Indian Journal of Traditional

 Knowledge

Total visitors: 25  since 05-06-07

VOLUME 6

NUMBER 2

APRIL 2007

CONTENTS

Papers

 

Ecology and traditional technology of screw pine perfume industry in coastal Orissa

253

      Deenabandhu Sahu & Malaya Kumar Misra

 

 

 

Traditional lime preparation-A case study in coastal Orissa, India

262

      Anima Panda & Malaya K Misra

 

 

 

Optimization of extraction and dyeing conditions for traditional turmeric dye

270

      Kiran Sachan & VP Kapoor

 

 

 

Traditional soap and detergent yielding plants of Uttaranchal

279

      PS Mehta & KC Bhatt

 

 

 

A review of sea turtle exploitation with special reference to Orissa,Andhra Pradesh and Lakshadweep Islands,India

285

      Basudev Tripathy & B C Choudhury

 

 

 

Preparation, method of optimization and physicochemical evaluation of traditional formulation, Triphala Mashi

292

      Yogesh S Biradar, Piush Sharma & K R Khandelwal

 

 

 

Evaluation of an Ayurvedic compound formulation-Agnimukha Cũrna

         298

      Ariamuthu Saraswathy, Joy Suganthan, R Vijayalakshmi & P Brindha

 

 

 

Effect of Kunapa Jalam Vrikshyurveda on growth of paddy

307

      P K Mishra

 

 

 

Uterine tonic activity of Siddha Kayakarpam Amuri in rats

311

      Krishna Murthy, TV Narayana, MVV Prasad, Jaiprakash & RV Karadi

 

 

 

Analgesic, anticonvulsant and antipyretic effects of a Unani compound formulation, Habb-e-Shifa

315

      Tajuddin M, Khan NA, Tajuddin & Afzal M

 

 

 

A scientific correlation between blood groups and temperaments in Unani medicine

319

      Syed Mahtab Ali, Rashid-ul-Islam & Mahe Alam

 

 

 

Jalaneti application in acute rhino sinusitis

324

      Sanjeev Rastogi, Ranjana & Rajiv Rastogi

 

Medicinal plants conservation through sacred forests by ethnic tribals of Virudhunagar district, Tamil Nadu

328

      S M Rajendran & S C Agarwal

 

 

 

Herbal fish toxicant used by fishers of Karbi-Anglong district, Assam

334

      Bhagaban Kalita, Amalesh Dutta & M Choudhury

 

 

 

Conservation ethos in the tribal folklore

337

      Vishal Gupta

 

 

 

Ethnobotany of Shompens - a primitive tribe of Great Nicobar Island

342

      R Elanchezhian, R Senthil Kumar, S J Beena & M A Suryanarayana

 

 

 

Aquatic/semi-aquatic plants used in herbal remedies in the wetlands of Manipur, Northeastern India

346

      Alka Jain, S Roshnibala, PB Kanjilal, RS Singh & H Birkumar Singh

 

 

 

Collection and conservation of major medicinal pants of Darjeeling and Sikkim Himalayas

352

      S Hussain & DK Hore

 

 

 

Medicinal plants used in skin disease in Deganga, West Bengal

358

      A Bhattacharjee & Soumyadip Chatterjee

 

 

 

Traditional phytomedicinal knowledge of Bhotias of Dharchula in Pithoragarh

360

      SS Garbyal, A Grover, KK Aggarwal & CR Babu

 

 

 

Indigenous medicinal usages of some macrophytes of the Muriyad wetland in  Vembanad-Kol, Ramsar site, Kerala

365

Sanilkumar MG & K John Thomas

 

Studies on plant species used by tribal communities of Saputara and
Purna forests, Dangs district, Gujarat

368

      Nirmal Kumar JI, Rita N Kumar, Narendra Patil& Hiren Soni

 

 

 

Traditional herbal remedies among the tribes of Bijagarh of West Nimar district, Madhya Pradesh

375

      S K Mahajan

 

 

 

Use of indigenous knowledge by coastal fisher folk of Mumbai district in Maharashtra

378

      Nirmale VH,Sontakki BS, Biradar RS, Metar SY, Charatkar SL

 

 

 

Traditional Knowledge System of the Muslim community in Manipur

383

      MM Ahmed & PK Singh

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(2), April 2007, pp. 253-261  

Ecology and traditional technology of screw pine perfume industry
in coastal Orissa

Deenabandhu Sahu & Malaya Kumar Misra*

Ecology & Floristic Laboratory, Department of Botany, Berhampur University, Berhampur 760 007, Orissa

Email: malayakmisra@rediffmail.com

Received 14 July 2005; revised 28 September 2006

Kewda perfume industry is one of the important cottage industries in coastal Ganjam district of Orissa, which has initiated about 200 years ago. The semi-natural Kewda vegetation provides flowers and performs many ecological functions. The objective of this study was to analyze the ecology of flower collection and the technical know-how used in Kewda distillation and its ecological implication. The traditional methods of flower collection, processing and extraction of essence (Kewda attar, Kewda water and Kewda oil) from the flower were described in detail. Three sample sites were surveyed for flower collection and annual flower production ranged from 6253 to 6993 flowers per hectare. Maximum daily flower distillation in the 10 units surveyed ranged between 6084 and 13,235 flowers while annual consumption varied from 125 × 103 to 505 × 103 flowers. The material inputs were fuel wood, base oil and a large number of other traditional materials such as copper containers, lid and chunga. The annual firewood consumption in the distilleries varied from 18.83 to 75.72 Mg. The annual production of Kewda attar, Kewda water and Kewda oil in the distilleries varied from 57 to 243 l, 50 to 124 l and 150 to 469 gm respectively. Other outputs were charcoal and flower waste materials, which were used locally.

Keywords: Ecology, Distillery, Kewda attar, Kewda water, Kewda oil, Screw pine, Traditional technology, Perfume industry

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(2), April 2007, pp. 262-269

Traditional lime preparation-A case study in coastal Orissa, India

Anima Panda & Malaya K Misra*

Ecology & Floristics Laboratory, Department of Botany, Berhampur University, Berhampur 760007, Orissa

Email: malaykmisra@rediffmail.com; malayabotany@yahoo.co.in

Received 11 July 2005; revised 23 October 2006

The present paper describes the indigenous method of lime preparation in coastal Ganjam district, Orissa. Molluscs shells such as Anadara granosa (Khola), Meritrix meritrix (Gondhi), Meritrix casta (Pati) and Cerithidea cingulata (Genda) were mainly used for lime preparation. Average annual consumption of shell in wet lime and powder lime units was 89 Mg 208 Mg, respectively. For preparation of 100 kg wet lime and powder lime average consumption of shell were 48 kg and 117 kg, respectively. Per burning, average production of wet lime and powder lime was 1.423 Mg and 0.553 Mg, respectively. Annual production of wet lime was 197.6 Mg and powder lime was 180.4 Mg per unit.  Inanimate energy expenditure in wet and powder lime units was 986 and 3120 GJ (average), respectively, while animate energy consumption was insignificant. Conservation of this traditional technology of lime preparation is suggested.

Keywords: Dry lime, Marine mollusc shell, Traditional lime preparation, Wet lime, Orissa

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(2), April 2007, pp. 270-278

 

Optimization of extraction and dyeing conditions for traditional turmeric dye

Kiran Sachan & VP Kapoor*

National Botanical Research Institute, Lucknow 226001, Uttar Pradesh

Email: vpkapoor123@rediffmail.com

Received 11 July 2005; revised 30 September 2005

Water soluble yellow dye was extracted from turmeric rhizomes (Curcuma longa L.), collected from Lucknow, Shillong and from local market, through aqueous/solvent extraction procedure using vacuum evaporator and spray drying of aqueous extract. Shillong sample was found to contain higher dye content (21.3-27.6%) followed by Lucknow sample (15.5-18.9%) and market sample (14.0-18.2%). Shillong sample was also been found to be rich in curcumin (6.6%) with compare to other samples (2.4-2.5%). Dyeing experiments were performed under different conditions of direct dyeing, pre-fixing treatment, mordanting treatment or/and simultaneous mordanting. 2% dyeing at 50-55º C for 30-60 min was most appropriate to obtain good dyeing results. Numerous shades were obtained with good wash fastness properties. Emphasis has been laid to ensure ecofriendly dyeing profiles using soft or natural mordants and no salt of heavy metals were used.

Keywords: Curcuma longa, Ecofriendly dye, Turmeric dye, Natural dye, Dyeing profile, Mordants

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(2),April 2007, pp. 279-284

 

Traditional soap and detergent yielding plants of Uttaranchal

 

PS Mehta* & KC Bhatt

National Bureau of Plant Genetic Resources, Pusa Campus, New Delhi 110 012

Received 9 May 2005; revised 23 October 2006

Transmission of traditional knowledge from one generation to another is a vital tool for assessing the evolution of human civilization. Rural communities, particularly in the hilly areas have developed various techniques for utilization of plants according to their needs. There are a number of plant species used as soap and detergent in the hilly areas, where access to market is not possible. Now, due to change in socioeconomic and cultural conditions of these communities, they have abandoned the traditional use of plant species. Consequently, the existing traditional knowledge in respect to plant uses has disappeared. In view of this, an attempt has been made to document the plant species used as soap and detergent in Uttaranchal and local processing techniques with an aim to preserve the centuries old traditions of the society.

Keywords: Traditional soap, Traditional detergent, Natural soap, Natural detergent, Traditional knowledge, Tharu, Boxas, Jaunsaris, Rajis, Bhotiyas, Kumaun, Garhwal, Uttaranchal

 

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(2), April 2007, pp. 285-291

 

A review of sea turtle exploitation with special reference to Orissa,
Andhra Pradesh and Lakshadweep Islands, India

Basudev Tripathy* & B C Choudhury**

*Wildlife Institute of India, P O Box # 18, Chandrabani, Dehradun 248 001, Uttaranchal; Ashoka Trust for Ecology and the
Environment (ATREE), 5th A Main, Bangalore 560 024, Karnataka

tripathyb@yahoo.co.uk

Received 13 June 2005; revised 17 October 2006

The abundance of sea turtles at a few sites gives the impression that they may not be endangered, but many nesting population are in a decline phase. Over exploitation of sea turtles is considered one of the most direct and easily identified of problem, and causes immense pressure on a population whether it is for commercial or non-commercial purpose. Intensive harvesting of Lepidochelys eggs has resulted in population declines in many parts of the world. The exploitation of sea turtle resources from northern Indian Ocean region area is known from early twentieth century. Although, historically for commercial purposes, sea turtles in recent times are considered a non-commercial resource because of its high rate of reduction in number throughout the region. The paper describes the traditional sea turtle exploitation practices in India with a focus on present exploitation trends in three important sea turtle regions of India. Stringent measures that are required to save sea turtles from exploitation have also been suggested.

Keywords: Sea turtle exploitation, Sea turtle consumption, Sea turtle trade, Traditional medicine

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(2), April 2007, pp. 292-297

Preparation, method of optimization and physicochemical evaluation of traditional formulation, Triphala Mashi

Yogesh S Biradar, Piush Sharma & K R Khandelwal *

Department of Pharmacognosy, Poona College of Pharmacy, Bharati Vidyapeeth Deemed University, Erandwane,
Pune 411 038, Maharashtra

E-mail: khandelwal_kr53@rediffmail.com

Received 21 July 2005; revised 30 October 2006

Triphala Mashi was mentioned in Bharat Bhaishjya Ratnakar (2522) and Sharangdhar Samhita-uttar khanda. Triphala Mashi is prepared by using muffle furnace and silica crucible. Physical evaluation of Triphala and Triphala Mashi was done by using DSC and chemical profile of Triphala and Mashi was obtained by preliminary phytochemical screening, total organic carbon content, total inorganic content, ascorbic acid content, HPTLC, and IR. DSC thermograms of Triphala and Triphala Mashi, all are reproducible and can be used as a promising tool for the quality control of the process development. Spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques are proved to be useful in obtaining chemical profile of both Triphala and Triphala Mashi. These techniques are also useful in studying qualitative and quantitative differences in inorganic as well as organic chemical constituents, thermal degradation and conversion of chemical constituents.

Keywords: Triphala Mashi, Ayurvedic formulation, Triphala


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(2), April 2007, pp. 298-306

 

Evaluation of an Ayurvedic compound formulation-Agnimukha Cũrna

Ariamuthu Saraswathy*, Joy Suganthan, R Vijayalakshmi & P Brindha

Captain Srinivasa Murti Drug Research institute for Ayurveda (CCRAS), Arumbakkam, Chennai 600 106, Tamil Nadu

Email: csmdria@rediffmail.com

Received 1 July 2005; revised 23 October 2006

India has a vast heritange of traditional systems of medicine for various ailments. An attempt has been made to scientifically evaluate Agnimukha Cũrna, an Ayurvedic compound formulation for laying down standards. Four different samples were procured from different Ayurvedic product manufacturers and subjected to pharmacognostic studies, physicochemical analysis, and TLC/HPTLC finger printing using authentic ingredients as reference standards. Volatile oils of Ferula foetida and Trachyspermum ammi were also used as control for TLC investigation of the volatile oils of four samples of Cũrna. The evolved microscopic features and chromatographic finger print profiles were found to compliment each other and are sufficient for establishing the presence of the ingredients in the compound formulation Agnimukha Cũrna.

Keywords: Agnimukha Cũrna, Ayurveda drugs, Fingerprint profiles, Volatile oils

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(2), April 2007, pp. 307-310

Effect of Kunapa Jalam Vrikshyurveda on growth of paddy

P K Mishra

F/2, Ganpati Apartments, Saraidhela 828 127, Dhanbad, Jharkhand

Email: malay_mishra@yahoo.com

Received 11 July 2005; revised 25 May 2006

In Vrikshyaurveda, several suggestions have been made for enhancing plant growth and for protecting them from diseases. Kunapa Jalam is one such prescription, which has been recommended for stimulating grwoth and development of plants. In the study, specially prepared Kunapa Jalam was tested upon paddy. Various parameters like plant height, leaf length, leaf number and inflorescence length were evaluated in test culture receiving Kunapa Jalam at different time intervals. Administration of Kunapa Jalam every tenth and fifteenth day exhibited remarkable enhancement in paddy growth. Further investigation in this direction will be important in the field of agriculture and can be a good substitute of synthetic fertilizer.

Key words: Ayurverda, Kunapa Jalam, Vrikshyaurveda, Paddy

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(2), April  2007, pp. 311-314

 

Uterine tonic activity of Siddha Kayakarpam Amuri in rats

Krishna Murthy1*, TV Narayana1, MVV Prasad1, Jaiprakash2 & RV Karadi2

1Dr HL Thimmegowda College of Pharmacy, Kengal-Channapatna, Bangalore 571 502, Karnataka;2
KLES College of Pharmacy, JNMC Campus, Belgaum, Karnataka

Email kmgmurthy@yahoo.com

km_289@yahoo.co.in

Received 19 July 2004; revised 7 July 2006

Siddha Kayakarpam Amuri was evaluated for its estrogenic activity using in-vivo and in-vitro experimental models. Estrogenic effect was studied in normal and ovariectomized rats. Amuri was administered for a period of 21 days. The parameters studied in both in-vivo models include changes in uterine weight, and histometric changes of uterus. The effect was also studied on normal and regular estrous cycle. In-vitro studies with Amuri on non-primed, estrogen-primed and Amuri pretreated uterus were carried out to find whether it possess any oxytocin like activity. Administration of Amuri in normal rats significantly increased the uterine weight. Amuri treatment in ovariectomized rats did not show any change in uterine weight. The rats from both control and treated groups showed normal estrous cycle and produced significant contractile response on the non-primed, estrogen-primed and Amuri pretreated rat uterus when exposed in-vitro.

Key words: Amuri, Estrogenic activity, Indian Systems of Medicine, Siddha drug, Uterine tonic

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(2), April 2007, pp. 315-318

 

Analgesic, anticonvulsant and antipyretic effects of a Unani compound formulation, Habb-e-Shifa

Tajuddin M1, Khan NA2, Tajuddin2* & Afzal M2

1Calcutta Unani Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata 700016, West Bengal

2Department of Ilmul Advia, AK Tibbiya College, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202002, Uttar Pradesh

Received 11 July 2005; revised 19 September 2006

Investigation report of Habb-e-Shifa- a Unani compound formulation prescribed in pain, pyrexia and convulsions has been presented. Analgesic effect of the test drug was studied by Eddy’s hot plate and Analgesiometer test in albino rats, while the antipyretic and anticonvulsant effects were studied in animals after inducing pyrexia and convulsion by the administration of DPT and pentylenetetrazole, respectively. Aqueous and alcoholic extracts of Habb-e-Shifa was found to produce significant analgesic effect against thermal stimuli and also exhibited significant antipyretic and anticonvulsant effects.

Key words: Habb-e-Shifa, Analgesic activity, Anticonvulsant activity, Antipyretic activity, Unani medicine

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(2), April 2007, pp. 319-323

A scientific correlation between blood groups and temperaments in
Unani medicine

Syed Mahtab Ali*, Rashid-ul-Islam & Mahe Alam

*Department of Anatomy & Physiology, Faculty of Medicine (U), Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi110062

Email: smali@jamiahamdard.ac.in

Received 21 March 2006; revised 7 December 2006

In Unani Medicine, Mizaj (temperament) is most important though a difficult theory as it indicates the properties of an atom (Unsur), a molecule, a cell, a tissue, an organ and of the organism as a whole. As the Unani therapy is dependent upon equilibrium, so if there is any change in Mizaj the equilibrium is disturbed in any way the life is threatened. Mizaj is derived from an Arabic word Imtizaj, which means meeting or mix with each other. The literal meaning of Mizaj according to Ibne Nafees is “intermixture of different components.” The word temperament used to describe mizaj is derived from a Latin word Tempero, which means to mix. In the study, effort is made to relate temperaments, blood groups and immunoglobulins.

Keywords: Blood groups, Temperaments, Immunoglobulins, Mizaj, Unani System of Medicine

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(2), April 2007, pp. 324-327 

 

Jalaneti application in acute rhino sinusitis

Sanjeev Rastogi*, Ranjana & Rajiv Rastogi

*Government Ayurvedic College, Handia, Allahabad; Department of Prasuti & Stri Roga,
State Ayurvedic College, Lucknow
Central Council for Research in Yoga & Naturopathy, New Delhi

Email: rastogisanjeev@rediffmail.com

Received 13 September 2006; revised 12 January 2007

Neti is among one of the 6 purificatory measures of yoga, which are practiced by yoga sadhaka for inner purification. Jalaneti (saline nasal lavage) is a simplified version of Neti, which utilizes saline water instead of cotton thread to clean the nasal passage. Nasya of Ayurvedic therapy is a generic term for all nasal applications having therapeutic activities. Jalaneti is of common practice to most yoga and nature cure units, however its scientific validation has not been attempted through controlled studies and case reports. Saline nasal irrigation has been promoted as an adjunct to the conventional therapy for common cold and sinusitis in many western countries. The indigenous technique used in Jalaneti seems to be more appropriate and cost effective for the patients of sinusitis as is seen in the case study, where Jalaneti was utilized as the sole therapy to treat the acute sinusitis. A remarkable recovery was observed within a 10-day period of twice a day Jalaneti therapy and the results were consistent till a follow up after 6 month.

Key Words: Jalaneti, Rhino sinusitis, Yoga
Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(2), April 2007, pp. 328-333

 

Medicinal plants conservation through sacred forests by ethnic tribals of Virudhunagar district, Tamil Nadu

S M Rajendran* & S C Agarwal

Botany Division, Central Drug Research Institute, Chattar Manzil, Lucknow 226 001, Uttar Pradesh

Email: rajendran_sm@rediffmail.com

Received 5 May 2005; revised 10 August 2006

Nature conservation practices are very ancient tradition in India. Useful biodiversity species have much reverence in culture of our country. At a time when ecological degradation and deforestation have been taking place at an alarming rate in entire world, in India numerous of pockets of natural vegetation spread over the country are preserved almost in pristine form. Such preserved pockets are commonly called sacred forests or Sunai/ Sholai/ Devasthanam. Cutting plants or grazing animals within sacred forest is a taboo. These forest covers show optimum growth of flora and luxurious exposure of fauna. Sometime, luxuriant climatic climax of forests formed by sacred forest in the midst of a devastated terrain area may be seen. Perhaps sacred groves could always be called as the last refuge for species and center for speciation and evolution.  At present, these small diversity units are being ignored and given least important by the common people and the conservationist. Efforts should be made to protect these unique habitats by imposing forest laws, reducing exploitation of species at the local level by the crude drug vendors, mending the periodical collection system, encouraging cultivation by using biotech tools. The study reveals the status of different sacred forest found in Virudhunagar district, floristic composition, their systematics and by role played in plant conservation and habitat management. Tribal people predominantly maintain these groves or deity belong to tribal community.

Key Words: Medicinal plants, Conservation, Tribals, Sacred forests, Sacred groves, Tamil Nadu, Kani, Kuravar, Pulayan, Paliyan

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(2), April 2007, pp. 334-336

 

Herbal fish toxicant used by fishers of Karbi-Anglong district, Assam

Bhagaban Kalita1*, Amalesh Dutta1 & M Choudhury2

1Department of Zoology, Gauhati University, Guwahati, Assam; 2Central Inland Fisheries, Research Institute, NER Centre, Guwahati, Assam

E-mail: bhagabank@ yahoo.com

Received 4 August 2005; revised 25 October 2005

Use of plant, Polygonum hydropiper Linn. (Smartweed) as fish toxicant by the tribal people of Karbi-Anglong district of Assam for catching fish from natural aquatic resources as well as for removal of uneconomical fishes from the aquaculture pond has been discussed. Indigenous Technical Knowledge on aquaculture has generously been passed on to newer generation by older ones. Plant’s botanical identity, local name, family, plant parts used, therapeutic uses and mode of application of the drug have been described. It was observed that carp fishes died immediately, but air-breathing fishes (Heteropneustus fossilis and Channa puntatus) lasted for sometime.

Key words: Smartweed, Fish poison, Fish toxicant, Indigenous Technical Knowledge, Karbi-Anglong, Assam


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(2), April 2007, pp. 337-341

 

Conservation ethos in the tribal folklore

Vishal Gupta

Department of Conservator of Forests, Science & Technology, Silvassa 396 230, Dadra & Nagar Haveli

vishalgupta_ifs@rediffmail.com; vishalgupta_ifs@yahoo.com

Received 10 February 2005; revised 20 December 2006

The richly forested Northeast Indian state of Arunachal Pradesh is home to 25 major tribes, which belong to the Indo-Mongoloid group and practise Buddhism, Vaishnavism or elementary form of animism based on magico-religious beliefs. They practice Jhum (slash-and-burn agriculture), depend on forests for supplementing their daily needs and are now taking to the newer modes of land use and settled agriculture. They have evolved their culture & tradition, myths & folktales in close association with the nature and have an intricate understanding of the complexities of the ecological processes.

Based on the field experiences with the communities, it is described the way these tribal communities perceive nature & their surroundings, their socio-religious beliefs & sanctions regarding forests & land, and the myths & folktales governing their resource use. It goes on to elucidate their sacred beliefs, and how the concept of environmental conservation is embedded in their customs and ethos. An attempt has also been made to understand the changes taking place in these closed societies, primarily due to exogenous contacts, which has damaged the traditional fabric of the society.

Keywords: Arunachal Pradesh, Jhum cultivation, Sacred forests, Conservation ethos, Monpas, Sherdukpens, Khamptis, Singhphoos, Membas, Khambas, Nishis, Tagins, Apatanis

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(2), April 2007, pp. 342-345

Ethnobotany of Shompens - a primitive tribe of Great Nicobar Island

R Elanchezhian, R Senthil Kumar*, S J Beena & M A Suryanarayana

Central Agricultural Research Institute, Port Blair 744 101, Andaman;
*National Bureau of Plant Genetic Resources, Regional Station, Thrissur, Kerala

Email: elan@cari.res.in

Received 21 May 2005; revised 6 October 2006

Shompens are the aboriginal inhabitants of Great Nicobar Island. They probably migrated into this area, several hundred years ago from nearby Malaysian regions. They are one of the Mongoloid aborigines whose number may not exceed a hundred at present. They are semi-nomadic, food gatherers and hunters with stone-age civilization. They live in small groups in dense interior forests of the island and are entirely dependent on forest resources and sea products for their sustenance. These primitive aboriginals use a host of edible plants; make use of a few plants for and use various plants and their parts for constructions, cover, brush, dugout canoes, utensils, fishing harpoons, mat and baskets.

Key words: Biodiversity, Great Nicobar, Shompen tribe, Ethnobotany Livelihood strategy
Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(2), April 2007, pp. 346-351

 

Aquatic/semi-aquatic plants used in herbal remedies in the wetlands of Manipur, Northeastern India

Alka Jain1, S Roshnibala1, PB Kanjilal2, RS Singh2 & H Birkumar Singh1*

1Regional Research Laboratory, Sub-station (CSIR), Lamphelpat 795 004, Manipur

2Regional Research Laboratory (CSIR), Jorhat 785 006, Assam

E-mail: hbirkumars@yahoo.com

Received 24 January 2005; revised 1 August 2006

This paper reports on aquatic/semi-aquatic plants from the wetlands of Manipur valley in Northeastern India, which are used to cure various diseases. Empirically formulated and accepted prescriptions by the various ethnic communities of Manipur for curing 45 ailments by using 43 aquatic/semi-aquatic plant species are presented along with method of preparation, prescribed doses and administration, which were recorded from the local healers and responses obtained by the patients. Out of the 43 aquatic/semi-aquatic medicinal plants recorded, 20 plants are regularly used as vegetables in Manipur and among them 13 are sold in the market. Some of the healers sell their formulated herbal products in the market.

Keywords:     Aquatic/semi-aquatic medicinal herbs, Edible, Wetlands, Manipur

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(2), April 2007, pp. 352-357

 

Collection and conservation of major medicinal pants of Darjeeling and Sikkim Himalayas

S Hussain & DK Hore*

NBPGR Regional Station, Umroi Road, Umiam 793 103, Meghalaya

E-mail: nbpgrshl@neline.com

Received 23 June 2005; revised 25 September 2006

The paper deals with use of certain indigenous medicinal plants among the local people of the Sikkim Himalaya (Eastern Himalaya), which includes the entire state of Sikkim and adjoining Darjeeling Hill district of West Bengal. The study highlighted the use of 28 plant species belonging to 26 genera and 19 families as herbal medicine in the treatment of various ailments. Considering the growing demand for raw materials of medicinal plants by the pharmaceutical companies and their depleting resource base, due to unscientific gathering from the wild, it is of utmost necessity to take up ex-situ cultivation and conservation of these medicinal plant species. Plant name, local name, family, along with their parts used, ethnobotanical application with active principles and conservation strategies are discussed.

Keywords: Conservation, Ethnomedicine, Medicinal plants, Darjeeling, Sikkim Himalayas, Lepcha, Bhutia, Limbus


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(2),April 2007, pp. 358-359

Medicinal plants used in skin disease in Deganga, West Bengal

A Bhattacharjee & Soumyadip Chatterjee*

Department of Botany Forestry, Vidyasagar University, Midnapore 721102, West Bengal

Email: soumyadipChatterji@yahoo.co.in

Received 13 December 2004; revised 26 July 2006

Ethnobotanical studies reveal some plant species used in skin disease by Oraon tribe of Chandanpur, Hadipur, Chupri village of Deganga, North twenty- four Paragana, West Bengal. Most of the plants were found to be unknown or less known from usage point of view. Other village people migrated from the erstwhile East Pakistan (Bangladesh) also used the plants in skin disease. The plants are: Aloe vera L, Argemone mexicana L, Atrocarpus gomezianus Trecul sub. Spp. zeylanicus jorett, Butea frondosa  Roxb ,Cassialata alata L.,Lawasonia inermis L., Ocimum sanctum L.,Pongamia pinnata (L)Merre, Solanum anguivi  Lam. &  Strychnos nux-vomica L.

Keywords: Medicinal Plants, Skin disease, Oraon tribe, West Bengal

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(2), April 2007, pp. 360-364

 

Traditional phytomedicinal knowledge of Bhotias of Dharchula in Pithoragarh

SS Garbyal, A Grover, KK Aggarwal* & CR Babu#

School of Biotechnology, Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Kashmere Gate, Delhi 110 006,
#Department of Botany, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007

Email: kkagg36@yahoo.com; kaggarwal@ipu.edu

Received 19 March 2005; revised 26 July 2006

Bhotias of Dharchula sub-division in Kumaon, Uttaranchal in North India have been living in isolation for centuries. They have had strong bond with the nature. They have traditionally been dependent on nature for healthcare, as they did not have access to the modern medicinal facilites until about 1960s. No serious attempts were made to document the traditional phytomedicines used by Bhotias of Dharchula areas in the past. Present attempt is the ethnomedicinal survey to document the traditional phytomedicines used by them.

Keywords: Bhotias, Dharchula, Indigenous knowledge, Pithoragarh, Traditional medicine, Tribes

 

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(2), April 2007, pp. 365-367

 

Indigenous medicinal usages of some macrophytes of the Muriyad wetland in Vembanad-Kol, Ramsar site, Kerala

Sanilkumar MG1,2 & K John Thomas1*

1Animal Behaviour and Wetland Research Laboratory, Department of Zoology, Christ College, Irinjalakuda, Kerala;
2School of Marine Sciences, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi 16, Kerala

Email: jkurishinkal@rediffmail.com

Received 21 June 2005; revised 3 October 2006

Iindigenous medicinal practices are an important component of the traditional knowledge. Wetlands provide a unique habitat for several medicinal plants. Apart from their commercial value, the local community utilizes a good number of these plants for various curative purposes, which are unknown to the people at large. Several of these plants are very sensitive to the fluctuations in the normal physico-chemical parameters of the wetland. A slight alteration or degradation of the wetland may result in the disappearance or the extinction of these plants. This will ultimately result in large-scale economic loss in terms of the medicinal products synthesized from these plants. Apart form the loss of plants, which are exclusively used by a community for their health- related uses, this will also result in the loss of local knowledge on the medicinal properties of these plants, which very often cannot be retrieved. Attempt has been made to document some of the little known medicinal properties of wetland/wetland-associated plants used by the local community living around Muriyad wetland system.

Keywords: Ethnomedicine, Medicinal plants, Muriyad wetland, Kerala

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(2), April 2007, pp. 368-374

 

Studies on plant species used by tribal communities of Saputara and
Purna forests, Dangs district, Gujarat

 

Nirmal Kumar JI1*, Rita N Kumar2, Narendra Patil1 & Hiren Soni1

1PG Department of Environmental Sciences, Institute of Science & Technology for Advanced Studies & Research (ISTAR)
Vallabh Vidyanagar 388 120, Gujarat;
2Department of Biosciences & Environmental Sciences, NV Patel College of Pure & Applied Sciences
Vallabh Vidyanagar 388 120, Gujarat

E-mail: istares2005@yahoo.com

Received 27 June 2005; revised 25 October 2006

The paper deals with the ethno-medico-botany of plant species of Saputara and Purna forests, extreme northern part of western Ghats, South Gujarat. About 50 plant species belonging to 40 genera and 28 families used by the tribals for their economic as well as medicinal uses in curing various diseases have been enumerated. Information on economic and medicinal utilization of plant species including their family, vernacular name and parts used for the treatment has been presented.

Keywords: Ethnobotany, Ethnomedicine, Medicinal plants, Koli, Konkni, Gamit, Talvi, Varli, Kolcha tribes, Saputara forest, Purna forest, Dangs district, Gujarat


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(2), April 2007, pp. 375-377

 

Traditional herbal remedies among the tribes of Bijagarh of West Nimar district, Madhya Pradesh

S K Mahajan

31, Jain Mandir Path, Khargone 451 001, Madhya Pradesh

Received 4 August 2005; revised 25 October 2005

The paper reports about the traditional herbal remedies common among the tribal people of Bijagarh of West Nimar district of Madhya Pradesh. In all, 38 species belonging to 37 genera and 21 families, used by the tribals in the treatment of various human ailments are reported.

Key words: Ethnomedicine, Medicinal plants, Madhya Pradesh, Traditional knowledge

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(2), April  2007, pp. 378-382

 

Use of indigenous knowledge by coastal fisher folk of Mumbai district in Maharashtra

Nirmale VH1, Sontakki BS2, Biradar RS1, Metar SY* & Charatkar SL1

1Central Institute of Fisheries Education, 7 Bungalows, Versova, Andheri West, Mumbai 400 061,

2National Academy of Agricultural Research Management, Rajendra Nagar, Hyderabad 40, Andhra Pradesh; 3Marine Biological Research Station, Pethkilla, Ratnagiri 415 612, Maharashtra

Email: vivekkop10@rediffmail.com

Received 28 June 2005; revised 6 November 2006

The benefit of indigenous knowledge can be harnessed and improved upon by appropriating it, establishing legitimacy of such knowledge and integrating it with development programmes. Against this background, the study was attempted to explore the indigenous knowledge of fisher folk of Mumbai district. The data were gathered through interview of fishers using a semi-structured interview schedule and personal non-participant observation. Indigenous knowledge was documented for the various aspects of fishery management. The fishers use indigenous materials and methods for construction, fabrication and maintenance of fishing crafts and gears. They were found to use indigenous knowledge to locate fishing grounds, to predict cyclones/storms, to preserve and process the fish caught.

Key Words: Indigenous knowledge, Fisher folk, Fishing crafts, Mumbai, Maharashtra


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(2), April  2007, pp. 383-389

Traditional Knowledge System of the Muslim community in Manipur

MM Ahmed & PK Singh*

Ethnobotany and Plant Physiology Laboratory, Department of Life Sciences,
Manipur University, Canchipur, Imphal 795 003, Manipur

Received 11 July 2005; revised 30 September 2005

The Muslims of Manipur state is commonly known as Pangal or Meitei-Pangal. Prefixing of Meitei to the word Pangal exemplifies the strong relationship between the two communities. The paper provides information on the use of plants and plant parts, which carry ethnobotanical significance in respect of common socio-religious activities of this minority community encompassing from the birth till death. It deals with 17 plant species belonging to 15 genera and 11 families closely associated with 9 categories of the formalities of socio-religious functions, customs, etc. The present investigation aims at the validity of the Traditional Knowledge System practiced and also focused on the activism concerning conservation of plants through the practices of socio-religious functions of Pangal community.

Keywords: Muslim, Pangal, Socio-religious aspects