Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Special Issue on Traditional Handlooms and Handicrafts

Total visitors: 64  since 23-01-08

 

VOLUME 7

NUMBER 1

JANUARY 2008

 

CONTENTS

 

Papers

 

(a) Diverse Communities, Diverse Skills: Discovering Their Material Cultures  

 

Plants in material culture of tribals and rural communities of Rajsamand district of Rajasthan

11

      BL Choudhary, SS Katewa & PK Galav

 

 

 

Traditional products and practices of indigenous people inhabiting Ramanathapuram district of Tamil Nadu

23

      Rathakrishnan T, Anandaraja N, Ramasubramanian M & Kalai Selvan S

 

 

 

Traditional skill among the Adi tribes of Arunachal Pradesh

27

      Ranjay K Singh, Anamika Singh, Hui Tag & Adi community

 

 

 

Traditional handicrafts of Ang tribes (Jarawa) of Andaman Islands

37

      Jayanta Sarkar

 

 

 

Tribal artifacts of Nicobari folk of Nicobar Archipelago

42

      MU Sharief

 

 

 

Traditional handloom industry of Kerala

50

      KKN Kurup

 

 

 

Traditional handicrafts of the Gonds tribe of Vidarbha, Maharashtra

53

      SG Deogaonkar

 

 

 

Traditional handicrafts and handloom of Kullu district, Himachal Pradesh

56

      Neetu Sharma, Promila Kanwar & Anju Rekha

 

 

 

Handicrafts heritage of Gaddi tribe of Himachal Pradesh

62

      Anju Kapoor, Promila Kanwar & Neetu Sharma

 

 

 

Handicrafts, handlooms and dye plants in the Italian folk traditions

67

      PM Guarrera

 

 

 

(b) Diverse Communities, Diverse Skills: Looking into Specific Craft Techniques

 

Throw shuttle weaving of Ambasi panje (lungi)

70

      Jyoti V Vastrad & Shailaja D Naik

 

 

 

Preparation of Maravuri from Antiaris toxicaria (Pers.) Lesch. by Muthuvans of Kerala

74

      Johncy Manithottam & MS Francis

 

A folk dye from leaves and stem of Jatropha curcas L. used by Tharu tribes of Devipatan division

77

      Subodh Kumar Srivastava, JP Tewari & DS Shukla

 

 

 

Manufacturing of blanket (Kambali) by traditional methods using Coimbatore sheep wool at Kalangal Village

79

      ASM Raja, DB Shakyawar & S Parthsarthy

 

 

 

Snippets renewed into fabulous quilts

83

      Shailaja D Naik

 

 

 

Gekong-Galong- Traditional weaving technology of Adi tribes of Arunachal Pradesh

87

      Anamika Singh, Ranjay K Singh & Adi women community

 

 

 

Ajarkh, the resist printed fabric of Gujarat

93

      Anjali Karolia & Heli Buch

 

 

 

Traditional Hira potters of lower Assam

98

      Nabakumar Duary

 

 

 

Traditional woodcraft, Jambili Athon of the Karbis

103

      Robindra Teron

 

 

 

Traditional teak wood articles used in households of Nilambur and Malapuram areas of Kerala

108

      Sani Lookose

 

 

 

Traditional knowledge on wood processing of Utis in Panauti of Kavrepalanchowk district, Nepal

112

      RB Chhetri & DP Gauchan

 

 

 

Clay- traditional material for making Handicrafts

116

      Charu Smita Gupta

 

 

 

The role and development of vegetable dyes in Indian handlooms

125

      S Ganesh

 

 

 

 

 

Masks from the archives of the Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts

130

      Kakoli Roy Biswas

 

 

 

(c) Crafts and Knowledge on Nature

 

Ethnobotanicals used by tribals of Mizoram for furniture and household equipments

134

      Sujata Bhardwaj & SK Gakhar

 

 

 

Ethnobotanical approach on wild plants for manufacturing musical instruments by Gond and Korku tribes of Vidarbha

138

      Amit Kaur Puri & Alka Chaturvedi

 

 

 

Natural dye yielding plants and indigenous knowledge of dyeing in Manipur, Northeast India

141

      Lunalisa Potsangbam, Swapana Ningombam & Warjeet S Laitonjam

 

 

 

Botanical resources used in traditional wood carving industry among the Wancho tribe of Arunachal Pradesh

148

      Hui Tag, AK Das, H Pallabi, Ranjay K Singh & G Palit

 

 

 

Plants used in traditional handicrafts in several Balkan countries

157

      Yunus Dogan, Anely M Nedelcheva, Dragica Obratov-Petković & Ioana M Padure

 

 

 

Plants used in traditional handicrafts in North eastern Andhra Pradesh

162

      KN Reddy, Chiranjibi Pattanaik, CS Reddy, EN Murthy & VS Raju

 

 

 

Dye yielding plants of Assam for dyeing handloom textile products

166

      A Kar & SK Borthakur

 

 

 

(d) Revitalizing Traditional Crafts

 

On-loom finishing of handloom products- An innovative & indigenous approach

172

      Arup Mukherjee & Ashis Mitra

 

 

 

Contemporary breakthrough in Ahimsa silk spinning

178

      Sanapapamma KJ & Shailaja D Naik

 

 

 

Panorama of eco-friendly naturally colour cotton

182

      Sadhana D Kulloli & Shailaja D Naik

 

 

 

Coast Salish weaving- Preserving traditional knowledge with new technology

188

      Leslie Tepper

 

 

 

Protection and revival of traditional hand embroidery, Kasuti by automation

197

      Shailaja D Naik & Jyoti V Vastrad

 

 

 

Development of handloom for jute based diversified fabrics modifying traditional cotton handloom

204

      Surajit Sengupta, Sanjoy Debnath & GK Bhattacharyya

 

 

 

Contemporized traditional textile made-ups- A mode for rural and urban linkage

208

      Namrata M & Shailaja D Naik

 

 

 

Author Index

212

 

 

Subject Index

212

 

 

Forthcoming Seminars/Conferences

214

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(1), January 2008, pp. 11-22

 

Plants in material culture of tribals and rural communities of
Rajsamand district of Rajasthan

 

B L Choudhary*, S S Katewa & P K Galav

Laboratory of Ethnobotany and Agrostology, Department of Botany, University, College of science,
M L Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001, Rajasthan

E-mail: blcchauhar@yahoo.com

Received 9 April 2007; revised 20 September 2007

While early studies into material culture often concentrated on items collected from archaeological investigations, current studies demonstrate an increasing interest in the artefacts, or man-made objects of existing traditional societies. For the material culture of a given society refers to the total range of objects produced by that society, including functional items such as tools, shelter and clothing as well as more decorative arts and crafts. Traditionally, many of these items have been made from plant materials. The use of plants in traditional art and technology remains an important aspect of traditional botanical knowledge (TBK). The paper discusses the current roles of plants in the manufacture of traditional goods, and outlines some of the specialist skills which are involved in the production of such items.

KeywordsEthnobotany, Traditional knowledge, Traditional goods, Traditional artefacts, Tribals, Bhil, Garasia, Rajsamand, Rajasthan

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(1), January 2008, pp. 23-26

 

Traditional products and practices of indigenous people inhabiting Ramanathapuram district of Tamil Nadu

Rathakrishnan T*, Anandaraja N, Ramasubramanian M & Kalai Selvan S

Department of Agricultural Extension and Rural Sociology,

Agricultural College & Research Institute, Madurai 625 104, Tamil Nadu

E-mail: anandaraja_n@rediffmail.com

Received 30 April 2007; revised 27 August 2007

Traditional knowledge plays a crucial role in establishing sustainable relationship between man and nature in the society more dependent on natural environment for their varied needs. A study was undertaken to document the indigenous products and practices related to non-farming livelihood activities of Ramanathapuram district. The data was collected with the help of focused group discussion and practitioner participatory approach. In the paper, indigenous materials with respect to non-farming livelihood activities of the people of Ramanathapuram district such as palm leaf products, traditional fishing devices and charcoal making process (Mootam) are discussed.

Keywords:   Ramanathapuram, Palm leaf, Traditional basket making, Traditional mat weaving, Traditional boats,
                     Catamaran, Kattumaram, Traditional fishing net, Karaivali, Mootam, Charcoal making process

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(1), January 2008, pp. 27-36

 

Traditional skill among the Adi tribes of Arunachal Pradesh

 

Ranjay K Singh1*, Anamika Singh2, Hui Tag3 & Adi community

1College of Horticulture & Forestry, Central Agricultural University, Pasighat, Arunachal Pradesh

2Mahila Mahavidyalaya, Banaras Hindu University (BHU), Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh

3Division of Higher Plant Systematic and Ethnomedicine, Department of Botany, Rajiv Gandhi University,
Itanagar, Arunachal Pradesh

E-mail: ranjay_jbp@rediffmail.com

Received 24 July 2007; revised 11 October 2007

The tribal people living in far flung areas dependent on rich biocultural resources have always been curious in exploring the plant resources of their immediate surrounding in order to sustain their traditional livelihood system. After centuries of being in close association with nature, they have developed for themselves the indigenous skill and technology to use these resources in various parts of their life support system. In recent decades, rapid modernization and acculturation process developed in traditional livelihood system of tribal community has practically endangered their age-old biocultural heritage and traditional skills, knowledge and technology in alarming proportion. The paper based on ethnobotanical field work discusses some vital aspects of plant based traditional skills and technology practiced by the rural Adi community of East Siang district of Arunachal Pradesh. A number of traditional plant based technologies such as handicrafts, fishing and hunting tools, storage items, utensils used in kitchen and foods system, etc. are available among the Adis. While crafting these valuable and low-cost traditional handicraft technologies, the local people are dependent on locally available plant biodiversity conserved in jhum land, kitchen gardens and community forest. Integrated and holistic approach can revive and sustain traditional plant technology through entrepreneurship development, coupled with ecotourism and economic empowerment to the concerned indigenous community.

Keywords: Traditional handicrafts, Adi tribes, Traditional utensils, Arunachal Pradesh

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(1), January 2008, pp. 37-41

 

Traditional handicrafts of Ang tribes (Jarawa) of Andaman Islands

 

Jayanta Sarkar

3, Ferryfan Road, HB Town, Sodepur, Kolkata 700110, West Bengal

E-mail: sarkar_jayanta@yahoo.com

Received 26 July 2007; revised 26 September 2007

Traditional handicrafts of the tribes of India are generally prepared out of resources available in their immediate ecology, where they inhabit. Traditional knowledge applied in the entire process of preparation of most of the handicrafts, as per the needs of these people, is inherited from their forefathers. Handicrafts of the Ang (Jarawa), hunter-gatherer tribes of the South and Middle Andaman Islands and the processes involved in preparation of such items have been discussed in the paper. Their hunting-gathering implements, the only handicrafts available with this foraging tribe not only reveal the eco-friendly nature of this small population, these also establish their astonishing capacity of intimate observation with regard to the nature and characters of surrounding flora and fauna those are most suitable in producing the handicrafts essential for survival against many odds. These further indicate their intelligent, aesthetic sense as well as innovative mind of the population, who remained in complete isolation till recent past. TK in respect of such a population living in the Bay Islands, who identify themselves as Ang tribes and called by the outsiders as the Jarawa tribes is discussed here.

Keywords: Traditional handicrafts, Ang, tribes, Jarawa tribes, Andaman Islands


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(1), January 2008, pp. 42-49

Tribal artifacts of Nicobari folk of Nicobar Archipelago

MU Sharief

Botanical Survey of India, National Orchidarium & Experimental Garden,

Yercaud 636 602, District Salem, Tamil Nadu

E-mail: sharief bsi@yahoo.co.in; bsisc@md4.vsnl.net.in; bsisc@rediffmail.com

Received 6 August 2007; Revised 9 October 2007

Studies on material cultures of aboriginal tribes of Andaman & Nicobar Archipelago are rather scanty. Nicobari culture represents true psyche of the Mongoloid race and their cultural life is illustrative. They show excellent craftsmanship in making various tribal artifacts and are skilled artisans, house builders, carpenters, carvers and potters. Ethnobotanical information of Nicobari tribe pertaining to hut building, canoe making, brooms & mats preparation, sitting stage making and pandanus fruit processing are presented besides highlighting their ethnoecological and cultural influences.

Keywords: Nicobari tribe, Tribal artifacts, Traditional handicrafts, Traditional huts, Nicobar Islands, Ethnobotany

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. .7(1), January 2008, pp. 50-52

 

Traditional handloom industry of Kerala

KKN Kurup

Centre for Heritage Studies, Department of Cultural Affairs, Government of Kerala,
Hill Palace, Thripunithura 682 301, Kerala

E-mail: kknkurup@hotmail.com; chskerala@yahoo.co.in

Received 3 September 2007; revised 23 October 2007

The paper describes the traditional handloom industry of Kerala. The Padma Saliyas community in Kerala used spinning and weaving aspects of textile production. Two sects of caste, Idankai and Valankai represented spinners and weavers, respectively. Native craftsmen of Kerala, produced items like, Mundu, Thorthu, Veshti and Pudava through the handlooms.  In Kerala, even now the hand woven clothes known for their durability, finishing, charming colours and smoothness. The traditional pit looms are almost disappeared in favour of wooden framed looms as a matter of technological change. Further from the cottage industry, it has changed into the factory pattern also.

Key words: Traditional weaving, Pit loom weaving, Traditional handloom, Kerala


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(1), January 2008, pp. 53-55

 

Traditional handicrafts of the Gond tribes of Vidarbha, Maharashtra

S G Deogaonkar

104, Vishwanath Apartments, Near Hotel Giriraj, KG Buty Road, Sitabardi, Nagpur 440 012, Maharashtra

Received 17 September 2007; revised 29 October 2007

The Vidarbha region of Maharashtra State consists of 11 districts having a large, proportion of tribal population. Gadchiroli (38.75%), Chandrapur (19.70%) and Yavatmal (21.47%) districts have a larger percentage of tribal population as compared to other districts. In these districts, Gonds, Pardhans and Kolam are major tribes followed by Korku and others. Gonds, who are numerically predominant, are a part of Gond tribe accounting for one of the major tribal groups in India followed by Mundas. Traditional knowledge of handicrafts among Gonds in general and among Gonds of Chandrapur and Gadchiroli districts in particular, attracts attention. An attempt has been made to present the traditional knowledge and skills, specially related to woodcraft and bamboocraft of Gond tribes of Vidarbha region.

Keywords: Maharashtra, Vidarbha, Gond, Madia-Gonds, Handicrafts, Woodcraft, Bamboo craft

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(1), January 2008, pp. 56-61

 

Traditional handicrafts and handloom of Kullu district, Himachal Pradesh

Neetu Sharma*, Promila Kanwar & Anju Rekha

Department of Home Science Extension Education, College of Home Science, CSKHPKV, Palampur 1760 62, Himachal Pradesh

E-mail: promilak@hillagic.ernet.in; neepradu@rediffmail.com

 

Received 8 October 2007; revised 27 November 2007

Handloom weaving and handicraft are the cultural heritage of the Himachali people and an indispensable part of the lives of Kulluites. The activity of preparing a vide range of handloom and handicraft products was originated to suffice local needs but it gradually took a turn towards commercialization. In the study, handloom and handicrafts of district Kullu of Himachal Pradesh have been presented. The local weavers besides following their ancestral traditions and skills are intentionally making some alterations in the designs and motifs to cater to the needs of modern buyers. The various handloom and handicraft items of the Kullu district include shawls, caps, borders, pattoo, muffler, patti, thobi, numdha, gudma, hand knit woolens, kilta, patari, etc. which have been described in detail in the paper.

Keywords: Traditional handloom, Traditional handicrafts, Kullu, Himachal Pradesh

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(1), January 2008, pp. 62-66

 

Handicrafts heritage of Gaddi tribe of Himachal Pradesh

Anju Kapoor, Promila Kanwar* & Neetu Sharma

Department of Home Science Extension Education, College of Home Science, CSK Himachal Pradesh Agricultural University,
Palampur 176 062, Himachal Pradesh

E-mail: promilak@hillagic.ernet.in; neepradu@rediffmail.com

Received 8 October 2007; revised 28 November 2007

The tribal people of Himachal Pradesh are living close to forests and facing unfavorable climatic conditions. Gaddi, the semi-agricultural tribe of Bharmaur area of Chamba district is identifiable due to their typical dress comprising topi, chola and dora. They sport a hukah (smoking pipe) in their hand and khalri containing cereals and other essential articles on their back. Due to tough topography and harsh climate, these people have developed their unique handicrafts, which is still manufactured as well as used by them. In the paper, an effort has been made to document the costumes, ornaments and various woven and other handicraft products used by the Gaddi tribe of Himachal Pradesh.

Keywords: Gaddi tribes, Himachal Pradesh, Traditional handicrafts

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(1), January 2008, pp. 67-69

 

Handicrafts, handlooms and dye plants in the Italian folk traditions

PM Guarrera

Museo Nazionale Arti e Tradizioni Popolari, Piazza Marconi 8/10 00144, Rome, Italy

E-mail: pmguarrera@arti.beniculturali.it

Received 27 July 2007; revised 12 November 2007

In the paper, the various categories of artefacts and domestic/handicrafts uses of plants are reported, together with an inventory of all the plants used in Italy in human medicines, veterinary sciences, cooking, rituals and in other fields. Natural plant dyes used in Italy and musical instruments of Italian folk traditions have also been reported.

Keywords: Handicrafts, Handlooms, Natural dye, Basketry, Folk traditions, Italy

 

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(1), January 2008, pp. 70-73

 

Throw shuttle weaving of Ambasi panje (lungi)

Jyoti V Vastrad1* & Shailaja D Naik2

Department of Textiles and Apparel Designing, College of Rural Home Science, UAS, Dharwad 580 005, Karnataka

E-mail: profshailajanaik@yahoo.co.in; jyoti_vastrad@rediffmail.com

Received 17 July 2007; revised 23 November 2007

 

Dhoti or the waistcloth of men is a scanty piece of cloth fastened round the waist, its ends being carried tightly between the two legs to the back and tucked. The dhoti or the lungi worn casually or as a daily wear gained its popularity when woven with a contrast border using traditional motifs. One among such traditionally produced made-ups is the contrast-bordered lungi, locally famous as Ambasi phadiki dhadi panje woven at the village, Lakkundi. The off-white lungi has contrast borders on either sides with rudraksha and chrysanthemum motifs and was woven on the throw shuttle pit loom during 1916 and even before. Weaving process of the same that gave rise to various contrast bordered made-ups is discussed here under.

Key words: Traditional weaving, Pit loom weaving, Throw shuttle weaving, Lungi

 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(1), January 2008, pp. 74-76

Preparation of Maravuri from Antiaris toxicaria (Pers.) Lesch. by
Muthuvans of Kerala

Johncy Manithottam & MS Francis*

Spices Board, Government of India, Ministry of Commerce and Industry, Sugandha Bhavan, Cochin 682 025, Kerala
*Center for Postgraduate Studies and Research, Department of Botany, Sacred Heart College, Thevara, Cochin 682 013, Kerala

E-mail: msfrancisman@yahoo.co.uk

Received 22 August 2005; revised 13 March 2007

 

Tribal populations of Kerala are rich in ethnobotanical information. Muthuvan tribes of Idukki district are experts in preparing Maravuri, a type of cloth from the bark tree Aranjali [Antiaris toxicaria (Pers.) Lesch.].This skilled work was carried out after constructing tall supports around the tree, require much experience. The cork is carefully removed with a sharp knife; bark is softened by beating with wooden hammers, and separated and cured by sun drying. It is used as bed spread. As modernization is fast progressing, the new generation is unaware of the technical know how to prepare the bark for cloth. So, it is highly important to record and preserve such valuable information.

Key words: Muthuvan tribe, Antiaris toxicaria, Western Ghats, Fiber curing, Maravuri, Kerala

 

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(1), January 2008, pp. 77-78

 

A folk dye from leaves and stem of Jatropha curcas L. used by Tharu tribes of Devipatan division

 

Subodh Kumar Srivastava*, JP Tewari & DS Shukla

Department of Botany, MLK (PG) College, Balrampur 271201, Uttar Pradesh

Received 17 July 2006; revised 5 October 2007

The leaves and stem of Jatropha curcas L. (physicnuts) can be used as a natural source of dye was noticed from Tharu villagers of Devipatan division. The colouring matter was extracted from leaves and stems by boiling in water. The extract was evaporated to dryness. The extracted matter was used to dye cotton yarn using different methods. The dyed cotton yarn was tested for its fastness and other properties. It was found superior to synthetic chemical dyes.

Keywords: Jatropha curcas L., Natural dye, Tharu tribes, Decripatan division

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(1), January 2008, pp. 79-82

 

Manufacturing of blanket (Kambali) by traditional methods using Coimbatore sheep wool at Kalangal Village

ASM Raja1*, DB Shakyawar2 & S Parthsarthy2

1Department of Textile Technology, PSG College of Technology, Coimbatore 4, Tamil Nadu; 2Southern Regional Research Center, Central Sheep & Wool Research Institute, Mannavanur 624103, Kodaikanal, Tamil Nadu

E-mail: asmraja16475@yahoo.com

Received 21 March 2007; revised 3 August 2007

Since ancient time, the manufacturing of textile goods has been carried out in India using indigenously produced natural fibres, i.e. wool, silk, ramie, etc. by rural artisans. Although, the techniques used in manufacturing such goods are labour intensive, which makes products costly. These processes are eco-friendly and provide large employment to rural artisans. Apart from this, the products possess good hand and have much acceptance among users. Among the various textile products produced using traditional knowledge, manufacturing of blanket using indigenous traditional knowledge of yarn spinning and blanket weaving from Coimbatore wool is one of the products, which is unique in construction and performance. In the paper, detailed information on availability of wool, its quality, processing technique, conversion of wool fibre into yarn, then yarn to blanket. 

Key words:  Muthuvan tribes, Antiaris toxicaria, Western Ghats, Fiber curing, Maravuri, Kerala

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(1), January 2008, pp. 83-86

 

Snippets renewed into fabulous quilts

Shailaja D Naik

Department of Textiles and Apparel Designing, College of RHSc, University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad 580 005, Karnataka

E-mail: profshailajanaik@yahoo.co.in

Received 9 September 2005; revised 5 October 2007

Quilting is centuries old form of stitchery. A quilt is, basically, a textile sandwich with a fabric cover on the top and bottom and the batting inside. Exciting and challenging contemporary quilts, whether stitched by hand or machine, now complements the enduring traditional designs and techniques that have evolved over the years. Patchwork, appliqué work and quilting can be very efficiently applied to enhance the appearance of many home furnishings. Synthetic batting that comes in several weights, is versatile as it can be laundered, making it suitable for bed linen such as throws and quilts.

Keywords: Traditional quilts, Traditional stitching, Traditional appliqué work

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(1), January 2008, pp. 87-92

Gekong-GalongTraditional weaving technology of Adi tribes of
Arunachal Pradesh

Anamika Singh1, Ranjay K Singh*2 & Adi Women Community

1Mahila Mahavidyalaya, Banaras Hindu University (BHU), Varanasi 221 005, Uttar Pradesh; 2 College of Horticulture & Forestry, Central Agricultural University, Pasighat, Arunachal Pradesh

E-mail: ranjay_jbp@rediffmail.com

Received 24 July 2007; Revised 14 September 2007

The women living in remote areas and dependent on traditional resources have developed appreciating knowledge and skill in weaving and making crafts for their subsistence livelihood in mountain ecosystems. In modernization and rapid acculturation process, this culturally important heritage of women is at risk and eroding. Varieties of culturally and traditionally important dresses are weaved by Adi women. Women are competent in selecting diverse plant biodiversity used in making entire set of gekong-galong (handloom), which requires years of experience. The culture, belief and spiritual aspects are intrinsically attached with weaving technology. Various sources are utilized in making and using thread for weaving like silkworm, indigenous cotton varieties and mechanically made thread available in market. In remote social system, women use local bioresources in preparing the dye and colours. Weaving is one of the major traditional sources of income and livelihood, but younger generation does not show considerable interest in learning and continuing such culturally important practices. A mission mode integrated effort would be required to conserve women wisdom of weaving and making this profession economically viable through value addition, entrepreneurship development, chaining market and economic empowerment. In the paper, traditional weaving and related knowledge systems of purposively selected villages of Padam, Pasi and Minyong subtribes of Adi community Arunachal Pradesh are discussed.

Keywords: Adi tribes, Traditional weaving, Gekong-Galong, Traditional knowledge, Biodiversity, Cultural heritage


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(1), January 2008, pp. 93-97

 

Ajarkh, the resist printed fabric of Gujarat

Anjali Karolia* & Heli Buch

Department of Clothing and Textiles, Faculty of Home Science,

The MS University of Baroda, Vadodara 390 002, Gujarat

E-mail: anjalikarolia@hotmail.com

Received 20 August 2007; revised 21 September 2007

The present study attempts to document the magnificent resist printed natural dyed textiles of Ajrakh, which has reached the threshold of extinction of its pure form. This is due to increase in fashion, use of synthetic dyes and production of screens for this block printed textile. The objectives were to document the craft of Ajrakh printing in detail and record the changes that have come about in its manufacturing process, colours and motifs. Data regarding the craft was collected from a purposively selected sample practicing the craft in the traditional manner. Ajrakh, traditionally a double sided resist block printed cotton textile has undergone a number of changes in production, in the motif and colours used.

Keywords: Ajarkh, Indigo dye, Resist printing, Madder, Mordant

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(1), January 2008, pp. 98-102

Traditional Hira potters of lower Assam

Nabakumar Duary

Anthropological Survey of India, 27 Jawaharlal Nehru Road, Kolkata 700016

E-mail: nduary@yahoo.co.in

Received 3 September 2007; revised 25 October 2007

Pottery making is an age-old traditional occupation of the human civilization. The process of making pottery from a particular type of clay on wheel reflects traditional knowledge. Hira potters are distributed in Goalpara, Kamrup and Barpeta districts of the lower Brahmaputra valley of Assam. The women folk of the Hira society of Assam are practicing the pottery making without wheel since centuries ago as their traditional occupation. It is their hereditary pursuits through female line, which has still retained its importance, aesthetic appeal, unique technique and skill. The paper, out come of the field research on the Hira people in lower Assam, examines the present status of crafts and artisans, technique of pottery production and sale of finished products. The study concludes that the Hira people lives under the shroud poverty and unless urgent measures are taken this inherent craft will not survive.

Key words: Hira potters, Traditional occupation, Assam,


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. .7(1), January 2008, pp. 103-107

 

Traditional woodcraft, Jambili Athon of the Karbis

Robindra Teron

Department of Botany, Diphu Government College, Diphu 782462, Karbi Anglong, Assam

E-mail: robindra_teron@yahoo.co.in

Received 17 September 2007; revised 29 October 2007

Jambili Athon is an extraordinary woodcraft of the Karbis, made entirely from Bengwoi ke-er (Wrightia coccinea Sims. (Apocynaceae), whose origin and making of the craft is strictly based on legends. It consists of a central axis and a whorl of four branches, all with beautiful carvings on it and the apices are perched with different species of birds. Jambili Athon is exhibited during socio-religio-cultural festival, Chomkan, during crowning ceremony of social chief, the Lindokpo and also to honour great persons. Jambili Athon has no parallel with any crafts or symbols of other tribes of Northeast India and is claimed as the symbol of pride and cultural identity by Karbis. It covers the philosophy of life & death, social institutions and religious practices of the people. Further, Jambili Athon is often used in logos of many institutions and organizations in Karbi Anglong and also as designs on textiles. A miniature Jambili Athon is usually kept as an artifact in almost every household.

Keywords: Karbi tribe, Woodcraft, Jambili Athon, Wrightia coccinea, Chomkan, Traditional craft

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(1), January 2008, pp. 108-111

 

Traditional teak wood articles used in households of Nilambur and Malapuram areas of Kerala

Sani Lookose

Teak Museum, KFRI Sub-Centre, Nilambur, Kerala

E-mail: sani_lookose@yahoo.co.in

Received 19 July 2007; revised 22 November 2007

The heartwood of teak is one of the most durable woods and used in structural needs like furniture making, ship building and even for the construction of railway sleepers in the olden days. But the use of teak in traditional households is totally neglected today due to the wide use of metals and other synthetic materials like plastic. Traditional teak wood household articles used in Nilambur and Malappuram areas of Kerala have been described. Lack of social awareness on these traditional teak wood articles and the importance of transferring this knowledge to younger generations have been emphasized.

Key words: Traditional teak wood articles, Traditional household articles

 

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(1), January 2008, pp. 112-115

 

 

Traditional knowledge on wood processing of Utis in Panauti of Kavrepalanchowk district, Nepal

RB Chhetri1* & DP Gauchan2

1Department of Environmental Science; 2Department of Biotechnology, PB No 6250, KTM Dhulikhel, Kavre,
Kathmandu University, Nepal

E- mail:rbchhetri@ku.edu.np; gauchan@ku.edu.np

Received 22 November 2007; revised 30 November 2007

Present study has aimed to communicate the indigenous technical knowledge (ITK) on the processing of wood of Utis (Alnus nepalensis D. Don) into various cottage products. Rural folk in Nepal has a rich folklore about indigenous utilization of different parts of different plants. Likewise soft wood obtained from mature bole of Alnus in the mid-hills of Nepal is extensively used in cottage industry for the manufacture of musical instruments, idols, toys, low cost furniture, cottage timber, electric wiring support chips, meter box, junction box, socket box, bulb holder, etc. The multifarious properties of Utis wood are much valued in the socio-economic upliftment of ethnic people in Nepal. Utis wood processing cottage industries are based on single species of Alnus tree because the wood is readily available and the soft texture of the wood enhances the processing conveniently to a greater extent.   

Key words: Alnus nepalensis D. Don, Utis, Handicrafts, Kastha Udhyog, Wood processing, Nepal

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(1), January 2008, pp. 116-124

 

Clay-traditional material for making Handicrafts

 

Charu Smita Gupta

National Handicrafts and Handlooms Museum, Ministry of Textiles, Pragati Maidan, New Delhi 110 001

E-mail: dchasmig@yahoo.com

Received 13 August 2007; revised 29 October 2007

Art in handicraft has been regarded as timeless and dateless. Clay and terracotta figures have been existing continuously from pre-historic times. There have been an implicit continuity in the traditional knowledge and technology of making artefacts of clay by adding several materials and if required, firing the artefacts thus made. The fired clay was called burnt clay or terracotta. Clay as a base material for hand crafted item has been used all over India for several types of finished products. There has been a variety of materials added to the clay, techniques and equipments for making several forms and decorating these forms across the length and breadth of the country. The paper discusses the variety of the variety of the clay components, shaping and firing techniques used to create variety of forms.

Keywords: Clay artefacts, Terracotta figures, Traditional handicrafts

 

 

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(1), January 2008, pp. 125-129

 

The role and development of vegetable dyes in Indian handlooms

S Ganesh

New No.6, Old No.14, 2nd Street, Bhakthavathsalalm Nagar, Adyar, Chennai 20, Tamil Nadu

E-mail: swamikrish8184@vsnl.co.in

Received 20 August 2007; revised 13 September 2007

India has a hoary tradition in the arts of handloom weaving and vegetable dyeing. The knowledge of sourcing of the plant materials, from which the dyes are obtained, is being passed on so far purely by way of tradition, from generation to generation. So, also is the art of extraction of the dyes and their application to the yarn/cloth. Vegetable dyeing is very ecofriendly and has several unique characteristics. The paper pleads for the preservation of this ancient art and for a greater thrust on R & D in all the relevant fields of raw material, extraction, application and production of the vegetable dyes.

Keywords: Natural dyes, Vegetable dyes, Indian handlooms, Mordant, Indigo dye

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(1), January 2008, pp. 130-133

 

Masks from the archives of the Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts

Kakoli Roy Biswas

Janapada Sampada DivisionIndira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts, New Delhi 110 001

E-mail: janapadasampada@hotmail.com

Received 10 August 2007; Revised 30 October 2007

Mask, used since antiquity for both ceremonial and practical purposes, are normally worn on the face, typically for protection, concealment, performance, or amusement. Masks are believed to embody the spirit of an ancestor, and symbolize a message of wisdom, prosperity, security, and power. Masks have been worn in cultures throughout the world for thousands of years. Masks are made of varied materials including paper, cloth, grass, leather, metal, wood and stone. They are painted with symbolic designs and vivid colours. Masks and their manifold forms are a very significant mode of cultural expression. The Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts (IGNCA) has a rich collection of masks from all over the world. The paper describes historical background, material used, traditional methods of preparation and cultural significance of masks from the repository of the GNCA. The article also highlights the musicological, psychological and philosophical significance of these masks and focused description of the Chhau masks of West Bengal and Saraikela.

Keywords: Masks

 

 

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(1), January 2008, pp. 134-137

 

Ethnobotanicals used by tribals of Mizoram for furniture and
household equipments

 

Sujata Bhardwaj & SK Gakhar*

Bhaskracharya College of Applied Sciences, Sector 2, Dwarka, New Delhi 110 045;

*Department of Biosciences, Maharshi Dayanand University, Rohtak 124 001, Haryana

E-mail: gakharsk@yahoo.co.in

Received 9 December 2005; Revised 29 October 2007

Results of ethnobotanical studies carried out in the state of Mizoram are presented. The usage of wild plants by the native people for furniture, household equipments and fuel is described. A Mizo hut is invariably raised on wooden post. Uses of 39 plant species along with their local names have been enumerated. Similarly, 6 plant species, which are used as fuel wood having excellent energy output with less smoke have been identified.

Key words: Ethnobotany, Traditional furniture, Household equipments, Fuel, Mizoram

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(1), January 2008, pp. 138-140

 

Ethnobotanical approach on wild plants for manufacturing musical instruments
by Gond and Korku tribes of Vidarbha

Amit Kaur Puri & Alka Chaturvedi

Department of Botany, TRM, Nagpur University, Nagpur 440 033, Maharashtra

Received 29 March 2007; revised 9 August 2007

Music and dancing are important part of Gond and Korku tribals inhabiting in Vidarbha region. These aboriginals make a variety of musical instruments from the natural products available around them. Musical instruments include drums, flute, dholki and small cymbals, etc. The study of musical culture among the tribals is an interesting line of investigation as this can open a new path of employment among them. The paper deals with the ethnobotanical survey on wild plants used by Gondu and Korku tribes for manufacturing musical instruments.

Keywords: Gond tribes, Korku tribes, Vidarbha, Musical instruments, Ethnobotany


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(1), January 2008, pp. 141-147

 

Natural dye yielding plants and indigenous knowledge of dyeing in Manipur, Northeast India

Lunalisa Potsangbam, Swapana Ningombam & Warjeet S Laitonjam*

Department of Chemistry, Manipur University, Canchipur 795 003, Manipur

E-mail: warjeet@yahoo.com

Received 9 September 2005: revised 5 October 2007

The people of Manipur, which lies under the Indo-Burmese region, have been using indigenous dyestuffs from plants since time immemorial, in handicrafts, handlooms, fine arts, etc. There are more than 50 plants species in Manipur, which are used as dyes right from ancient times, before chemical dyes were introduced in the state. Strobilanthus flaccidifolius is one such plants being traditionally used by the people of the state for preparing dye. Many tribes and Meitei community of Manipur have been using species like Parkia javanica, Melastoma malabathricum, Pasania pachyphylla, Solanum incidum, Bixa orellana, Tectona grandis, etc. The Maring tribes still uses the fruit of Melastoma malabathricum for staining teeth in dark blackish red; it strengthens the teeth and protects from gum diseases and cavities. These plants are used traditionally in combination with other plants for extraction and preparation of dyes utilizing indigenous processes. The compounds isolated from these dye yielding plants and the indigenous knowledge on dye preparation in Manipur is reported.

Keywords: Meitei tribes, Maring tribes, Natutal dye, Manipur, Indigenous knowledge

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(1), January 2008, pp. 148-156

 

Botanical resources used in traditional wood carving industry among the
Wancho tribe of Arunachal Pradesh

Hui Tag*1, AK Das1, H Pallabi1, Ranjay K Singh3 & G Palit2

1Division of Higher Plant Systematic and Ethnomedicine, Department of Botany, Rajiv Gandhi University, Rono Hills, Itanagar 791112, Arunachal Pradesh;  2Department of Geography, Rajiv Gandhi University, Rono Hills, Itanagar 791112, Arunachal Pradesh; 3Department of Agricultural Extension and Rural Sociology, College of Horticulture & Forestry, Central Agricultural University, Pasighat, East Siang, Arunachal Pradesh

E-mail: *huitag@yahoo.co.in;pallabi_tezu@yahoo.com; arupbot@rediffmail.com; gobindapalit@yahoo.co.in;

ranjay_jbp@rediffmail.com

Received 3 August 2007; revised 6 November 2007

Traditional woodcarving system is quite popular among the Wancho tribe of Arunachal Pradesh. The art and skills of wood carving practiced among the Wancho community is closely associated with their age-old religious beliefs and cultural practices, which are evident through their traditional institutions in the form of Morung (Bachelor dormitory), funeral rites, fertility cult and human head hunting. Unfortunately, the traditional art of wood carving among the Wancho has suffered a set back in recent decades. As a result, local artisans, who solely depend on woodcarving industry for the sustenance of their livelihood, are in dwindling position. However, Government initiative at community level somehow rescuing the degrading art but concerted effort is still needed to make the industry traditionally reliable and economically sustainable. The paper discuss the role of botanical resources used in woodcarving industry of Wancho and attempt has been made to highlight status of botanical species of Wancho locality emphasized on cultural knowledge of wood carving, commercial prospect and role of traditional knowledge in conservation of botanical resources associated with local woodcarving industry. In all, 12 plant species has been reported to be used in local woodcarving industry in Wancho dominated region of Tirap district of Arunachal Pradesh.

Keywords: Traditional Woodcarving Industry, Botanical resources, Wancho community, Arunachal Pradesh

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(1), January 2008, pp. 157-161

 

Plants used in traditional handicrafts in several Balkan countries

 

Yunus Dogan1*, Anely M Nedelcheva2, Dragica Obratov-Petković3 & Ioana M Padure4

1Buca Faculty of Education, Dokuz Eylul University, 35160 Buca, Izmir, Turkey

2Department of Botany, Faculty of Biology, Sofia University "St. Kliment Ohridski", 1164 Sofia, Bulgaria

3University of Belgrade, Faculty of Forestry, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia

4University of Agronomic Science and Veterinary Medicine, Department of Botany and Plant Physiology, Bucharest, Romania

E-mail: yunus.dogan@deu.edu.tr

Received 6 August 2007; Revised 5 October 2007

The aim of the study is to show some of the most common and popular plants used as raw in some traditional handicrafts in Balkan countries, in relation to the natural plant resources and national traditions. The information is gathered largely from literature, analyzing the findings in the existing ethnographic collections as well as field collected data and interviewed during field survey conducted during 2006-2007 more than 50 local informants using non-structured interviews. Arundo donax, Cannabis sativa, Corylus avellana, Fagus sylvatica, Fagus orientalis, Morus alba, Phragmites australis, Salix spp., Typha angustifolia, Urtica dioica, Vitex agnus-castus were found to be commonly used in the manufacturing of wood articles, mats & rugs making, basketry and fibers producing.

Keywords: Balkan countries, Traditional handicrafts

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(1), January 2008, pp. 162-165

 

Plants used in traditional handicrafts in North eastern Andhra Pradesh

 

K N Reddy1, Chiranjibi Pattanaik2*, C S Reddy3, E N Murthy4 & V S Raju4

1Laila Impex R&D Centre, Unit-1, Phase-3, Jawahar Autonagar, Vijayawada 520 007, Andhra Pradesh

2Salim Ali Centre for Ornithology & Natural History, Deccan Regional Station, Hyderabad 500 017, Andhra Pradesh

3Forestry & Ecology Division, National Remote Sensing Agency, Hyderabad 500 037, Andhra Pradesh

4Department of Botany, Kakatiya University, Warangal 506 009, Andhra Pradesh

E-mail: jilu2000@rediffmail.com

Received 17 September 2007; revised 29 October 2007

The purpose of the study was to collect and document the plants used in traditional handicrafts by tribal people of Andhra Pradesh. A total of 40 plant species were documented, which are used in preparation of different handicrafts like making of rope, toys, meals plate, carry bags, fishing nets, brooms, etc. Among these species, 19 species are trees followed by 8 herbs, 7 climbers and 6 shrubs. Mostly, wood are used for making of furniture and different wood carvings. It has been observed that a very few people are adopting this profession due to less income. For this reason, the traditional knowledge is on sharp decline. There is an urgent need to take necessary steps for uplift the tribal people, who are engaged in handicrafts profession.

Keywords: Traditional handicrafts, Eastern Ghats, Andhra Pradesh

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(1), January 2008, pp. 166-171

 

Dye yielding plants of Assam for dyeing handloom textile products

 

A Kar & SK Borthakur*

Department of Botany, Gauhati University, Guwahati 781014, Assam

E-mail: ashishvision10@rediffmail.com; skb_gu1@yahoo.co; skb_gu1@sify.com; skbgu1@gmail.com

Received 4 October 2007; revised 27 November 2007

Assam is floristically one of the richest states of Northeast India with more than 3,000 flowering plant species. The state is inhabited by five major tribes and nine minor tribes. The people of Assam have been using different herbs to dye their cotton, silk and woolen yarns, and garments. A survey on vegetable dye was undertaken during 2006-2007 in different parts and among different ethnic group of Assam. The paper deals with 47 dye yielding plant species and provides information on their botanical name, family, local names, plant parts used, method of preparation, colour produced, and kind of garments dyed.

Keywords: Dye yielding plants, Natural dyes, Handloom, Textile, Assam

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(1), January 2008, pp. 172-177

 

On-loom finishing of handloom products — An innovative &
indigenous approach

 

Arup Mukherjee & Ashis Mitra*

Textile Section, Silpa-Sadana, PSV, Visva-Bharati, PO Sriniketan731236, District Birbhum, West Bengal

E-mail: a_mitra2005@yahoo.com

Received 18 January 2006; revised 5 October 2007

In big sectors, finishing of textiles is not a matter of problem as the machines for this purpose can be fed with long length of fabrics. But the usual finishing techniques practiced in mill sectors can not be adopted in handloom sectors, because the products here are in the form of piece goods. In Fulia, Shantipur, Nabadweep and some other reputed handloom sectors of West Bengal, the weavers are found to apply size paste made of sago or starch mainly on saris and silk thans by hand on-looms (while weaving) only. But door curtains, towels, bed covers and many other handloom products are sold in the market without any finish. Many finishing can be developed on handloom products also by applying hand spraying system by the use of different softeners, stiffeners, glazers, etc. as required by the end-users, to make them more beautiful, attractive, lustrous and market competitive. In the paper, an innovative and indigenous approach has been made on trial basis for on-loom application of finish on handloom goods, and it has been proved by doing some simple testing that this indigenous approach is both technically and economically feasible not only for piece goods, but also for bulk application provided some other accessories like cottage level finishing chamber/steamer, ceiling fan, drier, etc. can be arranged. The products requiring this type of finishing treatments should not be hot pressed or ironed in any stage, otherwise the inherent fullness of the handloom goods will be adversely affected.

Keywords: Handloom finishing, Warp, Weft, Drape, Bending length, softener, Crimp interchange

 

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(1), January 2008, pp. 178-181

 

Contemporary breakthrough in Ahimsa silk spinning

Sanapapamma KJ & Shailaja D Naik*

Department of Textiles and Apparel Designing, College of Rural Home Science, UAS, Dharwad 580 005, Karnataka

Received 5 July 2006; revised 28 September 2007

Karnataka is the premier mulberry silk producing state in India, contributing nearly 73% of the country’s total production. Around 764 drainages distributed in different parts of Karnataka cater to the seed requirement of the Seri culturist. During drainages operation moths emerges out by piercing the cocoons thus become unreelable. Such cocoons amount to about 240 tons per year, hence proper utilization of these cocoons is of utmost importance for product diversification. The silk spun from pierced cocoon without letting pupae to die considered as Ahimsa silk is widely accepted by Hindus. Ahimsa silk spun on traditional devices viz., Takli, NR Das, Chuodhary Charaka and Medleri Charakas, did not produce regular tpi though the production was less. Hence, there was need to develop appropriate technology to spin quality spun silk. The CSTRI, Bangalore realized the necessity and to develop the improvised “Motorized Spinning cum Twisting Machine’’, a real break through in silk spinning. This machine was perfectly suitable to spin unreelable silk to 30-35s and the production rate ranged to 100-40g/8 hrs, which exhibited greater tenacity with remarkable elongation.

Keywords: Ahimsa silk, Silk spinning, Cocoons, Traditional spinning devices

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(1), January 2008, pp. 182-187

 

Panorama of ecofriendly naturally colour cotton

Sadhana D Kulloli* & Shailaja D Naik

Department of Textiles and Apparel Designing, College of Rural Home Science,

University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad 580 005, Karnataka

E-mail: profshailajanaik@yahoo.co.in

Received 19 July 2007; revised 14 November 2007

Two genotypes of naturally brown coloured cotton yarns, viz. Dharwad Desi Colour Cotton–1 (DDCC-1) and Dharwad Brown Hirsutum–250 (DBH-250) were shot on handloom with white cotton and filature silk (Muga, Mulberry and Tasar) to produce user and ecofriendly fabrics. Japanese Kawabata Evaluation System was used to assess these union fabrics for their performance. Union fabrics showed higher tensile, bending, shear, compressional and surface property values indicating the fabrics having low bending rigidity & fabric density, greater flexural rigidity than their corresponding control samples. Koshi (stiffness), Numeri (smoothness), Fukurami (fullness and softness) and Sofutosa (softness) were the Primary Hand Values of KES-FB in turn assisted to rate the Total Hand Value (THV). The THV expressed that these union fabrics are most suitable (good to excellent) for women’s winter thin dress and fairly suitable (fair to good) for women’s winter suits. Therefore, it is a boon for cotton cultivators to grow colour cotton on commercial scale to sustain in both domestic and international market as well as support the handloom sector.

Key words:  Colour cotton, Surface properties, Tensile properties, Union fabrics, Ecofriendly colour cotton, Natural colour cotton

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. .7(1), January 2008, pp. 188-196

 

Coast Salish weaving-Preserving traditional knowledge with new technology

Leslie Tepper

Canadian Museum of Civilization, 100 Laurier St, PO Box 3100, Station B, Gatineau, Quebec J8H 4H2, Canada
E:mail: leslie.tepper@civilization.ca

Received 31 July 2007; Revised 25 October 2007

Hand made textiles are an important source of traditional knowledge. Infused with symbolic and ritual meaning they can serve as a conduit of cultural information. During times of rapid social change, transmission of both the technology and symbolic content of these textiles is difficult to maintain. Among the Coast Salish weavers of Canada’s Northwest Coast, efforts to preserve their weaving heritage have now incorporated multimedia technology for the teaching of traditional knowledge. The paper explores the recent partnership of the Canadian Museum of Civilization and Coast Salish weavers to develop a new working tool.

Keywords: Weaving heritage, Traditional weaving, Coast Salish weavers, Canada

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol.7(1), January 2008, pp. 197-203

 

Protection and revival of traditional hand embroidery, Kasuti by automation

 

Shailaja D Naik* & Jyoti V Vastrad

Department of Textiles and Apparel Designing, College of Rural Home Science,

University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad 580005, Karnataka

Received 31 July 2007; Revised 8 October 2007

The handloom industry is highly labour oriented, having legacy of unrivalled craftsmanship. Handloom goods are no longer the choice of poor alone, but a weakness for the elite in India and abroad. Ethnic designs woven in brilliant coloured fabrics bear a distinct seal of magnificent, magical and traditional artistry of Indian weavers and bear their own regional identity. One among such exclusivity is the polycotton sari with contrast border having demand not only in India but also in the international markets especially when embellished with the traditional hand embroidery of Karnataka, Kasuti. Of the four stitches in kasuti, negi is rarely used by the embroiderers since it involve lot of skill, patience, expertise and intricacy. To achieve the embroidery, almost parallel to the interlacement of warp-weft is very difficult by the commercial embroiderers of today. Hence, many professional do not adopt negi stitch and hence this stitch of kasuti is unnoticingly going extinct. The paper explains the efforts made to revive and preserve the traditional negi motifs by way of computerizing and mechanizing.

Keywords: Traditional embroidery, CATD, Handloom weaving, Jacquard designing, Kasuti

 

 


Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(1), January 2008, pp. 204-207

 

Development of handloom for jute based diversified fabrics modifying traditional cotton handloom

Surajit Sengupta*, Sanjoy Debnath & GK Bhattacharyya

National Institute of Research on Jute & Allied Fibre Technology, 12, Regent Park, Kolkata 700 040, West Bengal

E-mail: ssg_42@rediffmail.com

Received 7 November 2007; revised 23 November 2007

Handloom is a traditional technology to produce specialty fabrics as well as ordinary fabrics in the rural and semi-urban areas scattered throughout India. In the present context, though the share of handloom industry has been drastically fallen due to advancement in power driven large scale sectors, this is one of the major decentralised small scale industry till today. West Bengal is traditionally rich in both cotton handloom and jute yarn making by its technology and availability. During weaving of jute and jute blended yarn in cotton handloom, the weavers have faced a lot of difficulties mainly due to coarseness and roughness of jute fibre. In the paper, some modifications in the traditional frame type cotton handloom have been discussed so that jute and jute blended yarns can be woven successfully for decorative, upholstery, furnishing and even for outer part of the apparel.

Key words: Diversified fabric, Traditional handloom, Jute based yarn

 

 

Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge

Vol. 7(1), January 2008, pp. 208-211

 

Contemporized traditional textile made-ups—A mode for rural and urban linkage

Namrata M & Shailaja D Naik*

Department of Textiles and Apparel Designing, College of Rural Home science, University of Agricultural Sciences
Dharwad
580 005, Karnataka

E-mail: profshailajanaik@yahoo.co.in

Received 9 September 2005; revised 5 October 2007

Traditional hand woven khana material is the choli or blouse material with extra warp dobby figures, which is from rural parts of northern Karnataka. There was a great need for diversification of its utility to suit the contemporary urban consumers. Therefore, the researcher has put forth the efforts in designing variety of elegant diwan sets, viz. block, crazy, log cabin, mosaic and tucked patch worked bed linens and has selected this mode for linking submerged rural art to the cosmopolitan urban customers. These newly designed diwan sets made of traditional hand woven khana material embellished with tribal hand embroideries will become the latest fashions to suit the trendy market and will further open a new vista for khana material to be used in home textiles.

Keywords: Contemporary, Extra-warp, Khana material, Traditional textiles, Traditional hand weaving, Tribal hand embroideries