Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Total visitors: 6,770  since 09-04-08

 

VOLUME 7

NUMBER 2

APRIL 2008

 

CONTENTS

 

Papers

 

Indigenous beekeeping for sustainable development in Himachal Himalaya

221

††††† Savitri Verma & PK Attri

 

 

 

Scope of ethnofisheries and sustainable marine fisheries management in India

226

††††† Ashaletha S & Sheela Immanuel

 

 

 

The effect of pyramids on preservation of milk

233

††††† RK Gopinath, Prem Anand Nagaraja & HR Nagendra

 

 

 

Indigenous herbal remedies used to cure skin disorders by the natives of Lahaul-Spiti in Himachal Pradesh

237

††††† Brij Lal & KN Singh

 

 

 

Ethnomedicinal plants used by tribes of Kalahandi district, Orissa

242

††††† Tribhubana Panda & Rabindra N Padhy

 

 

 

Some common plants used by Kurichiar tribes of Tirunelli forest, Wayanad district, Kerala in medicine and other traditional uses

250

††††† PS Udayan, MK Harinarayanan, KV Tushar & Indira Balachandran

 

 

 

Some therapeutic uses of biodiversity among the tribals of Rajasthan

256

††††† Anita Jain, SS Katewa, Praveen Galav & Ambika Nag

 

 

 

Phytomedicinal study of coastal sand dune species of Orissa

263

††††† Chiranjibi Pattanaik, CS Reddy & NK Dhal

 

 

 

Poisonous plants of the southern Aravalli hills of Rajasthan

269

††††† SS Katewa, PK Galav, Ambika Nag & Anita Jain

 

 

 

Traditional knowledge on medicinal plants used for the treatment of skin diseases in
Bidar district, Karnataka

273

††††††† Prashantkumar P & Vidyasagar GM

 

 

 


 

An ethnomedicinal inventory of plants used for family planning and sex diseases in
Samahni valley, Pakistan

277

††††† Muhammad Ishtiaq Ch & MA Khan

 

 

 

Ethnomedicobotanical uses of endemic and RET plants utilised by the Korku tribe of
Amravati district, Maharashtra

284

††††† SD Jagtap, SS Deokule & SV Bhosle

 

 

 

Medicinal plants used in traditional medicine in Lohit and Dibang valley districts of
Arunachal Pradesh

288

††††† Rama Shankar & MS Rawat

 

Folklore claims on snakebite among some tribal communities of Central India

296

††††† Chitralekha Kadel & Ashok K Jain

 

 

 


Indigenous plants in traditional healthcare system in Kedarnath valley of western Himalaya

300

††††† VP Bhatt & DP Vashishtha

 

 

 

Ethnobotanical uses of endemic and RET plants by Pawra tribe of Nandurbar district, Maharashtra

311

††††† SD Jagtap, SS Deokule & SV Bhosle

 

 

 

Ethnomedicinal uses of Eclipta prostrta Linn.

316

††††† Abdul Viqar Khan & Athar Ali Khan

 

 

 

Plants used by the tribes of Northwest Maharashtra for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders

321

††††† SY Kamble, TN More, SR Patil, SG Pawar, Ram Bindurani & SL Bodhankar

 

 

 

Animal products in traditional medicine from Attappady hills of Western Ghats

326

††††† P Padmanabhan & KA Sujana

 

 

 

Antimalarial activity and clinical safety of traditionally used Nyctanthes arbor-tristis Linn.

330

††††† Karnik SR, Tathed PS, Antarkar DS, Gidse CS, Vaidya RA & Vaidya ADB

 

 

 

Comparative assessment of antihyperlipidaemic action of Tamra Bhasma

335

††††† Rajiv Kumar Rai, CB Jha, JPN Chansuriya & KR Kohli

 

 

 

Evaluation of the clinical efficacy of Unani formulation on eczema

341

††††† Md Nawab, Abdul Mannan & Misbahuddin Siddiqui

 

 

 

Siddha way to cure Chikungunya

345

††††† MV Viswanathan, D Karpaga Raja and S Durai Khanna

 

 

 

Ethnoveterinary healthcare practices in southern districts of Tamil Nadu

347

††††† S Ganesan, M Chandhirasekaran & A Selvaraj

 

 

 

Traditional veterinary herbal medicines of western part of Almora district, Uttarakhand Himalaya

355

††††† Rohita Shah, PC Pande & Lalit Tiwari

 

 

 

Documentation and participatory rapid assessment of ethnoveterinary practices

360

††††† Raneesh Santhanakrishnan, Abdul Hafeel, Hariramamurthi BA & Unnikrishnan PM

 

 

 

Importance of local names of some useful plants in ethnobotanical study

365

††††† Harish Singh

 

 

 

Author Index

371

 

 

Subject Index

371

 

 

Announcement

373

 

 

Forthcoming Seminars/Conferences

374

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol.7(2), April 2008, pp. 221-225

 

 

Indigenous beekeeping for sustainable development in Himachal Himalaya

Savitri Verma1 & PK Attri2*

1Department of Biosciences, HP University, Shimla 5, Himachal Pradesh;
2Institute of Integrated Himalayan Studies (UGC-Centre of Excellence), HPU Shimla 5, Himachal Pradesh

E-mail: attripk29@rediffmail .com

Received 15 December 2005; Revised 22 March 2006

Indigenous beekeeping is the indigenous techniques of harvesting honey and beeswax from bees, using various indigenous styles of hives and other equipments. India and the neighbouring East Asian region are considered to be the centre of origin and evolution of honey bee species. Himachal Pradesh, owing to its varied agro-climate, has a great variety of bee forage sources that provide the basis for development of beekeeping industry in the state. The potential and success in beekeeping development is dependent on the quality and quantity of bees and bee flora available and the technology used. A survey conducted in seven blocks of district Chamba revealed that there are about 2.45 hives per house and occupancy rate of hive is 53.94 % in the region testifying to the rich ness of this culture. The Indigenous wall hives are locally called as Ganari in Chamba district. The dimensions of wall hive was accordingly, made by leaving a cavity in the wall when the house is under construction. On the inside, it is covered usually with a slate or stone plastered with mud. The size depends upon the availability of hollow tree trunk of Toon, Robinia, Bann, Kail trees. Beekeepers of district Chamba prefer the wall hive, however quantity of total honey harvested and ease of harvest is best in log hives. People clean their hives by scrubbing them from inside with scrubbers made of pine needle, Juniperis sp. or old raw combs. This helps in attracting the bees to the hives. Economic efficiency of Apis cerana (Indigenous beekeeping) is shown to be more economic then Apis mellifera. Beekeeping with Apis cerana should be encouraged for rural households with low investment capacity.

Keywords: Indigenous beekeeping, Chamba, Honey, Beeswax, Sustainable development, Himachal Pradesh, Himalaya

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(2), April 2008, pp. 226-232

 

 

Scope of ethnofisheries and sustainable marine fisheries management in India

Ashaletha S1* & Sheela Immanuel2

1Central Institute of Fisheries Technology, Matsyapuri, PO Kochi 29, Kerala;

2Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Tatapuram, PO Kochi18, Kerala

E-mail: ashaletha@rediffmail.com

Received 16 May 2006; revised 23 November 2006

The present global fisheries situation demands solving of the issue of resource depletion and environmental degradation to achieve a sustainable development. Efforts for making sustainable marine fisheries development plans pragmatic, necessitates participatory resource management and biodiversity conservation harmonized with attainment of societal, economic as well as ecological well being. Any scientific intervention attempted in a rural society, without regard for traditional and indigenous knowledge systems of local people has often failed. In recognition of these issues, an attempt was made to study the scope of genesis and development of a new paradigm, ethnofisheries. It deals with the indigenous and traditional knowledge items of marine fisheries sector and its significance in the contemporary fisheries management scenario of India. The perception of the actual repositories of this traditional wisdom was also studied regarding the relevance of conserving and scope of applying this knowledge in the current scenario. The Indigenous Traditional Knowledge (ITK) from a coastal state of Kerala was collected to illustrate the relevance of the traditional wisdom. The significance of ITK of marine sector in the present context is elicited from the viewpoint of policy makers, technocrats as well as fisher folk. The ITKs documented from a coastal state is arrayed to show the scope of ethnofisheries.

Keywords: Ethnofisheries, Indigenous knowledge, Marine fisheries


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. .7(2), April 2008, pp. 233-236

 

 

The effect of pyramids on preservation of milk

R K Gopinath1, Prem Anand Nagaraja2 & H R Nagendra1*

1Division of Yoga and Life Sciences, Swami Vivekananda Yoga Anusandhana Samsthana, Swami Vivekananda Yoga Research Foundation, #19, Eknath Bhavan, ear Gavipuram Circle, KGNagar, Bangalore 560019, Karnataka;

2Department of Microbiology, Narayana Hrudayalaya Institute of Cardiac Sciences, Bangalore, Karnataka

E-mail:hrnagendra@rediffmail.com

Received 6 December 2005; revised 29 August 2007

Pyramid has been variously studied for its mystical preservative, healing and curative effects. The power of the pyramids has been much talked about in Egypt and the great pyramids as the wonders of the world. They are mentioned as ÁikhariŽis and gopurams used in temples in Indian tradition. It is associated with Chakras and the elevation of the human mind to the super-consciousness levels. Although several studies have been undertaken on pyramids, much of their effects remain a mystery. In the study, attempt has been made as to scientifically analyze the preservative capability of the pyramids. Pyramids made out of natural materials as wood and other synthetic materials as fiberglass have been used to understand the effect. The shape of the pyramids was square and octagon of different sizes.

Milk kept under the pyramids for a period of 14 days was analyzed. All the samples in the pyramids have shown various levels of inhibition of bacterial growth, compared with the control sample. The samples in the wooden pyramids have shown the maximum preservative capability in comparison with the samples in the fiberglass pyramids. The samples in the octagon pyramid have shown better performance than that of square pyramids. The study could be the beginning of many more rigorous studies to establish the finding. All can imagine the tremendous implications of the study.

Keywords: Pyramid, Subtle energy, Preservative capabilities

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(2), April 2008, pp. 237-241

 

 

Indigenous herbal remedies used to cure skin disorders by the natives of
Lahaul-Spiti in Himachal Pradesh

Brij Lal* & K N Singh

Biodiversity Division, Institute of Himalayan Bioresource Technology, Palampur 176061, Himachal Pradesh

E-mail: brijihbt@yahoo.co.in

Received 13 April 2007; revised 12 December 2007

The communication highlights the medicinal importance of some plants used to cure different skin disorders by the native people inhabiting Lahaul-Spiti district of Himachal Pradesh. Ethnomedicinal information on 18 plant species belonging to 14 families, used by the inhabitants for curing different skin disorders including boils and blisters, itching (allergy), skin infection, leprosy, skin eruptions, cuts and wounds, were recorded. Details regarding plant names, local names, family, mode of administration and ailments treated, for each species are reported.

Keywords: Indigenous knowledge, Herbal remedies, Skin disorders, Lahaul-Spiti, Himachal Pradesh


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(2), April 2008, pp. 242-249

 

Ethnomedicinal plants used by tribes of Kalahandi district, Orissa

 

Tribhubana Pandaa* & Rabindra N Padhyb

aKalahandi Institute for Tribology and Ethnobiology, Jilingdar, Dedar 766014, District Kalahandi, Orissa

bDepartment of Botany, Government Autonomous College, Bhawanipatna 766001, Orissa

E-mail: kite_kld@yahoo.co.in

Received 6 December 2005; revised 29 August 2007

An ethnomedicinal survey on the traditional knowledge of aboriginal tribes and other non-tribal communities of 400 sq km of Kalahandi district, Orissa and a comparison of the data with the available literature revealed that out of the recorded 111 flowering plants of 60 families, 49 plants have new uses that were not known here before. Moreover, different uses of known 62 more plants are recorded with new uses. These 111 plants are in use against 42 human ailments. They use the plant parts as infusions, decoctions and powders.

Keywords: Ethnobotany, Ethnomedicine, Traditional knowledge, Tribes, Kalahandi

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(2), April 2008, pp. 250-255

 

 

Some common plants used by Kurichiar tribes of Tirunelli forest, Wayanad district, Kerala in medicine and other traditional uses

P S Udayan, M K Harinarayanan, K V Tushar & Indira Balachandran*

Centre for Medicinal Plants Research (CMPR), Arya Vaidya Sala, Kottakkal

Changuvetty, Kottakkal 676 503, Malappuram district, Kerala

E-mail: avscmpr@sify.com / avscmpr@yahoo.co.in

Received 12 December 2005; revised 20 April 2007

The paper enumerates the traditional uses of 48 plants used by Kurichiar tribes inhabiting the Tirunelli forest of Wayanad district in Kerala. Information on the medicinal and other traditional uses gathered from the tribals together with their botanical identity is presented.

Keywords: Ethnomedicine, Medicinal plants, Kurichiar tribes, Kerala

 

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(2), April 2008, pp. 256-262

 

Some therapeutic uses of biodiversity among the tribals of Rajasthan

 

Anita Jain, S S Katewa*, Praveen Galav & Ambika Nag

Laboratory of Ethnobotany and Agrostology, Department of Botany, College of Science
ML Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001 Rajasthan

E-mail: anitajain_02@rediffmail.com; sskatewa@yahoo.com

Received 21 August 2006; revised 20 August 2007

Extensive ethnomedicinal survey was carried out to document the precious indigenous healthcare practices prevalent among the different ethnic groups of Rajasthan. These people belonging to primitive or aboriginal culture possess a good deal of information about medicinal utility of biodiversity. During the survey, it was noted that plant parts, animals and substances of animal origin are commonly used by the tribals to cure various diseases and disorders. Indigenous healthcare practices, provide low cost alternatives, where western healthcare services are not available or are too expensive. Analysis of data based on 72 remedies indicates that 57 remedies are based on 45 different plant species belonging to 29 families and 15 remedies are based on several substances of animal origin. A list of plant/animal species along with their part/s used and the mode of administration for effective control in different ailments are given.

Keywords: Biodiversity utilization, Ethnobiology, Bhil, Meena, Garasia, Damor, Sahariya, Gujar, Kathodia, Dindor, Ahari, Raot, Parmar, Folklore, Medicinal plants, Rajasthan

 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(2), April 2008, pp. 263-268

 

Phytomedicinal study of coastal sand dune species of Orissa

 

Chiranjibi Pattanaik1*, CS Reddy1 & NK Dhal2

1Forestry and Ecology Division, National Remote Sensing Agency, Hyderabad 500 037, Andhra Pradesh

2Natural Products Department, Institute of Minerals Materials Technology
(Formerly Regional Research Laboratory), CSIR, Bhubaneswar 751 013, Orissa

E-mail: jilu2000@rediffmail.com

Received 24 January 2006; revised 28 August 2006

The coastal sand dune species of Orissa bears high cultural and ecological utility. Unfortunately, the dune vegetation has been extensively modified by human activity. Ethnobotanical survey was conducted among Savaras, Santals and other local communities, in sand dune vegetation of 6 coastal districts of Orissa during 2002-2004. A total of 55 plants have been collected and their popular uses are listed. Due to continuous loss of coastal vegetation, the associated indigenous knowledge with them is also gradually disappearing. So, it is imperative to protect and restore the dune vegetation, as an immediate priority.

Keywords: Phytomedicine, Ethnomedicine, Ethnobotany, Sand dune vegetation, Orissa, Khond, Savara, Santal

 

 

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(2), April 2008, pp. 269-272

 

Poisonous plants of the southern Aravalli hills of Rajasthan

 

SS Katewa*, PK Galav, Ambika Nag & Anita Jain

Laboratory of Ethnobotany & Agrostology, Department of Botany, College of Science,
ML Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001, Rajasthan

E-mail: sskatewa@yahoo.com

Received 23 March 2006; revised 17 August 2006

Of about 18-20 thousand flowering plants present in our country, many plant species are utilized as food, fodder, medicine and fibre. Quite a few flowering plant species are poisonous. Knowledge on poisonous plants is important as some of them are used in medicine. The poisonous properties are due to toxic substances such as alkaloids, glucosides, saponins, amines, tannins, resins, etc. An account of 32 poisonous plants occurring on the Aravalli hills of Rajasthan has been presented. The information on the poisonous plant species has been gathered from the tribals during ethnobotanical field survey. The study suggests that the tribal people are not only aware of such poisonous plants and their harmful effects, but also use them judiciously for control of insect-pests, bugs, mosquitoes and many other harmful organisms.

Keywords: Poisonous plants, Ethnomedicine, Bhil, Garasia, Kathodia, Menna, Parmar, Meghwal, Aravalli hills, Rajasthan

 

 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(2), April 2008, pp. 273-276

 

 

Traditional knowledge on medicinal plants used for the treatment of skin diseases in Bidar district, Karnataka

Prashantkumar P & Vidyasagar GM*

Department of Botany, Gulbarga University, Gulbarga 585 106, Karnataka

E-mail: gmvidyasagar@rediffmail.com

Received 2 December 2005; revised 20 April 2006

A survey of medicinal plants of different rural and forest areas of Bidar district was conducted. It was found that the drug preparations of plant origin are commonly used by tribals, local inhabitants and folk practitioners for the treatment of skin diseases. About 26 plant species of 25 genera belonging to 16 families are described along with the method of drug preparation, mode of administration, probable dosage and duration of treatment. The aim of the study is not only to prescribe the remedies for skin diseases in human beings but also an endeavor to draw attention for the need of a detailed study on medicinal plants of the area, which could provide better and efficient remedies for many other dreadful diseases.

Keywords: Medicinal plants, Traditional medicine, Skin diseases, Tribals, Folk medicine, Ethnomedicine, Karnataka


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(2), April 2008, pp. 277-283

 

An ethnomedicinal inventory of plants used for family planning and sex diseases in Samahni valley, Pakistan

Muhammad Ishtiaq Ch* & MA Khan

Laboratory of Ethnobotany and Plant Taxonomy, Department of Biological Sciences, Quaid-e-Azam University, Islamabad, Pakistan

E-mail: muhammad_ishtiaq2001@yahoo.com

Received 12 December 2005; revised 20 April 2007

An ethnomedicinal systematic exploration of medicinal plants of tribal area of Samahni valley was conducted. The data of ethnomedicine used by tribals for birth control and sex diseases were collected by frequent planned visits by applying semi-structured interviews, questionnaires, direct observations and biological inventories. There was a high degree of informant consensus for the species and their medicinal indications between the healers interviewed. Samahni valley is dressed up with a wide range of medicinal flora. The geographical isolation and hilly terrain has permitted the survival of folk herbal medicines still in this area. Indigenous plants are interactly associated to the culture and traditions of local people. About 36 plant species, distributed in 26 families were used to treat sexual diseases and control birth rate in Samahni valley, Pakistan. The most of these plants growing wild (55.55%) are indigenous (61.11%) and herbs (52.77%). The plant parts frequently used are seed (22.72 %), root (20.45%), fruit, leaf and whole plant (9.09%). Medications are mostly prepared as decoctions and infusions. Most of species reported here are found to control family size and treat sexual diseases. People are still dependent on medicinal plants in this rural area of Samahni valley. The study enlightens how data of ethnomedicinal inventory of medicinal plants can be used effectively at local and regional level for phytochemical and pharmacological research. Due to unplanned exploitation and acculturation, the area had resulted in loss of medicinally important plant species. It was concluded that afforestation programme followed by proper protection is need of time.

Key words: Ethnobotany, Ethnomedicine, Family planning, Sexual diseases Samahni valley, Pakistan

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(2), April 2008, pp. 284-287

 

Ethnomedicobotanical uses of endemic and RET plants utilised by the Korku tribe of Amravati district, Maharashtra

SD Jagtap1*, SS Deokule2 & SV Bhosle1

1Medicinal Plant Conservation Center Ė Rural Communes, Pune 411037, Maharashtra; 2Department of Botany,
University of Pune, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007, Maharashtra

E-mail: chiritatml@rediffmail.com

Received 7 February 2006; revised 6 September 2007

Ethnomedicobotanical uses of 13 plant species belonging to 12 families used by the Korku tribe are given with their botanical name, local name and family. Efforts for their conservation, cultivation and afforestation for sustainable utilization of such plants in future have also been discussed.

Keywords: Ethnobotany, Ethnomedicine, Korku tribes, Maharashtra


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(2), April 2008, pp. 288-295

 

 

Medicinal plants used in traditional medicine in Lohit and Dibang valley districts of Arunachal Pradesh

Rama Shankar1* & MS Rawat2

1Regional Research Institute (Ayurveda), Itanagar791111, Arunachal Pradesh; 2Herbal Research and Development Institute, Gopeshwar, District Chamoli, Uttarakhand

E-mail:†† regionals06@yahoo.com

Received 9 January 2006; revised 22 August 2006

The paper deals with medicinal plants used in various traditional systems of medicine in Lohit, Dibang Valley and Lower Dibang valley districts of Arunachal Pradesh. The three adjoining districts are located in the extremity of the state bounded by China in the Northeastern part, Changlang district of Arunachal Pradesh in the Southeastern part; state of Assam in the Southwest as well as East Siang and Upper Siang districts are in the western part. Lohit is inhabited by Mishmi, Khamti and Singpho tribes while the Lower Dibang valley and Dibang valley districts are inhabited by Mishmi tribe. Mishmi are divided into Idu Mishmi and Digaru Mishmi tribes. Brief account of the tribes, their mode of living and food habits along with detailed account of distribution of medicinal plants used in various systems of medicine have been described.

Key words:Ethnomedicine, Traditional medicine, Arunachal Pradesh, Folklore, Mishmi, Khamti, Singpho

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(2), April 2008, pp. 296-299

 

Folklore claims on snakebite among some tribal communities of Central India

Chitralekha Kadel* & Ashok K Jain**

*Lokmanya Tilak College, Ujjain 456006, Madhya Pradesh; **Institute of Ethnobiology, Jiwaji University,
Gwalior 474011, Madhya Pradesh

E-mail: asokjain2003@yahoo.co.in

Received 18 October 2005; revised 21 November 2006

Four regions of Madhya Pradesh and Chhattisgarh, Jhabua, Gwalior, Pachmarhi and Bastar were selected for observing folklore claims on some plant species used for the treatment of snakebite. Various plant parts are being used in different ways; some species are either used or not used in treatment of snakebite. To ascertain credibility of folklore claims, a comparison on use and disuse has been made.

Keywords:†††††† Ethnomedicine, Folklore, Medicinal plants, Snakebite, Sahariya, Bheel, Bhilala, Korku, Gond, Bharia, ††Mobasi, Madhya Pradesh, Chhattisgarh, Central India

 

 

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(2), April 2008, pp. 300-310

 

Indigenous plants in traditional healthcare system in Kedarnath
valley of western Himalaya

 

VP Bhatt1* & DP Vashishtha2

1Department of Botany, Government PG College Gopeshwar, Chamoli, Uttarakhand
2Department of Botany, HNB Garhwal University, Srinagar, Uttarakhand

E-mail:bhattvp3@yahoo.com; vishwapati_bhatt@rediffmail.com

Received 13 January 2006; revised 30 July 2007

The study deals with the indigenous plants used in traditional healthcare in Kedarnath valley of Uttarakhand in western Himalaya. A total 130 plant species belonging to 94 genera and 62 families have been identified. Of these, 21 species are trees, 19 species are shrubs and 90 species are herbs. These species diversity are described for their distribution, utilisation pattern, and indigenous uses. The roots, rhizomes, bulbs, stems, tubers, leaves, barks, fruits and seeds are used for treatment of different ailments. The plants are rare (30 sp), endangered (15 sp), and vulnerable (3 sp) and common (82). As per their population structure, several anthropogenic and natural causes are analysed for their threatened status. The study is a first attempt to study the medicinal plants of the Kedarnath valley area. Documentation of traditional knowledge on the ethnomedicinal use of these plants was studied.

Keywords: Kedarnath valley, Ethnomedicine, Traditional healthcare, Plant conservation

 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(2), April 2008, pp. 311-315

 

 

Ethnobotanical uses of endemic and RET plants by Pawra tribe of
Nandurbar district, Maharashtra

 

SD Jagtap1, SS Deokule2* & SV Bhosle1

1Medicinal Plant Conservation Center, Rural Communes, Pune 411037, Maharashtra
2Department of Botany, University of Pune, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007, Maharashtra

E-mail: chiritatml@rediffmail.com

Received 24 January 2006; revised 28 August 2006

The paper enumerates ethnobotanical uses of 28 plant species that are endemic and/or in the RET (Rare, Endangered and Threatened) category belonging to 15 families, by Pawra tribe of Nandurbar district. Plants are arranged alphabetically with their botanical name, followed by family, IUCN status, local names and uses. Efforts for conservation, cultivation and afforestation have been done with help of the state forest department and Pawra tribe for the sustainable use of such important plant species in near future.

Keywords: Ethnomedicine, Ethnobotany, Pawra, Maharashtra

 

 

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(2), April 2008, pp. 316-320

 

Ethnomedicinal uses of Eclipta prostrta Linn.

Abdul Viqar Khan* & Athar Ali Khan

Department of Botany, Faculty of Life Sciences, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202 002, Uttar Pradesh

E-mail: viqarvicky@rediffmail.com

Received 6 March 2006; revised 21 August 2006

Present communication records ethnomedicinal uses of Eclipta prostrta (L.) Linn. gathered from 5 districts of western Uttar Pradesh. It also presents the results of the screening of 5 Eclipta prostrta crude extracts for antibacterial activity against 18 human pathogenic bacteria. Standard methods of ethnobotanical explorations were followed and first hand information was collected by interviewing traditional medicine men / wise women. Antibacterial activity was determined by Standard Disk Diffusion method. A total of 33 claims were recorded from the study area. An attempt has been made to correlate the ethnomedicinal claims, gathered in this study with the already known pharmacological properties and antibacterial activity of crude extracts of this species. Ethyl acetate and methanol extracts showed antibacterial activity against maximum number of bacteria tested, followed by aqueous, benzene and petrol extracts.

Key Words: Eclipta prostrata, Ethnomedicine, Antibacterial activity, Traditional knowledge

 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(2), April 2008, pp. 321-325

 

 

Plants used by the tribes of Northwest Maharashtra for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders

SY Kamble1, TN More1, SR Patil1, SG Pawar1, Ram Bindurani2 & SL Bodhankar2*

1Bharati Vidyapeeth University, Yashwantrao Mohite College, Erandwane, Pune 38, Maharashtra; 2Bharati Vidyapeeth University,
Poona College of Pharmacy, Erandwane, Pune 38, Maharashtra

Received 6 March 2006; revised 21 August 2006

An ethnomedicinal survey was carried out to identify the wild plants used by the Bhilla, Thakar, Warli and Kokna tribes of Northwestern region of Maharashtra for the treatment of various ailments. During field visits to tribal settlements, medicine men, Mukhia or Mhorkya, Vaidus, etc. were contacted, interviewed and information on 33 plant species used by these tribes for the treatment of common gastrointestinal disorders was collected. The survey revealed that the plant parts of Aloe barbadensis, Ceropegia hirsuta, Cicer arietinum and Anisochilus carnosus are used for stomachache; Citrus aurantiifolia is used for diarrhoea and dysentery and Zingiber officinale rhizome is used for acidity and ulcer.

Keywords: Ethnomedicine, Gastrointestinal disorders, Bhilla, Thakar, Warli, Kokna Maharashtra

 

 

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(2), April 2008, pp. 326-329

 

 

Animal products in traditional medicine from Attappady hills of Western Ghats

 

P Padmanabhan* & KA Sujana

Division of Forest Ecology and Biodiversity Conservation, Kerala Forest Research Institute, Peechi 680620, Kerala

E-mail: padmanabhan@kfri.org; sujanakarjunan@rediffmail.com

Received 30 January 2006; revised 21 November 2006

The paper describes the traditional method of treating various kinds of ailments using various vertebrates and invertebrates and/or their products by different tribes in Attapadi hills of Western Ghats. Efforts have been made to identify different animals of medicinal value used by Irular, Mudugar and Kurumbar tribes and decode their names in English language along with scientific names as far as possible. A list of 44 animal species and their products, nature of ailments, mode of treatment has been presented.

Key words: Animal medicine, Traditional medicine, Western Ghats

 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(2), April 2008, pp. 330-334

 

Antimalarial activity and clinical safety of traditionally used
Nyctanthes arbor-tristis
Linn.

1Karnik SR, 2Tathed PS, Antarkar DS, 3Gidse CS, 3Vaidya RA, & 3Vaidya ADB*

1Samarth Ayurvedic Centre, C/o Lambs Pharmacy, 173, Karanghape Road, Newton, Auckland, New Zealand; 2Yerala Medical Trust, Ayurvedic Medical College, Institutional Area, Sector 4, Kharghar, Mumbai 410210, Maharashtra; 3Kasturba Health Society Medical Research Centre, Khandubai Desai Road, Vile Parle (West), Mumbai 400056, Maharashtra

E-mail: mmrckhs@gmail.com

Received 16 November 2007; revised 21 February 2008

Traditional systems of medicine, such as Ayurveda and Chinese medicine in Asia have been provided novel concepts and modalities for healthcare. Critical bedside observations by astute physicians have been followed up by systematic trans-disciplinary research. Such clinical hits of novel biodynamic actions can lead to new drug candidates. In the study, this path was taken up to document antimalarial activity of Nyctanthes arbor-tristis Linn. (Parijat). Nyctanthes arbor-tristis Linn., a popular plant with fragrant flowers described in Ayurveda is being sporadically used for malaria by several Ayurvedic physicians. Patients with malaria were treated with the paste of five fresh leaves of Nyctanthes arbor-tristis Linn, Given orally three times in a day for 7-10 days. The relief of symptoms and signs of malaria and the features of Visham jwara were graded basally and daily. Of 120 patients, ninety two (76.7%) showed complete clinical and parasitic cure within 7 days. Other 20 patients, who then continued on the same treatment, were cured by 10 days. Those patients who did not respond clinically and by parasite clearance were treated with standard antimalarial therapy. Parasite clearance was gradual and showed a direct temporal relationship with the level of initial parasitemia. The paste was well tolerated and no severe side effects were reported. Nyctanthes arbor-tristis Linn, with the dose used showed significant clinical antimalarial activity and good tolerability. A standardized formulation has to be prepared for further studies with critical markers of disease severity as well as parasite clearance.

Keywords:†† Antimalarial activity, Ayurvedic drugs, Traditional medicine, Nyctanthes arbor-tristis Linn, Visham jwara, Parijat


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(2), April 2008, pp. 335-340

 

Comparative assessment of antihyperlipidaemic action of Tamra Bhasma

Rajiv Kumar Rai1*, CB Jha2, JPN Chansuriya3 & KR Kohli1,

1Ayurveda Research, Dabur Research Foundation, 22 Site 4, Sahibabad, Ghaziabad 201010, Uttar Pradesh; 2Department of Rasa Shastra; 3CEMS, IMS, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005, Uttar Pradesh

E-mail: rrajiva@yahoo.com

Received 15 December 2005; Revised 22 March 2006

Metals are processed through various steps like Shodhana, Marana, Amritikarana, etc. to convert them into Bhasmas, which are then used as a medicine in Ayurveda for internal consumption. These processes are said to increase the bio-acceptability of the metallic preparations mentioned in Ayurveda. In the classical texts, Marana of metals is categorized according to various media used during the process of Marana, such as Kajjali, Mullika, Gandhakadi (mercurial compounds, herbs and sulphur containing compounds) and Ariloha (enemy metals), which are claimed to be superior, medium, inferior and unwarranted, respectively. Tamra (copper) Bhasma has been advocated for its therapeutic use in Hrid Rogas. Therefore, an attempt has been made to evaluate the relative antihyperlipidaemic efficacy of Tamra Bhasmas made by adopting different Marana procedures. The results indicate that lipid lowering capacity of Tamra Bhasma prepared using Mullika (herb) is best; whereas Bhasma prepared using Kajjali (mercurial compound) is of second grade. Bhasma prepared using Gandhaka (sulphur) is not effective for the antihyperlipidaemic activity. Tamra Bhasma with Ariloha was not tried as it has been referred not fit for human use.

Keywords: Ayurvedic drugs, Bhasmas, Tamra Bhasma

 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(2), April 2008, pp. 341-344

 

Evaluation of the clinical efficacy of Unani formulation on eczema

 

Md Nawab*, Abdul Mannan & Misbahuddin Siddiqui

Department of Moalijat, Ajmal Khan Tibbiya College, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202002, Uttar Pradesh

E-mail: drnawab20022000@yahoo.co.in

Received 24 January 2006; revised 22 August 2006

Eczema (Nar-e-farsi) is a universally encountered and recurrent disease of the skin. It is estimated that 10% of people have some form of eczema at any one time. A formulation containing Olea europea Linn., Lawsonia innermis Linn. and Nigella sativa Linn. was prepared in the form of oil for local application and studied clinically for its efficacy on eczema. The effect of the formulation was seen on subjective parameters such as itching, burning sensation, oozing, erythema, oedema, scaling, macule, papule, vesicles, papulo-vesicles, crusting, lichenification, excoriation, and hyper pigmentation. At the end of the study statistical significance of the results was noted. It was concluded that the formulation was effective on eczema.

Key words: Olea europea, Lawsonia innermis, Nigella sativa, Nar-e-farsi, Eczema, Unani formulation


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(2), April 2008, pp. 345-346

 

 

Siddha way to cure Chikungunya

 

MV Viswanathan*, D Karpaga Raja and S Durai Khanna

Parampara, 46/38, Kasturi Ranga Road, Alwarpet, Chennai 600 102

Garpagam Siddha Home, Aattayamaptti, Salem, District, Tamil Nadu

E-mail: paramparaind@yahoo.com

 

Received 16 October 2006; revised 21 September 2007

The symptoms and signs of Chikungunya were studied among 500 patients and the methods to fight the disease with traditional Siddha medicines are described which is substantiated by clinical trials.

Keywords: Chikungunya, Siddha medicine

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(2), April 2008, pp. 347-354

 

Ethnoveterinary healthcare practices in southern districts of Tamil Nadu

S Ganesan*, M Chandhirasekaran & A Selvaraj

Centre for research and PG Department of Botany, Thiagarajar College (Autonomous), Madurai 625009, Tamil Nadu

E-mail: sganesan76@yahoo.com

Received 9 December 2005; revised 7 June 2006

The southern districts of Tamil Nadu has a predominantly livestock based economy and social welfare. However, economic dependence on livestock, lack of effective veterinary infrastructure, etc. have forced the local farmers to apply their indigenous knowledge to look after and maintain their livestock population. The indigenous knowledge and practice based on locally available bioresources are effective to cure diseases, do not have financial cost and are easily administrable. In the paper, ethnoveterinary medicine for the treatment of 44 veterinary health hazards is enumerated. A total of 113 plant species belonging to100 genera and 46 families are used by rural peoples in the treatment of anthrax, bone fracture, bloat, bronchitis, blackquarter, corneal opacity, dog bite, enteritis, foot and mouth diseases, etc. The medicinal plants are listed with their scientific name, family, local name (Tamil) and mode of utilization.

Keywords: Ethnoveterinary medicine, Southern districts, Tamil Nadu

 

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(2), April 2008, pp. 355-359

 

Traditional veterinary herbal medicines of western part of Almora district, Uttarakhand Himalaya

Rohita Shah1, PC Pande1 & Lalit Tiwari2*

SSJ Campus, Kumaon University, Almora, 2Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia Laboratory, Kamla Neharu Nagar, Ghaziabad, Uttar Pradesh

E-mail: ltherbal@rediffmail.com

Received 12 December 2005, revised 14 February 2007

A preliminary survey of an age-old veterinary practice of the western part of Almora district, which is inhabited by hill communities, was made. The main emphasis was given to 24 most common livestock diseases and disorders. For the treatment of these veterinary diseases and disorders, locals use about 57 plants. The biomedicines are composed of single drug or combination of drugs. These medicines are presented disease wise. This type of traditional knowledge is a wealth for the human being and has great value in the context of today's Intellectual Property Rights (IPRs) scenario.

Keywords: Ethnoveterinary medicine, Almora, Uttaranchal

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(2), April 2008, pp. 360-364

 

Documentation and participatory rapid assessment of
ethnoveterinary practices

 

Raneesh Santhanakrishnan*, Abdul Hafeel, Hariramamurthi BA & Unnikrishnan PM

Foundation for Revitalisation of Local Health Traditions, 74/2 Jarakbande Kaval, Attur.P.O,
Yelahanka, Bangalore 560 064, Karnataka

E-mail:vaidya.raneesh@frlht.org.in, hafeel@gmail.com, g.hari@frlht.org.in, unni.pm@frlht.org.in

Received 30 September 2005; revised 17 August 2007

The Indian subcontinent has a rich ethnoveterinary health tradition owing to the large agriculture based livelihoods and rich biodiversity. Due to various social, economic and political factors this tradition is facing the threat of rapid erosion. A Programme to revitalise the ethnoveterinary traditions was initiated in 2001 by the Foundation for Revitalisation of Local Health Traditions (FRLHT), Bangalore in collaboration with National Diary Development Board (NDDB) and many field based non-governmental organisations in southern India. A participatory Rapid Assessment Programme was designed in order to find the best ethnoveterinary practices in select locations of southern India. This method is a community-based rapid assessment in which ethnoveterinary folk healers, veterinary doctors, Ayurvedic doctors, botanists and field workers play key roles. Many such documentation and assessment workshops were conducted in different parts of southern India from the year 2001-2003. A total of around 116 plant species for nearly 19 health conditions that are commonly seen in cattle were taken for assessment in different geographical locations. The basic principle of this assessment is a consensus of opinion among different medical systems about the management of a health condition. It was found that nearly 70% of the practices had supportive evidence from Ayurveda and modern pharmacology on their prescribed uses. It was also found that 55% of those positively assessed plants are easily available locally in each of the bio-geographical locations and can be grown in homestead gardens. The methodology of the assessment programme with an illustration of a health condition as understood by the local healers has been presented.

Key words: Ethnoveterinary medicine, Local health traditions, Participatory rapid assessment


 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(2), April 2008, pp. 365-370

 

Importance of local names of some useful plants in ethnobotanical study

 

Harish Singh

Central Botanical Laboratory, Botanical Survey of India, Howrah 711 103, West Bengal

E-mail: harish_bsi@yahoo.co.in

Received 19 January 2006; revised 22 November 2007

Plants are commonly known by their local names in every part of the world. These local names play a very important role in ethnobotanical study of a specific tribe or region. Local names given to plants by indigenous people in their local dialects often reflect a broad spectrum of information on their understanding of plants. Most often, the local names are given based on some salient features, e.g. appearance, shape, size, habit, habitat, smell, taste, colour, utility, and other peculiar character, etc of the plants. These practical, meaningful, easily understandable and rememberable local names are disappearing rapidly along with the culture and tradition of the tribal group of our country. Therefore, it must be recorded, preserved and documented before lost forever. In the paper, about 100 plants of Garhwal, Kumaun and Bhoxar area of Uttarakhand have been given in alphabetical order with their family followed by local names including their meaning in English along with detail reason / basis for the naming of the plants.

Keywords: Bhoxa, Garhwali, Kumauni, Ethnobotany, Garhwal, Kumaun, Bhoxar, Etymology, Uttaranchal