Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

 

 

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VOLUME 5

NUMBER 3

JULY 2006

 

CONTENTS

 

Papers

 

Documentation of traditional knowledge on medicinal plants of Bidar district, Karnataka

295

      P Prashantkumar & GM Vidyasagar

 

 

 

Medicinal plants use in traditional healthcare systems prevalent in western Himalayas

300

      Promila Kanwar, Neetu Sharma & Anju Rekha

 

 

 

Ethnomedicinal knowledge among Tharu tribe of Devipatan division

310

      Akhilesh Kumar, DD Tewari & JP Tewari

 

 

 

Folk remedies against rheumatic disorders in Jalgaon district, Maharashtra

314

      Shubhangi Pawar & DA Patil

 

 

 

Ethnomedicinal studies of the Khamti tribe of Arunachal Pradesh

317

      AK Das & Hui Tag

 

 

 

Folk medicine used in gynecological and other related problems by rural population of Haryana

323

      P Yadav, Suresh Kumar & Priyanka Siwach

 

 

 

Medicinal knowledge system of tribals of Nandurbar district, Maharashtra

327

      HM Patil & VV Bhaskar

 

 

 

Ethnomedicinal plant resources of Jaunsari tribe of Garhwal Himalaya, Uttaranchal

331

      VP Bhatt & GCS Negi

 

 

 

Ethnopharmacology of Banjara tribe of Umarkhed taluka, district, Yavatmal, Maharashtra for reproductive disorders

336

      PY Bhogaonkar & VN Kadam

 

 

 

Trends in ethnodomestication of some wild plants in Meghalaya, Northeast India

342

      RB Chhetri

 

 

 

Herbal remedies used for haemorrhoids by tribals of Saurashtra, Gujarat

348

      BA Jadeja, NK Odedra & KR Odedra

 

 

 

People’s knowledge on medicinal plants in Sringeri taluk, Karnataka

353

      HM Prakasha & M Krishnappa

 

 

 

Ethnomedicinal observations among the inhabitants of cold desert area of Himachal Pradesh

358

      Parveen Kumar Sharma, GS Sethi, SK Sharma & TK Sharma

 

 

 

Household remedies of Keshavraipatan tehsil in Bundi district, Rajasthan

362

      Diksha Shekhawat & Amla Batra

 

 

 

Ethnoveterinary medicine for treating livestock in eastern Ghats of Andhra Pradesh

368

      KN Reddy, GV Subbaraju, CS Reddy & VS Raju

 

Traditional goat health management practices in Chamba district of Himachal Pradesh V

373

      Ram Singh & Bimal Misri

 

 

 

Effect of the subterranean termite used in the South Indian folk medicine

376

      Solavan A, R Paulmurugan & V Wilsanand

 

 

 

In-vitro antibacterial activity of Takrarishta – an Ayurvedic formulation

380

      Sandeep Bhardwaj, Girish S Achliya, Vijaya S Meghre, Sudhir G Wadodkar &
Avinash K Dorle

 

 

 

Efficacy and safety of RA-11 (O) – A herbal analgesic cream

384

      Neelesh Wadnap, Jasmin Johnson, Narendra Bhatt & Deepa Chitre

 

 

 

Pharmacognostical studies on Vata shrung, (Ficus benghalensis Linn. leaf primordium)

388

      TR Shantha, JKP Shetty, Indira Ammal & T Bikshapathi

 

 

 

Indigenous water conservation technology of Sumari village, Uttaranchal

394

      Richa Kala & Chandra Prakash Kala

 

 

 

Traditional irrigation and water distribution system in Ladakh

397

      Dorjey Angchok & Premlata Singh

 

 

 

Traditional skill of resource utilisation

403

      Sudhir Singh Bisht, SK Buchar & BP Kothyari

 

 

 

Study on traditional knowledge and utility of medicinal herbs of district Buner, NWFP, Pakistan

407

      Muhammad Hamayun, Ambara Khan, Sumera Afzal & Mir Ajab Khan

 

 

 

Centurion women and diverse knowledge systems

413

Ranjay K Singh & Amish K Sureja

 

 

 

Natural remedies for heart diseases

420

      PD Lokhande, SC Jagdale & AR Chabukswar

 

 

 

Author Index

428

 

 

Subject Index

429

 

 

Book Review

430

 

 

Forthcoming Conferences/Seminars

431

 

 

Guidelines for Submission of Manuscript

432

 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(3), July 2006, pp. 295-299

 

Documentation of traditional knowledge on medicinal plants of
Bidar district, Karnataka

 

Prashantkumar P & Vidyasagar G M*

Department of Botany, Gulbarga University, Gulbarga 585 106, Karnataka

E-mail: gmvidyasagar@rediffmail.com

Received 4 February 2005; revised 10 May 2005

A floristic survey of Bidar district was made to assess the medicinal value of herbaceous flora. It is observed that local people practice traditional system of medicine in their healthcare system. About 30 plant species, belonging to 29 genera and 20 families largely used as medicine by tribals and local people of Bidar have been enumerated in this paper. These plants contain valuable chemical substances and are employed in the treatment of various ailments. The present work aims at documentation of traditional uses of the local medicinal plants for the benefit of mankind and further scientific investigation.

Keywords: Folk medicine, Herbal remedies, Karnataka, Tribals, Medicinal plants, Bidar district, Ethnomedicine,
Lambanis tribe

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K36/00, A61P1/00, A61P1/04, A61P1/08, A61P1/10, A61P5/00, A61P5/50, A61P7/00, A61P9/14, A61P11/00, A61P11/10, A61P11/12, A61P15/02, A61P15/10, A61P17/00, A61P17/14, A61P19/00, A61P29/00, A61P29/02, A61P31/00, A61P35/00

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(3), July 2006, pp. 300-309

Medicinal plants use in traditional healthcare systems prevalent
in western Himalayas

 

Promila Kanwar, *Neetu Sharma & Anju Rekha

Department of Home Science Extension Education, College of Home Science,
CSK Himachal Pradesh Krishi Vishvavidyalaya, Palampur 176062, Himachal Pradesh

Received 8 February 2005; revised 11 July 2005

The present research work was carried out in six villages of Kangra district of Himachal Pradesh to study application of plants at home scale level in treating various kinds of ailments. The information was documented using questionnaire and PRA techniques with the help of village elders, key informants and local healers. In the present study, thirty-one plant species used by the villagers for the treatment of various diseases at home scale level were identified. Twenty plant species were used for curing more than one disease. Three plants, Aloe barbadensis Mill., Asparagus racemosus Roxb. and Tinospora cordifolia Willd. were used against more than five diseases. It was found that elder people had more inclination towards herbal medicines followed by middle and young people. Since the knowledge of various medicinal plants being used in herbal treatment and their method of use is confined to mostly local healers, it is of utmost importance to record this knowledge for future generations, otherwise, it will be lost forever.

Keywords: Himachal Pradesh, Medicinal plants, Traditional healthcare system

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K36/00, A61P1/00, A61P1/08,A61P1/10, A61P1/14, A61P11/00, A61P11/12, A61P15/00, A61P25/00, A61P29/00, A61P31/00

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(3), July 2006, pp. 310-313

 

Ethnomedicinal knowledge among Tharu tribe of Devipatan division

Akhilesh Kumar*, D D Tewari & J P Tewari

Post Graduate Deportment of Botany, MLK (PG) College, Balrampur 271 201, Uttar Pradesh
E-mail: akhilpbh@rediffmail.com

Received 21 December 2004; revised 19 December 2005

Rich phytogenic diversity and Tharu tribal population characterize Devipatan division situated in Terai belt of Uttar Pradesh. Tharu tribe endowed with vast knowledge of medicinal plants have strong believes in supernatural powers (magicotherapeutic properties) of plants in the treatment or prevention of various ailments. An attempt has been made to document the ethnophytotherapeutics and folk claims.

Key words:  Ethnomedicine, Folk medicine, Medicinal plants, Terai region, Tharu tribe, Uttar Pradesh

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K36/00, A61P1/02, A61P1/16, A61P11/00, A61P15/00, A61P15/06,A61P17/02, A61P27/00,                A61P27/02, A61P29/00, A61P29/02, A61P31/00, A61P33/02, A61P33/06, A61P39/02

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(3), July 2006, pp. 314-316

 

Folk remedies against rheumatic disorders in Jalgaon district, Maharashtra

Shubhangi Pawar * & D A Patil

Department of Botany, Pratap College, Amalner 425401, Maharashtra; Post-Graduate Department of Botany, L K Dr P R Ghogrey Science College, Dhule 424005, Maharashtra

Received 15 February 2005; revised 13 April 2005

The paper deals with 26 species of angiosperms belonging to 20 families employed against rheumatic disorders by aboriginal and rural folks of Jalgaon district. The folkloric information about their vernacular names, plant product or parts used, form of application and method of administration, etc. are gathered. The data accrued is compared with the available literature. Eight plants species are new reports to treat rheumatism.  Three other plant species are described in other parts of India but different plant parts are used. Further research on modern scientific line is necessary to improvise their efficacy, safety and validation of the traditional knowledge.

Keywords:   Folk remedies, Rheumatism, Jalgaon district, Ethnomedicine, Medicinal plants

IPC Int. Cl.8:    A61K36/00,A61P19/00, A61P19/02, A61P19/08, A61P21/00, A61P29/00

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(3), July 2006, pp. 317-322

 

Ethnomedicinal studies of the Khamti tribe of Arunachal Pradesh

AK Das* & Hui Tag**

*Department of Botany, Arunachal University, Rono Hills, Itanagar 791 112 Arunachal Pradesh

E-mail: arupbot@rediffmail.com

**Center for Biodiversity, Division of Plant Taxonomy & Ethnomedicine

Department of Botany, Arunachal University, Rono Hills, Itanagar791 112 Arunachal Pradesh

E-mail: huitag@yahoo.co.in

Received 4 March 2005; revised 12 May 2005

An ethnobotanical study was done in Khamti dominated area of Chongkam and Namsai Circle of Lohit district of Arunachal Pradesh during 2002-2004. Khamti tribe is rich in plant based traditional knowledge. Of 45 medicinal plants studied, 5 plants were found to be used in malaria and fever, 4 in bone fractured, 3 in anemia, 2 each in snakebite, cancer, reproductive health, and rabies, 1 each in tuberculosis, diabetes, and jaundice, and rest for curing different ailments which are used either singly or in combined form. The science of orthopaedics was found to be well developed and their medicinal preparation techniques are mostly accompanied by enchanting traditional mantra.

Keywords: Arunachal Pradesh, Ethnomedicine, Folk medicine, Herbal remedies, Khamti tribe, Medicinal plants, Tribals

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K36/00, A61P1/04, A61P1/08, A61P1/10, A61P1/16, A61P3/08, A61P5/00, A61P5/50, A61P11/00, A61P11/06,A61P11/08,A61P11/10, A61P11/12, A61P19/00, A61P29/00, A61P29/02, A61P33/06

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(3), July 2006, pp. 323-326

 

Folk medicine used in gynecological and other related problems
by rural population of Haryana

J P Yadav1*, Suresh Kumar & Priyanka Siwach2

1Department of Biosciences, M D University, Rohtak 124001, Haryana

2Department of Biotechnology, Guru Jambeshwar University, Hisar, Haryana

E-mail: yadav1964@rediffmail.com

Received 3 February 2005; revised 24 March 2005

Traditionally, the rural women prefer plant medicines rather than modern medicines for abortion, menstrual trouble, conception disorders, sterility, delivery problems, etc. Some ethnomedicinal observations made from the rural areas of Haryana, revealed valuable phytotherapeutic information on the various gynecological disorders. Uses of 17 plant species for menstrual disorders, 15 species for leucorrhoea, 6 species for delivery problems, 5 species for gonorrhea, 4 species for lactation troubles, 3 species for abortion and 2 species for miscarriage have been enumerated. Information on 52 plants with their botanical and vernacular names, family, prescriptions with therapeutic doses and uses are presented. Documentation of such ethnomedicinal data on biological resources will be steps for bioprospecting.

Keywords:        Folk medicine, Gynecological disorders, Haryana, Medicinal plants

IPC Int. Cl.8:   A61K36/00, A61P7/00, A61P13/06, A61P15/00,A61P15/02, A61P15/06, A61P15/14, A61P15/29,
                          A61P15/41

 

 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(3), July 2006, pp. 327-330

Medicinal knowledge system of tribals of Nandurbar district, Maharashtra

H M Patil & V V Bhaskar*

VN College, Shahada, District Nandurbar, Maharashtra; Department of Botany, PSGVP Mandal’s A S C College, Shahada,
District Nandurbar, Maharashtra

Email: v_bhaskar_v@yahoo.com

Received 4 February 2005; revised 10 May 2005

The paper reports 33 tribal medicinal preparations for curing different ailments. It includes 10 preparations for 6 types of skin diseases, 3 preparations for 2 types of eye diseases, 2 for tuberculosis, 5 for piles, and 13 for other diseases. Need has been emphasized for putting the tribal knowledge system of Nandurbar to validation test by pharmacologists.

Keywords:      Ethnomedicine, Folk medicine, Maharashtra, Medicinal plants, Nandurbar district, Tribal medicine

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K36/00, A61P1/02, A61P1/04, A61P1/08, A61P1/10, A61P9/14, A61P11/00, A61P11/10, A61P15/00,
                        A61P15/06, A61P15/06, A61P17/00, A61P17/14, A61P27/02, A61P27/14, A61P27/16, A61P29/00,
                        A61P31/00,A61P33/02, A61P35/00

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(3), July 2006, pp. 331-335

 

Ethnomedicinal plant resources of Jaunsari tribe of Garhwal Himalaya, Uttaranchal

 

V P Bhatt & G C S Negi*

GB Pant Institute of Himalayan Environment & Development, Kosi-Katarmal, Almora 263 643, Uttaranchal
E-mail: gcsnegi@yahoo.co.in

Received 7 march 2005; revised 26 July 2005

An attempt has been made to evaluate plants used for medicare by the tribal people of the Jaunsar area of Garhwal Himalayas. The study reveals the indigenous medicinal uses of 66 plant species belonging to 52 genera and 41 families by the tribal people of Jaunsar. Ethnomedicinal uses of 17 species recorded in the paper are the first report from the region. Documentation of traditional knowledge on the ethnomedicinal uses of these plants is essential for conservation efforts for the plant resources and new drug development.

Key words: Conservation, Ethnomedicine, Garhwal Himalayas, Jaunsari tribe, Traditional healthcare

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K36/00, A61P1/10, A61P1/12, A61P3/08, A61P5/00, A61P5/50, A61P9/14, A61P11/00, A61P11/06, A61P13/00, A61P25/00, A61P27/16, A61P29/00, A61P29/02, A61P31/00, A61P33/06, A61P35/00

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(3), July 2006, pp. 336-341

Ethnopharmacology of Banjara tribe of Umarkhed taluka, district Yavatmal,
Maharashtra for reproductive disorders

Bhogaonkar P Y & Kadam VN*

Department of Botany, Government Vidarbha Institute of Science & Humanities, Amravati, Maharashtra; *Department of Botany, G S Gawande College, Umarkhed, Maharashtra

An attempt is made to document the formulations used by Banjara tribe of Umarkhed region of Maharashtra, specially practicing in reproductive disorders. In all 22 prescriptions using 39 plant species in different combinations are being enumerated here.

Key words: Banjara tribe, Maharashtra, Ethnopharmacology, Reproduction

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K36/00, A61P5/00, A61P5/10, A61P5/24, A61P7/00, A61P7/04, A61P15/00, A61P15/10

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(3), July 2006, pp. 342-347

 

Trends in ethnodomestication of some wild plants in Meghalaya, Northeast India

R B Chhetri

Department of Biological Sciences and Environmental Science, P B No 6250, KTM Dhulikhel, Kavre, Kathmandu University, Nepal;

E-mail: rbchhetri@ku.edu.np, info@ku.edu.np

Received 17 January 2005; revised 17 July 2005

Tribals in Meghalaya not only cultivate variety of crops but also domesticate quite a lot of wild s plant species in their courtyard, orchards, kitchen garden, flower garden and sedentary agricultural fields. Present study has explored as many as 62 wild plant species under 59 genera belonging to 44 families domesticated by Khasis, Garos and Jaintias of Meghalaya.

Keywords:   Ethnodomestication, Ethnobotany, Ethnomedicine, Folk medicine, Khasi tribe, Garo tribe, Jaintia tribe,                               Medicinal plants, Meghalaya

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K36/00,A61P1/04, A61P1/08, A61P1/16, A61P11/00, A61P11/06, A61P11/08, A61P11/10, A61P11/12,                         A61P11/14, A61P19/00, A61P19/02, A61P29/00, A61P31/00

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(3), July 2006, pp. 348-352

 

Herbal remedies used for haemorrhoids by tribals of Saurashtra, Gujarat

 

B A Jadeja*, N K Odedra & K R Odedra

Botany Department, M D Science College, Porbandar 360 575, Gujarat

Received 17 February 2005; revised 10 May 2005

The Saurashtra region is rich in ethnomedicinal plants and indigenous communities. Due to lack of modern healthcare facilities and poor economic conditions, the indigenous people of the region fully or partially depend on locally available medicinal plants for their healthcare needs. In the present paper, 94 plant species belonging to 82 genera and 52 families used by the indigenous people for the treatment of haemorrhoids have been described.

Key words: Folk medicine, Ethnomedicine, Gujarat, Haemorrhoids, Herbal remedies, Medicinal plants, Saurashtra

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K36/00, A61P9/14, A61P35/00

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(3), July 2006, pp. 353-357

People’s knowledge on medicinal plants in Sringeri taluk, Karnataka

H M Prakasha & *M Krishnappa

Department of PG Studies and Research in Applied Botany,

Kuvempu University, Shankaraghatta 577 451, Shimoga, Karnataka

Received 16 June 2004; revised 12 December 2005

The present paper reports therapeutic uses of eleven medicinal plants used by the indigenous people for curing many of the skin diseases. For ringworms, eczema and scabies, the species of Lobelia, Vitex, Asparagus, Leucas and Ocimum are used, during prickly heat, itching and measles, species of Ocimum, Asparagus, Adhatoda, and Leucas are used, while during small pox, species of Hibiscus and Vitex are extensively used. Indigenous people depend upon these plants for curing the skin disorders rather going for modern medicine. Documentation of such knowledge is important to evaluate culture and protection of people’s exert on local biodiversity, since these aspects have implications in conservation and management of local resources.

Keywords: Folk medicine, Indigenous medicine, Karnataka, Medicinal plants,

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K36/00, A61P1/04, A61P1/06, A61P1/08, A61P1/10, A61P1/12, A61P5/00, A61P5/50, A61P9/14, A61P11/00, A61P11/10, A61P17/00, A61P17/04, A61P29/00, A61P31/00, A61P31/12, A61P35/00

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(3), July 2006, pp. 358-361

Ethnomedicinal observations among the inhabitants of cold desert area of Himachal Pradesh

 

Parveen Kumar Sharma1*, GS Sethi2, SK Sharma2 & TK Sharma2

1Department of Agroforestry and Environmental Sciences, CSK HPKV, Palampur 176061, Himachal Pradesh
2Advanced Centre for Hill Bioresources and Biotechnology, COA, CSK HPKV, Palampur 176062, Himachal Pradesh

E-mail: praveenkumarsharma11@rediffmail.com

Received 13 October 2004; revised 28 December 2005

The paper deals with the field observations of traditional phytotherapeutic applications used by inhabitants of Spiti valley, a cold desert in western Himalayas. The average land population ratio in the area is probably thinnest in the world. The Spitians (originally Mongolians) have been largely dependent on the plant resources for food, fuel, timber, household articles, and medicines to a great extent for ages. First hand information of about 26 plant species were recorded during extensive field survey carried out in cold desert area of Himachal Pradesh during 2003. The information covers scientific name, vernacular names, plant parts used and mode of usages.

Keywords:      Cold desert area, Ethnomedicine, Folk medicine, Himachal Pradesh, Medicinal plants, Spitians, Traditional medicine, Western Himalayas

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K36/00, A61P1/02, A61P1/04, A61P1/10, A61P1/14, A61P5/00, A61P9/14, A61P11/00, A61P25/00, A61P15/00, A61P29/00, A61P31/00,

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(3), July 2006, pp. 362-367

Household remedies of Keshavraipatan tehsil in Bundi district, Rajasthan

 

Diksha Shekhawat* & Amla Batra

Department of Botany, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur 302 004, Rajasthan

E-mail: amlabatra@rediffmail.com

Received 8 February 2005; revised 22 August 2005

The paper presents ethnomedicinal remedies for joints pain, arthritis, diabetes, asthma, swollen gums, dermatitis, ear, eye and hair problems, pneumonia, hypo-pigmentation, snakebite, scorpion bite, piles, mouth sore, dysentery, gastric and urinary problems, jaundice, whooping cough, bone fracture, swelling, cardiac and liver problems, etc. practiced by rural population of Keshavraipatan tehsil of Bundi district. In all, 54 plant species belonging to 35 families used in the treatment have been enumerated giving botanical and local names, mode of preparation, dosage and usages.

Key wordsEthnomedicine, Folk medicine, Household remedies, Bundi district, Medicinal plants, Rajasthan

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K36/00, A61P1/00, A61P1/02, A61P1/08, A61P1/10, A61P1/16, A61P5/00, A61P5/50, A61P9/14, A61P11/00, A61P11/06, A61P17/00, A61P17/02, A61P17/04, A61P17/08, A61P19/00, A61P27/14, A61P27/16, A61P29/00, A61P29/02, A61P31/02, A61P35/00, A61P37/08

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(3), July 2006, pp. 368-372

 

Ethnoveterinary medicine for treating livestock in eastern Ghats of
Andhra Pradesh

K N Reddy*1, G V Subbaraju1, C S Reddy2 & V S Raju3

1Laila Impex R&D Centre, Unit-1, Phase-3, Jawahar Autonagar, Vijayawada 520 007, Andhra Pradesh
2Forestry & Ecology Division, NRSA, Balanagar, Hyderabad 500 037, Andhra Pradesh
3Department of Botany, Kakatiya University, Warangal 506 009, Andhra Pradesh;
E-mail: reddykamasaninr@rediffmail.com

Received 16 March 2005; revised 31 May 2005

The paper highlights some commonly used ethnomedicines for domestic animals such as cattle, sheep and goat to treat anthrax, ephemeral fever and trypanosomiasis. The plant crude drugs used belong to 35 species of 35 genera representing 28 families of Magnoliophyta. The phytomedicine usually consisted of a sole drug or occasionally a principal drug with 2-4 aids. The species, family and vernacular names, plant-part used, drug preparation, mode and duration of administration, etc. gathered from the ethnic people of Chenchu, Koya, Konda reddi, Lambadas, Nukadora, Pojras, Savaras, Valmikis and Yanadis are reported. The information is expected to be of use for veterinary practices and herbal drug industry.

Key words: Ethnoveterinary medicine, Medicinal plants, Eastern Ghats, Livestock

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K36/00,A61P13/00, A61P15/00, A61P29/00, A61P31/00, A61P33/00, A61P43/00

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(3), July 2006, pp. 373-375

 

Traditional goat health management practices in Chamba district of Himachal Pradesh

Ram Singh* & Bimal Misri

Central Avian Research Institute, IVRI Campus, Izatnagar 243122, Bareilly, Uttar Pradesh; Regional Research Centre, Indian Grassland and Fodder Research Institute, CSKHPKV Campus, Palampur 176062, Himachal Pradesh

Received 29 October 2004; revised 30 January 2006

Animals are reared under two systems, viz. the sedentary and the migratory/ transhumant in Chamba district. The fodder needs of the animals are met through traditional feed resources, but the migratory system of animal rearing is totally dependent on grazing in natural grasslands. The grasslands have been infested with numerous poisonous plants, causing poisoning to animals due to heavy grazing. Some of these poisonous plants are quite fatal and are major causes of livestock mortality and morbidity as veterinary services are not adequately available to provide health cover to all the animals. The farmers have to travel long distances to get their animals treated in the veterinary dispensaries. The farmers have devised their own traditional methods of treating the animals. They possess some knowledge based ethnoveterinary practices and able to distinguish the poisonous and medicinal plants to cure diseases. The communication aims at presenting the traditional animal health management practices used by the farmers with special reference to goat health in Chamba district of Himachal Pradesh.

Keywords:   Ethnoveterinary practices, Folk medicine, Gaddis tribes, Goat health management, Herbal remedies, Himachal                      Pradesh, Livestock, Medicinal plants

IPC Int. Cl.8:  A61K36/00, A61P1/04, A61P1/10, A61P17/02, A61P19/00, A61P27/14, A61P27/16, A61P29/00,               A61P31/00, A61P33/00, A61P33/14, A61P37/08

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(3), July 2006, pp. 376-379

 

Effect of the subterranean termite used in the South Indian folk medicine

Solavan A 1, Paulmurugan R2 & Wilsanand V3*

1Department of Zoology, PMT College, Melaneelithanallur, Thirunelveli, Tamil Nadu

2Department of Radiology and the Bio-X Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA 94305, USA

3Department of Zoology, Sree Narayana College, Alathur, Erattakulam, Palakkad 678 682, Kerala

Email: wilsanand@yahoo.com

The present investigation reports the effect of the termite, Odontotermes formosanus Shiraki, most commonly used by the South Indian tribes as food for enhancing lactation in women, on growth and reproduction in Swiss albino mice, Mus musculus Linn. Dietary supplementation with termite to Swiss albino mice significantly increased the percentage growth rate and number of litters delivered, when compared to the control groups fed with normal rodent pellets. The percentage growth rate of experimental male and female mice fed on Odontotermes formosanus Shiraki showed a significant increase (P<0.01), when compared to the respective control groups. Results on litter production revealed a 22% increase in the experimental groups supplemented with termite, when compared to the control groups. The present results suggest that termite can be used as a viable protein rich feed. Studies on termite culture on a commercial scale and its use, as an alternative protein rich feed for poultry would probably go a long way.

Key words: Ethnozoology, Ethnopharmacology, Folk medicine, South India, Termite, Kanikkar tribes, Pallian tribes

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K35/64, A61P15/00, A61P15/04, A61P39/00, A61P39/02

 

 

 

 Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(3), July 2006, pp. 380-383

 

In-vitro antibacterial activity of Takrarishta – an Ayurvedic formulation

Sandeep Bhardwaj, Girish S Achliya, Vijaya S Meghre, Sudhir G Wadodkar & Avinash K Dorle*

Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagpur University Campus, Amravati Road, Nagpur 440 033,
Maharashtra; *42, Ramnagar,
Nagpur-440 033, Maharashtra

Email: akdorle@rediffmail.com

Received 1 July 2004; revised 21 August 2005

Takrarishta is an Ayurvedic formulation containing Go-Takra (buttermilk prepared from curd of cow’s milk), Amla, Harda, Marich, Ajowan, Saindhava namak, Sauvarcala namak, Bida namak, Audbhida namak and Samudra namak is indicated against haemorrhoids, worm infestation, loss of appetite, irritable bowel syndrome and diarrhoea. In present investigation, Takrarishta formulation has been screened for antibacterial activity against ten bacterial species, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhi, Bacillus subtilis (MTCC 441), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MTCC 424), Proteus vulgaris (MTCC 1771), Micrococcus luteus (MTCC 1541), Bacillus cereus (MTCC 430) Escherichia coli (MTCC 739), Shigella flexneri (MTCC 1457) and Clostridium perfringens (NCIM 2677). The formulation as well as individual components exhibited antibacterial activity against different strains. The formulation has been suggested to be useful in gastrointestinal infections and in food poisoning.

Keywords: Antibacterial activity, Ayurvedic drug, Food poisoning, Gastrointestinal infections, Panchgavya, Takrarishta

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K36/00,A61P1/04, A61P1/06, A61P1/08, A61P1/10, A61P1/14, A61P29/00, A61P31/00

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(3), July 2006, pp. 384-387

 

Efficacy and safety of RA-11 (O) – A herbal analgesic cream

1Neelesh Wadnap, Jasmin Johnson, 2Narendra Bhatt & * 3Deepa Chitre

1Wadnap Hospital, Pune, Maharashtra; 2,3BIO-VED Pharmaceuticals, Pune, Maharashtra
Email: dchitre@bioved.com

Received 14 February 2005; revised 12 December 2005

The plant based multi-component formulation; RA-11 (O) has been conceived and developed from Ayurvedic science for topical application in patients with joints pain and swelling. The clinical study was undertaken to test the safety and efficacy of RA-11 (O). Thirty patients, who had joints pain and swelling, with restriction of movement, and were able to understand and sign the informed consent form, were included in the study. The patients were advised to apply the study drug thrice daily for 14 days. There was significant reduction in the Visual Analog Scale score for joints pain on 7th and 14th day (p<0.001). The physician’s assessment of disease showed improvement with 9 patients being a symptomatic on 7th day of treatment and 25 patients being a symptomatic on 14th day of treatment. The patient’s assessment of disease showed a similar resolution of symptoms with 6 patients noting no symptoms on 7th day of treatment (p<0.01) and 23 patients being a symptomatic on 14th day of treatment (p<0.001). Body weight and vital parameters were unaffected over the course of the study. Skin irritation test showed no irritation in any of the patients and no dermal side effects were observed on follow up over 14 days. The domains of pain, freedom of movement and global assessment, which are the core variables in any study of joints pain and swelling; showed significant improvement in the study. RA-11 (O) has been reported as a safe and effective topical cream for relief of joints pain and swelling.

Key words: Ayurvedic cream, Analgesic cream, Antiinflammatory cream, Herbal cream, Joints pain, Swelling

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K36/00,A61P7/10, A61P19/00, A61P19/02, A61P19/06, A61P21/00, A61P29/00, A61P19/02

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(3), July 2006, pp. 388-393

Pharmacognostical studies on Vata shrung, (Ficus benghalensis Linn. leaf primordium)

T R Shantha*, J K P Shetty, Indira Ammal & T Bikshapathi

Regional Research Institute, Ashoka Pillar, Bangalore 560011, Karnataka

Received 29 June 2004; revised 17 March 2006

The present communication deals with pharmacognostical and preliminary phytochmical studies on the leaf primordium of Ficus benghalensis, which is used in Pumsavana Samskar of Ayurvedic System of Medicine. Different plants parts are used to cure number of diseases in indigenous system of medicine. No reports are available on microscopical and phytochemical studies, hence, the present attempt was undertaken to investigate the microscopical and preliminary phytochemical studies. The study revealed the presence of simple starch grains, clustered calcium oxalate crystals, patches of rounded to polygonal stone cells with lignified cell walls, broad and narrow lumen, thick walled cells, abundant unicellular trichomes and brown tannin content.

Keywords:   Ficus benghalensis, Indigenous medicine, Karnataka, Leaf primordium, Medicinal plants, Pharmacognostical characters, Phytochemical studies, Vata shrunga

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K36/00, A61P1/10, A61P1/16, A61P5/00, A61P5/24, A61P5/26, A61P5/30, A61P7/00, A61P7/04, A61P15/00, A61P15/08, A61P31/00, A61P31/02, A61P31/04

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(3), July 2006, pp. 394-396

Indigenous water conservation technology of Sumari village, Uttaranchal

Richa Kala*1 & Chandra Prakash Kala2

1Environment and Mountain Development Institute, Village and PO Sumari, Pauri Garhwal 246 174,
Uttaranchal; 2National Medicinal Plants Board,

36,Chandralok Building, Janpath, New Delhi 110 001

E-mail: cpkala@yahoo.co.uk

Received 21 June 2004; revised 29 November 2005

An indigenous water conservation technology was studied in Sumari village of Pauri district, Uttaranchal. Since, the village had high population and low water quantity, therefore, they had developed an indigenous mechanism in such a way so that the available water could be managed properly for the use of humans and livestock. The indigenous technology developed by villagers is termed as Nawn and Chaunree systems of water management and conservation. The present paper investigates in detail about the Nawn and Chaunree systems of water conservation.

Key words: Indigenous water conservation technology, Nawn system, Chaunree system, Sumari, Uttaranchal, Himalayas

IPC Int. Cl.8: A01G25/02, A01G27/02

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(3), July 2006, pp. 397-402

Traditional irrigation and water distribution system in Ladakh

Dorjey Angchok1 & Premlata Singh2

1Division of Agricultural Extension, Field Research Laboratory, DRDO, C/o 56 APO

2Division of Agricultural Extension, Indian Agriculture Research Institute, New Delhi
E-mail: achuk_iari@rediffmail.com

Received 18 December 2004; revised 22 February 2006

An attempt has been made to discuss the importance of water to Ladakh farmers, its use pattern, traditional irrigation and water distribution methods, prevalent management institutions, and how these phenomena are codified through expression in folk tradition and local beliefs.

Keywords: Folk tradition, Ladakh, Traditional irrigation, Water management

IPC Int. Cl.8: E02B13/00

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(3), July 2006, pp. 403-406

Traditional skill of resource utilisation

 

Sudhir Singh Bisht, S K Buchar* & B P Kothyari

GB Pant Institute of Himalayan Environment & Development, Kosi-Katarmal 263643, Almora, Uttaranchal

Email: ssbisht1@yahoo.co.in

*International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development, Khumaltar, GPO Box 3226, Kathmandu, Nepal

Received 14 February 2005; revised 24 January 2006

The peasants have evolved ecological and economic sustainability in an agro‑forest‑ livestock management system centred on Grewia over centuries in central Himalaya. The report focuses on the communities residing in Kature valley in Central Himalaya, who have learnt to utilize the Grewia for a number of domestic uses. The system's sustainability has been achieved through knowledge of local ecological processes derived through traditional means. In the past, these models of resource utilization were sustainable on account of low biotic pressure, but now with the increase in population, these age-old practices, which were providing both economic and ecological sustenance, have started showing signs of redundancy being less economical.

Key words: Central Himalayas, Fibre extraction, Grewia, Indigenous Knowledge

IPC Int. Cl.8: A23K1/00, A61K36/00, D01C1/00

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(3), July 2006, pp. 407-412

Study on traditional knowledge and utility of medicinal herbs of district Buner, NWFP, Pakistan

 

Muhammad Hamayun*1, Ambara Khan2, Sumera Afzal3 & Mir Ajab Khan2

¹Goverment Degree College Kotha, Swabi, NWFP, Pakistan

E-mail: hamayun73@gmail.com

²Department of Biological Sciences, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad, Pakistan

3Centre of Biotechnology, University of Peshawar, Pakistan

Received 27 April 2005; revised 28 October 2005

Medicinal herbs are in human use for curing different ailments since thousands of years. Even in modern era, the rural population of third world countries is primarily relying on medicinal plants for healthcare. An ethnomedicinal study was carried out in order to document the indigenous knowledge of medicinal herbs in Buner. The area lies in HinduKush Mountains and exhibits diverse flora and immense potential regarding traditional knowledge of medicinal plants. The most frequently used medicinal herbs of the area include Acorus calamus, Ajuga bracteosa, Trachyspermum ammi, Paeonia emodi, Skimmia laureola, Thymus serphylum, Valariana jatamansii and Viola biflora. These plants collected from wild and sold in the local markets for earning livelihood contribute to the socioeconomic of the area.

Keywords: Ethnomedicine, HinduKush mountains, Medicinal plants, Pakistan

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K36/00, A61P1/00, A61P1/08,A61P1/10, A61P1/16, A61P1/16, A61P11/00, A61P11/06, A61P11/08, A61P11/10, A61P13/00, A61P13/02, A61P19/00, A61P19/02, A61P29/00, A61P33/00, A61P33/10

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(3), July 2006, pp. 413-419

 

Centurion women and diverse knowledge systems

Ranjay K Singh1* & Amish K Sureja2

1Department of Extension Education and Rural Sociology; 2Department of Vegetable Science, College of Horticulture and Forestry, Central Agricultural University, Pasighat 791 102, Arunachal Pradesh

E-mail: ranjay_jbp@rediffmail.com

Received 30 May 2005; revised 12 December 2005

The present study based on anthropological participant observations has been conducted on selected centurion women of Gujarat. Forty old women (80 yrs or more) were selected to study diverse indigenous knowledge systems used to cure various human and animals ailments. Personal interview schedule with the set of open-ended questions and focus group discussion with the relatives and family members of these women were adopted as tools to record the data. The study indicates that with passage of age, indigenous knowledge systems get more strengthened and refined. They have developed specific ethnomedicinal practices based on years of experience, which are ecofriendly, with no side effects, cost effective, locally available and provide first hand remedies. In curing the diseases of human and animals, various locally available plant parts are utilized. In spite of availability of modern veterinary services, these women still follow ethnoveterinary medicines to cure their animals; similar cases exist for the healthcare of human being. Even they have developed food packages to cope up the food and nutritional security of their family especially during drought. With regards to conservation of indigenous biodiversity, domestication of local medicinal plants were found to be the mean for sustainable management of natural resources by these women.

Keywords: Centurion women, Ethnomedicine, Ethnoveterinary practices, Healthcare practices, Indigenous biodiversity conservation, Natural resource conservation, Traditional knowledge

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K36/00,A61P1/04, A61P1/06, A61P1/12, A61P1/14, A61P11/00, A61P11/06, A61P11/08, A61P11/10, A61P11/12, A61P13/00, A61P15/10, A61P17/02, A61P25/00, A61P25/02, A61P29/00, A61P31/00,A61P31/02

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(3), July 2006, pp. 420-427

Natural remedies for heart diseases

Lokhande PD*, Jagdale SC & Chabukswar AR

Center for Advanced Studies, Department of Organic Chemistry, University of Pune, Pune 411007, Maharashtra
E-mail: pdlokhande@rediffmail.com

Received 17 March 2005; revised 11 April 2005

Heart diseases have posed a great challenge in the developing countries. Heredity, high blood pressure, diabetes, high serum cholesterol, smoking, improper diet and stressful life styles are the factors, which are responsible for heart diseases. In Ayurveda believes that heart diseases are due to the imbalance of three doshas and bringing the normal levels of these tridoshas back to normal will be major step in management of heart diseases. Ayurveda treats heart diseases at two levels; first level is the preventive one and second level deals with the treatment of heart diseases with different plants and their formulations. In the paper, some of the plants and formulations, useful in the treatment of heart diseases have been summarized.

Keywords: Ayurvedic drugs, Heart diseases, Medicinal plants, Natural remedies

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K36/00,A61P9/00, A61P9/04, A61P9/06, A61P9/08, A61P9/10, A61P9/12