Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

 

VOLUME 5

NUMBER 4

OCTOBER 2006

 

CONTENTS

 

Papers

 

Spectral analysis of Gamaka Swaras of Indian music

439

      Karuna Nagarajan, Heisnam Jina Devi, NVC Swamy & HR Nagendra

 

 

 

Personality development through Yoga practices

445

      Sripriya Krishnan

 

 

 

Traditional knowledge and practices involved in Muga culture of Assam

450

      R Phukan & SN Chowdhury

 

 

 

Nutritional and medicinal values of some indigenous rice varieties

454

      Shakeelur Rahman, MP Sharma & Suman Sahai

 

 

 

Acute and subacute toxicity of an antidiabetic Siddha herbal formulation

459

      C Ramesh, V Gopal & K Sembulingam

 

 

 

Unani drug, Jadwar (Delphinium denudatum Wall.)  - A review

463

      Qudsia Nizami & MA Jafri

 

 

 

Evaluation of antidiabetic and diuretic activity of polyherbal formulation

468

      S Hemalatha, T Ayyappan, S Shanmugam, D Nagavalli & T Shrivijaya Kirubha

 

 

 

Diuretic activity of coconut husk Mashi - an Ayurvedic formulation

471

      BS Rathi, AM Baheti, KR Khandelwal, SR Parakh & SL Bodhankar

 

 

 

Chemical perspective of Tagar - an Ayurvedic drug

474

      CS Mathela, CS Chanotiya, S Sati, M Tiwari & SS Sammal

 

 

 

Chemistry and pharmacological profile of guggul- A review

478

      Jain Anurekha & VB Gupta

 

 

 

Traditional medicinal formulation, Chyawanprash- A review

484

      Milind Parle & Nitin Bansal

 

 

 

Medicinal plants of North-Kamrup district of Assam used in primary healthcare system

489

      NJ Das, SP Saikia, S Sarkar & K Devi

 

 

 

Additions to the traditional folk herbal medicines from Shekhawati region of Rajasthan

494

      S S Katewa & P K Galav

 

 

 

Weeds of Kanyakumari district and their value in rural life

501

      S Jeeva, S Kiruba, BP Mishra, N Venugopal, SSM Dhas, GS Regini, C Kingston,

 

      A Kavitha, S Sukumaran, ADS Raj & RC Laloo

 

(Contd)

Traditional medicine in the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases in Upper Assam

510 

      PK Borah, P Gogoi, AC Phukan & J Mahanta

 

 

 

Community knowledge and biodiversity conservation by Monpa tribe

513

      Ranjay K Singh, Dheeraj Singh & Amish K Sureja

 

 

 

Medicinal plants used by the Kandhas of Kandhamal district of Orissa

519

      Soumit K Behera, Anima Panda, Susanta K Behera & Malaya K Misra

 

 

 

Ethnomedicinal plants from Gohpur of Sonitpur district, Assam

529

      B Saikia

 

 

 

Screening of folklore claim of Scaevola frutescens Krause

531

      S Umadevi, GP Mohanta & R Manavalan

 

 

 

Ethnobotany and ethnoconservation of Aegle marmelos (L.) Correa

537

      Chandra Prakash Kala

 

 

 

Status and potential of wild edible plants of Arunachal Pradesh

541

      Angami, PR Gajurel, P Rethy, B Singh & SK Kalita

 

 

 

Some ethnomedicinal plants of family-Fabaceae of Chhattisgarh state

551

      Amia Tirkey

 

 

 

Some common ethnomedicinal uses for various diseases in Purulia district, West Bengal

554

      MK Chakraborty & A Bhattacharjee

 

 

 

Medicinal plants prescribed by different tribal and non-tribal medicine men of Tripura state

559

      Koushik Majumdar, Reema Saha, BK Datta & T Bhakta

 

 

 

Traditional knowledge and biodiversity conservation in the sacred groves of Meghalaya

563

      S Jeeva, BP Mishra, N Venugopal, L Kharlukhi & RC Laloo

 

 

 

Therapeutic utilization of secretory products of some Indian medicinal plants – a review

569

      Mradu Gupta, Tuhin Kant Biswas, Shyamali Saha & Pratip Kumar Debnath

 

 

 

 Enumeration of ethnoveterinary plants of Cape Comorin, Tamil Nadu

576

      S Kiruba, S Jeeva& SSM Dhas

 

 

 

Approaches in documenting ethnoveterinary practices

579

      Hema Tripathi

 

 

 

Author Index

582

Subject Index

582

Announcements

583

Annual Title Index

584

Annual Author Index

590  

Annual Subject Index

591

List of Referees

594

 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(4), October 2006, pp. 439-444

Spectral analysis of Gamaka Swaras of Indian music

Karuna Nagarajan, Heisnam Jina Devi, N V C Swamy* & H R Nagendra

Swami Vivekananda Yoga Anusandhana Samsthana (Deemed University), Bangalore 19, Karnataka

E-mail: nvcswamy@rediffmail.com

Received 6 April 2005; revised 24 April 2006

In Indian classical music, there are a huge number of modes (Ragas). There are also pieces (Ragamala or Ragamalika) in which modulations are employed. In both Hindustani & Carnatic (Karnataka) music, songs are usually preceded by an improvised unmeasured prelude (Alap), which is sometimes extensive. Individual pieces are shorter in Carnatic music, so recitals are constructed by selecting items in contrasting ragas. Gamaka Swaras, the subtle decorations of musical notes, usually referred to as the shaking of notes or vibration of Swaras come in various forms. Gamaka plays a very essential role in Indian music. Spectral analysis of the seven notes of Indian music has been reported. The work reported in the paper is a continuation of that work, extending it to Gamaka Swaras. Report of the preliminary study giving a glimpse into spectral intricacies of Arohana Gamaka has also been discussed.

Keywords: Gamaka Swaras, Indian music, Karnataka music, Spectral analysis

IPC Int. Cl.8: G06F17/20, G10G3/00, G10L19/02

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(4), October 2006, pp. 445-449

Personality development through Yoga practices

Sripriya Krishnan

College of Allied Health Sciences, Sri Ramachandra Medical College and Research Institute (Deemed University), No1, Ramachandra Nagar, Porur, Chennai 600 116, Tamil Nadu

Received 18 July 2005; revised 12 September 2005

The present study was aimed to investigate the effect of Simplified Kundalini Yoga on personality development of adolescents. The study using devised standardized questionnaire, was conducted on 450 students from Government, Government aided and private schools situated in Chennai. Training consisting of simplified physical exercises, meditation and introspection, was imparted to the experimental group of 250 students. ‘t’ Tests were used to study the impact of the yoga on the various aspects of personality and the academic achievement of the students. Variance analysis was done to find out the differences in the aspects of personality and improvement, if any, in the academic achievement of the practitioners with respect to type of school, sex, and subject studied. Results of ANOVA highlighted that sex and the subjects studied have no significant bearing on the effects of Simplified Kundalini Yoga. Results of the training showed significant effect on the personality and the academic achievement of the students.

Keywords: Simplified Kundalini Yoga, Meditation, Personality development, Yoga

IPC Int. Cl.8:  A61H1/00, A61P5/00, A61P5/06, A61P9/00, A61P9/08, A61P9/12, A61P11/00, A61P11/06, A61P15/10,   A61P19/00, A61P19/08, A61P21/00, A61P25/00, A61P25/02, A61P27/00, A61P27/02, A61P27/04


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(4), October 2006, pp. 450-453

Traditional knowledge and practices involved in Muga culture of Assam

R Phukan1* & SN Chowdhury2

1Department of Economics, Gargaon College, Sivasagar, Assam

2Department of Sericulture, North East Council, Shillong, Meghalaya

E-mail: rajuphukan.2005@indiatimes.com

Received 18 May 2005; revised 28 November 2005

The golden Muga silk culture is associated with the traditions and customs of Assamese people. An attempt has been made in the paper to report the traditional knowledge, practices and skills of Assamese people involved in Muga culture of Assam and to assess problems faced by this unique culture.

Key words: Muga culture, Silk, Traditional knowledge, Assam

IPC Int. Cl.8: A01B7/00, A01B7/02, A01B7/04, A01B7/06, D01C3/02, A01K67/04

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(4), October 2006, pp. 454-458

 

Nutritional and medicinal values of some indigenous rice varieties

 

Shakeelur Rahman1, MP Sharma1 & Suman Sahai*

1Department of Botany, Faculty of Science, Hamdard University, Hamdard Nagar, New Delhi 110 062

*Gene Campaign, Sainik Farms, Khanpur, New Delhi 110 062

Email: genecamp@vsnl.com

Received 11 April 2005; revised 27 February 2006

There are a large number of indigenous rice varieties in India, which are still grown by the tribal people and small farmers of the remote areas where the modern agricultural practices, sufficient foods as well as healthcare systems are a dream. Nature has provided them some alternative ways. They have different indigenous rice varieties with its nutritional and medicinal values. The paper presents nutritional and medicinal values of some of the rice varieties identified from the distant areas of Assam, Bihar, Chhattisgarh and Jharkhand.

Keywords:      Indigenous rice varieties, Nutritional value, Medicinal value, Assam, Bihar, Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K36/00, A61P1/08, A61P1/14, A61P1/16, A61P15/00, A61P15/14, A61P27/00, A61P27/00, A61P27/02, A61P27/04, A61P27/12

 

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(4), October 2006, pp. 459-462

Acute and subacute toxicity of an antidiabetic Siddha herbal formulation

 

C Ramesh1*, V Gopal1 & K Sembulingam2

1College of Pharmacy, Mother Theresa Institute of Health Sciences, Gorimedu, Government Pharmacy, Pondicherry 605 006

2Department of Physiology, Sri Ramachandra Medical College & Research Institute, Porur, Chennai 600 116, Tamil Nadu

Email: rampharm23@yahoo.co.in

Received 19 April 2005; revised 10 July 2006

The management of diabetes is considered a global problem. FS002, a polyherbal Siddha formulation intended to be used for diabetic patients, has been screened for toxic effect. For sub-acute toxicity studies, different doses of FS002 were administered orally to rats once daily for 30 days. Animals were observed for physiological and behavioral responses, mortality, food, water intake and body weight changes. Hematological evaluation was performed weekly. Biochemical studies were done on liver and serum enzyme levels. No mortality was observed up to 4 gm/kg of FS002 in acute studies. Daily administration of as high as 2 gm/kg of FS002 did not result in mortality or changes in behaviour, body weight, organ weight, histology, serum and liver biochemistry. The dose required to produce significant antidiabetic activity in rats,
0.2-0.5 gm/Kg, is much lower than doses used in present study. For a chronic disease like diabetes such doses may be safe for daily administration without causing any serious side effects.

Keywords: Antidiabetic activity, Diabetes, Siddha drug

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K36/00, A61P5/00, A61P5/50

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(4), October 2006, pp.  463-467

Unani drug, Jadwar (Delphinium denudatum Wall.)—A review

Qudsia Nizami* & MA Jafri

*A-7, Second Floor, Johri Farm, Noor Nagar Extn., Okhla, New Delhi110062,

Department of Ilmul Advia (Pharmacology); Faculty of Medicine (Unani), Hamdard University, New Delhi 110 062

Email: qudsianizami@rediffmail.com; qudsianizami@hotmail.com

Received 4 April 2005; revised 22 August 2005

Jadwar, root of Delphinium denudatum Wall. is an important central nervous system (CNS) active drug of Unani System of Medicine. In various classical texts, it has been mentioned to be sedative, analgesic, brain and nervine tonic, and is recommended for various brain and nervine disorders like epilepsy, tremors, hysteria, atony, numbness, paralysis, morphine dependence, etc. The present paper reviews chemical and pharmacological investigations carried out on Jadwar drug during recent times.

Keywords: Anticonvulsant activity, Antidote activity, Delphinium denudatum, Jadwar, Review, Unani medicine

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K36/00, A61P25/00, A61P25/02, A61P25/08, A61P25/14, A61P25/20, A61P29/00, A61P39/02, A61P39/04

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(4), October 2006, pp. 468-470

 

Evaluation of antidiabetic and diuretic activity of polyherbal formulation

Hemalatha S*, Ayyappan T, Shanmugam S, Nagavalli D & Shrivijaya Kirubha T

Department of Pharmacognosy, Adhiparasakthi College of Pharmacy, Melmaruvathur 603 319, Tamil Nadu

Email: tayyaps@yahoo.co.in

Received 7 April 2005; revised 30 August 2005

Aqueous extract of the formulation, prepared from powder of plants, Toddalia asiatica (Linn.) Lam., Terminalia chebula Retz.; CB Clarke in part, Terminalia bellirica Roxb., Eclipta alba (Linn.) Hassk., Enicostemma littorale Blume, named as Pan-Five powder was subjected to phytochemical test and pharmacological screening for antidiabetic and diuretic activities. At different dose level of 100mg/kg and 200mg/kg weight, the formulation showed significant activity when compared to respective standard.

Keywords: Antidiabetic activity, Diuretic activity, Pan-Five formulation, Medicinal plants

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K36/00, A61P3/08, A61P3/10, A61P5/00, A61P5/48, A61P5/50, A61P13/00, A61P13/02

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(4), October 2006, pp. 471-473

 

Diuretic activity of coconut husk Mashi—an Ayurvedic formulation

 

BS Rathi2, AM Baheti1*, KR Khandelwal3, SR Parakh1 & SL Bodhankar2

*1Department of Pharmacognosy, MAEER’s Maharashtra Institute of Pharmacy, Ex-servicemen colony, MIT Campus,Kothrud, Pune 412 038, Maharashtra

2Department of Pharmacology, BVDU’s Poona College of Pharmacy and Research Center, Pune 412 038

3Siddhant College of Pharmacy, Talegaon-Chakan Road, Sudumbre, Pune 412109, Maharashtra

Email: akshaybaheti@rediffmail.com

Received 3 May 2005; revised 23 September 2005

Coconut husk Mashi is an Ayurvedic formulation prepared by Anterdhum Padhati (APM) and Bahirdhum Padhati (BPM). Though, Ayurvedic practitioners use coconut husk Mashi for diuretic activity, no systematic studies are reported with regard to the verification of the traditional medicinal claims of Mashi. The present study was undertaken to investigate and rationalize the diuretic activity of APM and BPM in experimental rats. The diuretic properties of APM and BPM were evaluated by determination of urine volume, electrolyte concentration and diuretic potency in male albino rats. Different concentrations of Mashi (250 mg/kg, 500 mg/kg) were orally administered to hydrated rats and their urine output was immediately measured after 5hrs of treatment. Frusemide (10 mg/kg) was used as reference drug while normal saline (0.9%) solution was used as control. BPM exhibited dose dependent diuretic property and APM failed to show activity. The onset of diuretic action was extremely prompt (within 1hr) and lasted throughout the study period (up to 5 hrs). BPM at 500 mg/kg displayed highest activity with potency value of 0.92 and same dose of APM gave a value of 0.24. BPM caused mark increased in Na+, K+ and Cl- level. The results suggest that BPM possess significant diuretic activity.

Keywords: Anterdhum Padhati, Ayurvedic drug, Bahirdhum Padhati, Coconut husk, Diuretic activity, Mashi

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K36/00, A61P13/00, A61P13/02


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(4), October 2006, pp. 474-477

Chemical perspective of Tagar¾An Ayurvedic drug

C S Mathela*, C S Chanotiya, S Sati, M Tiwari & S S Sammal

Department of Chemistry, Kumaun University, Nainital 263002, Uttaranchal

Email: mathelacs@rediffmail.com

Received 9 May 2005; revised 25 July 2005

Valeriana wallichii DC., commonly known as Tagar is an important ingredient of Ayurvedic recipes for the treatment of nervous unrest and emotional problems. Besides, roots provide commercially important essential oil used in perfumery. Morphologically it is a single species and is common in the Himalayan region (1220-2134 m) with no subspecies or varieties. The investigations, however, revealed the existence of chemically different forms (chemical races) within V. wallichii DC on the basis of chemical analysis of root extracts (essential oils and valepotriates) responsible for the activity. Chemotype-I is represented by maaliol (64.3%) while the type-II possesses patchouli alcohol (40.2%) in their essential oils. Interestingly, Charak and Sushruta Samhita have also documented the existence of two types of Tagar known as Pindtagar and Nata having medicinal properties.

Keywords: Ayurvedic drug, Chemical composition, Chemotypes, Maaliol, Patchouli alcohol, Tagar, Valerian

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K36/00, A61P25/00, A61P25/02, A61P29/00, A61M21/00, C11B9/02

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(4), October 2006, pp. 478-483

 

Chemistry and pharmacological profile of guggul¾A review

Jain Anurekha1* & Gupta V B 2

1BR Nahata College of Pharmacy, Mhow - Neemuch Road, Mandsaur 458001, Madhya Pradesh; 2BRNSS Contract Research Center, Mandsaur, Madhya Pradesh

Email- anurekha_jain@yahoo.com

Received 24 May 2005; revised 23 September 2005

Oleo gum resin secreted by Commiphora wightii (A.) Bhandari known as guggul, one of the most reputed drugs in Ayurveda has been extensively studied for its medicinal applications. The plant contains essential oil, mainly consisting of myrecene, dimyrecene and polymyrecene, Z-gugglusterone, E-gugglusterone, gugglusterone-I, gugglusterone-II, and gugglusterone-III. These isolates have been found useful in curing many diseases like rheumatism, arthritis, hyperlipidemia, obesity, inflammation, atherosclerosis, wrinkles, acne and other diseases.  The review discusses chemistry and pharmacological activity of guggul.

Key Words:    Chemistry, Guggul, Guggulipid, Gugglusterone, Pharmacology, Obesity, Oleo gum resin, Review,                 Rheumatism

IPC Int. Cl.8:      A61K36/00, A61P3/04, A61P3/06, A61P17/00, A61P17/10, A61P19/00, A61P19/02, A61P29/00

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(4), October 2006, pp.  484-488

Traditional medicinal formulation, Chyawanprash—A review

Milind Parle1* & Nitin Bansal2

1Pharmacology Division, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Guru Jambheshwar University, Post Box No. 38, Hisar 125001,Haryana,

Email: mparle@rediffmail.com

2Lord Shiva College of Pharmacy, PB 63, Near Civil Hospital, Sirsa125055, Haryana

Email: nitindsp@rediffmail.com

Received 19 April 2005; revised 21 September 2005

Chyawanprash is a household remedy in northern India, popular for its nutritional value. In Ayurveda, Chyawanprash is classified under the category of Rasayana, which aims at maintaining physique, vigour and vitality, while delaying the ageing process. It is believed that Chyawanprash helps not only in maintaining homeostasis but also increases resistance of the body. Chyawanprash is prepared by incorporating around 50 herbs including Amla, the richest source of vitamin C. Herbs used in the preparation of formulation are boiled in water, then dried extract is combined with honey followed by addition of aromatic (like cardamom, cinnamon, and clove) herb powders. The finished product, which has consistency of a fruit jam, is sour and spicy in taste. Chyawanprash deserves a scientific exploration so as to document its therapeutic utility.

Keywords:         Chyawanprash, Ethnobotany, Ethnomedicine, Medicinal plants, Santal tribe, Traditional medicine, Tripura

IPC Int. Cl.8:      A61K36/00, A61P1/08,A61P1/10,A61P1/16,A61P9/00,A61P9/04, A61P11/00, A61P11/06, A61P15/00, A61P15/14, A61P17/00, A61P17/02, A61P19/00,A61P19/02, A61P25/00,A61P29/00, A61P31/02, A61P39/02

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(4), October 2006, pp. 489-493

Medicinal plants of North-Kamrup district of Assam used in primary
healthcare system

N J Das1*, S P Saikia2, S Sarkar2 & K Devi3

1Horticulture Division, Archaeological Survey of India, No 1, Eastern Gate, Taj Mahal, Agra 282 001, Uttar Pradesh; 2Department of Botany, Rangia College, Rangia 54, Assam; 3Department of Biological Sciences, Kaliabor College, Kaliabbor 37, Assam

Email: nikhiljyotidas2002@yahoo.co.in

Received 8 April 2005; revised 30 August 2005

Medicinal value of herbaceous plants used by different ethnic groups of the North-Kamrup district of Assam, based on survey is presented. Information was collected through personal interview with local herbal practitioners. Of 31 plant medicinal species documented, 8 species were found to be used in stomach disorder, 4 in body pain, 3 species in piles, 2 species in skin disease, 2 in ulcer and remaining in dysurea, boils, nervous affection, spermatorrhoea, jaundice, toothache, hydrophobia, sinusitis, asthmatic trouble and obstetrics problem.

Key Words: Assam, Ethnomedicine, Healthcare practices, Bodo tribe, Rabha tribe, Koch-Rajbongshi tribe, Santal tribe, Asthma, Dog bite, Dysentery, Piles, Sinusitis, Ulcer

IPC Int. Cl.8:    A61K36/00, A61P1/02, A61P1/04, A61P1/16, A61P5/24, A61P5/26, A61P9/14, A61P11/00, A61P11/02,                            A61P11/06, A61P11/08, A61P15/00, A61P15/08, A61P17/00, A61P17/14, A61P27/14, A61P29/00,         A61P35/00, A61P39/02


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(4), October 2006, pp. 494-500

Additions to the traditional folk herbal medicines from Shekhawati region of Rajasthan

S S Katewa* & P K Galav

Laboratory of Ethnobotany and Agrostology, Department of Botany,

College of Science, M L Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001, Rajasthan

Email: sskatewa@yahoomail.com

Received 15 April 2005; revised 21 July 2006

During the exhaustive ethnomedicinal survey of the Shekhawati region of Rajasthan, information on 40 more traditional herbs have been collected. Mode of administration, plant part(s) used and dosages given is also noted. The source of information is based on the personal interviews with local physicians practicing Indigenous System of Medicine, shepherds, Sadhus or holy men and experienced, aged tribesmen and women. Out of 40 herbs, 12 have the property of curing gastrointestinal related ailments, whereas 11 have the property of curing respiratory tract infection and related ailments.

Key words:  Ethnomedicine, Indigenous knowledge, Medicinal plants, Rajasthan, Shekhawati region, Meena, Sansi, Nut, Gadulia lohar and Gurjar tribes

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K36/00, A61P1/08, A61P1/10, A61P1/16, A61P5/00, A61P5/50, A61P11/00, A61P11/06, A61P11/14,                         A61P13/00, A61P13/02, A61P13/06, A61P15/00, A61P15/06, A61P15/14, A61P19/00, A61P19/08,            A61P21/00, A61P29/00, A61P31/00, A61P33/00

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(4), October 2006, pp. 501-509

 

Weeds of Kanyakumari district and their value in rural life

 

S Jeeva1*, S Kiruba2, BP Mishra1, N Venugopal1, SSM Dhas2, GS Regini3, C Kingston3,
A Kavitha3, S Sukumaran3, ADS Raj3 & RC Laloo1*

1Ecology Research Laboratory, Department of Botany, School of Life Sciences, North - Eastern Hill University, Shillong-793 022, Meghalaya
2Research Centre in Zoology, Scott Christian College, Nagercoil 629 003, Tamil Nadu
3Research Centre in Botany, Scott Christian College, Nagercoil 629 003, Tamil Nadu

Email: rclaloo4@yahoo.com; solomon_jeeva@rediffmail.com

Received 21 April 2005; revised 26 July 2005

The paper deals with enumeration of medicinally important weeds frequently used by local communities of Kanyakumari district, Tamil Nadu. A total of 93 medicinal weedy species from 85 genera used in traditional medicines were identified. Majority of species are used for curing skin diseases, fever, cold and cough, etc. Of 42 families, 20 families were monospecific. Plants of family Fabaceae was largely represented (7 species) family followed by Asteraceae, Lamiaceae and Euphorbiaceae.

Keywords:   Indigenous people, Kanyakumari, Medicinal plants, Traditional medicine, Weeds, Western Ghats

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K36/00, A61P1/00, A61P1/08, A61P1/10, A61P1/16, A61P9/14, A61P11/00, A61P11/14, A61P13/00, A61P13/02, A61P15/00, A61P17/00, A61P17/02, A61P17/14, A61P19/00, A61P19/02, A61P29/00, A61P31/00, A61P31/02, A61P39/02


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(4), October 2006, pp. 510-512

Traditional medicine in the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases in Upper Assam

P K Borah1, P Gogoi2, A C Phukan3 & J Mahanta1*

1Regional Medical Research Centre, NE Region, (Indian Council of Medical Research), Post Box No 105,
Dibrugarh 786001, Assam; 2Department of Botany, DR College, Golaghat, Assam; 3 Department of Microbiology, North Eastern Indira Gandhi Regional Institute of Health and Medical Sciences, Shillong 793001, Meghalaya

Email: icmrrcdi@hub.nic.in

Received 24 May 2005; revised 19 October 2005

Treatment of diseases with medicinal plants in different ethnic groups of Assam is widespread, because of effectiveness, easy availability, lack of modern healthcare alternatives, cultural preferences and century old association with the plants. The study performed in Dibrugarh district of Upper Assam included interview with 27 traditional practitioners from three different communities, i.e. Deori (8), Muttak (15) and Nepalee (4). The results reveal use of 38 plant species represented by 36 genera and 29 families for the treatment of various gastrointestinal diseases.

Key words: Ethnomedicine, Gastrointestinal disorder, Traditional medicine, Deori tribe, Muttak tribe, Nepalee tribe, Assam

IPC Int. Cl.8:              A61K36/00, A61P1/00, A61P1/04, A61P1/06, A61P1/08, A61P1/10, A61P1/14, A61P1/16, A61P29/00,       A61P31/00

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(4), October 2006, pp. 513-518

Community knowledge and biodiversity conservation by Monpa tribe

Ranjay K Singh1*, Dheeraj Singh2 & Amish K Sureja3

1Department of Extension Education and Rural Sociology, 2Department of Pomology, 3Department of Vegetable Science, College of Horticulture and Forestry, Central Agricultural University, Pasighat 791102, Arunachal Pradesh

E-mail: ranjay_jbp@rediffmail.com

Received 30 May 2005; revised 7 November 2005

Community knowledge is the essence of social capital of the poor people and plays a significant role in conservation of biodiversity. Local culture, spirit, social and ethical norms possessed by local people has often been determining factors for sustainable use, and conservation of biodiversity. In the present paper, an effort has been made to explore the dynamics of using Paisang [Quercus rex (Hemsl.) Schottky, Oak tree], Roinangsing and Lenthongsing (pine tree spp. Pinus wallichiana A. B. Jacks. and Pinus roxburghii Sarg.) leaves in different crops by Monpa tribe of Arunachal Pradesh. To achieve this objective, Monpa tribe dominating villages from Dirang development block, West Kameng district of Arunachal Pradesh, Northeast India have been selected. Study indicates that Monpa tribe is having their location specific life-long experience and indigenous strategy for sustainable biodiversity use and management at community level. This has been built up through regular practice and observations of local practices related with use of dry leaves of Paisang and pine trees. The use of dry leaves of these trees as mulch and organic matter helps the farmers to increase the soil fertility, control soil erosion and conserve soil moisture, thereby, helpful in diversifying the local cropping systems and reducing the risk.

Keywords: Community knowledge, Biodiversity, Monpa tribe, Paisang, Oak, Roinangsing, Lenthongsing

IPC Int. Cl.8: A01N3/00


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(4), October 2006, pp. 519-528

 

Medicinal plants used by the Kandhas of Kandhamal district of Orissa

Soumit K Behera, Anima Panda, Susanta K Behera & Malaya K Misra *

Ecology & Floristics Laboratory, Department of Botany, Berhampur University, Berhampur 760007, Orissa

Email: malayabotany@yahoo.co.in

Received 19 April 2005; revised 10 February 2006

The paper deals with the ethnomedicinal information on the Kandha tribe of Kandhamal district of Orissa situated on the Eastern Ghats of India. Use of allopathic drugs by the Kandhas inhabiting in the remote part of the district is almost unknown. Several field trips were made to the area and information on the uses of plants was collected along with plant specimens.  First hand information on use of 98 plant species under 93 genus and 59 families against 127 ailments was collected from the Kandha community of the district. There is a need for further critical phytochemical analysis and bioactive effects of the information collected on plants used by the tribes. The uses that are recorded in the paper are almost new to the literature. Botanical name, local name(s), families and their medicinal uses have been enumerated.

Keywords:      Ethnomedicine, Kandhamal district, Kandha tribe, Medicinal plants, Traditional medicine

IPC Int. Cl.8:              A61K36/00, A61P1/04, A61P1/06, A61P1/08, A61P1/10, A61P1/12, A61P1/14, A61P1/16, 61P3/08, A61P3/10, A61P5/00,A61P5/30, A61P9/14, A61P11/00, A61P11/14, A61P13/00, A61P13/02, A61P15/00, A61P15/14, A61P19/00, A61P19/02, A61P19/08, A61P21/00, A61P25/00, A61P25/08, A61P25/10, A61P27/00, A61P27/02, A61P27/04, A61P27/14, A61P29/00, A61P31/00, A61P35/00, A61P39/02

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(4), October 2006, pp. 529-530

Ethnomedicinal plants from Gohpur of Sonitpur district, Assam

B Saikia

Department of Botany, Chaiduar College,  Gohpur, Sonitpur 784168, Assam

Received 6 December 2004; revised 26 May 2006

The paper describes the traditional knowledge related to ethnomedicine of different communities of Gohpur of Sonitpur district of Assam state. Population of the study area is mainly dominated with Assamese, Bodo, Mishing, Napali and Santhal communities. Information was collected on the basis of interview and observation with local healers, generally known as Bej (Vaidya). All together 22 prescriptions were recorded from 20 plant species belonging to 17 families.

Key words:     Ethnomedicine, Traditional knowledge, Assam, Bodo tribe, Mishing tribe, Napali tribe, Santhal tribe

IPC Int. Cl.8:  A61K36/00, A61P1/02, A61P1/04, A61P1/08, A61P1/12, A61P1/14, A61P1/16, A61P11/00, A61P11/06,   A61P11/08, A61P11/10, A61P11/12, A61P17/00, A61P17/14, A61P19/00, A61P19/02, A61P19/10,        A61P21/00, A61P29/00, A61P31/00, A61P31/02, A61P37/08


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(4), October 2006, pp. 531-536

 

Screening of folklore claim of Scaevola frutescens Krause

 

S Umadevi*, GP Mohanta & R Manavalan

Department of Pharmacy, Annamalai University, Annamalai Nagar 608 002, Tamil Nadu

Email: umadevi_viji@rediffmail.com

Received 5 January 2005; revised 8 June 2006

In post GATT WTO era, it is essential for every country to develop own drug molecules for self-reliance in drugs and medicine. India has rich biodiversity. Many of the traditionally used medicinal plants have not been exploited / investigated scientifically. The paper presents the pharmacological, phytochemical and pharmacognostical characters of Scaevola frutescens Krause leaves, used in traditional and folk medicine.

Keywords:      Analgesic activity, Antipyretic activity, Antiinflammatory activity, Cardiovascular activity, CNS depressant activity, Diarrhoea, Dysentery, Hepatoprotective activity, Medicinal plants, Muscle relaxant activity, Scaevola frutescens Krause, Traditional knowledge

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K36/00, A61P1/08, A61P1/16, A61P9/00, A61P9/04, A61P19/00, A61P19/02, A61P21/00, A61P27/02, A61P27/14, A61P29/00, A61P31/00, A61P31/04

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(4), October 2006, pp.  537-540

 

Ethnobotany and ethnoconservation of Aegle marmelos (L.) Correa

Chandra Prakash Kala

National Medicinal Plants Board, Chandralok Building, 36 Janpath, New Delhi 110 001

Email: cpkala@yahoo.co.uk

Received 22 March 2005; revised 20 June 2006

The paper highlights the ethnobotany and ethnoconservation of Aegle marmelos (L.) Correa, generally known as Bael. Of 66 ethnobotanical uses of bael documented, 48 were found to be medicinal and 18 were of other ethnobotanical purposes. The importance of bael in ethnomedicine and for religious purposes is of utmost significance. Almost all parts of bael tree are used in preparing herbal medicine. The most common use of bael is to cure the gastrointestinal disorders. Historically, certain ethnoconservation norms have been set-aside with a view to conserve such an important tree species for its long-term sustainability.

Key words: Aegle marmelos, Sacred tree, Indigenous uses, Ethnobotany, Ethnoconservation, Gastrointestinal disorders

IPC Int. Cl.8:    A61K36/00, A61P1/04, A61P1/06, A61P1/08, A61P1/10, A61P1/14, A61P1/16, A61P3/08, A61P3/10, A61P5/00, A61P5/50, A61P27/00, A61P27/02, A61P29/00

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(4), October 2006, pp. 541-550

 

Status and potential of wild edible plants of Arunachal Pradesh

A Angami, P R Gajurel, P Rethy*, B Singh & S K Kalita1

Department of Forestry, NERIST, Nirjuli 791109, Itanagar, Arunachal Pradesh; 1Department of Herbal Remedies and Cosmetology, Rajiv Gandhi Polytechnic, Itanagar, Arunachal Pradesh

Emails: parakalrethy@yahoo.com; pgajurel@yahoo.com

Received 30 March 2005; revised 19 December 2005

The consumption of wild plants is one of the strategies, adopted by the local people for sustenance, is intrinsically linked to their strong traditional & cultural system and is inseparable. The indigenous communities continuously include wild edibles to their daily food intake and sales from the surplus add to their income. Simultaneously, an emphasis on the sustainable harvesting of wild edible plants will help enhance and maintain the region’s biodiversity. As the local people are endowed with a vast knowledge concerning the utilization of wild plants, the paper focuses on their knowledge and illustrates the need to select local priority plant species with potential to become valuable staple foods and important alternatives to the usual cultivated agricultural crops.

Keywords:   Arunachal Pradesh, Medicinal plants, Sustainable harvesting, Wild edible plants

IPC Int. Cl.8:  A61K36/00, A61P1/02, A61P1/10, A61P1/12, A61P1/14, A61P11/00, A61P11/10, A61P19/00, A61P19/02, A61P29/00

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(4), October 2006, pp. 551-553

Some ethnomedicinal plants of family-Fabaceae of Chhattisgarh state

Amia Tirkey

School of Life Sciences, Pt Ravishankar Shukla University, Raipur 492 010, Chhattisgarh

Received 10 November 2004; revised 31 May 2006

During ethnobotanical exploration of Chhattisgarh, a number of plants have been collected which are used by the local tribals for the treatment of various ailments. The paper deals with certain plants of the family Fabaceae, which are ethnomedicinally exploited by local tribals of Chhattisgarh, viz., Abrus precatorius for skin disease and poor eye-sight, Clitoria ternatea as diuretic Crotalaria medicaginea in case of white discharge, Desmodium gangeticum for goitre, Flemingia macrophylla for arthritis and fever, Ougeinia dalbergioides for dysentery, Pueraria tuberosa for chest pain and weakness, Sesbania sesban for abortion and as antifertility agent. A number of ethnomedicinally important plants with their vernacular names and mode of administration are presented.

Keywords:   Antifertility, Arthritis, Chhattisgarh, Dysentery, Ethnomedicine, Medicinal plants, Skin disease, Tribes

IPC Int. Cl.8:   A61K36/00, A61P1/00, A61P1/02, A61P1/10, A61P1/16, A61P15/00, A61P15/02, A61P15/06, A61P17/00,             A61P17/02, A61P19/00, A61P19/02, A61P21/00, A61P27/00, A61P27/02, A61P27/04, A61P29/00,           A61P31/00, A61P31/02
Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(4), October 2006, pp.  554-558

 

Some common ethnomedicinal uses for various diseases in
Purulia district, West Bengal

MK Chakraborty1* & A Bhattacharjee2

1Department of Botany, Narajole Raj College, Narajole721211, Paschim Medinipur, West Bengal

2Department of Botany and Forestry, Vidyasagar University, Midnapore 721 102, West Bengal

Email: alokebc@yahoo.co.in

Received 5 April 2005; revised 15 September 2005

Purulia, the western most district of West Bengal, covering land area of 6259 sq km is the natural treasure of vast number of plants having ethnobotanical importance. The present study enumerates some common and extensively used ethnomedicinal plants. During the ethnobotanical survey in the district, 57 plant species belonging to 57 genera and 40 families have been enumerated. The medicinal information have been collected by personal contact with the aborigines such as Bhumijs, Birhores Kherias, Mundas, Oraons and Santals. Plants with botanical name, family, local names, parts used, mode of preparation and administration are given. These plants may be useful under rural healthcare system & for herbal drug industry.

Key-words:       Bhumijs tribe, Birhores Kherias tribe, Mundas tribe, Oraons tribe and Santals tribe, Ethnomedicine, Medicinal plants, Purulia, West Bengal, Healthcare practices, Livestock diseases

IPC Int. Cl.8:      A61K36/00, A61P1/02, A61P1/04, A61P1/08, A61P1/16, A61P9/14, A61P11/00, A61P11/06, A61P15/00, A61P15/02, A61P15/06, A61P17/00, A61P17/14, A61P19/00, A61P19/02, A61P29/00, A61P29/02, A61P31/00, A61P33/06, A61P35/00, A61P37/08

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(4), October 2006, pp.  559-562

 

Medicinal plants prescribed by different tribal and non-tribal medicine men of Tripura state

Koushik Majumdar1, Reema Saha1, B K Datta*1 & T Bhakta2

1Plant Taxonomy and Palynology Laboratory, Department of Life Sciences, Tripura University, Suryamaninagar799130, Tripura
2Regional Institute of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Abhoynagar, Agartala, Tripura

Email: badal2003@rediffmail.com; reema_p_s@yahoo.co.in

Received 25 April 2005; revised 17 August 2005

The paper deals with 33 medicinal plants along with their local names, parts and ethnomedicinal uses prescribed by tribal and non-tribal medicine men of Tripura state. The ethnobotanical field survey was conducted around the tribal areas of the state during 2002-2003 to highlight the ethnomedicinal uses and the herbal formulation/ preparations of various traditional medicines. The survey comprised of the medicinal use of 33 species of 31 genera belonging to 25 families of flowering plants used for the treatment of various ailments either single or in combinations. The study provides immense scope for the active principles analysis and clinical studies of these plants for future drug development.

Keywords: Ethnobotany, Ethnomedicine, Medicinal plants, Santal tribe, Tripura

IPC Int. Cl.8:         A61K36/00, A61P1/02, A61P1/08, A61P1/10,A61P1/16, A61P3/08, A61P3/10, A61P5/00, A61P5/50, A61P11/00, A61P11/06, A61P11/08, A61P11/10, A61P11/14, A61P13/00, A61P13/02, A61P15/00, A61P15/02, A61P17/00, A61P17/08, A61P17/14, A61P19/00, A61P19/02, A61P27/14, A61P27/16, A61P29/00, A61P31/12, A61P37/08, A61P39/02

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(4), October 2006, pp. 563-568

 

Traditional knowledge and biodiversity conservation in the sacred groves of Meghalaya

S Jeeva, BP Mishra, N Venugopal, L Kharlukhi & RC Laloo*

Forest Ecology Research Laboratory, Department of Botany, School of Life Sciences,
North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong 793 022, Meghalaya

Email: solomon_jeeva@rediffmail.com; rclaloo4@yahoo.com

Received 9 May 2005; revised 26 July 2005

The people of Meghalaya believe that the sacred groves (forests) are the abode of deities. It bestows the welfare of people, their cattle & land, and keeps the evil spirits away. Those who do not obey the traditional norms of these groves may have to face the wrath of the deity. A religious belief is one of the major factors for conservation of plant resources in such groves. Local people believe that the Sylvan deities would be offended if trees are cut and twigs, flowers, fruits, etc. are plucked. These groves are considered as one of the most species-rich areas for plants, birds and mammals. The mythological stories and indigenous knowledge associated with the groves have been the principal factor in preserving the sacred groves in the immaculate condition.

Key words: Indigenous knowledge, Meghalaya, Plant diversity, Sacred groves, Khasi tribe, Garo tribe, Jaintia tribe

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K36/00, A61P25/00

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol 5(4), October 2006, pp 569-575

 

Therapeutic utilization of secretory products of some
Indian medicinal plants - a review

Mradu Gupta1*, Tuhin Kant Biswas2, Shyamali Saha1 & Pratip Kumar Debnath3

1Department of Dravyaguna Vijnana, 2Department of Sharir Kriya,

3Department of Kayachikitsa, JB Roy State Ayurvedic College & Hospital,

170–172, Raja Dinendra Street, Kolkata 700004, West Bengal

Email: mradu_gupta@hotmail.com

Received 29 June 2005; revised 5 September 2005

Indian Systems of Medicine use around eight thousand medicinal plants in preventive, promotive and curative applications. Although the bark and roots are the most common plant parts used, depending on the potency other plant parts such as leaves, flowers, stem, secretory products, etc. are also used as medicine. Secretory products include secretions obtained either naturally or by making incisions in the plant. External secretory structures include trichomes, glands, nectaries, hydathodes and osmophores while the internal secretory structures located below the epidermis layer consist of the glands and ducts, which secrete oils, gums and resins, and laticifers, which secrete latex. Detailed study of a few commonly found secreting Indian medicinal plants exhibits pharmacochemical properties and therapeutic actions.

Keywords: Ayurveda, Clinical activity, Medicinal plants, Pharmacological activities, Review, Secretory products

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K36/00, A61P1/04, A61P1/06, A61P1/10, A61P1/12, A61P1/14, A61P5/00, A61P5/50, A61P11/00, A61P11/10, A61P15/00, A61P17/00, A61P17/02, A61P19/00, A61P19/02, A61P21/00, A61P39/02

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(4), October 2006, pp. 576-578

 

Enumeration of ethnoveterinary plants of Cape Comorin, Tamil Nadu

 

S Kiruba1, S Jeeva2 & SSM Dhas1*

1Department of Zoology, Scott Christian College, Nagercoil 629 003, Tamil Nadu,

2Forest Ecology Research Laboratory, Department of Botany, School of Life Sciences,
North - Eastern Hill University, Shillong 793 022, Meghalaya

Emails: solomon_jeeva@rediffmail.com, kirubas2003@yahoo.co.in, ssmd1956@yahoo.co.in; sam_biocontrol@yahoo.com

Received 123 May 2005; revised 2 August 2005

 

From a survey of ethnoveterinary medicinal plants of Puthalam village in Cape Comorin, Tamil Nadu, 34 species belonging to 30 genera and 21 families of angiosperms were recorded. The medicinal importance of these plants used by the rural peoples as traditional medicine for their cattle is enumerated in this communication.

Keywords: Cape Comorin, Ethnoveterinary practices, Medicinal plants, Puthalam, Tamil Nadu

IPC Int. Cl.8: A61K36/00, A61P1/00, A61P1/04, A61P1/14, A61P1/16, A61P11/00, A61P11/10, A61P15/00, A61P15/14, A61P17/00, A61P17/02, A61P19/00, A61P29/00, A61P31/00, A61P39/02

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 5(4), October 2006, pp. 579-581

Approaches in documenting ethnoveterinary practices

 

Hema Tripathi

Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar-243122, Uttar Pradesh

Email: hematripathi1@yahoo.co.in

Received 19 April 2005; revised 10 July 2006

The paper explores some of the relevant approaches for documenting ethno veterinary practices followed by livestock owners, ethnoveterinarians, traditional healers, Vaids, etc. in Indian livestock production system. Case study method, focus group approach, participant observation, survey, key informants, field observation, preference ranking and inventory of farmer’s indicators, conducting village level workshops/meeting and group discussion, use of media for communication and networking in ethno-knowledge, in different agroclimatic, socio-cultural zones, publication of newsletter in English, Hindi & other local languages to link farmers of different states, touring in interior regions/tribal areas and remote villages, gender-based participatory discussion in small homogenous groups separately with males and females, etc. are some of the suitable techniques and guidelines have been discussed for eliciting and documenting the knowledge from people.

The study also discusses some of the methods of short listing the documented practices for ultimate scientific validation in order to develop a sustainable, economically viable and ecofriendly system of animal treatment. This paper attempts to draw attention to the research, development and the extension workers to take due cognizance of the knowledge possessed by them their contribution and potential, competencies and capabilities to explore fully for deriving real benefits for the animal sector.

Key Words:    Ethnoveterinary practices, Traditional Knowledge, Documentation methodology

IPC Int. Cl.8:  A61D