Indian Journal of Traditional

 Knowledge

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VOLUME 6

NUMBER 4

OCTOBER 2007

 

 

CONTENTS

 

Papers

 

Traditional methods of mollusc shell collection for lime preparation in East coast of India

549

      Anima Panda & Malaya K Misra

 

 

 

Antibacterial activity of subterranean termites used in South Indian folk medicine

559

      Solavan A, Paulmurugan R & V Wilsanand

 

 

 

Therapeutics of insects and insect products in South Indian traditional medicine

563

      Wilsanand V, Preema Varghese & Rajitha P

 

 

 

Ethnomedicine of Malapandaram tribes of Achenkovil forest of Kollam district, Kerala

569

Udayan PS, Satheesh George, KV Tushar & Indira Balachandran

 

 

 

Ethnomedicinal information from Kattunayakas tribes of Mudumalai Wildlife Sanctuary

574

      PS Udayan, KV Tushar, Satheesh George & Indira Balachandran

 

 

 

Medicinal plants used by Malasar tribes of Coimbatore district

579

      P Pandi Kumar, M Ayyanar & S Ignacimuthu

 

 

 

Indigenous animal healthcare practices from Udaipur district

583

      Ambika Nag, Praveen Galav & SS Katewa

 

 

 

Traditional remedies of Kani tribes of Kottoor reserve forest, Agasthyavanam, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala

589

      Arun Vijayan, Liju VB, Reena John JV, Parthipan B & Renuka C

 

 

 

Ethnomedicine used by Mishings tribes of Dibrugarh district, Assam

595

      Madhumita Baruah & Dilip Kalita

 

 

 

Ethnomedicinal formulations used by traditional herbal practitioners of Ranchi, Jharkhand

599

      Rabish Chandra, Malati Mahato, SC Mandal, Kamini Kumar & Jyoti Kumar

 

 

 

Herbal remedies used by Warlis of Dahanu to induce lactation in nursing mothers

602

      Nudrat Z Sayed, Richa Deo & Usha Mukundan

 

 
 
Medicinal pants used against gastrointestinal tract disorders by the traditional healers of Sikkim Himalayas
606
      Ranabir Chanda, JP Mohanty, NR Bhuyan, PK Kar & LK Nath
 

 

 

Medicinal pteridophytes from the Western Ghats

611

      Benjamin A & Manickam VS

 

Dynamics of sustainable livestock and natural resources management

619

      Ranjay K Singh & Amish K Sureja

 

 

 

Monitoring spatial distribution of commercial rattans and palms in the tropical forest of Baratang Islands (Andaman and Nicobar Islands)

630

      Nidhi Nagabhatla, PS Roy & Rajendra Jagdale 

 

 

 

Traditional uses of some medicinal plants of district Swat, Pakistan

636

      Muhammad Hamayun

 

 

 

Indigenous Knowledge System of waste management in Nigeria

642

      LT Ajibade

 

 

 

Standardization of Ayurvedic polyherbal formulation, Nyagrodhadi Churna

648

      KR Gopala Simha & V Laxminarayana

 

 

 

Bhallatak (Semecarpus anacardium Linn.)-  A Review

653

      Ashwini Kumar A Raut, NS Sawant, AS Badre, AJ Amonkar & Ashok DB Vaidya

 

 

 

Ayurveda in Rajtrangni - Kalahana’s treatise of ancient Kashmir

660

      YK Sharma

 

 

 

Cardioprotective effect of Unani formulation in rats

663

      Tajuddin, Nasiruddin M & Ahmad N

 

 

 

A clinical study on the management of anxiety neurosis with Sankhaholi

668

      Yasmeen Shamsi, Jameel Ahmad & Asim Ali Khan

 

 

 

Herbs used in Siddha medicine for arthritis – A review

678

      Eugene Wilson, GV Rajamanickam, Neera Vyas, A Agarwal & GP Dubey

 

 

 

Veda and Yajña in Indian tradition

687

      Krishna Murti Raju

 

 

 

Carl Linnaeus (1707-1778) and plants in the traditions (Hadith) of Prophet Muhammad

692

      Sania Hamid

 

 

 

Author Index

695

Subject Index

695

Forthcoming Seminars/Conferences

697

Annual Title Index

698

Annual Author Index

705

Annual Subject Index

706

List of Referees

709

Workshop Proceedings

712

Announcements

713

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(4), October 2007, pp. 549-558

 

Traditional methods of mollusc shell collection for lime preparation in
East coast of India

 

Anima Panda & Malaya K Misra*

Ecology & Floristics Laboratory, Department of Botany, Berhampur University, Berhampur 760007, Orissa

Received 30 November 2005; revised 5 July 2006

For lime preparation, mollusc shells are traditionally collected from the sea and estuaries. The main objective of the study was to analyse technically how mollusc shells are collected from the coastal areas of Ganjam district, Orissa. In the study, five sites of Ganjam coast, viz. Badapur, Sonapur, Gopalpur, Haripur and Palur, from where mollusc shell collection was carried out by the local Nolia or Bauri community were studied. Four types of methods, viz. hoeing, netting, sweeping and digging, were used to collect the shell from the estuary, sea, creek and Chilika lagoon, respectively. Four main types of shell that were used in the industries for lime preparation, viz. Anadara granosa (Khola), Meritrix meritrix (Gondhi), Meritrix casta. (Pati) and Ceritidea cingulata (Genda) were collected from different sites. During the study year, collection of shells from Badapur, Sonapur, Gopalpur, Haripur and Palur were 366.7, 194.1, 1435.8, 158.9 and 1676.4 Mega gm (Mg) respectively. Total energy expenditure through human labour and material varied from 18.96 to 67.8 GJ in five sites, out of which more than 80% was contributed by human energy.

Key words: Mollusc shell collection, Shells, Coastal Orissa, Estuary, Lime preparation

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(4), October 2007, pp. 559-562

 

Antibacterial activity of subterranean termites used in South Indian folk medicine

Solavan A1, Paulmurugan R2 & V Wilsanand3 *

1Department of Biology, PMT College, Melaneelithanallur, Thirunelveli, Tamil Nadu
2Department of Radiology and the Bio-X Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA 94305, USA
3Department of Zoology, Sree Narayana College, Alathur, Erattakulam (PO), Palakkad 678 682, Kerala

Email: wilsanand@yahoo.com

Received 17 May 2005; revised 7 May 2007

The investigation reports antimicrobial activity of the termite species most commonly used by the South Indian tribes for treating diseases likely to be associated with microorganisms. The antibacterial activities of 90% alcohol extracts of three species of subterranean termites, viz: Microtermes obes Holmgren, Macrotermes estherae (Desneux), and Odontotermes formosanus Shiraki, their mounds and nearby soil extracts collected from three different sites of South India were assayed against various bacterial strains. The antibacterial activity was most apparent in Odontotermes formosanus Shiraki, and its mound extracts, which inhibited all the bacterial strains studied. The highest antibacterial activity was encountered in Odontotermes formosanus (12.6 ±0.5 mm) and its mound extracts (14.3 ± 1.1 mm) against E. coli BL21. The MIC values also varied with the extracts and test organisms used and ranged from 10 µg/disc to 50 µg/disc. No activity was observed in the negative control as well as soil extracts collected from near by the termite mounds. Since, the traditional knowledge of indigenous people throughout the world has played an important role in identifying natural resources worthy of commercial exploitation and the search for new pharmaceuticals from naturally occurring biological material has been guided by ethnobiological data, the results are of significance to modern medicine.

Keywords: Antibacterial activity, Asthma, Ethnozoology, Ethnopharmacology, Termites, Paniyan, Palliyan, Sholaga, Irular Kota tribes

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(4), October 2007, pp. 563-568

 

Therapeutics of insects and insect products in South Indian traditional medicine

Wilsanand V*, Preema Varghese & Rajitha P

Department of Zoology, Sree Narayana College, Alathur, PO Erattakulam, Palakkad 678 682, Kerala

Email: wilsanand@yahoo.com

Received 27 September 2005; revised 16 March 2007

Studies on the therapeutic use of animals, especially insects and insect products, have been neglected when compared to plants. An attempt has been made to study the utilization of insects and insect products as traditional medicine among the tribes spread over two districts of Kerala in South India. Detailed information was collected regarding traditional therapeutic use of six different insect species and their products for the treatment of over 15 kinds of diseases or ailments. The preparation and usage of the insects and insect products for various ailments like ulcer, rheumatics, anaemia, scabies, conjunctivitis, malaria, asthma, cough, throat infection, chest infection, chest pain, back pain and for other minor ailments like headache, cold, burns, body pain, bee bites, wasp bites, insect bites, etc. are presented. Further studies on validation of these therapies using modern scientific techniques with the cooperation of tribal communities would probably go a long way leading to the discovery of more novel drugs from bugs.

Key words: Ethnoentomology, Entomo-ethnomedicine, Insects, Insect therapy, Tribals, Zootherapy, Traditional medicine, South India

 

  

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(4), October 2007, pp. 569-573

 

Ethnomedicine of Malapandaram tribes of Achenkovil forest of
Kollam
district, Kerala

 

Udayan PS, Satheesh George, KV Tushar & Indira Balachandran*

Centre for Medicinal Plants Research (CMPR), Arya Vaidya Sala, Kottakkal

Changuvetty, Kotuku 676 503, Malappuram district, Kerala

E-mail: avscmpr@sify.com; avscmpr@yahoo.co.in

Received 8 November 2005; revised 20 April 2006

The paper enumerates the traditional uses of 27 plants used by Malapandaram tribes of Achenkovil forest of Kollam district, Kerala Information on the medicinal uses gathered from the tribals together with their botanical identity is presented.

Keywords: Ethnomedicine, Malapandaram tribes, Achenkovil forest, Kerala

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(4), October 2007, pp. 574-578

 

Ethnomedicinal information from Kattunayakas tribes of Mudumalai Wildlife Sanctuary, Nilgiris district, Tamil Nadu

 

PS Udayan*, KV Tushar, Satheesh George & Indira Balachandran

Centre for Medicinal Plants Research (CMPR), Arya Vaidya Sala, Kottakkal, Changuvetty, Kottakkal 676 503,
Malappuram district, Kerala

E-mail: avscmpr@sify.com / avscmpr@yahoo.co.in

Received 16 September 2005; revised 16 February 2006

The paper enumerates the traditional uses of some plants used by the Kattunayaka tribes of Mudumalai Wildlife Sanctuary of Nilgiris district, Tamil Nadu. Information on the medicinal uses of 37 plants gathered from the tribals along with their botanical identity is highlighted.

Keywords: Medicinal plants, Kattunayaka, Mudumalai Wildlife Sanctuary, Ethnomedicine, Tamil Nadu

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(4), October 2007, pp. 579-582

 

Medicinal plants used by Malasar tribes of Coimbatore district, Tamil Nadu

P Pandi Kumar, M Ayyanar & S Ignacimuthu*

Entomology Research Institute, Loyola College, Chennai 600 034, Tamil Nadu

E-mail: eri_lc@hotmail.com

Received 2 December 2005; revised 5 July 2006

India is known for its rich flora and fauna, diverse climatic zones and wealth of living ethnomedicinal tradition. The paper enumerates medicinal plants used by Malasar tribes of Coimbatore district, Tamil Nadu. The traditional uses of 51 medicinal plants belonging to 34 families are presented with botanical name, family, local name, parts used, method of preparation and ethnomedicinal uses.

Keywords: Traditional knowledge, Ethnomedicine, Malasar tribes, Tamil Nadu

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(4), October 2007, pp. 583-588

 

Indigenous animal healthcare practices from Udaipur district, Rajasthan

Ambika Nag, Praveen Galav & SS Katewa*

Laboratory of Ethnobotany and Agrostology, Department of Botany, College of Science,

M L Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001, Rajasthan

Email: sskatewa@yahoomail.com

Received 25 November 2005; revised 13 June 2006

Livestock economy forms a major part of our agricultural economics. Tribals in far-flung rural areas still depend upon plants and household remedies for curing various veterinary ailments. The folk knowledge of ethnoveterinary significance has been identified by tribals through a process of experience over hundreds of years. The study throws light on folk ethnoveterinary practices of Udaipur district of Rajasthan. The paper deals with 30 diseases of domestic animals and their treatment by 62 plant species found in close vicinity of the rural people of the area.

Keywords:   Animal healthcare practices, Livestock, Indigenous knowledge, Medicinal plants, Herbal remedies, Ethnoveterinary practices, Udaipur, Rajasthan

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(4), October 2007, pp. 589-594

 

Traditional remedies of Kani tribes of Kottoor reserve forest, Agasthyavanam, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala

 

Arun Vijayan1*, Liju VB2, Reena John JV2, Parthipan B2 & Renuka C1

1Kerala Forest Reaearch Institute, Forest Ecology and Biodiversity Conservation Division, Peechi, Thrissur, Kerala
2ST Hindu College, Botany Department, Nagercoil, Kanyakumari, Tamil Nadu

E-mail: malarvady@rediffmail.com

Received 31 October 2005; revised 15 February 2006

Agasthya Vanam is known for its floral diversity and is a part of Western Ghats. Kottoor Reserve forest is a rich source for medicinal plants that has long been utilized by the people, and hence this region is remarkable for rich medicinal folk knowledge. The paper provides information about 50 plant species used by Kani tribes to treat 39 ailments. In addition to the scientific names, vernacular names, family, habit, procedure for preparation of medicine, dosage and dietary control are given.

Keywords: Traditional remedy, Kani tribes, Ethnomedicine, Agasthya Vanam, Kottoor reserve forest, Kerala

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(4), October 2007, pp. 595-598

 

Ethnomedicine used by Mishings tribes of Dibrugarh district, Assam

 

Madhumita Baruah & Dilip Kalita*

Department of Botany, Dibru College, Dibrugarh 786003, Assam

Received 16 September 2005; revised 16 February 2006

Ethnobotanical folklore of Mishings of Dibrugarh district of Assam is very rich. An attempt has been made to study ethnomedicine used by Mishings for the treatment of diseases like allergy, backache, cough, constipation, cut injury, diabetes, dysentery, eczema, epilepsy, indigestion, lice control, piles and ringworm infection. A total number of  22 medicinally important plant species are described.

Keywords: Ethnomedicine, Mishings, Kinne, Kusere

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(4), October 2007, pp. 599-601

 

Ethnomedicinal formulations used by traditional herbal practitioners of Ranchi, Jharkhand

Rabish Chandra, Malati Mahato, SC Mandal#, Kamini Kumar & Jyoti Kumar*

Medicinal Plant Laboratory, University Department of Botany, Ranchi University, Ranchi 834008, Jharkhand

#Pharmacognosy and Phytotherapy Research Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology

Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032, West Bengal

E-mails:rabishchandra@yahoo.com; jyotikumar1@yahoo.com; subhashmandal@yahoo.com

Received 13 Sptember 2005; revised 30 January 2006

Ranchi district of Jharkhand state is immensely rich in biodiversity and ethnomedicinal information. Ethnomedicinal survey was conducted during 2004. The information on ethnomedicinal formulation is based on the exhaustive interview with local traditional herbal practitioners and other knowledgeable persons, who prescribe their herbal preparation to treat various ailments. Twelve ethnomedicinal formulations reported in the paper includes 28 medicinal plants. These research finding need to be integrated with national healthcare systems, which requires further pharmacological validation.

Keywords: Ethnomedicine, Folklore, Traditional herbal practitioner, Ranchi, Jharkhand

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(4), October 2007, pp. 602-605

 

 

Herbal remedies used by Warlis of Dahanu to induce lactation in nursing mothers

Nudrat Z Sayed, Richa Deo & Usha Mukundan*

Plant Biotechnology Laboratory, Ramniranjan Jhunjhunwala College, Ghatkopar (W), Mumbai 400086, Maharashtra

E-mail: umukundan@hotmail.com

Received 19 October 2005; revised 3 February 2006

Warlis largely depend on traditional medicine mostly based on plant remedies for a wide range of ailments and health related problems. Breast feeding is a major source of nourishment for the tribal infants and it is carried for a prolonged period. Lactation inducing remedies are commonly used by the nursing mothers to meet the nutritional requirement of their children. Some of the galactogogue are plants that are found commonly growing in the wild while others are cultivated plants, however easily available. 

Keywords: Breast feeding, Galactagogue, Lactation, Nourishment, Traditional medicine, Warlis tribes

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(4), October 2007, pp. 606-610

 

Medicinal pants used against gastrointestinal tract disorders by the traditional healers of Sikkim Himalayas

 

Ranabir Chanda*, JP Mohanty, NR Bhuyan, PK Kar & LK Nath

Himalayan Pharmacy Institute, Majhitar, Rangpo737132, East Sikkim

Email: ranabirchanda@yahoo.com

Received 2 November 2005; revised 9 May 2006

Ethnomedicinal survey of various tribes in the four districts of Sikkim reveals the use of medicinal plants. The paper records ethnomedicinal values of 36 plants species belonging to 27 families having the activities in gastrointestinal tract disorders. A list of plants species along with their plant names, family, local names, plant parts used and the mode of administration has been enumerated.

Keywords: Indigenous knowledge, Medicinal plants, Gastrointestinal tract disorders, Ethnomedicine, Sikkim Himalayas

 

 Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(4), October 2007, pp. 611-618

 

Medicinal pteridophytes from the Western Ghats

 

Benjamin A & Manickam V S*

Centre for Biodiversity and Biotechnology, St Xavier's College (Autonomous), Palayamkottai 627 002, Tamil Nadu

Email : tvl_cbbsxc@sancharnet.in

Received 2 November 2005; revised 13 June 2006

Medicinal uses of 61 pteridophyte species belongs to 31 families used by tribals of the Western Ghats of India in their traditional methods of treatment of various diseases and ailments like stomach disorders, poisonous bites, rheumatics, cough, asthma fever and diabetes, etc. are presented.

Keywords: Western Ghats, Medicinal plants, Pteridophytes

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(4), October 2007, pp. 619-629

 

Dynamics of sustainable livestock and natural resources management

Ranjay K Singh1* & Amish K Sureja2

1Division of Agricultural Extension, 2Division of Vegetable Science

College of Horticulture and Forestry, Central Agricultural University, Pasighat 791 102, Arunachal Pradesh

E-mail: ranjay_jbp@rediffmail.com

Received 21 November 2005; revised 28 February 2006

The traditional communities derive both their socio-cultural and spiritual identity from land and forest for which a dynamic body of traditional knowledge and many socio-cultural institutions tested over centuries, flexible and collective in nature were evolved to sustain and mange the natural resources. Looking to the importance of this dynamics, an attempt has been made to explore the knowledge and practices pertaining to livestock and natural resources management governed by traditional knowledge and rural social institutions. To achieve the objective, the livestock owners from different ethnoculture from different villages of Dindori and Chhindwara districts, Madhya Pradesh were selected purposively. Various ethnographic tools, conventional methods like personal interview and participatory tools were adopted to explore and interpret the data. A range of locally available plant and other materials are widely used for curing many diseases and ailments of livestock. The indigenous biodiversity including local grasses, shrubs and trees are dynamically associated with local feeds, forages and are over all part of natural resources management of livestock owners. Still more preference is given to rear the local breeds of different livestock on account of their socio-cultural and spiritual compatibility resulting in conservation of biological diversity. Various social (Sajha) and cultural (Pola) institutional arrangements and traditional knowledge codified in local language are adopted to select, purchase, manage and improve the breeds of livestock. The ecological diversities in which pasture lands are categorized in to private and common property and associated with customary rules and culture play a significant role in sustainable use, conservation and management of the natural resources.

Keywords: Traditional knowledge, Ethnoveterinary practices, Social institutions, Natural resources management

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(4), October 2007, pp. 630-635

 

Monitoring spatial distribution of commercial rattans and palms in the tropical forest of Baratang Islands (Andaman and Nicobar Islands)

 

*Nidhi Nagabhatla, **PS Roy & **Rajendra Jagdale

*International Water Management Institute, PO Box 2075, Colombo, Sri Lanka; **National Remote Sensing Agency, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh; **Science and Technology Park, Pune 248011, Maharashtra

Email: n.nagabhatla@cgiar.org; nidhi26@gmail.com

Received 28 November 2005; revised 12 February 2007

Tropical forests are diverse and highly productive of all existing ecosystems. The need of the hour is to protect them from the devastating effect of development. The initiative requires not only assessment of the change in vegetation pattern over years but continuous monitoring of associated diversity as well. Since, the extraction activities in the islands are under check in the existing management policies, the economic upliftment has switched over to the non-forest timber products (NNTP’s) (mainly canes and bamboos). The study proposes to foreground the islands having maximum cane diversity and have spotlight a comparative account of distribution in different parts of Andaman & Nicobar Islands. The potential use of remote sensing is highly promising and the study is an approach for multidisciplinary assessments. The study is carried out in the tropical forests of Baratang Forest Division, Andaman Islands for the estimation of rattan and cane resources. The study has aimed to highlight the areas having dense growth of NTPF’s using spatial analysis. Distribution pattern of  Licula peltata, a palm of high commercial importance has also been analysed. It also attempts to prepare map for the region highlighting areas of high rattan diversity using IRS IC LISS-III data. The necessary set of attributes at a resolution sufficient for monitoring the distribution of rattan species in the islands is also described. A vegetation cover type map was prepared and the ground details were integrated to establish a correlation between the upper storey and the under storey forms.

Keywords: Rattans, Palms, Non Timber forest products, Remote sensing, Andaman and Nicobar Islands, Baratang Islands

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(4), October 2007, pp. 636-641

 

Traditional uses of some medicinal plants of Swat Valley, Pakistan

 

Muhammad Hamayun

Department of Botany, Government Degree College, Kotha, District Swabi, NWFP, Pakistan

E-mail: hamayun73@gmail.com

Received 27 September 2005; revised 16 March 2007

An ethnobotanical project was carried out in Swat valley in order to explore medicinal plants present in the local markets and their medicinal folk uses in the area. It was found that 51 species of medicinal plants belonging to 32 different families makes their way to the main local markets of Mingora and Madyan. Few of these are also traded to national and international markets. The people of Swat use indigenous medicinal plants for curing different ailments and also sell them in the local market for earning their livelihood. These medicinal plants are sold in the local market in fresh form, as the collectors are poor and needy. Some species are however, cleaned, sun dried and stored in plastic bags. During storage process, a considerable proportion of medicinal plants are lost. The population of medicinal plants has considerably decreased over past 15-20 yrs and the prime reasons are the increased dependency of locals on medicinal plants marketing, lack of job opportunities, non-sustainable harvesting methods like digging of whole plant and increased deforestation.

Keywords: Folk medicine, Ethnomedicine, Medicinal plants, Conservation status, Swat valley, Pakistan

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(4), October 2007, pp. 642-647

 

Indigenous Knowledge System of waste management in Nigeria

 

LT Ajibade

Department of Geography, University of Ilorin, 7 Ilorin, Nigeria

E-mail: edabijalt2001@yahoo.com

Received 5 August 2005; revised 28 March 2007

The paper examines the Indigenous Knowledge Systems of waste management in Nigeria, with particular emphasis on waste reduction techniques of reuse and recycling. In spite of the efforts of public and private agencies, heaps of wastes are still seen in Nigerian major cities. This observation has directed concerns towards the exploration of the indigenous waste management practices for possible adoption. Any developmental effort must be culturally feasible and relevant. The study observes the existence of indigenous techniques of waste management which were hitherto adequate for the volume and types of wastes generated long before the growing population in Nigeria. The study recommends further research on the existing methods to be complimented with the scientific and technological efforts, creation of awareness, encouragement of industries and businesses, creation of processing facilities and Waste Marketing Board as well as allowing the Federal Environmental Protection Agency (FEPA) to stand and operate independent of the Ministry of Environment.

Keywords: Indigenous Knowledge Systems, Indigenous waste management, Indigenous reuse methods, Indigenous recycling methods, Nigeria

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(4), October 2007, pp. 648-652

 

Standardization of Ayurvedic polyherbal formulation, Nyagrodhadi churna

 

KR Gopala Simha* & V Laxminarayana

Sodhana Trust, Gautam Towers, Sardar Patel Road, Secunderabad 500 003, Andhra Pradesh

E-mail:sodhana@satyam.net.in; sodhana@sify.com

Received 9 September 2005; revised 5 October 2006

Ayurvedic medicine Nyagrodhadi churna, known to be effective in all types of prameha (Pramehadhikara) – polyuria, including madhumeha (Diabetes mellitus), has been standardized by following modern scientific quality control procedures both for the raw material and the finished product. The obtained values of physical and chemical parameters can be adopted to lay down new pharmacopoeial standards to be followed for traditional preparation of Nyagrodhadi churna with batch-to-batch consistency. The phytochemical constituents found to be present in the raw material used for the preparation of Nyagrodhadi churna possibly facilitate the desirable therapeutic efficacy of the medicinal formulation, and also could help in knowing the underlying mechanisms of pharmacological action.

Keywords:Standardization, Nyagrodhadi churna, Ayurvedic formulation, Prameha, Polyuria, Madhumeha, Diabetes          mellitus, Pharmacopoeial standards

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(4), October 2007, pp. 653-659

 

Bhallatak (Semecarpus anacardium Linn.)—A Review

Ashwini Kumar A Raut*, N S Sawant, A S Badre, A J Amonkar & Ashok D B Vaidya

Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan’s SPARC, 13th NS Road, JVPD Scheme, Juhu, Mumbai 400 049, Maharashtra

Received 7 November 2005; revised 5 October 2006

Bhallatak (Semecarpus anacardium Linn.) has been used for medicinal and non-medicinal purposes since ancient times. The toxicity of bhallatak precludes its mega scale production particularly as a medicine at the industrial level. However, traditional healers and physicians of Indian Systems of Medicine continue to use bhallatak in various forms in their clinical practice. Several experimental investigations have been undertaken in diverse in vitro and in vivo models. The major focus of these investigations reported in the current literature, remains on anticancer and antiarthritic activity .The purpose of this review is to get a better insight in the activity of S. anacardium Linn. and comprehend its narrow therapeutic margin. It is important to understand the significance of Ayurveda inspired investigation of this traditionally acclaimed medicinal plant.

Keywords: Bhallatak, Ayurvedic drugs, Traditional medicine, Antiinflammatory activity, Antirheumatic activity, Anticancer activity, Review

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(4), October 2007, pp. 660-662

 

Ayurveda in Rajtrangni-Kalahana’s treatise of ancient Kashmir

 

YK Sharma

PG Department of Kayachikitsa, Rajiv Gandhi Government Post Graduate Ayurvedic College,
Paprola 176115, Himachal Pradesh

E-mail: dryks1@rediffmail.com

Received 8 November 2005; revised 14 September 2006

In the paper, information about Rajtarangini compiled throws light on the development and prevalence of Ayurveda in Kashmir. The paper related to eight main disciplines of Ayurveda (Astanga Ayurveda), medicine, Pancakarma, surgery, etc. have been described according to chapters (tarangas) of Rajtarangini. There is a reference of Dandalasaka and Sitajvara, which have been described as epidemics while Ksaya (tuberculosis) has also been mentioned. References of plastic surgery, trauma and surgical removal of the embedded foreign body have also been included.

Keywords: Ayurveda, Rajtrangni, Kashmir

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(4), October 2007, pp. 663-667

 

Cardioprotective effect of Unani formulation in rats

Tajuddin*, Nasiruddin M & Ahmad N

Department of Ilmul Advia*, AK Tibbiya College, Department of Pharmacology,

JN Medical College, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202 002, Uttar Pradesh

E-mail: naseer_bettiah@yahoo.co.in

Received 5 August 2005; revised 22 September 2006

The study was conducted to evaluate cardioprotective effect of Unani formulation. Unani formulation in the dose of 100 mg / 100 gm body weight was administered per oral for 60 days before isoproterenol to test cardioprotective effect. The levels of various cardiac enzymes, glycogen and adrenal ascorbic acid were significantly altered in isoproterenol treated group as compared with control and formulation pre-treated groups. The levels were statistically similar in the groups. Unani formulation has been found to exhibit cardioprotective activity.

Keywords:   Bombyx mori Linn., Nepata hindostana (Roth) Haines, Terminalia arjuna (Roxb.) Wight & Arn., Isoproterenol, Cardioprotective activity, Unani formulation

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(4), October 2007, pp. 668-677

 

A clinical study on the management of anxiety neurosis with Sankhaholi

Yasmeen Shamsi1*, Jameel Ahmad2 & Asim Ali Khan2

1Department of Kulliyat, Faculty of Medicine, Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi 110062; 2Department of Moalijat, Faculty of Medicine, Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi110062

E-mail: yasmeenshamsi@yahoo.co.in

Received 7 November 2005; revised 22 February 2006

Sankhaholi (Evolvulus alsinoides Linn.) has been used to improve brain power, memory and to treat various psychiatric disorders. A single blind, placebo controlled study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of Sankhaholi in 60 patients of Anxiety neurosis, belonging to 18-50 yrs of age group of both sexes. The severity of anxiety symptoms was assessed by Hamilton’s Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS), which was administered at baseline, at every week for 4 weeks, and then at 6th week of treatment (the treatment end point). In Drug group, the mean HARS score before treatment was 22.26, which was trimmed down to 12.21 after 6 weeks treatment. Whereas, in placebo group, pre-treatment mean HARS score was 23.78 and post treatment HARS score were 24.07. Sankhaholi markedly relieved anxiety symptoms without producing any side effects. Statistically the results of Sankhaholi were determined highly significant as compared to the results of placebo.

Keywords: Anxiety neurosis, Psychiatric disorders, Anxiolytic activity, Sankhaholi, Unani medicine, Nafsiyati amraz

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(4), October 2007, pp. 678-686

 

Herbs used in Siddha medicine for arthritis – A review

Eugene Wilson*1, GV Rajamanickam1, Neera Vyas2, A Agarwal3 & GP Dubey3

1Centre for Advanced Research in Indian System of Medicine (CARISM),

SASTRA University, Thanjavur 613 402, Tamil Nadu; 2Escorts Heart Institute and Research Centre, New Delhi 110 025; 3Centre for Psychosomatic and Biofeedback Medicine, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005, Uttar Pradesh

E-mail: willeuge@yahoo.co.in

Received 18 November 2005; revised 22 January 2007

Plants used in Siddha system of medicine for arthritis has been studied from various Siddha literatures and are presented hereunder. The particulars of herbs used with its botanical name, vernacular name (Tamil), family, parts used, administration form and indication are tabulated. This information provides immense potential for studying their activity for arthritis both in pre-clinical and clinical stages, which lead to the preparation of useful pharmaceutical products.

Keywords: Siddha medicine, Arthritis, Medicinal plants

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 6(4), October 2007, pp. 687-691

 

Veda and Yajña in Indian tradition

 

Krishna Murti Raju

Department of Physics, BNV PG College, Rath, Hamirpur 210 431, Uttar Pradesh

E-mail: krishnamurtiraju@yahoo.com

Received 8 November 2005; revised 20 April 2006

India is cradle of the world civilizations on the earth. It is the place of origin of Vedas and through them the place of origin of all other sciences of the world. The main theme of Vedas is Yajña. Yajña is recommended for well beings of human and for replenishing the nature. Yajña is essential foremost requirement to get rid of present anxieties and stress. In the paper, all above thoughts are discussed in detail.

Keywords: Brahmā, Veda, Yajña, Agnihotra