-01-05

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

 

 

VOLUME 4

NUMBER 1

JANUARY 2005

 

 

SPECIAL NUMBER

ON

TRADITIONAL KNOWLEDGE OF NORTH EAST INDIA

CONTENTS

Papers

 

Potential of ethnobotanical studies in North East India: an overview 

7

B K Dutta and P K Dutta

IPC Int. Cl.7 : A61K35/78, A01K1/00

Plants used for making traditional rosaries in Manipur

15

H Birkumar Singh and Th Brojendro Singh

IPC Int.Cl.7: A41G01/04

Ethnomedicinal plants in the sacred groves of Manipur

21

Ashalata Devi Khumbongmayum, M L Khan and R S Tripathi

IPC Int.Cl. 7: A61K35/78, A61P1/04, A61P1/12, A61P11/08, A61P15/02, A61P17/00, A61P21/00, A61P39/02

 

 

 

Traditional dye yielding plants Of Manipur, North East India 

33

G Akimpou, K Rongmei and PS Yadava

 

IPC Int.Cl.7: C09B61/00

 

 

 

Vegetable dyes used by the Meitei community of Manipur

39

H Manoranjan Sharma, A Radhapyari Devi and B Manihar Sharma

 

IPC Int.Cl. 7: D06P01/34

 

 

 

Jhum cultivation practices of the Bangnis (Nishis) of Arunachal Pradesh

47

Vishal Gupta

 

IPC Int. Cl.7:  A01B1/00, A01C1/00, A01G1/00

 

 

 

Plants used by the Hill Miri tribe of Arunachal Pradesh in ethnofisheries

57

Hui Tag, A K Das and Pallabi Kalita

 

IPC Int. Cl.7: A01K79/00, A01K97/16

 

 

 

Apatani paddy-cum-fish cultivation: An indigenous hill farming system of North East India

65

S C Rai

 

IPC Int.Cl. 7: A01G16/00, A01G25/00, A01G61/00, A01G63/00

 

 

 

Report on the treatment of dysmenorrhoea by the tribes of Nalbari district, Assam

72

Nikhil Jyoti Das, Kamala Devi and Satya Ranjan Goswami

 

IPC Int.Cl. 7: A61K 35/78, A61P 15/02, A61P 15/08

 

 

 

Ethnomedicinal plants used by the tribals of Mizoram to cure cut and wounds

75

Sujata Bhardwaj and S.K. Gakhar

 

IPC Int.Cl. 7: A61K35/78, A61P01/04, A61P01/10, A61P01/12, A61P01/16, A61P09/02, A61P13/02, A61P17/02, A61P33/06, A61P33/10, A61P39/02

 

 

 

Few plants and animals based folk medicines from Dibrugarh District, Assam

81

Dilip Kalita, Manashi Dutta, and Nazim Forid Islam

 

IPC Int Cl.7: A61K35/78, A61P 1/ 04, A61P 7/ 00, A61P 13/ 02, A61P 17/ 00, A61P 17/ 10, A61P 25/ 08, A61P 29/ 00

 

 

 

Bottle Gourd: Part and parcel of Karbi culture

86

Robindra Teron

 

IPC Int. Cl.7:  A47J31/00, C12C1/00

 

 

 

Fish attractant: An indigenous device to prevent escapement of fishes

91

Bhagaban Kalita, Amalesh Dutta and M Choudhury

 

IPC Int.Cl. 7: A01K79/00, A01K97/00

 

 

 

Local soil knowledge of smallholder rice farmers: A case study in Barak valley, Assam

94

Tapasi Das and Ashesh K Das

 

IPC Int. Cl7.: A0B7/00, A01G1/00

 

 

 

Ethnozoological practices among Naga tribes

100

N.S. Jamir and P. Lal

 

IPC Int. Cl.7: A61K35/12, A61K35/56, A61K35/58, A61K35/60, A61K35/64, A61K35/78, A61K39/38, A61P1/00, A61P1/12, A61P1/16, A61P11/06, A61P15/08, A61P15/10, A61P17/00, A61P17/02, A61P19/02, A61P19/08, A61P2702, A61P31/06, A61P33/00, A61P39/02 

 

 

 

Author Index and Subject Index                                                    

105 

 

 

Explanatory note on IPC Int. Cl.7 

106 

 

 

Announcements 

107 

                                                                     

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(1), January 2005, pp. 7-14

 

Potential of ethnobotanical studies in North East India: An overview

B K Dutta and P K Dutta

North East India has a valuable heritage of herbal remedies. Its rural people and tribals living in remote/forest areas still depend to a great extent on the indigenous systems of medicine/cultivation. So far studies in this regard have been reported from a very limited number of the tribes of North East region, viz. Ler, Mikir, Karbis, Miris, Khasi and Jaintai, Garo, Monpas, Nishi, Apatani, Reangs, etc. A wide range of plants with ethnobotanical value against some very important diseases have been reported but much larger numbers of folk medicines have remained endemic to certain tribal pockets in North East India. Therefore, further detailed studies on the ethno­botanical aspects in the region may provide meaningful ways for the promotion of traditional herbal medicinal plants/land races of crop plants for the benefit of mankind at large. In the present paper, the work that has been reported and the potentials of the ethnobotanical studies with particular reference to biodiversity conservation of the important medicinal/crop plants in the North Eastern region have been highlighted and discussed.

Keywords: Ethnobotany, North East India, Medicinal Plants, Biodiversity, Conservation, Tribes

IPC Int. Cl.7: A61K35/78, A01K1/00

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(1), January 2005, pp. 15-20

 
Plants used for making traditional rosaries in Manipur

 H Birkumar Singh* and Th Brojendro Singh

The uses of rosaries made from various plant parts by the Meitei community in Manipur are the symbol of tradition and culture and are used as ornaments or related to health and /or religious practices. Out of the 20 plants, reported to be used for rosaries, 18 plants belonging to 15 families, are used to cure 29 diseases or complicacies such as fever, gout, urinary disorder, rheumatism, tuberculosis, heart diseases, liver complaint, bronchitis, etc. Some of the rosaries are also sold in the local markets and fetch good price. There is scope for promotion of traditional rosaries as cottage industry in the state.

Keywords: Rosary Plants, Meitei Tribe, Medicinal Plants, Traditional rosaries, Manipur, Ethnobotany

IPC Int. Cl.7: A41G01/04

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(1), January 2005, pp. 21-32

 
Ethnomedicinal plants in the sacred groves of Manipur

Ashalata Devi Khumbongmayum, M L Khan* and R S Tripathi#

Ethnobotanical studies carried out in the four sacred groves of Manipur revealed therapeutic applications of 120 plant species representing 106 genera and 57 families. Tree species contributed the maximum having 42% while herbs recorded 33% of the total medicinal plants. These plants are used for a wide range of common ailments like skin disorders, ulcer, rheumatism, bronchitis, etc. Majority of the preparations are taken orally in the form of juice extracted from the freshly collected plant parts. Leaves are the major plant parts used for the preparation of medicine by the medicine-men (Maibas). Most of the plant parts are harvested from the wild. It has been observed that the species that are scarce locally in the forest due to various developmental activities, deforestation, over-exploitation, etc. are abundant in the ‘sacred groves’. Information on medical claims was collected from the elderly people residing in the vicinity of sacred groves and also from the traditional healers called ‘Maibas’. The study describes details of botanical identity, family, local name, parts of the plant used, therapeutic uses, and mode of application of the drug.

Key words: Sacred groves, Ethnobotany, Medicinal Plants, Conservation, Ethnomedicine, Manipur

IPC Int. Cl.7: A61K35/78, A61P1/04, A61P1/12, A61P11/08, A61P15/02, A61P17/00, A61P21/00, A61P39/02


 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(1), January 2005, pp. 33-38

 
Traditional dye yielding plants of Manipur, North East India

 G Akimpou, K Rongmei and P S Yadava*

Manipur is one of the richest states in plant biodiversity in the North Eastern states of India. Different ethnic groups, residing in Manipur before the introduction of the chemical dyes into the state, used the dyes extracted from the plants. The survey was undertaken during 2002-2003 in different parts of Manipur. Eighteen traditional dye yielding plants belonging to sixteen families have been reported, which different ethnic communities of Manipur use for dyeing the cloth and other items.

Key words: Natural Dyes, Traditional Dyes, Dye Yielding Plants, Manipur

IPC Int.Cl.7: C09B61/00

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(1), January 2005, pp. 39-46

 
Vegetable dyes used by the Meitei community of Manipur

 H Manoranjan Sharma, A Radhapyari Devi and B Manihar Sharma*

The paper describes 34 plant species, belonging to 30 families, used in the extraction of dyes by the Meitei community of Manipur. The plant parts used in the extraction of dyes along with the method of extraction and their uses have also been described in detail. Besides these dye-yielding plants, another 19 plant species belonging to 14 families, used as dye mordants have also been included. The people of the state still use these dyes for dyeing of their handloom products, which are famous all over the world.

Keywords: Vegetable Dyes, Meitei Community, Manipur, Ethnobotany

IPC Int. Cl.7: D06P01/34

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(1), January 2005, pp. 47-56

 
Jhum cultivation practices of the Bangnis (Nishis) of Arunachal Pradesh

Vishal Gupta

Jhum (slash and burn cultivation) is an age-old system of agriculture among the indigenous groups in the humid tropics. The Jhumias make use of the local ecological and environmental conditions to their advantage. The natural indicators, their magico-religious beliefs, and analogy & faith condition their decision-making. Worships, rituals, myths and folktales also govern their land and resource use. The entire gamut of their socio-cultural life is thus woven around Jhum that is not merely an ‘Agricultural Activity’, but a Cultural Practice’ and a ‘Way of Life’.

The paper attempts at understanding the complex relation of how the socio-cultural life of Bangni jhumias of East Kameng to Jhum. The traditional calendar of Jhum activity is presented and is followed by tracing the origin, settlement history and land stewardship of the tribe that closely relates to origin of this practice. The socio-cultural beliefs, magico-religious practices, festivities and rituals associated with Jhum are described, to give a view of their traditional system of agriculture and land management.

Keywords: Arunachal Pradesh, Bangni Tribe, Nishis Tribe, Jhum Cultivation, Rice beer

IPC Int. Cl.7: A01B1/00, A01C1/00, A01G1/00

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(1), January 2005, pp. 57-64

 
Plants used by the Hill Miri tribe of Arunachal Pradesh in ethnofisheries

 Hui Tag1*, A K Das2 and Pallabi Kalita3

The state of Arunachal Pradesh is known for its rich bioresources and ethnocultural diversity. Ethnobiological survey was conducted during 2001-2003 in Hill Miri dominated districts of Arunachal Pradesh, which reveals their hidden Indigenous Knowledge System. Fishing and hunting is one of the major economic activities of this hilly tribe apart from Jhum cultivation. They derive their fish protein diet requirement directly from the wild sources. Two major rivers and number of its tributaries form ideal site for fisheries activity. A total of 21 plants significant for ethnofisheries have been listed. Twelve plants are used as ethnotoxic (Fish Poison) and rest 9 species are used in different ethnofisheries techniques and gears.

Keywords: Ethnobiology, Ethnofisheries, Fish poison, Hill Miri tribe, Arunachal Pradesh, Ethnomedicine.

IPC Int. Cl.7: A01K 79/00, A01K 97/16.

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(1), January 2005, pp. 65-71

 
Apatani paddy-cum-fish cultivation: An indigenous hill farming system of North East India

 S C Rai

The tribal communities of North East India have paddy-cum-fish farming along with shifting cultivation (Jhum). Paddy-cum-fish cultivation is practiced mainly by Apatanis, a progressive agricultural community of Arunachal Pradesh. The Apatani version of paddy cultivation is one of the most advanced cultivation practices. The main advantage from the practice is that, the land gives sustained yield year after year, unlike the Jhum system, that is under cropping only once in a few years of fallow interval, depending upon the Jhum cycle. The economic and energy efficiency of this agro-ecosystem is exceptionally high and rice is exported after meeting local needs. Rain fed cultivation of millet and mixed cropping contributes toward meeting the diverse needs of the people. Mithun, Swine and poultry husbandry are an important link with agro-ecosystems. Therefore, an understanding of this agro-ecosystem function becomes significant and it offers opportunities for redevelopment with additional scientific inputs.

Keywords: Agro-ecosystem, Arunachal Pradesh, Indigenous knowledge, Land management, Wet-rice cultivation, Jhum cultivation

IPC Int. Cl.7: A01G16/00, A01G25/00, A01G61/00, A01G63/00

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(1), January 2005, pp. 72-74

 
Report on the treatment of dysmenorrhoea by the tribes of Nalbari district, Assam

Nikhil Jyoti Das*, Kamala Devi and Satya Ranjan Goswami

The paper describes the use of Jatropha curcus Linn. collected through personal interview with local herbal practitioner for the treatment of dysmenorrhoea by the Koch-Rajbongshi tribe in Nalbari district of Assam. Botanical description of the plant, local name and method of administration have been described.

Key words: Abdominal pain, Koch-Rajbongshi Tribe, Dysmenorrhoea, menstrual problem.

IPC Int. Cl. 7: A61K 35/78, A61P 15/02, A61P 15/08

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(1), January 2005, pp. 75-80

 
Ethnomedicinal plants used by the tribals of Mizoram to cure cuts & wounds

Sujata Bhardwaj and S.K. Gakhar*

Results of ethnobotanical studies carried out in the state of Mizoram are presented. The usage of wild plants by the native people for the cure of cuts and wounds is described. The use of 17 species, belonging to 14 families together with their local names and other uses have been enumerated. The plants not only contain antiseptic value but also have regenerative and healing properties. Sticking property of paste of bark was also observed in Laki tree. In addition, blood-clotting properties of some plants has also been reported.

 

Key words: Cuts & Wounds, Mizoram, Ethnobotany, Ethnomedicine

 IPC Int. Cl.7: A61K35/78, A61P01/04, A61P01/10, A61P01/12, A61P01/16, A61P09/02, A61P13/02, A61P17/02, A61P33/06, A61P33/10, A61P39/02

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(1), January 2005, pp. 81-85

 
Few plants and animals based folk medicines from Dibrugarh District, Assam

 Dilip Kalita*, Manashi Dutta, and Nazim Forid Islam

An attempt has been made to study the plant and animal based folk medicine used by people of Dibrugarh district, Assam for treatment of eleven different diseases, viz. ascites, body pain, carbuncle, diabetes, epilepsy, gastritis, indigestion, obesity, piles, pimples and urinary tract infection.

Key words: Bej, Bejini, Folk Medicine, Ethnomedicine, Assam

IPC Int. Cl.7: A61K35/78, A61P 1/ 04, A61P 7/ 00, A61P 13/ 02, A61P 17/ 00, A61P 17/ 10, A61P 25/ 08, A61P 29/ 00

 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(1), January 2005, pp. 86-90

Bottle Gourd: Part and Parcel of Karbi culture

 Robindra Teron

Bong, gourd shell (Lagenaria siceraria Standl.) is essentially an integral part of Karbi culture and regularly used during Adam-asar or marriage and worships. The seeds of bottle gourd are believed to have been gifted by a Karbi God, Songsar Recho, the creator to the ancestor of the Karbis and till today gourd seeds are considered as one of the assets of the tribe. Songsar Recho is also considered as the custodian of all crops. Investigation further revealed that before the introduction of Bong into Karbi society, a fruit of Nong-nong (Thunbergia grandiflora Roxb.) was used as Bong for storing Horlank or rice beer and leaves of Phle-phle (Premna latifolia Roxb.) were rolled into cones and used as Lankponk (traditional drinking pot made out of bamboo) during marriage. Probably it was a symbolic exercise performed by a learned Karbi to demonstrate the use of Bong during marriage. The present work enumerates data collected from Chinthong region particularly around Baithalangso where gourd shells are believed to have taken its root.

Keywords: Bong, Bottle Gourd, Assam, Ethnobotany, Horlank, Rice Beer, Karbi Tribes

IPC int. Cl.7: A47J31/00, C12C1/00

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(1), January 2005, pp. 91-93

Fish attractant: An indigenous device to prevent escapement of fishes

Bhagaban Kalita1*, Amalesh Dutta1 and M Choudhury2

Studies on fish attractant especially in fresh water fish are very scanty. Tribal people, who practice fish attractant against the escapement of fish during inundation of ponds during flood, mainly inhabit the Karbi-Anglong district of Assam. This fish attractant is made from locally available ingredients such as rice bran, oil cake, Jubulee, etc. The practice is quite popular among the fishers in Karbi-Anglong. On verification of the efficacy of this indigenous method, it was observed that as many as 70% of fishes remain in the pond after flood.

Key words: Fish attractant, Fish escapement, Rice bran, Oil cake, Jubulee, Rice Beer, Assam

IPC Int.. Cl.7: A01K79/00, A01K97/00

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(1), January 2005, pp. 94-99

 
Local soil knowledge of smallholder rice farmers: A case study in Barak Valley, Assam

Tapasi Das and Ashesh K Das*

Smallholder farmers in traditional farming systems are an untapped source of traditional knowledge. They are the managers of well-preserved local soil knowledge and folk soil taxonomy. In the present study rice farmers in Barak Valley, South Assam, were inventorised for local soil knowledge in relation to rice farming systems. The rice farmers were interviewed for the prevalence of folk soil taxonomy and a total of five major soil types were recorded. Since smallholder farmers practice their farming systems under various environmental factors, they on the basis of their local knowledge of soil, etc. shape the crop diversity. The study revealed that the farmers are faced with heterogeneous soil types and hence they maintain systematic classification criteria for the nomenclature of different soils, which was found to be positively correlated to scientific analysis of the soils.

Keywords: Small holder Farmers, Folk Soil Taxonomy, Rice farmers, Assam, Traditional Farming System

IPC Int. Cl.7: A01B 7/00, A01G 1/00

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(1), January 2005, pp. 100-104

 
Ethnozoological practices among Naga tribes

 N S Jamir* and P Lal**

The present paper describes the traditional method of treating various kinds of ailments using different vertebrates and invertebrates and/or their products by different Naga tribes. Since different Naga tribes have their own distinct language and vernacular of a particular animal differs from one tribe to other. Efforts have been made to identify different animals of medicinal value used by Naga tribes and decode their names in common English language along with their local and zoological names as far as possible. A list of twentysix animal species and their products, nature of ailments and mode of treatments has been presented. Efforts have been to make known the animal based remedial measures practiced by and large by the Naga tribes. Though traditional in nature, most of the treatments have been reported to provide miraculous healing in various kinds of ailments.

Key words: Ethnozoology, Naga Tribes, Nagaland, Traditional Knowledge

IPC Int. Cl.7: A61K35/12, A61K35/56, A61K35/58, A61K35/60, A61K35/64, A61K35/78, A61K39/38, A61P1/00, A61P1/12, A61P1/16, A61P11/06, A61P15/08, A61P15/10, A61P17/00, A61P17/02, A61P19/02, A61P19/08, A61P2702, A61P31/06, A61P33/00, A61P39/02