Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

 

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VOLUME 4

NUMBER 3

JULY 2005

 

CONTENTS

 

Papers

 

Medicinal plants used by the tribals of Tirunelveli hills, Tamil Nadu to treat poisonous bites and skin diseases

229

      M Ayyanar and S Ignacimuthu

 

       [A61K35/78; A61P17/00; A61P17/02; A61P29/00; A61P31/00; A61P39/02]

 

 

 

Traditional herbal medicines from Shekhawati region of Rajasthan

237

      S S Katewa and P K Galav

 

       [A61K35/78, A61P1/06, A61P1/10, A61P7/04, A61P7/12, A61P11/10, A61P11/14, A61P13/02, A61P15/02, A61P15/08, A61P15/10, A61P15/14, A61P17/02, A61P19/02, A61P25/20, A61P33/10, A61P30/02]

 

 

 

Wild tribal food plants of Orissa

246

      Rekha Sinha and Valeria Lakra

 

       [A10G1/00, AO1G17/00]

 

 

 

Ethnoveterinary practices in Uttara Kannada district of Karnataka

253

      V H Harsha, V Shripathi and G R Hegde

 

       [A61K35/78, A61P1/16, A61P15/00, A61P15/14, A61P17/06, A61P19/00, A61P19/10, A61P21/00, A61P29/00, A61P31/00, A61P39/02]

 

 

 

Traditional knowledge on medicinal plants among rural women of the Garhwal Himalaya, Uttaranchal

259

      Bhagwati Uniyal and Vandana Shiva

 

       [A61K35/78, A61P11/10, A61P11/14, A61P13/02, A61P15/02, A61P15/04, A61P15/08, A61P15/10, A61P17/02, A61P19/02, A61P33/10, A61P39/02]

 

 

 

Folk medicine used for common women ailments by Adivasis in the Eastern Ghats of Andhra Pradesh

267

      Venkata Ratnam K and Venkata Raju R R

 

       [A61K35/78, A61P13/06, A61P15/00, A61P15/02, A61P29/00]

 

 

 

Antidiarrhoeal activity of antidiarrhoeal Unani formulation in rats

271

      M Aleem Khan, Naeem A Khan, Iqbal A Qasmi, Ghufran Ahmad, Shadab Zafar

 

       [A61K 35/78, A61P1/12]

 

 

 

Aesthetic values of selected floral elements of Khatana and Waghai forests of Dangs, western Ghats

275

      J I Nirmal Kumar, Hiren Soni and Rita N Kumar

 

       [A61P15/00, A61P15/08, A61P15/10, A61P17/00, A61P17/02, A61P39/02, A61P85/00]

 

 

 

Ethnomedicinal practices of Nasik District, Maharashtra

287

      M V Patil and D A Patil

 

       [A61K35/78, A61P1/04, A61P1/16, A61P11/10, A61P11/14, A61P13/02, A61P13/04, A61P15/02, A61P15/04, A61P15/06]

 

(Contd)

Some phytotherapeutic claims by tribals of southern Rajasthan

291

      Anita Jain, S S Katewa and P K Galav

 

       [A61K35/78; A61P01/04; A61P01/16; A61P11/00; A61P13/02; A61P15/00; A61P17/02; A61P35/0]

 

 

 

Antiulcerogenic activity of Elettaria cardamomum Maton. and Amomum subulatum Roxb. Seeds

298

      Anwar Jamal, Farah, Aisha Siddiqui, Mohd Aslam, Kalim Javed & M A Jafri

 

       [A61K35/78, A61P01/04, A61P17/02, A61P29/00, A61P31/02, A61P33/00, A61P33/10, A61P33/12]

 

 

 

Traditional technologies in the improvement of breeds of livestock in Tamil Nadu

303

      S M K Karthickeyan and K Gajendran

 

       [A61D19/00]

 

 

 

Vighneswara: The Lord of Wisdom and Desire As Gleaned from Literature and the Images in Stone, Wood and Ivory in Salar Jung Museum

307

      Balagouni Krishna Goud

 

 

 

Traditional uses of plants in curing jaundice in the Pin Valley National Park,
Himachal Pradesh

314

      K Chandra Sekar and S K Srivastava

 

       [A61K35/78, A61P1/16]

 

 

 

Herbal folklores for male sexual disorders and debilities in western Uttar Pradesh

317

      Viquar A Khan and Athar A Khan

 

       [A61K35/78, A61P15/00, A61P15/10, A61P17/00, A61P17/04, A61P37/08]

 

 

 

In vitro antibacterial activity of Takrarishta – An Ayurvedic formulation

325

      Sandeep Bhardwaj, Girish S Achliya, Vijaya S Meghre, Sudhir G Wadodkar and Avinash K Dorle

 

       [A61K35/78, A61P1/04, A61P1/06, A61P1/08, A61P1/12, A61P1/14, A61P9/14, A61P27/02, A61P27/14, A61P29/00, A61P29/02, A61P31/00, A61P31/04, A61P33/06, A61P33/08, A61P35/00, A61P37/08, A61P39/02, A61P39/04]

 

 

 

Identification of Tridosa of Caraka-Susruta-Vagbhatta Samhitatrayi: A scientific bridge between Ayurveda and modern medicine

329

      N G Dongre

 

       [A61K35/78, A61P1/04, A61P7/00]

 

 

 

Book Review

333

 

 

Author Index and Subject Index

334

 

 

Forthcoming Conferences

335

 

 

Guidelines for Authors

337

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(3), July 2005, pp. 287-290

 

 

Ethnomedicinal practices of Nasik District, Maharashtra

M V Patil* and D A Patil

Department of Botany, Gangamai Education Trust's Arts, Commerce And Science College, Nagaon, District Dhule, Maharashtra;
Post-Graduate Department of Botany, S S V P S's L K Dr P R Ghogrey Science College, Dhule 424 005, Maharashtra

Received 6 October 2003; revised 28 September 2004

The paper reports the age old empirical ethnomedicinal knowledge of 30 plant species belonging to 20 families from aboriginal and rural populace of Nasik district, Maharashtra. The preparation of ethnomedicinal recipes, dosage, mode of administration and uses of plants are given. These taxa appear to be promising from the view point of drug evaluation. They are enumerated with botanical name, local name, family name, uses and number of voucher specimens.

Keywords: Ethnomedicine, Nasik district, Maharashtra, Western Ghats, Tribals.

IPC Int. Cl.7: A61K35/78, A61P1/04, A61P1/16, A61P11/10, A61P11/14, A61P13/02, A61P13/04, A61P15/02, A61P15/04, A61P15/06.

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(3), July 2005, pp. 253-258

 

Ethnoveterinary practices in Uttara Kannada district of Karnataka

V H Harsha, V Shripathi and G R Hegde*

P G Department of Botany, Karnatak University, Dharwad 580 003, Karnataka,
E-mail: grhbhadran@rediffmail.com

Received 19 December 2003; revised 1 April 2005

Traditional methods of veterinary treatments using plants are predominant in rural folk of Uttara Kannada district situated in western Ghats of Karnataka. A total of 25 formulations from 39 plant species belonging to 30 families used to treat 21 diseases of domestic animals are described. The method of preparation, dose and duration of each plant along with its botanical name, family and local names are discussed.

Key words: Ethnobotany, Veterinary Medicine, Western Ghats, Karnataka, Uttara Kannada

IPC Int. Cl.7:               A61K35/78, A61P1/16, A61P15/00, A61P15/14, A61P17/06, A61P19/00, A61P19/10, A61P21/00, A61P29/00, A61P31/00, A61P39/02

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(3), July 2005, pp 317-324

 

Herbal folklores for male sexual disorders and debilities in
western Uttar Pradesh

Viquar A Khan* and Athar A Khan

Department of Botany, Faculty of Life Sciences, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202002, Uttar Pradesh,

E-mail:viqarvicky@rediffmail.com

Received 30 January 2004; revised 8 February 2005

A survey of medicinal plants prescribed by the local medicine men and traditional healers in five districts of western Uttar Pradesh, lead to interesting therapeutic applications of 30 plant species belonging to 20 families for different male sexual disorders and debilities. Among them, 18 ethnomedicinal claims used for such complaints were recorded for the first time from the study area.

Key words: Sexual vitality, Sexual Vigour, Impotency, Folk Medicine, Male Sexual Disorders, Uttar Pradesh.

IPC Int. Cl.7: A61K35/78, A61P15/00, A61P15/10, A61P17/00, A61P17/04, A61P37/08


 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(3), July 2005, pp 329-332

 

Identification of Tridosa of Caraka-Susruta-Vagbhatta Samhitatrayi: A scientific bridge between Ayurveda and modern medicine

N G Dongre

B-62, Brij Enclave, Post Sundarpur, Varanasi 221 005, Uttar Pradesh

Received 28 January 2004; revised 26 July 2004

Brhattrayi or Caraka-Susruta-Astanghrdaya Samhitas are works on Indian therapeutics based on the principles of Tridosa, which are comprised of three humours, Vata, Pitta and Kapha. The aim of this paper is to decipher the meaning of Vata, Pitta and Kapha and identify them in the allopathic terms. Modern techniques to test the blood of artery and vein origin and lymph from the lymphatic vessel may be useful to determine the states of Vata, Pitta and Kapha and may also provide an elegant method for the diagnosis of a disease on the Tridosa principle of Ayurveda.

Keywords: Ayurveda, Tridosa, Vata, Pitta, Kapha, Lymphatic Vessel, Susruta Samhita, Caraka Samhita, Vagbhatta Samhitatrayi

IPC Int. Cl.7: A61K35/78, A61P1/04, A61P7/00

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(3), July 2005, pp. 237-245

 

Traditional herbal medicines from Shekhawati region of Rajasthan

S S Katewa* and P K Galav

Laboratory of Ethnobotany & Agrostology, Department of Botany, College of Science, M L Sukhadia University,
Udaipur 313 001, Rajasthan

Received 19 April 2004; revised 1 November 2004

Shekhawati region of Rajasthan specially the hilly tracts of Lohargal, Mansadevi, Khetri, Babai, Sakambari, Singhana and Harshnath areas are endowed with rich vegetation and the local people nicely learnt to use the area’s vegetation resources including health care. These people successfully treat many difficult diseases using plant-based medicines. Recent survey for ethnomedicinal plants among the people of these localities recorded the use of 48 species of dicotyledonous and 2 species of monocotyledonous plants. Different types of uses of the recorded plants are presented and discussed in the article.

Keywords: Ethnobotany, Folk Medicine, Medicinal plants, Shekhawati region, Traditional Knowledge, Tribals

IPC Int. Cl.7: A61K35/78, A61P1/06, A61P1/10, A61P7/04, A61P7/12, A61P11/10, A61P11/14, A61P13/02, A61P15/02, A61P15/08, A61P15/10, A61P15/14, A61P17/02, A61P19/02, A61P25/20, A61P33/10, A61P30/02


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(3), July 2005, pp 267-270

 

Folk medicine used for common women ailments by Adivasis in
the eastern Ghats of Andhra Pradesh

Venkata Ratnam K and Venkata Raju R R *

Department of Botany, Sri Krishnadevaraya University, Anantapur 515 003, Andhra Pradesh;

E-mail: rrvenkataraju@yahoo.com

Received 7 may 2004; revised 24 January 2005

The paper deals with 25 little known plant crude drugs belonging to 16 plant families used for leucorrhoea and menorrhoea, the common ailments in women prevalent in tribal communities inhabiting the Eastern Ghats of Andhra Pradesh. Of 25 plant species, 2 are used for menorrhoea, 7 for leucorrhoea and menorrhoea and 16 species are used only for leucorrhoea.

Key words: Folk medicine, Adivasi, Eastern Ghats, Andhra Pradesh, Chenchus Tribes, Ethnomedicine

IPC Int. Cl.7: A61K35/78, A61P13/06, A61P15/00, A61P15/02, A61P29/00

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(3), July 2005, pp 314-316

 

Traditional uses of plants in curing jaundice in the Pin Valley National Park, Himachal Pradesh

K Chandra Sekar and S K Srivastava*

Botanical Survey of India (NC), 192 Kaulagarh Road, Dehradun 248 195, Uttaranchal.

Received 25 May 2004; revised 15 December 2004

The paper provides traditional uses of few plant species in curing jaundice by the local community residing in and around Pin Valley National Park, Lahaul & Spiti in Himachal Pradesh. Their uses along with the dosages and combination with other plants are provided.

Key words: Traditional uses, Jaundice, Pin Valley National Park, Himachal Pradesh

IPC Int. Cl.7: A61K35/78, A61P1/16

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(3), July 2005, pp 246-252

Wild tribal food plants of Orissa

Rekha Sinha* and Valeria Lakra

Directorate of Extension Education, Birsa Agricultural University, Kanke, Ranchi 834006, Jharkhand

Received 9 June 2004; revised 23 August 2004

Three tribal dominated districts of Orissa, Kheonjhar, Mayurbhanj and Dhenkenal were studied for plant consumption pattern in five tribal groups. Data were collected through PRA exercises and interview schedules. The study identifies leaves (50 types), fruits (46 types), flowers (11 types), tubers (14 types) and gums (5 types) consumed by the tribal population. The potential nutritive value of these plants has been discussed.

Keywords: Ethnobotany, Tribals, Orissa, Wild Food Plants

IPC Int. Cl.7: A10G1/00, AO1G17/00

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(3), July 2005, pp 271-274

 

Antidiarrhoeal activity of antidiarrhoeal Unani formulation in rats

M Aleem Khan, Naeem A Khan, Iqbal A Qasmi, Ghufran Ahmad, Shadab Zafar*

Department of Ilmul Advia (Pharmacology), Faculty of Unani Medicine, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202002, Uttar Pradesh; Unani Dispensary, Municipal Corporation of Delhi, Jhatikra, New Delhi 110043

Received 23 June 2004, revised 10 August 2004

Aqueous extract of antidiarrhoeal formulation (ADF) containing Holarrhena antidysenterica Wall, Aegle marmelos Correa ex Koen and Punica granatum Linn. was investigated for antidiarrhoeal activity against charcoal induced gut motility and serotonin induced diarrhoea in experimental rats. The control, standard and test groups of experimental animals were administered with distilled water, Lomotil and ADF (150 mg and 300 mg/kg) orally. Charcoal and serotonin were administered after 30 min in each group of first and second experiment. The distance traveled by charcoal in small intestine was measured after 30 and 60 min of charcoal administration and diarrhoea was observed every 30 min for six hours after serotonin administration. ADF causing significant reduction in the distance traveled by charcoal and serotonin induced diarrhoea. Thus ADF may have the potential to reduce the diarrhoea in rats.

Keywords: Antidiarrhoeal Activity, Diarrhoea, Medicinal Plants

IPC Int. Cl.7: A61K 35/78, A61P1/12

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(3), July 2005, pp 307-313

 

Vighneswara: The Lord of Wisdom and Desire as Gleaned from Literature and the Images in Stone, Wood and Ivory in Salar Jung Museum

Balagouni Krishna Goud

Salar Jung Museum, Hyderabad 500 002, Andhra Pradesh

E-mail: Kittugoud2001@yahoo.com

Received 2 July 2004

Museum is an institution devoted to the acquisition, conservation, study, exhibition, and educational interpretation of objects having scientific, historical, cultural or artistic value. A museum is typically a non-profit making, permanent institution in the service of society and of its development, open to the public, which acquires, conserves, researches, communicates and exhibits, for purposes of study, education and enjoyment, the tangible and intangible evidence of people and their environment. Museums connect people to knowledge and information, creativity and inspiration. The paper describes diverse collection of Indian mythological figures in the Salar Jung Museum, especially the images of Vinayaka (Vigneswara or Ganesa), the Lord of Remover of Obstacles, in different media describing its artistic and thematic points of view.

Keywords: Vighneswara, Salar Jung Museum, Museum

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(3), July 2005, pp 303-306

 

Traditional technologies in the improvement of breeds of livestock in Tamil Nadu

S M K Karthickeyan* and K Gajendran

Department of Animal Genetics and Breeding, Madras Veterinary College,
Chennai 600 007; Centre for Animal Production Studies, TANUVAS, Chennai 600 051, Tamil Nadu

E-mail: kannikarthi@yahoo.co.in

Received 12 July 2004; revised 21 December 2004

Animal husbandry has been practiced in India since time immemorial. Among different species of livestock kept by farmers, cattle and buffaloes are maintained by maximum numbers in varying combinations. Earlier various methods were used for the improvement of the breeds of livestock. Tamil Nadu is endowed with some recognized breeds of cattle (5), buffalo (1), sheep (8) and goat (1), besides many non-descript domestic animal species. There are certain traditional background in the evolution and existence of these breeds. Selection of animals and planned mating were evolved in earlier days itself. Further, efforts are being made by the farmers to change their sire in the herd / flock for improvement even with out knowing the underlying principles. Indigenous technical know-how used for the improvement of breeds of cattle, buffaloes, sheep and goats and pigs in Kerala have been discussed.

Key words: Traditional Knowledge, Breed Improvement, Livestock, Animal husbandry.

IPC Int. Cl.7: A61D19/00

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(3), July 2005, pp 275-286

 

Aesthetic values of selected floral elements of Khatana and Waghai forests
of Dangs, western Ghats

J I Nirmal Kumar*, Hiren Soni and Rita N Kumar

Department of Biosciences, N V Patel College of Pure & Applied Sciences, Vallabh Vidyanagar 388 120, Gujarat,
E-mail: nvpas2003@yahoo.com

Received 2 September 2004; revised 13 November 2004

Plants are an integral part of Indian life and culture and are worshipped among various tribes in India. Plant worship has also played an important role in the religious history since time immemorial by the Aryan race in India. The ancient Indian culture flourished in the midst of forests. Since plants of forests are the oldest associates of man, they are offered in worship of several deities. Such plants are used for religious performances among all races of mankind. The present article deals with some important and common plants, such as dicots like Aegle marmelos Correa ex Roxb., Ficus benghalensis Linn., Mangifera indica Linn., Ocimum sanctum Linn., Sesamum indicum Linn., Cocos nucifera Linn. and monocots like Musa paradisiaca Linn., Cynodon dactylon Pers. and Oryza sativa Linn.. These plants are found in wild as well as grown in a close vicinity of tribal folk of Khatana and Waghai forests of Dangs forest, which falls on the extreme northern part of western Ghats of India, one of the biodiversity Hotspots of the world. These plants have some special significance with respect to their description in various old scriptures, folk religions, mythologies, folk songs, etc. These plants are also used in offerings, rites, rituals, traditions, customs and decorations. Some sacred plants with aesthetic values have got particular attention as they are worshipped as symbols of Gods and Goddesses in both the forest areas.

Keywords: Ethnomedicine, Western Ghats, Tribals, Aesthetic values, Khatana Forests, Waghai Forests.

 

IPC Int. Cl.7: A61P15/00, A61P15/08, A61P15/10, A61P17/00, A61P17/02, A61P39/02, A61P85/00

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(3), July 2005, pp 298-302

 

Antiulcerogenic activity of Elettaria cardamomum Maton. and Amomum subulatum Roxb. seeds

*Anwar Jamal, Farah, ***Aisha Siddiqui, Mohd Aslam, **Kalim Javed & M A Jafri

*Unani Expert, TKDL, NISCAIR (CSIR), Near  Pusa Gate, K S Krishnan Marg, N.Delhi 110 012;
Dept of llmul Advia (Pharmacology), Faculty of Medicine (U),
**Dept of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi 110 062

***M D Scholar, Dept of Ilmul Advia, Ajmal KhanTibbia College, A M U Aligarh 202002, Uttar Pradesh

Received 29 November 2004; revised 24 February 2005

Small cardamom known as 'Heel Khurd’ (fruits of Elettaria cardamomum Maton.) and large cardamom 'Heel Kalan’ (fruits of Amomum subulatum Roxb.) are used in Unani System of Medicine to treat gastrointestinal disorders. These seeds are used as stomachic (Muqavvi-e-Meda), desiccant (Mujaffif), resolvent (Muhallil), digestive (Hazim) carminative (Kasir-e-Riyah), etc. Their essential oils and petroleum ether soluble fractions were studied in rats for their ability to inhibit gastric lesions induced by aspirin and ethanol, and results were compared. Both the fractions of drugs inhibited gastric lesions significantly. Fractions of small cardamom were found to be better than large cardamom.

Keywords: Antiulcerogenic Activity, Small cardamom, Large cardamom, Unani System of Medicine, Gastroprotective Activity

IPC Int. Cl.7: A61K35/78, A61P01/04, A61P17/02, A61P29/00, A61P31/02, A61P33/00, A61P33/10, A61P33/12