Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

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VOLUME 4

NUMBER 4

OCTOBER 2005

 

CONTENTS

 

Papers

 

Traditional uses of some Indian plants among islanders of the Indian Ocean

345

        S K Jain and Sumita Srivastava

 

 

 

Data Warehouse Techniques in Traditional Knowledge Systems

358

        Deepak K Pande

 

 

 

A study of the effect of individual Asanas on blood pressure

367

        Varun Malhotra and O P Tandon

 

 

 

Effect of pyramids on microorganisms

373

        Itagi Ravi Kumar, N V C Swamy and H R Nagendra

 

 

 

*Woodcarvings from Pabbar Valley

380

        Hari Chauhan

 

 

 

Karimnagar filigree art works in the Salar Jung Museum

386

        Balagouni Krishna Goud and M V Subrahmenyeswara Sarma

 

 

 

Ethnomedicinal uses of Pteridophytes of Amarkantak, Madhya Pradesh

392

        Shweta Singh, R D Dixit and T R Sahu

 

 

 

Ethnobotanical usages of grasses by the tribals of West Dinajpur district, West Bengal

396

        S Mitra and Sobhan Kr Mukherjee

 

 

 

Studies on plant associated indigenous knowledge among the Malanis of Kullu district, Himachal Pradesh

403

        Parveen Kumar Sharma, NS Chauhan and Brij Lal

 

 

 

Ethnomedicinal studies of Pichavaram mangroves of  East coast, Tamil Nadu

409

        K C Ravindran, K Venkatesan, V Balakrishnan, K P Chellappan and T Balasubramanian

 

 

 

Clinical Efficacy of Hijamat (Cupping) in Waja-ul-Mafasil (Arthritis)

412

        Nighat Anjum, Shakir Jamil, Abdul Hannan, Jamal Akhtar and Bilal Ahmad

 

 

 

Effect of Kabdeen in Warm-e-Kabid Vairoosi (viral hepatitis)

416

        M M H Siddiqui, Asia Sultana, and M Y Siddiqui

 

 

 

Effect of Colchicum luteum Baker in the management of rheumatoid arthritis

421

      Mohammad Javed, Jamal A Khan and M M H Siddiqui

 

(Contd)

Ethnobotanical notes on some medicinal and aromatic plants of Himachal Pradesh

424

        Parveen Kumar Sharma and Brij Lal

 

 

 

Traditional Phytotherapy among Karens of Middle Andaman

429

        M U Sharief, Senthil Kumar, P G Diwakar and TVRS Sharma

 

 

 

Ethnomedicine of the Chellipale community of Namakkal district, Tamil Nadu

437

        P S Udayan, Sateesh George, Thushar K V and Indira Balachandran

 

 

 

Ethnomedicine for dysentery and diarrhoea from Khammam district of Andhra Pradesh

443

        Vatsavaya S Raju and K N Reddy

 

 

 

Some new ethnomedicinal uses of Milkweed in the Indian desert

448

        Suresh Kumar, Sangeeta Goyal, Aruna Chauhan and Farzana Parveen

 

 

 

Ethnoveterinary medicine from Koch Bihar district, West Bengal

456

        S Bandyopadhyay and Sobhan Kr Mukherjee

 

 

 

Indigenous technical know-how in the healthcare of domestic animals

462

        S M K Karthickeyan and K Gajendran

 

 

 

Book Review

464

 

 

Author Index and Subject Index

466

 

 

Forthcoming Conferences

467

 

 

Annual Title Index

469

 

 

Annual Author Index

473

 

 

Annual Subject Index

474

 

 

List of Referees

476

 

 

 

The Papers published in Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge are covered by

 

·        NAPRALERT, USA

·        MANTIS Database, USA

·        Food Science and Technology Abstracts, UK

·        Medicinal and Aromatic Plants Abstracts, India

·        Indian Science Abstracts, India

 

 

 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(4), October 2005, pp.345-357

 

Traditional uses of some Indian plants among islanders of the Indian Ocean

S K Jain* and Sumita Srivastava

A-26, Mall Avenue Colony, Lucknow 226001, Uttar Pradesh

Email: skjain1926@rediffmail.com

 

A comparative study of the traditional herbal knowledge of the islanders of the Indian Ocean and the folk of India shows that both use about seventy species of plants in Indian medicine. Whereas some uses are common among the folk of two regions, many traditional uses among the islanders are unique. Comparative data on such species is presented. Details of uses, dosages, mixture plants or other materials are given for some unique uses/species. The advantage of substituting underground parts of plants with aerial parts use discussed.

Keywords:   Ethnomedicine, Indian Ocean, Madagascar, Comoros, Seychelles, Mascarenes, Traditional Medicine,                                    Ethnomedicine

IPC Code:   Int. Cl.7: A61K35/78, A61P1/06, A61P1/08, A61P1/10, A61P1/12, A61P1/14, A61P1/16, A61P5/00,                                  A61P5/14, A61P5/16, A61P11/00, A61P11/06, A61P11/08, A61P15/00, A61P19/00, A61P19/02, A61P25/00,                   A61P25/08, A61P27/02, A61P29/00, A61P31/00, A61P31/02, A61P31/04, A61P33/00, A61P33/06,                                   A61P37/08, A61P39/02, A61P39/04 

________________________________

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(4), October 2005, pp.358-366

 

Data Warehouse Techniques in Traditional Knowledge Systems

Deepak K Pande

G B Pant Institute of Himalayan Environment and Development, Kosi Katarmal, Almora 263 643, Uttaranchal,
E-mail: pandedk1181@yahoo.com

 

Traditional knowledge is the knowledge that has been passed from one generation to the next through the oral or written traditions. Elders, being the most knowledge persons are very important in the society. The elders are the people, who have gained the knowledge over their lifetime and are needed to teach the younger generations. The relationship of the indigenous people to the land and its resources is tantamount to their survival. No matter where they live and whatever beliefs they have, they all view land as the basis of their survival. Attempts are being made to document and preserve Oral Traditional Knowledge and Traditional Cultural Expressions. Looking into the quantum of the information, It is difficult to document and retrieve the information. To make this a reality, an urgent need to fabricate a Data Warehouse (DW) on Traditional Knowledge Systems (TKS) has been emphasised.

Keywords: Data Warehouse Techniques, Traditional Knowledge Systems

IPC Int. Cl.7: G06K9/00

_____________________________________

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(4), October 2005, pp.367-372

 

 

A study of the effect of individual Asanas on blood pressure

Varun Malhotra and O P Tandon*

Department of Physiology, University College of Medical Sciences, Guru Tegh Bahadur Hospital, Delhi 110 095

E-mail: dreamgirlsonal@rediffmail.com

 

Asana means a steady and pleasant posture of the body. Asanas are to be performed without strain. Undue stretching in some Asana may do more harm than benefit. This study of individual Asana was undertaken to understand the effect of changing postures on the blood pressure. Twenty five first year MBBS students in the age group of 16-19 years performed Sukhasan, Vajrasan and Dhanurasan in the Department of Physiology. The blood pressure was measured by the mercury sphygmomanometer by standard method while the Asana were being performed. In Sukhasan blood pressure was the lowest 116.4 ± 7.21 / 76.1 ± 7.34. The pressure increased slightly in Vajrasan to 119.5 ± 7.82/ 81.4 ± 6.2. It was the highest recordable in Dhanurasan (125.2 ± 8.23/ 84.8 ± 7.78). Thereby, indicating that the pressure is lowest in Sukhasan, and this Asana may be performed regularly in meditation for calming the overworked heart.

Key words: Asanas, Blood Pressure, Yoga, Meditation

IPC Int. Cl.7: A61P9/00, A61P9/04, A61P9/06, A61P9/08, A61P9/10, A61P9/12

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(4), October 2005, pp.373-379

 

Effect of pyramids on microorganisms

 

Itagi Ravi Kumar, N V C Swamy* and H R Nagendra

Hindu University of America Extension Center, Swami Vivekananda Yoga Anusandhana Samsthana,
Eknath Bhavan, 19, Gavipuram Circle, Bangalore 560019, Karnataka

E-mail: nvcswamy@rediffmail.com; svyasa@zeeaccess.com

 

Investigations have been undertaken to find out if an enclosed pyramidal structure has any influence on the growth of microorganisms inside them, as claimed in legendary literature. Five models were used, four of them being pyramidal in shape and the fifth with a flat roof. The medium chosen was fresh unboiled milk. The control was the same milk sample kept in the open. Results subjected to statistical analysis indicate that there is a noticeable influence of the pyramidal shape on the rate of growth of microorganisms. Quantitative data have been supported by visual observations.

Keywords: Pyramids, Microorganisms, Antimicrobial Activity, Vaastu Shastra

IPC Int. Cl.7: A61P31/00

_______________________________________

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(4), October 2005, pp.380-385

Woodcarvings from Pabbar Valley

Hari Chauhan

Himachal State Museum, Shimla 171004, Himachal Pradesh

 

Woodcarving was the favoured medium of artistic expression of the Indian subcontinent. Indian houses and temples were profusely adorned with it and are often inseparable from it. Woodcarving, an indigenous tradition craft finds a mention in the ancient texts such as the Rig Veda and Matsya Purana. Woodcarving craft was well developed in many states specially, Himachal Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan, Gujarat, Kerala, Kashmir and Madhya Pradesh. They differed in terms of the kind of wood and the craft tradition. In the early days of kings and nawabs, woodcarving was essentially seen as an adjunct to architecture. Palaces, havelis and temples were decorated with incredibly carved doors, windows and jalis (lattice work). The present paper describes traditional woodcarving work adoring houses and temples of Pabbar valley of Himachal Pradesh.

Keywords: Woodcarving, Traditional Craft, Pabbar Valley, Himachal Pradesh

IPC Int. Cl.7: B44C1/22, B44C5/04

_____________________________________________

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(4), October 2005, pp.386-391

Karimnagar filigree art works in the Salar Jung Museum

Balagouni Krishna Goud* and M V Subrahmenyeswara Sarma

Salar Jung Museum, Hyderabad 500 002, Andhra Pradesh

E-mail: kittugoud2001@yahoo.com

 

Filigree refers to laces like decoration using gold or silver wire. It is ideal for arabesque designs. One of the necessary steps in making filigree is the forming of the wire. It is made by twisting very tightly two pieces of very small silver wire and then flattened. Country-seeds, feathers, leaves, fruits, flowers, animal bones, claws and teeth have been used in early India to fashion ornaments. Even today such ornaments are popular in tribal societies. In India, filigree work of Karimnagar, Orissa, Srinagar, etc. are known for their intricate designs and artistic work. The paper describes the filigree work of Karimnagar and some of the filigree objects housed in the Salar Jung Museum, Hyderabad.

Keywords: Filigree Art Work, Salar Jung Museum, Karimnagar Filigree Work, Silver Filigree Work

IPC Int. Cl.7: B21F1/00, B21F3/00, B21F7/00, B23P17/04

_______________________________________

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(4), October 2005, pp.392-395

Ethnomedicinal uses of Pteridophytes of Amarkantak, Madhya Pradesh

Shweta Singh*, R D Dixit and T R Sahu

Botanical Survey of India, Central Circle, 10 Chatham Lines, Allahabad 211002, Uttar Pradesh; Department of Botany,
Dr Hari Singh Gaur Vishwavidyalaya, Sagar, Madhya Pradesh

 

The present communication deals with the ethnomedicinal usage of pteridophytes in the treatment of various diseases. These pteridophytes are widely used by the local tribes and the plant material is sold in the local market of Amarkantak. They grow naturally in rock crevices and boulders near water stream in shady and moist places. The present study documents ethnomedicinal usage of eight pteridophytic plants, which are prevalent in study area along with botanical name, family, vernacular name, distribution in central India, plant parts used and mode of use.

Keywords: Traditional Medicine, Ethnomedicine, Pteridophytes, Amarkantak, Tribes

IPC Int. Cl.7: A61K35/78, A61P1/10, A61P9/14, A61P11/00, A61P11/06, A61P13/00, A61P13/02, A61P15/00,

                        A61P15/02, A61P15/10, A61P17/00, A61P17/02, A61P19/00, A61P19/02, A61P25/08, A61P27/02,

            A61P27/14, A61P29/00, A61P29/02, A61P31/00, A61P35/00, A61P37/08

_______________________

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(4), October 2005, pp.396-402

 

Ethnobotanical usages of grasses by the tribals of West Dinajpur district,

West Bengal

S Mitra and Sobhan Kr Mukherjee*

Department of Botany, University of Kalyani, Kalyani 741235, West Bengal

Email: sobhankr@yahoo.com; sunitmitra2003@yahoo.co.in

 

In the present paper, 27 ethnobotanical usages of 16 taxa of grasses are documented from 4 major tribal communities of West Dinajpur district of West Bengal. All the ethnobotanical information collected from these tribal communities is documented along with their vernacular name, phenology, place of collection, mode of preparation, and the processes of medication.

Keywords: Ethnobotany, Grasses, West Dinajpur District, West Bengal, Munda Tribes, Santal Tribes, Oraon Tribes, Polia Tribes, Ethnomedicine

IPC Int. Cl.7A61K35/78, A61P1/02, A61P1/04, A61P1/06, A61P1/12, A61P1/14, A61P13/00, A61P13/02, A61P13/10, A61P17/00, A61P17/02, A61P17/04, A61P27/00, A61P27/02, A61P27/04, A61P31/00, A61P39/02

__________________________________


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(4), October 2005, pp.403-408

 

Studies on plant associated indigenous knowledge among the Malanis of Kullu district, Himachal Pradesh

Parveen Kumar Sharma1, NS Chauhan2 and Brij Lal*3

1Department of Agroforestry and Environment, COA, CSKHPKV, Palampur 176 062, Himachal Pradesh, E-mail-praveenkumarsharma11@rediffmail.com; 2Dr Y S Parmar University of Horticulture and Forestry, Nauni, Solan 173 230, Himachal Pradesh; 3*Biodiversity Division, Institute of Himalayan Bioresource Technology, PO Box 6, Palampur 176 061, Himachal Pradesh, E-mail: brijihbt@yahoo.co.in.


The Malani is an ethnic community inhabiting a remote village generally called as Republic of Malana, located in Parvati valley of Kullu district, Himachal Pradesh. The adjoining area of Malana is inhabited by Gujjars, Gaddis, and other rural communities. Since ages, these people have been utilizing their ambient plant resources for food, fodder, fibre, medicine, fuel, and other purposes. During ethnobotanical surveys conducted in 2000-2002 among the Malanis and other inhabitants of Parvati valley, first hand information on 35 plant species was recorded. The uses in details are described in the present communication.

Keywords: Traditional Knowledge, Parvati Valley, Western Himalaya, Gujjar, Gaddi, Malani, Kulluvi, Tribes, Ethnobotany, Himachal Pradesh

IPC Code:   Int. Cl.7: A61K35/78, A61P1/10, A61P1100, A61P11/10, A61P11/12, A61P11/14, A61P15/00,  A61P15/10, A61P19/00, A61P19/02, A61P19/10, A61P21/00, A61P29/00, A61P31/00, A61P37/08, A61P39/02

_____________________

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(4), October 2005, pp.409-411

Ethnomedicinal studies of Pichavaram mangroves of East coast, Tamil Nadu

 

K C Ravindran1*, K Venkatesan1, V Balakrishnan1, K P Chellappan1 and T Balasubramanian2

1Department of Botany, Annamalai University, Annamalainagar 608 002, Tamil Nadu

2CAS in Marine Biology, Annamalai University, Parangipettai 608 502, Tamil Nadu

E-mail: drkc_ravi@rediffmail.com

 

The present paper describes medicinal properties of mangroves and halophytes used by local inhabitants of Pichavaram village on East coast of Tamil Nadu, collected through survey of the area. Information on 11 species from 8 families used for therapeutic purposes with their botanical names, vernacular names, family, habit and manner of using recipes have been enumerated.

Keywords: Pichavaram, Mangroves, Ethomedicine, Tamil Nadu

IPC Int. Cl.7A61K35/78, A61P1/02, A61P1/04, A61P1/06, A61P1/08, A61P1/10, A61P1/12, A61P1/14, A61P1/16, A61P7/06, A61P13/00, A61P13/02, A61P27/02, A61P27/14, A61P29/00, A61P31/00, A61P31/02, A61P31/04, A61P31/12, A61P33/04, A61P33/06, A61P37/08, A61P39/02, A61P41/00

___________________________________________________________

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(4), October 2005, pp.412-415

Clinical Efficacy of Hijamat (Cupping) in Waja-ul-Mafasil (Arthritis)

Nighat Anjum, Shakir Jamil*, Abdul Hannan**, Jamal Akhtar, Bilal Ahmad

TKDL, NISCAIR, Dr K S Krishnan Marg, New Delhi-110012

* Dept of Moalijat, Faculty of Medicine, Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi-110062

** Regional Research Institute, Okhla, New Delhi-110025

E-mail: nighatanjum@rediffmail.com

 

Cupping is one of the oldest and most practiced therapies of the Unani System of Medicine. Unani physicians have described it thoroughly and indicated in various diseases e.g. arthritis, migraine, asthma, headache, hemorrhoids, etc. Arthritis is a very common problem in present day scenario. In this study, an attempt is being made to evaluate the efficacy of cupping in patients of arthritis. 30 patients were randomly selected, of which 20 patients were kept in the test group i.e. these patients were given the cupping therapy, while the rest 10 patients were in the control group and were not receiving the cupping therapy. At the end of the study, it was concluded that cupping is an effective therapy for the patients of arthritis.

Key words: Arthritis, Cupping, Unani Medicine, Hijamat

          IPC Int. Cl.7: A61P19/00, A61P19/02, A61P19/08, A61P21/00, A61P29/00

_______________________________________


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(4), October 2005, pp.416-420

 

Effect of Kabdeen in Warm-e-Kabid Vairoosi (viral hepatitis)

M M H Siddiqui,* Asia Sultana,** and M Y Siddiqui*

*Department of Moalejat, A K Tibbiya College A M U Aligarh 202 002,Uttar Pradesh; **Department of Moalejat, Faculty of Medicine, Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi 110 062

E-mail: drhaque@rediffmail.com

 

The therapeutic evaluation of a polyherbal non-pharmacopoeial Unani formulation Kabdeen in 50 patients of Warm-e-Kabid Vairoosi (viral hepatitis) revealed an over all clinical improvement in about 75.17 % at the end of 3rd week and 87.54 % at the end of 6th week, while 42.1 % improvement was observed in cases of hepatitis B. Out of 19 hepatitis B positive cases, 8 cases showed Australian antigen test negative. It was also observed during the study that the test drug not only restores the normal functioning of the liver but also has no side effects.

Keywords:   Viral hepatitis, Warm-e-Kabid Vairoosi, Kabdeen, Antiinflammatory Activity Hepatoprotective Activity,

                     Antioxidants activity, Antiviral Activity, Unani Medicine, Nephrotoxicity

IPC Int. Cl.7: A61K35/78, A61P1/04, A61P1/06, A61P1/08, A61P1/14, A61P1/16, A61P7/06, A61P31/02, A61P41/00,

                        A61P43/00

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(4), October 2005, pp.421-423

Effect of Colchicum luteum Baker in the management of rheumatoid arthritis

Mohammad Javed*, Jamal A Khan** and M M H Siddiqui***

*Institute of Public Health and Hygiene, New Delhi; **J N M C, Department of Microbiology, A M U Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh; ***
A K T C Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh.

 

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disorder, characterized by symmetrical, erosive synovitis, and in some cases, extra articular involvement. In early onset of disease analgesics and anti inflammatory drugs are used in modern medicine. While in late stages, therapeutic strategy is related to lowering generalized immunity by corticosteroids or by cytotoxic drugs. These drugs provide symptomatic relief but did not have any significant effect on the underlying disease process. In addition, they caused a fair degree of side effects. Amongst several useful herbal drugs, Colchicum luteum is one, which is claimed to be effective in this ailment. On an average the oral use of Colchicum luteum showed benefits in 82.4% cases in 90 days without any side effect.

Keywords: Rheumatoid Arthritis, Antiinflammatory Activity, Unani Medicine

IPC Int. Cl.7: A61K35/78, A61P19/00, A61P19/02, A61P19/08, A61P21/00, A61P29/00

________________________________________

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(4), October 2005, pp.424-428

Ethnobotanical notes on some medicinal and aromatic plants

of Himachal Pradesh

 

Parveen Kumar Sharma and Brij Lal*

C S K Himachal Pradesh Krishi Vishwavidyalaya, Palampur 176 061, Himachal Pradesh

*Biodiversity Division, Institute of Himalayan Bioresource Technology, Palampur 176 061, Himachal Pradesh

 

Himachal Pradesh, which forms a part of the western Himalaya, is a repository of medicinal and aromatic plants and the traditional knowledge associated with these plants. Utilization of plant resources in their day-to-day life has been an age-old practice of the people inhabiting this hilly state. The people living in remote and tribal areas still depend on household remedies for healthcare. The present paper provides information on the indigenous therapeutic application and other traditional uses of 9 plant species that are used by the natives of Himachal Pradesh. Information provided includes scientific name, family name (in bracket), vernacular names, distribution, and ethnobotanical use clubbed with the common uses as recorded from the relevant literature.

Keywords: Ethnobotany, Himachal Pradesh, Tribes, Medicinal Plants, Aromatic Plants, Ethnomedicine, Gaddi Tribe, Gujjar Tribe, Kinnura Tribe, Bhotia Tribe, Swangla Tribe, Lahaula Tribe, Pangwal Tribe

IPC Int. Cl.7A61K35/78, A61P1/02, A61P9/00, A61P9/08, A61P9/12, A61P9/14, A61P11/00, A61P11/06, A61P11/08, A61P11/14, A61P13/00, A61P13/02, A61P13/12, A61P15/00, A61P17/02, A61P19/00, A61P19/02, A61P25/00, A61P25/08, A61P25/10, A61P25/12, A61P29/00, A61P31/00, A61P35/00, A61P37/08

_________________________________

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(4), October 2005, pp.429-436

Traditional Phytotherapy among Karens of Middle Andaman

 

M U Sharief1*, Senthil Kumar2, P G Diwakar3 & TVRS Sharma4

1Botanical Survey of India, National Orchid Area and Experimental Garden, Nagalur Road, P O Ondikadai,
Yercaud 636 602, Distt Salem, Tamil Nadu

2,4Central Agricultural Research Institute, Garacharma, Port Blair 744 101, Andaman

 3Botanical Survey of India, Andaman & Nicobar Circle, Port Blair 744 102, Andaman

 

Karens, originally a hill tribe hailing from Pegu district of western Mayanmar, brought to Andaman by Britishers for forest timber operations during the year 1924-25. Although Karens have not been classified as tribals in the recent tribal notification, they form a minor ethnic group that has apparently been living amidst the forests of Mayabunder tehsil since decades. They posses extensive indigenous knowledge of the plants which they use in their ethnomedicinal practices. Information about 24 selected medicinal plants, their local names, parts used, methods of application and medicinal uses are recorded. The medicinal utilities of these plants used by Karens have not been recorded earlier. Ethnobotanical information related to agriculture, house building, canoe making and traditional artifacts are also recorded.

Key Words: Karen Tribe, Ethnobotany, Ethnomedicine, Mayabunder, Middle Andaman, Tribes, Phytotherapy

IPC Int. Cl.7: A61K35/78, A61P1/02, A61P9/00

________________________________________

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(4), October 2005, pp.437-442

 

Ethnomedicine of the Chellipale community of Namakkal district, Tamil Nadu

P S Udayan, Sateesh George, Thushar K V and Indira Balachandran*

Centre for Medicinal Plants Research (CMPR), Arya Vaidya Sala, Kottakkal

Changuvetty, Kottakkal 676 503, District Malappuram, Kerala

E-mail: avscmpr@sify.com; avscmpr@yahoo.co.in

 

The paper enumerates the traditional uses of some plants used by the Chellipale community near Kolli hills of Namakkal district, Tamil Nadu. Medicinal uses of 51 plants belonging to 36 families as gathered from the tribal along with their botanical identity are highlighted in this paper.

Key words: Medicinal plants, Chellipale community, Kolli Hills, Ethnomedicine, Tamil Nadu

IPC Int. Cl.7: A61K35/78, A61P1/02, A61P1/04, A61P1/06, A61P1/08, A61P1/14, A61P11/00, A61P11/14, A61P13/00, A61P13/02, A61P13/04, A61P15/10, A61P17/00, A61P17/14, A61P19/00, A61P19/02, A61P29/00, A61P31/00, A61P39/02

__________________


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(4), October 2005, pp.443-447

 Ethnomedicine for dysentery and diarrhoea from Khammam district of Andhra Pradesh

Vatsavaya S Raju* and K N Reddy

Department of Botany, Kakatiya University, Warangal 506 009, Andhra Pradesh; Laila Impex, Research Centre,
Jawahar Autonagar, Vjayawada 520 007, Andhra Pradesh

E-mail: vatsavayar@hotmail.com

 

Dysentery and diarrhoea are common and age-old problems among the humans and cattle in the tropics. As a lead for new drug discovery, the ethnomedicine for dysentery and diarrhoea that is in practice among the tribes Konda Reddi, Koyas, etc. in Khammam district of Andhra Pradesh, is presented. Thirty seven plant species used for gastroenteric problems belonging to 28 families,representing 34 genera of Magnoliophyta have been reported. These include 34 dicots and 3 monocots; 28 native and 9 exotic species; 21 trees, 6 shrubs, 1 climber and 9 herbs; and 23 unknown and 14 known remedies.

Keywords:      Ethnogastroenterology, Antidysenteric Activity, Antidiarrhoeal Activity, Andhra Pradesh, Ethnomedicine,
                        Konda Reddi Tribe, Koyas Tribe, Tribes

IPC Int. Cl.7: A61K35/78, A61P1/04, A61P1/06, A61P1/12, A61P1/14, A61P1/16, A61P1/18, A61P3/12,A61P31/00,      A61P31/04, A61P31/12

_____________________________

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(4), October 2005, pp.448-455

Some new ethnomedicinal uses of Milkweed in the Indian desert

Suresh Kumar*, Sangeeta Goyal, Aruna Chauhan & Farzana Parveen

Central Arid Zone Research Institute, Jodhpur 342 003, Rajasthan

E-mail: skumar@cazri.raj.nic.in

 

Survey of desert dwellers in 102 villages in the Indian desert revealed many ethnomedicinal uses of commonly occurring Asclepiadaceous shrub called Milkweed, Calotropis procera (Ait.) R. Br. The information has been compared with 43 uses reported in previously published records and a total of 28 new medicinal uses have been found.  Veterinary uses of Calotropis procera (Ait.) R. Br. have also been reported. In view of its new curative uses, need for their pharmacological validation has been emphasized.

Key words: Medicinal Plants, Indian Desert. Milkweed, Ethnomedicine, Rajasthan

IPC Code: Int. Cl.7: A61K35/78, A61P3/10, A61P9/00, A61P9/14, A61P11/00, A61P11/10, A61P11/14, A61P15/00,

                   A61P17/02, A61P19/10, A61P19/02, A61P27/00, A61P29/00, A61P31/02, A61P33/02, A61P35/00, A61P39/02


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Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(4), October 2005, pp.456-461

Some new ethnomedicinal uses of Milkweed in the Indian desert

Suresh Kumar*, Sangeeta Goyal, Aruna Chauhan & Farzana Parveen

Central Arid Zone Research Institute, Jodhpur 342 003, Rajasthan

E-mail: skumar@cazri.raj.nic.in

 

Survey of desert dwellers in 102 villages in the Indian desert revealed many ethnomedicinal uses of commonly occurring Asclepiadaceous shrub called Milkweed, Calotropis procera (Ait.) R. Br. The information has been compared with 43 uses reported in previously published records and a total of 28 new medicinal uses have been found.  Veterinary uses of Calotropis procera (Ait.) R. Br. have also been reported. In view of its new curative uses, need for their pharmacological validation has been emphasized.

Key words: Medicinal Plants, Indian Desert. Milkweed, Ethnomedicine, Rajasthan

IPC Code: Int. Cl.7: A61K35/78, A61P3/10, A61P9/00, A61P9/14, A61P11/00, A61P11/10, A61P11/14, A61P15/00,

A61P17/02, A61P19/10, A61P19/02, A61P27/00, A61P29/00, A61P31/02, A61P33/02, A61P35/00, A61P39/02

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Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 4(4), October 2005, pp.462-463


Indigenous technical know-how in the healthcare of domestic animals

 

S M K Karthickeyan* and K Gajendran

Department of Animal Genetics and Breeding, Madras Veterinary College, Chennai 600 007, Tamil Nadu

E-mail: kannikarthi@yahoo.co.in

Centre for Animal Production Studies, TANUVAS, Chennai 600 051, Tamil Nadu

 

The Indigenous Technical Knowledge (ITK) in utilizing some of the commonly available ingredients of plants used by our rural farmers, have been observed and documented along with their scientific rationale in the treatment of many diseases affecting livestock.

Keywords: Indigenous Technical Knowledge, Farmer’s knowledge, Healthcare, Livestock

IPC Int. Cl.7A61D19/00, A61K35/78, A61P17/02, A61P27/02, A61P27/14, A61P29/00, A61P31/02, A61P33/10, A61P33/12, A61P37/08

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