Indian Journal of Traditional

 Knowledge

Total visitors: 1,082  since 25-07-07

VOLUME 6

NUMBER 3

July 2007

CONTENTS

 

Papers

 

Traditional system for the production of kewda essential oil and attar

399

      DK Mohapatra & S Sahoo

 

 

 

Traditional method of Chuli oil extraction in Ladakh

403

      Deepa H Dwivedi & Sanjai K Dwivedi

 

 

 

Antigenotoxic activity of the subterranean termite on Swiss albino mice

406

      A Solavan, R Paulmurugan  & V Wilsanand

 

 

 

Effect of Apthoryama yajna on people and environment

412

      Surendra Rawat & Nagendra HR

 

 

 

Herbal recipe prepared during Bohag or Rongali Bihu in Assam

417

      Samim Sofika Begum & Rajib Gogoi

 

 

 

Antioxidant potential of five Ksheerapaka’s and Kashaya’s, Ayurvedic decoctions

423

      Shrishailappa Badami, M Sangeetha, V Latha, N Archana & Suresh B

 

 

 

Numerical v/s quantitative variations in ingredients of Cyavanaprasa- A limiting factor
for SOP

426

      Sujit Kumar Dalai, Mohan S Dashora & Laxmikant Dwivedi

 

 

 

Clinical evaluation of Pushyanuga choorna and Lodhrasava in Rakta Pradara (DUB)

429

      K Prameela Devi

 

 

 

Concept of personality type in West and in Ayurveda

432

      Rudrani Mukherjee

 

 

 

Evaluation of antiinflammatory activity of a Unani formulation

439

      Nafis Ahmad Quasmi, Ghufran Ahmad, M Anwar, KMY Ameen & NA Khan

 

 

 

Ethnoveterinary plants of Uttaranchal- A review

444

      PC Pande, Lalit Tiwari & HC Pande

 

 

 

Traditional livestock feeding practices in Northern Karnataka

459

      Nagaratna Biradar, CR Ramesh & PS Pathak

 

 

 

Use of indigenous plants for sustainable management of livestock diseases in rural Nigeria

463

      Ayoola Josephine B, R Ofukwu, Ama Teryila & GB Ayoola

 

 

 

Plants folk medicine of Negrito tribes of Bay Islands

468

      M U Sharief

 

 

 

Ethnomedicinal plants from Dibru-Saikhowa Biosphere Reserve, Assam

477

      Jubilee Purkayastha, Malakshmi Dutta & Subhan C Nath

 

 

 

Ethnomedicinal knowledge among Malamalasar tribe of Parambikulam wildlife
sanctuary, Kerala

481

      K Yesodharan & KA Sujana

 

 

 

Ethnobotanical usages of plants in western Mizoram

486

      R Lalfakzuala, H Lalramnghinglova & H Kayang

 

 

 

Indigenous medicinal plants knowledge of Kunihar forest division, district Solan

494

      Saroj Verma & NS Chauhan

 

 

 

Traditional treatment of skin diseases in South Travancore, southern peninsular India

498

      GM Jeeva, S Jeeva & C Kingston

 

 

 

Abortifacient plants of the Buea region, their participation in the sexuality of adolescent girls

502

      Emmanuel Noumi & Claudette Djeumen

 

 

 

Medicinal plants used by Chakma tribe in Hill Tracts districts of Bangladesh

508

      M Atiqur Rahman, SB Uddin & CC Wilcock

 

 

 

Traditional knowledge on utility of Cedrus deodara (Roxb.) Loud. in Doda district of
Jammu province

518

      PS Slathia, GR Bhagat, Swaranjeet Singh, SK Kher & Narinder Paul

 

 

 

Sustainable use of ethnobotanical resources

521

      Ranjay K Singh, Anamika Singh & Amish K Sureja

 

 

 

Traditional medicinal practices of Rajasthan

531

      Laxmi Kant Sharma & Ashwini Kumar

 

 

 

Divine botany - universal and useful but under explored traditions

534

      SK Jain & SL Kapoor

 

 

 

Book Review

540

 

 

Author Index

542

 

 

Subject Index

542

 

 

Forthcoming Conferences / Seminars

544

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(3), July 2007, pp. 399-402

 

Traditional system for the production of kewda essential oil and attar

 

D K Mohapatra & S Sahoo*

 

Natural Products Department, Regional Research Laboratory, Bhubaneswar 751013, Orissa

Email: sbsahoo@rrlbhu.res.in

 

Received 17 August 2005; revised 28 December 2006

 

Kewda (Pandanus odoratissimus Linn. f.) flower distillation is high value because of its flavour and fragrance. Using the age-old traditional Deg-bhabka method, till date the floral essential oil and attar are produced. This traditional method is appropriate, popular, economical and convenient for kewda distillation. According to the number of flowers, the size of deg or bhabka is used for distillation. Essential oil and attar both can be made in the same distillation unit. This system can be operated at the plantation site. The products have high demand in the market value. The traditional system of kewda distillation is cost effective; simple operation techniques are involved for kewda oil & attar production.

 

Key word: Deg-bhabka, Kewda, Essential oil, Attar, Traditional distillation method

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(3), July 2007, pp. 403-405

 

Traditional method of Chuli oil extraction in Ladakh

 

Deepa H Dwivedi* & Sanjai K Dwivedi**

 

*BBAU, Vidya Vihar, Rae Barielly Road, Lucknow 226025, Uttar Pradesh

**Field Research Laboratory, DRDO, Leh 194 101, Ladakh, J&K state

Email: deepahansraj@rediffmail.com

 

Received 25 July 2005; revised 27 December 2005

 

Chuli, the wild apricot, growing abundantly in trans-Himalayan Ladakh yields bitter kernels called Khante which are utilized primarily for extraction of apricot oil by the aboriginal communities. In remote villages, apricot oil is used for cooking, religious, cosmetic and medicinal purposes. The paper describes the traditional method for extraction of Chuli oil.  One kg apricot kernel yields about 35-37% oil.  The oil is light yellow in colour and has a typical apricot odour.

 

Keywords: Chuli, Apricot oil, Traditional oil extraction, Ladakh

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(3), July 2007, pp. 406-411

 

Antigenotoxic activity of the subterranean termite on Swiss albino mice

 

A Solavan1, R Paulmurugan2 & V Wilsanand3*

 

1Department of Zoology, PMT College, Melaneelithanallur, Thirunelveli, Tamil Nadu

2Department of Radiology & Bio-X Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA 94305, USA; 3*Department of Zoology, Sree Narayana College, Alathur, Palakkad 678682, Kerala

E-mail: wilsanand@yahoo.com

 

Received 1 August 2005; revised 7 September 2006

 

The paper reports the antigenotoxic potential of the termite (Odontotermes formosanus Shiraki) supplemented food on acephate and endosulfan induced toxicity in the Swiss albino mice (Mus musculus). Dietary supplementation with termite to male and female mice Mus musculus treated with acephate and endosulfan significantly decreased the percentage of chromosomal aberration and micronuclei in the bone marrow cells than in pesticide treated F0 and F1 generations
(P < 0.01). The chromosomal aberrations induced by acephate and endosulfan included minute, gap, inversion, ring, pulverization and tetraploids. The experimental groups treated with acephate/endosulfan and supplemented with termite food did not show critical genotoxic aberration markers like pulverization and ploidy suggesting a strong antigenotoxic effect of the termite components.

 

Keywords: Antigenotoxic activity, Chromosomal aberrations, Micronuclei index, Termite, Toxicity, Kanikkaran, Paniyan, Palliyan, Sholaga, Irular, Kota tribes

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(3), July 2007, pp. 412-416

 

Effect of Apthoryama yajna on people and environment

 

Surendra Rawat* & Nagendra HR

 

Swami Vivekananda Yoga Anusandhana Samsthana, 19 Eknath Bhavan, Gavipuram Circle, Kempegowda Circle, Bangalore 560 019, Karnataka

 

Received 27 January 2005; revised 26 December 2006

 

In traditional knowledge base of the Vedas mention that Yajďas have effect on the environment and people. Yajnas of various kinds are elaborated in the four Vedas. Apthoryama yajďa is one such yajďa in the Soma yajďa. A large-scale yajďa Apthoryama yajďa was organized in Thrissur district of Kerala to evaluate the effects on environment, society and humans beings. In the study, following aspects were taken up: attitudinal survey, random event generator (REG) studies, bacterial count in the atmosphere and analysis from the yajďa. Attitudinal survey showed that people came to yajďa for spiritual reason and their life is affected from the spiritual activity. On measuring consciousness fields in the surroundings of yajďa using (REG) has shown a significant change as measured at a distance of 12 m from the place of yajďa. Air borne bacteria counts have shown an increase at 20 m distance as compared to 40 m. The speciation of the bacteria was not done. A study of ash filtrate of yajďa was done using standard stain; the result of the filtrate was negative for bacterial growth and also for antibacterial activity after 6 months.

 

Key words: Apthoryama Yajna, Environment, Antibacterial activity

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(3), July 2007, pp. 417-422

 

Herbal recipe prepared during Bohag or Rongali Bihu in Assam

 

Samim Sofika Begum* & Rajib Gogoi

 

Botanical Survey of India, Eastern Circle, Shillong793003, Meghalaya

E-mail: samimbegum@rediffmail.com

 

Received 7 April 2006; revised 25 August 2006

 

The work relates to the herbal recipe prepared during Bohag or Rongali Bihu in Assam. For the preparation of this recipe, 101 plant species are used. In the paper, each species is provided with plant name, family, vernacular name, plant parts used and their other uses.

 

Key words: Herbal recipe, Bohag, Rongali Bihu, Bodo, Mishing, Karbi, Deori, Sonowal-Kachari, Dimasha, Rabha, Assam

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(3), July 2007, pp. 423-425

 

Antioxidant potential of five Ksheerapaka’s and Kashaya’s, Ayurvedic decoctions

 

Shrishailappa Badami*, M Sangeetha, V Latha, N Archana & Suresh B

 

JSS College of Pharmacy, Rocklands, Ootacamund 643 001, Tamil Nadu

E-mail: shribadami@rediffmail.com

 

Received 26 September 2005; revised 21 February 2007

 

Five milk decoctions and water decoctions prepared by using coriander; ginger, pepper, tulsi and turmeric were evaluated for in-vitro antioxidant activity using standard DPPH, ABTS and hydrogen peroxide methods. The milk decoctions exhibited potent antioxidant activity when compared to their corresponding water decoctions. The total phenol content of the milk decoctions was also found to be high supporting the antioxidant activity. The study provides a scientific validation of the common preference of milk decoctions over water decoctions in Ayurveda for a few plants.

 

Keywords: Ayurveda, Ksheerapaka, Kashaya, Free radicals, Radical scavenging activity, Antioxidant activity

 

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(3), July 2007, pp. 426-428

 

Numerical v/s quantitative variations in ingredients of
Cyavanaprāśa — A limiting factor for SOP

 

Sujit Kumar Dalai*, Mohan S Dashora & Laxmikant Dwivedi

 

Department of Rasa Shastra & Bhaishajya Kalpana,

National Institute of Ayurveda, Madhav Vilas Palace, Amer Road, Jaipur, Rajasthan

E-mail: drsujitayu@yahoo.co.in

 

Received 20 May 2005; revised 22 February 2007

 

Numerical v/s quantitative variation in ingredients of various formulations of Indian Systems of Medicine is one of the major limiting factors for development of SOP (Standard Operative Procedure) and standardization. The paper enumerates & highlights SOP hiatus with special reference to formulation like Cyavanaprāśa having Āmalaka (Indian gooseberry; Emblica officinalis Gaertn.) in 500 numbers in single lot.

 

Keywords: Āmalaka, Standard Operative Procedure, Cyavanaprāśa, Indian gooseberry, Indian Systems of Medicine

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(3), July 2007, pp. 429-431

Clinical evaluation of Pushyanuga choorna and Lodhrasava in
Rakta Pradara (DUB)

 

K Prameela Devi

 

Central Council for Research in Ayurveda & Siddha, Janakpuri, New Delhi110058

Email: gtp-ccras@nic.in

 

Received 10 May 2005; revised 23 June 2006

 

Rakta Pradara (uterine hemorrhage) covers all types of menorrhagia. For the study, exclusively dysfunctional uterine bleeding was taken up in the clinics, where around 20 to 30% cases come with the problem. In Indian System of Medicine many effective remedies are available. Ayurvedic drugs, Pushyanuga choorna & Lodhrasava combination was selected for the study. Of total 46 cases studied, 12 (29.26%) cases showed good response, 16 cases (39.02%) showed fair response,
9 cases (21.95%) showed poor response and 4 cases (9.75%) did not show any response after treatment. Five (10.86%) cases were dropped out from study. The treatment was found to be highly significant (P<0.001) in reduction of uterine hemorrhage.

 

Keywords: Uterine haemorrhage, Menorrhagia, Dysfunctional uterine bleeding, Rakta pradara, Pushyanuga choorna, Lodhrasava, Ayurvedic drugs

 

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(3), July 2007, pp. 432-438

 

Concept of personality type in West and in Ayurveda

 

Rudrani Mukherjee

 

Indian Institute of Psychometry, 117 BT Road, Kolkata 700 108, West Bengal

E-mail: sykomtry@cal.vsnl.net.in

 

Received 21 July 2006; revised 12 February 2007

 

In western psychology, personality type has been widely discussed. This Typology is but one-way of understanding “Personality”. It has some practical utility. In Ayurveda, personality types have been discussed from two angles, viz. physiological and psychological as body and mind is correlated. Psychological qualities are Sattva, Rajas and Tamas. Physiological qualities are Vata, Pitta and Kapha. Here, western and eastern approaches are compared to identify the points of similarities and dissimilarities.

 

Keywords: Ayurveda, Western typology, Personality type, Vata, Pitta, Kapha, Sattva, Rajas, Tamas, Psychological qualities, Physiological qualities

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(3), July 2007, pp. 439-443

 

Evaluation of antiinflammatory activity of a Unani formulation

 

*1Nafis Ahmad Quasmi, 2Ghufran Ahmad, 3M Anwar, 5KMY Ameen & 4NA Khan

 

*1CGHS Dispensary No1, Shivaji Nagar, Bangalore, Karnataka; 2Department of Ilmul Advia, AMU, Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh; 3Department of Moalejat, NIUM, Bangalore, Karnataka; 4Department of Ilmul Advia, AMU, Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh; 5Pharmacology Laboratory, Department of Ilmul Advia, AMU, Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh

 

 

Received 29 July 2005; revised 9 February 2007

 

The study presents the acute antiinflammatory effect of a non-pharmacopoeal Unani formulation. Both the aqueous and alcoholic extracts were tested for acute antiinflammatory activity by carrageenin oedema test. Since, most of the mainstream antiinflammatory drugs have significant gastric toxicity; therefore test combination was subjected to the test for ulcerogenic activity. The standard drug Piroxicam was used for comparison of antiinflammatory and ulcerogenic activity. The LD50 was also performed to point out the safety margin of test drug. The test drug was found to possess significant antiinflammatory activity against acute inflammation. The test drug also exhibited gastro-friendly effect and the safety margin was very large. The alcoholic extract was more effective than that of aqueous extract.

 

Key words: Antiinflammatory activity, Ulcerogenic activity, Unani formulation

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(3), July 2007, pp. 444-458

Ethnoveterinary plants of Uttaranchal — A review

 

PC Pande1*, Lalit Tiwari1 & HC Pande2

 

1Department of Botany, Kumaon University, SSJ Campus, Almora 263 601, Uttaranchal
2Botanical Survey of India (NC), Dehradun, Uttaranchal

E-mail: ltherbal@rediffmail.com

 

Received 21 December 2004; revised 7 February 2007

 

The study reveals that the people of the Uttaranchal state use 364 plants species in ethnoveterinary practices. Bhotiyas, Boxas, Tharus, Jaunsaris and Rhajis are the tribal groups inhabiting in Uttaranchal. Analysis of data indicates that information on 163 plants is significant as it provides some new information of the ethnoveterinary uses. The study is expected to provide basic data for further studies aimed at conservation of traditional medicine and economic welfare of rural people at the study area.

 

Keywords: Ethnoveterinary practices, Medicinal plants, Uttaranchal, Review

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(3), July 2007, pp. 459-462

 

Traditional livestock feeding practices in Northern Karnataka

 

Nagaratna Biradar*, CR Ramesh & PS Pathak

 

Indian Grassland and Fodder Research Institute, Regional Research Station, UAS Campus, Dharwad 5,

Karnataka

E-mail: nagaratna123@rediffmail.com

 

Received 17 August 2006; revised 21 February 2007

 

A study was conducted in four villages of Dharwad district of Karnataka to elicit information on traditional livestock feeding practices followed by the farmers. Focused PRA tools coupled with personal interview technique were used to document the traditional practices. The study revealed that farmers preferred to feed cotton seed cake, hay of mixed crop and they did not prefer to feed dry maize stover and paddy straw. They have an established daily feeding pattern for bullocks and milch animals. Strong association was found between farmers’ practices and scientists responses. Calculated contingency coefficient indicated 64 % of traditional practices as scientific. 

 

Key words: Livestock, Traditional knowledge, Livestock feeding practices, Karnataka

 

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(3), July 2007, pp. 463-467

 

Use of indigenous plants for sustainable management of livestock diseases in rural Nigeria

 

Ayoola Josephine B, R Ofukwu, Ama Teryila & GB Ayoola*

 

Centre for Indigenous Knowledge in Farm and Infrastructure Management, Farm and Infrastructure Foundation, University of Agriculture, Private Mail Bag 2373, Makurdi, Nigeria

Email: gbayoola@yahoo.com

 

Received 24 March 2005; revised 19 March 2007

 

The paper examines local management of mixed infection of Newcastle diseases, coccidiosis and fowl typhoid in poultry birds, and Pestes Des Petits Ruminants (PPR) in sheep and goats in the middlebelt of Nigeria, wherein smallholder farmers either lose all their livestock or sell them off as the period when the diseases are most prevalent approaches. It discusses the technical and socioeconomic viability of the AKAGA and LOKA technologies that evolved from continued experimentation with local herbs within the agroecological zone. It concluded that the options are viable and sustainable within the context of the environment and socioeconomic circumstances of the people concerned.

 

Key words: Livestock diseases, Nigeria, Indigenous plants, Medicinal plants

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(3), July 2007, pp. 468-476

 

Plants folk medicine of Negrito tribes of Bay Islands

 

M U Sharief

 

Botanical Survey of India, National Orchidarium & Experimental Garden, Yercaud 636 602, Salem district, Tamil Nadu

Email: sharief bsi@yahoo.co.in; bsisc@md4.vsnl.net.in; bsisc@rediffmail.com

 

Received 9 November 2005; revised 5 April 2007

 

The Negrito tribes of Andaman Islands nurture rich knowledge about the medicinal plants of their surroundings acquired by trial and error over millennia. The ethnomedicinal plants of Great Andamanese, Onges and Jarawa tribes are presented. These tribes were found using more than 52 plant species in their ethnomedicinal practices. Plants used to cure fever, headache, stomach disorder, cough and cold, cuts and wounds, bee repellent, joint pains and leech bite are recorded. Botanical names, family, local name, plant parts used and uses are provided for each species. Phytochemical investigations of these medicinal plants are desirable.

 

Keywords: Negrito tribes, Onges tribe, Jarawa tribe, Bay Islands, Andaman Islands, Ethnomedicine, Medicinal plants

 

 

 

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(3), July 2007, pp. 477-480

 

Ethnomedicinal plants from Dibru-Saikhowa biosphere reserve, Assam

 

Jubilee Purkayastha1, Malakshmi Dutta2 & Subhan C Nath1*

 

1Division of Medicinal Aromatic and Economic Plants, Regional Research Laboratory, Jorhat 785 006,
Assam; 2NNSaikia College, Titabor, Jorhat, Assam

E-mail: scnath2004@yahoo.co.in

 

Received 6 April 2005; revised 21 September 2006

 

An account on medicinal usage of 61 plant species traditionally used as folk medicine to treat different ailments by the inhabitants of Dibru-Saikhowa biosphere reserve in Northeast India has been reported. For each plant species, local names, parts used, purpose of use, processing and mode of administrations are indicated.

 

Keywords: Ethnomedicine, Dibru-Saikhowa biosphere reserve, Assam, Northeast India

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(3), July 2007, pp. 481-485

 

Ethnomedicinal knowledge among Malamalasar tribe of Parambikulam wildlife sanctuary, Kerala

 

K Yesodharan* & KA Sujana

 

Division of Forest Ecology and Biodiversity Conservation, Kerala Forest Research Institute, Peechi, Thrissur 680 653, Kerala

E-mail: yesodharan@kfri.org

 

Received 2 August 2005; revised 11 November 2006

 

The paper examines traditional uses of some plants used by the Malamalasar tribe of Parambikulam wildlife sanctuary in Palakkad district of Kerala state. Forests have provided tribals with enough material for use in the traditional medicine. During the survey of the tribal colonies, data on 80 medicinal plants used to cure common ailments were collected. From 80 selected medicinal plants, 10 species were found to be used for cuts & wound healing, 4 species for cough & cold, 4 species for treating snakebite, 4 species for headache, 4 species to control dysentery, 3 species for jaundice, etc. Details of the study have been enumerated.

 

Keywords: Ethnobotany, Malamalasar, Parambikulam wildlife sanctuary, Tribal medicine

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(3), July 2007, pp. 486-493

 

Ethnobotanical usages of plants in western Mizoram

 

R Lalfakzuala1*, H Lalramnghinglova1 & H Kayang2

 

1Department of Forest Ecology, Biodiversity and Environmental Science, Mizoram University, Tanhril, Aizawl 796 001, Mizoram; 2Northeastern Biodiversity Research Cell, Northeastern Hill University, Bijni Complex, Shillong 793 003, Meghalaya

E-mail: lalfak@yahoo.com

 

Received 3 August 2005; revised 8 May 2006

 

Ethnobotanical survey among the tribals inhabiting western part of Mizoram brought to light a number of wild plant species used as edibles and as herbal medicine. There are 23 plants species, which were common throughout the study area. The tribals utilized 89 plant species for herbal medicine, 44 plant species consumed as wild edible fruits, 33 plant species as wild edible plants, 8 plant species for pig food, 11 plant species for fire wood & for charcoal making and 23 plant species for timber. The paper enumerates and discusses various ethnobotanical aspects of the plants used by the tribals of Mizoram.

 

Keywords: Ethnobotany, Endangered plants, Rare plants, Mizoram

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(3), July 2007, pp. 494-497

 

Indigenous medicinal plants knowledge of Kunihar forest division,
district Solan

 

Saroj Verma* & NS Chauhan

 

Department of Forest Products, Dr Y S Parmar University of Horticulture and Forestry, Nauni-Solan 173 230, Himachal Pradesh

 

Received 25 August 2005; revised 18 December

 

Kunihar forest division falling under district Solan boasts of rich plant diversity. The study was undertaken for making preliminary survey of the indigenous technological knowledge on the uses of medicinal plants of Kunihar forest division, district Solan, Himachal Pradesh. Important medicinal and aromatic plants with their vernacular names, family and indigenous uses have been presented.

 

Keywords:  Kunihar forest, Ethnomedicine, Indigenous Technical Knowledge, Medicinal plants, Himachal Pradesh

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(3), July 2007, pp. 498-501

 

Traditional treatment of skin diseases in South Travancore,
southern peninsular India

 

GM Jeeva1, S Jeeva2 & C Kingston1*

 

1PG and Research Centre in Botany, Scott Christian College, Nagercoil 629 003, Tamil Nadu; 2Forest Ecology Research Laboratory, Department of Botany, School of Life Sciences, North Eastern Hill University, Shillong 793 022, Meghalaya

E-mail: solomon_jeeva@yahoo.com; solomon_jeeva@rediffmail.com

 

Received 18 May 2005; revised 23 February 2007

 

The paper deals with some medicinal plants used in the treatment of skin diseases in South Travancore, southern peninsular India. Thirty plant species belonging to 29 genera and 22 families of angiosperms reported along with dosage rate and mode of administration have been enumerated.

 

Keywords: Medicinal plants, Skin disease, South Travancore, Peninsular India, Ethnomedicine

 

 

 Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(3), July 2007, pp. 502-507

 

Abortifacient plants of the Buea region, their participation in the
sexuality of adolescent girls

 

Emmanuel Noumi* & Claudette Djeumen

 

Laboratory of Plant Biology Vegetal, Higher Teachers’ Training, College, University of Yaounde I
PO Box 47, Yaounde, Cameroon

E-mail: noumikap@yahoo.fr

 

Received 10 May 2005; revised 23 June 2006

 

A survey carried out on 297 teenage girls from four different high schools show that 43.7% cases of abortion were done using some of 24 plant species belongings to 16 families. Within 1996 and 1998, 85 cases of provoked abortion were registered in the surgical service of the district hospital in Buea. With 63.2% cases of plant elements diversified side effects resulting from these abortion were equally registered.

 

Key words: Abortifacient activity, Medicinal plants, Buea region, Cameroon

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(3), July 2007, pp. 508-517

 

Medicinal plants used by Chakma tribe in Hill Tracts districts of Bangladesh

 

M Atiqur Rahman1*, SB Uddin & CC Wilcock2

 

1Department of Botany, University of Chittagong, Chittagong 4331, Bangladesh; Department of Plant and Soil Science,
University of Aberdeen, Cruickshank Building, St. Machar Drive, Aberdeen AB24 23UU, UK

E-mail: TTTTatiquerahman125@hotmail.com

 

Received 11 July 2005; revised 21 December 2006

 

An ethnobotanical survey was carried out on the utilization of medicinal plants by Chakma tribe living in the remote hilly forest areas of Hill Tracts districts of Bangladesh by interviewing traditional herbalists, called Baiddaya, and various elderly men and women. Indigenous knowledge of herbal medicine remains an integral part of the healthy system among chakmas in the Hill Tracts area. 198 plant species with their local (Chakma) names were recorded for their uses for curing at least 78 ailments. These species, belonging to 74 families, are listed in alphabetical order, each with local names, methods of preparation, route of administration and uses.

 

Keywords: Medicinal plants, Ethnobotany, Indigenous knowledge, Chakma tribe, Hill Tracts, Bangladesh

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(3), July 2007, pp. 518-520

 

Traditional knowledge on utility of Cedrus deodara (Roxb.)
Loud. in Doda district of Jammu province

 

PS Slathia*, GR Bhagat, Swaranjeet Singh, SK Kher & Narinder Paul

 

Division of Agricultural Extension Education,
FOA Chatha, Sher-e-Kashmir University of Agricultural Sciences and Technology, Jammu (J&K)

 

Received 16 December 2005; revised 12 February 2007

 

The communication deals with the traditional uses of deodar (Cedrus deodara) (Roxb.) Loud. tree used by local inhabitants of mythic hilly areas of tehsil Bhaderwah, district Doda of Jammu & Kashmir. Bhaderwah is very rich in ethnic as well as floristic diversity. The inhabitants of the area have inherited a rich traditional knowledge on the use of deodar tree. The traditional knowledge of local people on various uses of Deodar tree in their social, cultural and economic milieu has been enumerated.

 

Keywords: Traditional knowledge, Deodar oil, Insecticidal properties, Traditional grain storage, Weedicide

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(3), July 2007, pp. 521-530

 

Sustainable use of ethnobotanical resources

 

Ranjay K Singh*, Anamika Singh & Amish K Sureja

 

College of Horticulture and Forestry, Central Agricultural University, Pasighat 791 102, Arunachal Pradesh

E-mail: ranjay_jbp@rediffmail.com

 

Received 6 July 2006; revised 12 February 2007

 

The study demonstrates the significance of ethnobotanical resources used for ensuring the food and nutritional security conserved by the tribal women of Chattisgarh state. The study was conducted among the tribal women of Halba, Mandiya, Bhatra and Muriya communities of Jagdalpur-Bastar district, Chhatisgarh. Data pertaining to study were recorded by using the participatory approach. Study revealed that there are more than 20 major ethnobotanical resources prevalent in the tribal community, which is being consumed in the forms of leaves, bulbs, plants and fruits. Few of the ethnic vegetables, like charoti, koliari, siliari, chench, bodi and jheera are mostly available in the rainy season and vary in its consumption percentage on account of extent of availability. Few of these ethnic plants are wild and few are domesticated in the kitchen garden for its conservation and sustainable use. Wild indigenous mushroom species namely, banse, jam and mane chhati are the nutritious source of foods and are available in the month of July-August. These ethnobotanical resources provide nutritional security as well as play a multifunctional role in curing several diseases. These varieties are economically sustainable on account of stable marketing. However, there was variation (15-90%) in the consumption of these ethnic plants depending upon availability and duration. No cost nature, stable source of income, compatibility to culture and local availability are the factors responsible for continuous consumption of the identified ethnic vegetables. Different socio-cultural, spiritual and high ethical values attached with these ethnobotanical resources play a pivotal role in its sustainable use and conservation.

 

Key words: Tribal women, Ethnobotanical resources, Ethnic vegetables, Forest resources, Conservation, Sustainability, Chattisgarh, Halba tribe, Mandiya tribe, Bhatra tribe, Muriya tribe

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(3), July 2007, pp. 531-533

 

Traditional medicinal practices of Rajasthan

 

Laxmi Kant Sharma* & Ashwini Kumar

 

*46, Soni Colony, Bhomia Nagar, Kalwar Road, Jhotwara, Jaipur 302 012, Rajasthan; Biotechnology Laboratory, Department of Botany, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur 302004, Rajasthan

Email: laxmikant1000@yahoo.com

 

Received 17 August 2006; revised 21 February 2007

 

During the course of investigation it has been observed that a particular plant is sometimes prescribed for different ailments in different localities and some Vaidyas (Ayurvedic physicians) apply a mixture of plants for remedy of diseases. The data collected from Vaidyas have been presented. However, a systematical and methodical approach is needed to collect such information.

 

Keywords: Ayurveda, Traditional medicine, Vaidyas, Rajasthan

 

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(3), July 2007, pp. 534-539

 

Divine botany-universal and useful but under explored traditions

 

SK Jain1* & SL Kapoor

 

1A-26, Mall Avenue Colony, Lucknow 226 001,
Uttar Pradesh;
C-166, Nirala Nagar, Lucknow 226 020, Uttar Pradesh

 

Received 17 August 2006; revised 21 February 2007

 

The study of all relationships between man and plant based on faith, belief and tradition concerning gods, goddesses, saints & other such powers can be called Divine botany. There are three aspects; the knowledge and information contained in the ancient religious books and epics of various faiths; the beliefs and practices as presently observed or performed among various ethnic group, and the future prospects and possibility in this area of botany. The paper has a brief account of faith related to plant in epics like Ramayan and Mahabharat, in religious scriptures like Bible and Quran & plants associated with planets, stars, Vastu-shastra, practices relating to plants in worship and decoration of deities, taboos and plants in various ceremonies, festivals and rites from birth to death. It is discussed that such a faith belief and practice have scientific basis and is helpful for good health and preservation of biodiversity. It is also suggested that the subject is not static but due to changes in biodiversity, human attitude to tradition and introduction of many exotics in various parts of the world, there is dynamism in this relationship. The future prospects and immense possibilities of the subject are indicated.

 

   Keywords: Divine botany, Sacred plants, Scriptures, Constellations, Nakshatras