NATURAL PRODUCT RADIANCE

A Bimonthly Journal on Natural Products

Total visitors: 3,694  since 24-04-09

VOLUME 8

NUMBER 2

March – April 2009

 

 

C       O       N       T       E       N       T       S

Readers’ Write  
   
Allium odorum Linn.–Traditional medicine for insomnia 105
Ch. Binod Singh  
   
Watermelon products and by-products 105
Sachin Kamble   
   
Research Papers  
   
Chemistry, antimicrobial and antioxidant potentials of Cinnamomum tamala Nees & Eberm. (Tejpat) essential oil and oleoresins 106
I P S Kapoor, Bandana Singh, Gurdip Singh, Valery Isidorov and Lech Szczepaniak    
IPC code; Int. cl.8 A61K 36/54, A61P 31/00, A61P 39/06  
   
Free radical scavenging activity screening of medicinal plants from Tripura, Northeast India 117
Rajendra Kshirsagar and Shakti Upadhyay  
IPC code; Int. cl.8 A61K 36/00, A61P 17/18  
   
Evaluation of protective effects of ethanolic extract of Costus speciosus (Koenig.) Sm. rhizomes on carbon tetrachloride induced hepatotoxicity in rats 123
Nitin Verma and R L Khosa  
IPC code; Int. cl.8 A61K 36/00, A61K 36/906, A61K 125/00, A61P 1/16  
   
Characterization of jatropha oil for the preparation of biodiesel 127
R K Singh and Saroj K Padhi  
IPC code; Int. cl.8 A61K 36/47, C11C 3/02  
   
Bioefficacy of neem products and insecticides against the incidence of whitefly, yellow mosaic virus and pod borer in Black gram 133
M P Gupta and R K Pathak  
IPC code; Int. cl.8 A61K 36/00, A01N 65/26  
   

Anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anti-lipid peroxidative properties of

Wattakaka volubilis (Linn.f.) Stapf.

137
TS Divya, PG Latha, K Usha, GI Anuja, SR Suja, S Shyamal, VJ Shine, S Sini, P Shikha and S Rajasekharan  
IPC code; Int. cl.8 A61K 36/00, A61P  
   
Identification and characterization of Ratanjot (Arnebia nobilis Reichb.f.) 142
Anjali Arora, M L Gulrajani and Deepti Gupta  
IPC code; Int. cl.8 A61K 36/00, A61K 36/30  
   
Pharmacognostical studies and evaluation of total phenolic contents of trunk bark of Spondias mangifera Willd. 146
Muhammad Arif, K Zaman and Sheeba Fareed  
IPC code; Int. cl.8 A61K 36/22, A61P 1/12, A01G 17/00  
   
Studies on the pharmacognostical and in vitro antioxidant potential of the leaves of Cleome gynandra Linn. 151
T Anbazhagi, K Kadavul, G Suguna and A J A Petrus  
IPC code; Int. cl.8 A61K 36/18, A61K 127/00, A61P 17/18  
   
Green page: Research Papers  
   
Effect of organic manures and chemical fertilizers on the performance of a newly introduced aromatic crop Clarysage (Salvia sclarea Linn.) in the Uttarakhand 158
A C Mishra and K S Negi  
IPC code; Int. cl.8 A01G 9/00, A61K 36/537  
   
Determination of suitable cutting size for vegetative propagation and comparison of propagules to evaluate the seed quality attributes in Jatropha (Jatropha curcas Linn.) 162
M Kathiravan, A S Ponnuswamy and C Vanitha
IPC code; Int.cl.8 A01G 1/00, A01H 5/04, A61K 36/00, A61K 36/47  
   
Explorer: Research Papers  
   
Some abortifacient plants used by the tribal people of West Bengal 167
S Mitra and Sobhan Kr Mukherjee  
IPC code; Int. cl.8 A61K 36/00, A61 K 35/78, A61P 15/04   
   
Ethnobotanical uses of some plants by Tripuri and Reang tribes of Tripura 172
Himanshu Bikash Das, Koushik Majumdar, B K Datta and Debasis Ray  
IPC code; Int. cl.8 A61K 36/00   
   
Review Papers  
   
Chemistry and in vivo profile of entkaurene glycosides of Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni – An overview 181
Manishika Sharma, Naveen Kr Thakral and Seema Thakral  
IPC code; Int. cl.8 A23L 1/09, A61K 36/28, A61K 127/00   
   
Kigelia africana (Lam.) Benth. ¾ An overview 190
Sangita Saini, Harmeet Kaur, Bharat Verma, Ripudaman and S K Singh  
IPC code; Int. cl.8 A61K 8/97, A61K 36/18, A61P 1/12, A61P 17/00, A61P 25/00, A61P 29/00, A61P 31/00, A61P 33/00, A61P 35/00, A61P 39/06  
   
Book Review  
   
Ethnopharmacology–Recent Advances 198

P. Pushpangadan, V. George and K. K. Janardhanan (Eds)

 
   
Forthcoming Conferences, Seminars, Exhibitions and Trainings 199
   
Guidelines to authors  
   
Index  

 

 

Forthcoming Conferences, Seminars, Exhibitions and Trainings

 

1. Symposium on Application of Biotechnological tools in Genetic Improvement of Fish stock, 25-27 May 2009, Bhimtal, Uttarakhand, India, Director Direcorate of Coldwater Fisheries Research Anusandhan Bhawan Industrial Area Bhimtal-263136 Distt. Nainital (UK); Phone: 05942-247279, 247280; Fax: 05942-247693; E-mail: dcfrin@rediffmail.com, dcfrin@gmail.com.

 

2. Training Course on Fish Processing Innovations & Extension Methods, 08-20 June 2009, Cochin, Kerala, India, Dr B Meenakumari, Director Central Institute of Fisheries Technology, Matsyapuri P.O. Cochin-682 029; Phone: 0484-2666845; Fax: 0484-2668212; E-mail: cift@ciftmail.org.

 

3. Workshop on Vegetable Production and Management, 10-12 June 2009, Varanasi, India, Dr A K Singh, Zonal Coordinator, Indian Institute of Vegetables Research, Varanasi-221005 and Zonal Coordinating Unit, Zone-IV, Kanpur; Phone: 0512-2533560.

 

4. Training on Processing of Sunflower Seeds and its By-Products Utilization, 11-17 June 2009,   Ludhiana, India, Director or Head, Transfer of Technology Division CIPHET, Ludhiana-141004; Phone: 0161-2308669, 2313115; Fax: 0161-2308670; E-mail: ciphet@sify.com.

 

5. First Asian Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR)Congress for Sustainable Agriculture, 21-24 June 2009, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India, Dr. Suseelendra Desai; Website: http://asiapgpr.freehostia.com

 

6.  BIT Life Sciences 2nd World Cancer Congress 2009, 22-25 June 2009, Beijing, China, Annie Sun, Organizing Committee of The World Cancer Congress, 26 Gaoneng St., R401, Dalian Hightech Zone, Dalian, LN 116025, China, Phone: 0086-411-84799479; Fax: 0086-411-84799629; E-mail: annie@cancercon.com; Website: http://www.bitlifesciences.com/cancer2009

 

7.  China Biofuels & Ethanol 2009, 24-25 June 2009, Beijing, Beijing, China, Ms Tham Ruoh Yi;  E-mail: register@ibcasia.com.sg; Phone: +65 6514 3180; Fax: +65 6733 5087;

Website: http://www.ibc-asia.com/chinabiofuelsethanol.

 

8.  Sugarasia 2009, 2-4 July 2009, Pragati Maidan, New Delhi, India; Website:  http://www.sugarasia.net/

 

9.  BIT Life Sciences' 2nd Annual World Summit of Antivirals 2009, 18-20 July 2009, Seoul, China, Ms. Yolanda Wang, Program Coordinator , Organizing Committee of WSA-2009, China 26 Gaoneng Street, Room 405, Dalian High-tech Zone, Dalian, LN 116025, China; Phone: 0086-411-84799609-813; Fax: 0086-411-84799629; E-mail: yolanda@bit-wsa.com; Website: http://www.bitlifesciences.com/wsa2009.

10. Euro-Conference on Marine Natural Products, 19-23 July, 2009, Porto, Portugal, Prof. Dr. Anake Kijjoa, Departamento de Química Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas de Abel Salazar, Universidade do Porto,  4099-003 Porto Portugal, Phone:  +351-222062288; Fax:+ +351-222062232; E-mail: ankijjoa@icbas.up.pt; Website: www.cimar.org/6ECMNP/

11. International Conference on Algal Biomass–Resources and Utilization, 27-30 July 2009, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India, Dr V Sivasubramanian, Krishnamurthy Institute of Algology;

Website: http://www.geocities.com/krishalg/icabru09.htm

12. International Conference on Challenges In Biotechnology And Food Technology, (ICBF-2009), 26-28 August, 2009, Dr. P. Mullai/Dr. M. Thenmozhi, Department of Technology, Annamalai University, Annamalai Nagar-608 002, Tamil Nadu, India; E-mail: sammullaip@yahoo.in, thenmozhim.au@gmail.com, icbf2009@gmail.com

13. Indonesian Food Technology Exhibition (Indo Foodtec), 12-15 August 2009, Jakarta; Website: http://www.indofoodtec.com/

 

14. 22nd Asian Pacific Weed Science Conference, 19-23 October 2009, Lahore, Pakistan, Prof. Dr. K.B. Marwat; Website: http://www.wssp.org.pk.

 

15. International Exhibition and Conference for the Food and Beverage Industry (Annapoorna-World Food India), 25-27 November 2009, Mumbai, India; Website: http://www.worldoffoodindia.com/

 

 

 

 

 

Readers Write

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.8, March- April 2009, pp.105

 

 

Allium odorum Linn. – Traditional medicine for insomnia

 

            Dear editor, I would like to share with readers of Natural Product Radiance that in Manipur local people use Maroi Nakuppi which is botanically known as Allium odorum Linn. for curing haemolytic anaemia. Normally the plant is used like onion as spice for food flavouring and in the preparation of various types of recipes. Local people have explored its medicinal values also. They use it to improve blood circulation, healing muscles, bones and bone marrows. It is highly evidencing that babies/children who have less sleep and weeping habit during night can be given decoction (10-15ml with meal) of fresh whole plant with little salt or sugar or both, with or with out pepper for 2 to 3 weeks. This can also be given to adults (20-30ml) suffering from insomnia. The reason for insomnia is mainly less supply of blood to mind and heart which may be due to congested blood vessels. Insomnia persisted for a long time can cause anaemia, a symptom of paleness of body which can be characterised by reduction in the quantity of haemoglobin, an oxygen carrying pigment in the blood. Haemolytic one is as caused by toxicity of the blood. Haemolytic anaemia which is sometimes caused due to heavy smoking and congestion of blood vessels due to nicotine contents is observed in children whose parents do heavy smoking/ tobacco chewing habits. Hence, local people in Manipur use decoction of Maroi Nakuppi to get relief from insomnia and anaemia both.

 

            Ch. Binod Singh

Manipur-795 134

Watermelon products and by-products

            Dear madam, I read Natural Product Radiance with great interest and quest to know something new in the world of fruits and vegetables. The summer season is on and market is full of watermelon [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Mats. & Nakai] (though now-a-days available throughout the year). Here I would like share a research report on some latest developments on watermelon products and by-products. In India watermelon (Hindi-Tarbuz) is cultivated throughout India, especially Rajasthan, Bihar, Madhya Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh, Maharashtra, Andhra Pradesh and Punjab. Several cultivars have been developed to get, small sized (1-2 kg) fruits, thin rind and seedless and brilliant red coloured pulp. With the development of modern scientific studies the pulp is now utilized for making bottled natural drinks, jam, jellies, cakes and marmalades. The seeds are also a rich source of protein and carbohydrates suitable for use in various confectionary products. The cakes prepared from watermelon pulp have been preferred in terms of texture, odour, pore structure, wetness and overall acceptability. Increased consumption of watermelon throughout world has prompted the scientific studies on storage of the fruit for a longer time. Therefore, analytical quality characteristics of packaged fresh-cut watermelon slices from non-treated and 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP)-and/or ethylene-treated whole fruit were investigated. It has been observed that low dosage 1-MCP treatments prior to ethylene exposure of whole watermelons prevented ethylene-mediated quality deterioration in fresh-cut slices stored under modified atmosphere conditions at 5°C. Commercial use of pulp and seeds generated a bulk availability of fruit rind. Researchers have studied the possible use of rind for industrial production of pickle and evaluated seven existing watermelon rind pickle formulations (representing various soaking pretreatments including lime, brine and water) for their chemical, physical, sensory properties, safety and suitability for industrial production. Sensory data using a mixed gender consumer panel indicated that overall, consumers preferred lime-soaked samples over brine or water pretreatments. Rind also yielded more citrulline (a non-essential amino acid) than flesh on a dry weight basis (24.7 and 16.7mg/g dwt, respectively).

Sachin Kamble

Sangli- 416 305, Maharashtra

Research Papers

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.8, March- April 2009, pp. 106-116

 

 

Chemistry, antimicrobial and antioxidant potentials of

Cinnamomum tamala Nees & Eberm. (Tejpat) essential oil and oleoresins†

I P S Kapoor1, Bandana Singh1, Gurdip Singh1*, Valery Isidorov2 and Lech Szczepaniak2

1Chemistry Department, DDU Gorakhpur University, Gorakhpur- 273 009, Uttar Pradesh, India

2Institute of Chemistry, Bialystok University, UI. Hurtowa 1, 15-399, Bialystok, Poland

        *Correspondent author, E-mail: gsingh4us@yahoo.com; Phone: +91-551-2200745 (R), 2202856 (O); Fax: +91-551-2340459; † Part 63

 

Gas chromatography-mass spectrometery (GC-MS) analysis of essential oil and oleoresins of Cinnamomum tamala Nees & Eberm. (Tejpat) revealed eugenol as major component of essential oil and oleoresins. The antioxidant activity of essential oil and oleoresins were evaluated against mustard oil by peroxide, p-anisidine, thiobarbituric acid and total carbonyl value method. In addition, their inhibitory action by FTC method, scavenging capacity by DPPH (2, 2′-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical) method was also studied. The antimicrobial potentials of essential oil and oleoresins were tested against various food born fungi and bacteria. Results showed that both the volatile oil and oleoresins have effective antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. Thus, they could be evaluated as natural food preservatives, however, essential oil is better than oleoresins.

Keywords: Antimicrobial activity, Antioxidant activity, Cinnamomum tamala, Essential oil, Indian  Cassia lignea, Oleoresins, Tejpat.

IPC code; Int. cl.8 A61K 36/54, A61P 31/00, A61P 39/06

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.8, March- April 2009, pp.117-122

 

 

Free radical scavenging activity screening of medicinal plants from Tripura, Northeast India

Rajendra Kshirsagar1* and Shakti Upadhyay2

1Drug Discovery & Development, Reliance Pharmaceuticals Pvt Ltd, Dhirubhai Ambani Life Sciences Center, R-282, TTC Industrial Area of MIDC, Thane Belapur Road, Rabale

Navi Mumbai – 400 701, Maharashtra, India

235/1002, Seawood Estate, Palmbeach Marg, Nerul, Navi Mumbai-400 706

*Correspondent author, E-mail: rajendra_kshirsagar@relbio.com

Fax No.: +9122-27068499

Antioxidative effects of 123 extracts (Direct methanolic and sequential per ether, dichloro- methane, ethyl acetate, methanol) prepared from 32 plants species (59 plant samples) collected from Tripura, Northeast India have been studied. Their ability of scavenging free radicals was measured by DPPH reduction spectrophotometric assay. Sixteen extracts showed strong antioxidant capabilities, which were, subjected for their dose dependent activity at different concentrations to calculate IC50 values.

Keywords: Antioxidant, DPPH, Free radical scavenging activity, Medicinal plants, Northeast India, Tripura.

IPC code; Int. cl.8 A61K 36/00, A61P 17/18

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.8, March- April 2009, pp.123- 126

 

 

Evaluation of protective effects of ethanolic extract of Costus speciosus (Koenig) Sm. rhizomes on carbon tetrachloride induced hepatotoxicity in rats

Nitin Verma* and R L Khosa

Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Bharat Institute of Technology

Partapur Bypass, NH#58, Meerut-250 005, Uttar Pradesh, India

*Correspondent author, E-mail: nitinmiet14@rediffmail.com, nitinmiet1482@gmail.com

Phone: +91 121 24001877 (0), 9897222975 (Mob.)

 

The hepatoprotective activity of the ethanolic extract of the rhizomes of Costus speciosus (Koenig) Sm. was studied on carbon tetrachloride treated rats. The extract registered a significant fall in the levels of serum glutamyl oxalacetic acid transaminase (SGOT), serum glutamyl pyruvate transaminase (SGPT), alkaline phosphatase (ALKP), serum bilirubin (SBLN) and liver inflammation supported by histopathological studies on liver, thus exhibited a significant hepatoprotective activity.

 

Keywords: Costus speciosus, Carbon tetrachloride, Ethanolic extract, Hepatoprotective activity, Lipid peroxidation.

IPC code; Int. cl.8 A61K 36/00, A61K 36/906, A61K 125/00, A61P 1/16

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.8, March- April 2009, pp.127-132

 

 

Characterization of jatropha oil for the preparation of biodiesel

R K Singh1* and Saroj K Padhi2

 

Chemical Engineering Department

National Institute of Technology

Rourkela-769 008, Orissa, India

*Correspondent author, E-mail: raghubansh.singh@rediffmail.com

sarojpadhi@yahoo.com; Phone: +91-9861285425, 06812-462260

There has been greater awareness on biodiesel in developing countries in the recent times and significant activities have picked up for its production especially with a view to boost the rural economy. In the present investigation Jatropha curcas Linn. seed oil (non-edible) and its methyl ester have been chosen to find out their suitability for use as petro-diesel. Experimental investigation has been done to find out the different properties of jatropha oil. Theoretical equation has been developed to find out the properties and they have been compared with the experimental values. Biodiesel was prepared from jatropha oil, through esterification followed by trans-esterification; former was performed using acid catalyst (5% H2SO4) and methanol (20% of oil). The trans-esterification reaction was carried out for 2 hrs keeping the molar ratio of methanol to oil at 6:1 and sodium hydroxide concentration of 0.7 weight percentage of oil. The yield of jatropha oil methyl ester was about 97% .The properties of biodiesel depends on the nature of the vegetable oil to be used for preparation of biodiesel and if the developed process is scaled up to commercial levels then excellent business opportunity will be offered by the biodiesel obtained from jatropha oil methyl ester and it could be a major step towards the creation of an eco-friendly transportation fuel that is relatively clean on combustion and provides farmers with substantial income.

 

Keywords: Seed oil, Extraction, Jatropha oil, Esterification, Transesterification, Methyl ester, Biodiesel, Catalysts, Jatropha curcas.

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/47, C11C 3/02.

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.8, March- April 2009, pp. 133-136

 

 

Bioefficacy of neem products and insecticides against the incidence of whitefly, yellow mosaic virus and pod borer in Black gram

M P Gupta* and R K Pathak

College of Agriculture, Jawaharlal Nehru Krishi Vishwa Vidyalaya

Tikamgarh-472 001, Madhya Pradesh, India

*Correspondent author, E-mail: mpguptatkg@gmail.com

Phone: 07683-245136

            Yellow mosaic virus disease of Black gram [Vigna mungo (Linn.) Hepper] caused by mung bean yellow mosaic Gemini virus and transmitted by whitefly (Bemisia tabaci Genn.) is most serious in northern states of India, particularly, Bundelkhand Zone of Madhya Pradesh. Efficacy of some indigenous neem products, insecticides and their admixtures were tested at Research Farm of College of Agriculture, Tikamgarh during kharif 2003-2005. The results indicated that admixture treatments, neen seed kernel extract (NSKE ) (in cow urine), 3% + dimethoate, 0.03% and neem oil, 0.5% + dimethoate, 0.03% not only reduced the incidence of whitefly and yellow mosaic but also of pod borer. These treatments gave maximum grain yield of 935 and 902 kg/ha, net profit of Rs 3934 and Rs 3320/ha with incremental cost benefit ratio of 11.2 and 10.9, respectively.

 

Keywords: Neem products, Dimethoate, Methyl demeton, Bemisia tabaci, Yellow Mosaic Virus, Pod borer, Meruca testulalis, Black gram, Vigna mungo, Urd.

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/00, A01N 65/26

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.8, March- April 2009, pp.137-141

 

 

Anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anti-lipid peroxidative properties of

Wattakaka volubilis (Linn.f.) Stapf.

 

TS Divya1, PG Latha*, K Usha1, GI Anuja, SR Suja, S Shyamal, VJ Shine,

S Sini, P Shikha and S Rajasekharan

Tropical Botanic Garden and Research Institute, Palode, Thiruvananthapuram-695 562, Kerala, India

1Avinashilingam University for Women, Coimbatore-641 043, Tamil Nadu, India

*Correspondent author, E-mail: lathagopalakrishnan@yahoo.com;

Phone: 0472-2869226(O) 0471-2443503(R)

            The ethanolic extract of Wattakaka volubilis (Linn.f.) Stapf. was screened for its anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects in animals. The extract showed a significant inhibition of carrageenan-induced rat paw edema and acetic acid-induced writhing in mice compared to the standard anti-inflammatory and analgesic drug, indomethacin. The extract also showed potent in vitro inhibition of FeCl2-ascorbic acid-stimulated mice liver lipid peroxidation.

Keywords: Wattakaka volubilis, Anti-inflammatory, Analgesic, Lipid peroxidation, Indomethacin

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/00, A61P

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.8, March- April 2009, pp. 142-145

 

 

Identification and characterization of Ratanjot (Arnebia nobilis Reichb.f.)

Anjali Arora, M L Gulrajani and Deepti Gupta*

Department of Textile Technology

Indian Institute of Technology, Hauz Khas, Delhi-110 016

*Correspondent author, E-mail: deeptibgupta@gmail.com;

Phone: (O) 91-11-2659-1417(O), 91-11-2659-6952 (R)

            In literature, the vernacular name Ratanjot is attributed to at least 15 plant species of four different families. Taxonomic analysis revealed that true Ratanjot comprises of the crude rootstocks of the plant Arnebia nobilis Reichb.f. Interestingly, this material, though abundantly available in India, is not indigenous to this country but imported from Afghanistan. Macroscopic analysis of authenticated sample showed the material to be in the form of purple brown roots which are fusiform, twisted, covered with papery layers and have a pungent odour. Under SEM, the adaxial surface showed the presence of epidermal cells with stomata and epicuticular wax secretions whereas, abaxial surface showed only elongated epidermal cells. The powdered roots gave orangish brown colour with concentrated nitric acid and bright red colour with acetic acid during chemical identification. TLC analysis of the n-hexane extract showed the presence of five red and pink components. Shikonin was identified as one of the components; however, it is not the major component.

Keywords: Ratanjot, Arnebia nobilis, Macroscopic, Microscopic, Chemical analysis, TLC analysis.

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/00, A61K 36/30

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.8, March- April 2009, pp. 146-150

 

 

Pharmacognostical studies and evaluation of total phenolic contents of trunk bark of Spondias mangifera Willd.

Muhammad Arif1*, K Zaman2 and Sheeba Fareed1

 

1Deptt of Pharmacognosy & Phytochemistry
Faculty of Pharmacy, Integral University, Lucknow-226 026, Uttar Pradesh, India
2Deptt of Pharmaceutical Sciences
Dibrugarh University, Dibrugarh-786 004, Assam, India

*Correspondent author, E-mail: arif_sweet@rediffmail.com

Phone: +91-9918464963 (Mob.)

            Spondias mangifera Willd., commonly known as Wild mango or Hog plum (Hindi-Amara) is an important medicinal plant. The dry bark is silver brown coloured with mucilaginous astringent characters. It is traditionally used in North-East regions of India as refrigerant, aromatic, tonic and for the treatment of dysentery, diarrhoea and rheumatism. This study deals with the pharmacognostical evaluation of its dried trunk bark which includes macro and microscopic studies, determination of physicochemical parameters of the extract using TLC fingerprinting.

Keywords: Spondias mangifera, Wild mango, Hog plum, Amara, Phenolic contents, Macroscopic, Microscopic.

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/22, A61P 1/12, A01G 17/00

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.8, March- April 2009, pp. 151-157

 

 

Studies on the pharmacognostical and in vitro antioxidant potential of Cleome gynandra Linn. Leaves

T Anbazhagi1, K Kadavul1*, G Suguna2 and A J A Petrus2

1Department of Plant Sciences, 2Department of Chemistry

Kanchi Mamunivar Centre for Post-Graduate Studies, Puducherry- 605 008, India

*Correspondent author, E-mail: kadavul2004@yahoo.com

Cleome gynandra Linn. of Cleomaceae (Capparidaceae) family is an annual herb, growing up to 0.6-1m in height and is popular in the Ayurveda, Siddha, Folk and Tibetian systems of medicine. The present paper deals with the pharmacognostical study, including the macroscopic, microscopic, fluorescence and phytochemical characteristics, which enables the identification of the leafy vegetable, as well as the determination of the antioxidant potential and the predominant classes of antioxidants that contribute to the activity.

Keywords: Antioxidant, Cleome gynandra, Flavonoids, Microscopic characters, Pharmacognostic characterization, Phytochemicals, Polyphenols, Trace elements, Vitamin C.

IPC code; Int. cl.8 A61K 36/18, A61K 127/00, A61P 17/18

 

 

Green Page: Research Paper

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.8, March- April 2009, pp. 158-161

 

 

Effect of organic manures and chemical fertilizers on the performance of a newly introduced aromatic crop Clarysage (Salvia sclarea Linn.) in the Uttarakhand

A C Mishra and K S Negi*

National Bureau of Plant Genetic Resources

Regional Station, Bhowali-263 132, Niglat

Distt. Nainital, Uttarakhand, India

*Correspondent author, E-mail: officerinchargebhowali@yahoo.com

Phone: 91-5942-220027, 09411166201 (Mob.)

An experiment was conducted in rainfed sub-temperate hills of Uttarakhand with a Clarysage (Salvia sclarea Linn.) genotype EC314327, introduced from Germany, by applying three organic manures, viz. Farmyard manure (FYM), leaf manure (LM) and ash (20 t/ha each) and an NPK dose of 150:80:100 kg/ha along with control. Results indicated that maximum spike yield (104.67g/plant) and 6.61kg/plot were obtained with application of NPK followed by FYM (81.33g and 5.96kg, respectively). Harvesting of inflorescence at complete petal-fall stage (during late July) was the best time in relation to essential oil percentage.

 

Keywords: Clarysage, Salvia sclarea, Organic manures, Chemical fertilizer, Spacing, Aromatic crop.

IPC code; Int. cl.8A01G 9/00, A61K 36/537

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.8, March- April 2009, pp. 162-166

 

 

Determination of suitable cutting size for vegetative propagation and comparison of propagules to evaluate the seed quality attributes in Jatropha curcas Linn.

M Kathiravan, A S Ponnuswamy and C Vanitha*

Department of Seed Science and Technology

Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore-641 003, Tamil Nadu, India

* Correspondent author, E-mail: cvani_seed@yahoo.co.in; Phone: 9846442771

 

An attempt was made to propagate Jatropha curcas Linn. through stem cutting without any rooting hormonal treatments. The cuttings were selected with three different lengths, viz. 20 cm (L1), 30 cm (L2) and 40 cm (L3) and four different stem thickness: 1.5-2.0 cm (T1), 2.0-2.5 cm (T2), 2.5-3.0 cm (T3) and 3.0-3.5 cm (T4). The cuttings were planted in the nursery and observed for survival percentage, number of leaves per plant, root volume, root fresh and dry weight on 90 days after planting. The result revealed that the stem cutting with 40 cm length (L3) and 2.5 to 3.0 cm thickness (T3) was found to be very suitable for quicker regeneration with seedling quality characteristics compared to other types of cuttings. Hence, to find out the suitable propagating material for commercial exploitation, the best performed stem cutting with 40 cm length (L3) and 2.5 to 3.0 cm  thickness (T3) along with freshly harvested seeds were forwarded to field trial. The plant biometric characteristics, fruit and seed quality attributes were observed in both the treatments and compared to find out the best propagating techniques. The plants propagated by seeds recorded more plant height (1.65 m), number of branches (3.2). However, the flowering was four days earlier by cuttings than the plants propagated by seeds. The reproductive character of the monoecious inflorescence in terms of male to female flower ratio was higher in seed propagated crop (24:1) than cuttings (22:1). J. curcas propagated through seeds recorded better performance related to plant biometric and seed quality characteristics compared to cuttings, which induced early flowering and more female flowers than the seed crop.

 

Keywords: Jatropha, Jatropha curcas, Seed quality, Survival percentage, Vegetative propagation.

IPC code; Int. cl.8 A01G 1/00, A01H 5/04, A61K 36/00, A61K 36/47.

 

 

Explorer: Research Paper

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.8, March- April 2009, pp. 167-171

 

 

Some abortifacient plants used by the tribal people of West Bengal

S Mitra1 and Sobhan Kr Mukherjee2*

1Department of Botany, Ranaghat College, Ranaghat, Nadia-741235, India

2Department of Botany, University of Kalyani, Kalyani, Nadia

*Correspondent author, E-mail: sobhankr@yahoo.com

Phone: (033) 2592 6917, 09432224984 (Mob.)

            Use of abortifacient plants is common practice among the tribal communities of West Bengal. In the present paper a list of 22 Angiospermic plant species belonging to 21 genera under 18 families and used as abortifacient has been provided. The study was conducted with 7 native tribal communities of West Bengal, i.e. Lodha, Lohar, Munda, Oraon, Polia, Sabar and Santal. Among these, Santal and Oraon people are well-acquainted with knowledge of the plants usage. The mode of preparation, administration and the dosage of the drugs are also provided for further studies and induce early stage pregnancy termination.

Keywords: Abortifacient plants, Tribal communities, Lodha, Lohar, Munda, Oraon, Polia, Sabar and Santal, West Bengal.

IPC code; Int. cl.8A61K 36/00, A61 K 35/78, A61P 15/04

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.8, March- April 2009, pp.172-180

 

 

Ethnobotanical uses of some plants by Tripuri and Reang tribes of Tripura

Himangshu Bikash Das1, Koushik Majumdar1, B K Datta1* and Debasis Ray2

1Plant Taxonomy and Biodiversity Laboratory, Department of Botany,Tripura University

Suryamaninagar -799 130, Tripura (W), India

2Department of Pharmacology, Agartala Govt. Medical College, Agartala-799 006, Tripura (W)

*Correspondent author, E-mail: dattabadal2008@gmail.com

 

An ethno-medicinal survey of plants in Tripura state revealed that some less known medicinal plants have been used by the indigenous tribes. The valid scientific name, family, local name(s), habit, dosages and traditional formulation of 33 species belonging to 32 genera and 25 families are enumerated in the paper. The ethnic people of Tripuri and Reang communities of Tripura are involved in using these medicinal plants. Traditional beliefs, concepts, knowledge and practices among them for preventing, lessening or curing disease are accessible till now. Still they depend upon such traditional healthcare and the need for immediate documentation of such knowledge and conservation of these valuable plants are emphasized to secure it for our future generation.

 

Keywords: Medicinal plants, Reang tribes, Traditional herbal practice, Tripuri tribes, Tripura, India.

IPC code; Int. cl.8 A61K 36/00

 

 

Review Papers

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.8, March- April 2009, pp. 181-189

 

 

Chemistry and in vivo profile of ent - kaurene glycosides of Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni –An overview

Manishika Sharma1, Naveen Kr Thakral2 and Seema Thakral3*

1G.V.M. College of Pharmacy, Sonipat-131 001, Haryana, India

2Laborate Pharmaceutical India Ltd., Poanta Sahib-173 025, Himachal Pradesh, India

3PDM College of Pharmacy, Bahadurgarh-124 507, Haryana

*Correspondent author, E-mail: seemathakral@rediffmail.com

The ent-kaurene type of diterpenoid glycosides are typically the characteristics of leaves of Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni, the plant with sweet leaves. Relative to sucrose, the potent sweetness intensities of these glycosides have projected them as cost effective sucrose substitute. In the present paper, the structural and physicochemical features of ent-kaurene glycosides of Stevia along with an insight into the structure-sweetness relationship are presented. Despite their age-old widespread use in several parts of the world, there still remains certain concern regarding safety profile of these glycosides. Henceforth, the pharmacokinetic, pharmacological and toxicological evaluation of ent-kaurene glycosides is reviewed.

Keywords: ent-Kaurene glycosides, Stevia, Stevia rebaudiana, Structure-sweetness relationship, Sweeteners.

IPC code; Int. cl.8 A23L 1/09, A61K 36/28, A61K 127/00

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.8, March- April 2009, pp. 190- 197

 

 

Kigelia africana (Lam.) Benth. ¾ An overview

Sangita Saini1*, Harmeet Kaur1, Bharat Verma2, Ripudaman1 and S K Singh3

1P.D.M. College of Pharmacy, Bahadurgarh 125 407, Haryana, India

2Deptt of Forensic & Toxicology, All India Institute of  Medical Sciences, Delhi-110 029, India

3Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Guru Jambeshwar University of Science & Technology,

Hisar-125 001, Haryana

*Correspondent author, E-mail: sangi_132@yahoo.co.in

Our world harbours a rich source of medicinal plants which are used in treatment of wide range of diseases. The present review highlights the traditional uses, chemical constituents and pharmacological properties of Kigelia africana (Lam.) Benth. syn. K. pinnata (Jacq.) DC. This plant has great potential to be developed as drug by pharmaceutical industries but before recommending its use in modern system of medicine clinical trials are to be done.

 

Keywords: Kigelia, Kigelia africana, Kigelia pinnata, Cucumber-, Sausage tree, Balmkheera, Isopinnatal, Kigelin, Chemical constituents, Medicinal properties.

 

IPC code; Int. cl.8 A61K 8/97, A61K 36/18, A61P 1/12, A61P 17/00, A61P 25/00, A61P 29/00, A61P 31/00, A61P 33/00, A61P 35/00, A61P 39/06

 

 

 

Book Review

 

 

Natural Product Radiance

Vol.8, March- April 2009, pp. 198

 

 

Ethnopharmacology–Recent Advances, P. Pushpangadan, V. George and K. K. Janardhanan ( Eds), Daya Publishing House, 1123/74, Deva Ram Park, Tri Nagar, Delhi-110 035, India, 2008, Hardbound, ISBN10 81-7035-564-8; ISBN13 978-81-7035-564-9, pp. 260 +xiii

 

            Ethnopharmacology is an area of research where tradition and modern science coexists. The term ethnopharmacology, introduced in 1967, has progressed into an interdisciplinary science during the past four decades. It is expanding fast with increasing interest of scientific society in biologically active compounds available in natural resources. Increasing awareness on traditional and alternative systems of medicines such as Ayurveda, Siddha and Homoeopathy has also supported the development of this branch of life sciences. Ethnopharmacological research thus aims at scientific validation of traditional knowledge and development of new useful products through science and technology intervention.

 

            The book is a compilation of articles written by eminent researchers working on phytomedicine and on various aspects of ethnopharmacology. It contains following selected twenty papers with relevant coloured pictures, tables and graphs: Mechanisms of Apoptosis induced by Garlic-derived components; Music therapy: an introduction; Application of traditional knowledge of medicinal plants by tribes of some part of Rajasthan; An experimental evaluation to the anticancer activity of Homoeopathic medicines; Molecular mechanisms underlying immunomodulatory effects of Viscum album preparations; A Rasayana, ICHOR-CR, as a possible Chemoprotectant against Doxorubicin-related toxicity; Ethnomedicinal potential of herbal drugs on gastric dysfunction in experimental animals; Anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive and diuretic activities of Amoora cucullata Roxb.; The role of ethnomedical leads in drug discovery; Quality of natural health products through marker profiling: promotion and international coordination; Potential use of some natural compounds as radioprotectors; Resveratrol miracle: from chemoprevention to cardioprotection; Protective effect of phytochemicals in cancer Chemoprevention, wound healing and Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury; A brief review on phytoconstituents with potential antidiabetic activity; Scientific evaluation of traditional medicine: ethnopharmacology, reverse pharmacology, system biology to metabolomics; Biological diversity in curcuma: a review; Therapeutic potential of medicinal mushrooms occurring in South India amelioration of oxidative stress-induced Hepato-renal damages: a pre-clinical evaluation; Traditional medicine and the Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) Regime of 21 century; Antimitotic polysaccharide from Punica granatum; Documentation of traditional knowledge and IPR Protection related to plants used for food and medicine

            The term traditional knowledge (TK) was introduced by The World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) to refer to the Tradition based literary, Artistic or Scientific works; Performances, Inventions, Scientific discoveries, Designs, Marks, Names and Symbols, Undisclosed information, etc. Categories of TK, significance of TK, Documentation of TK, How to protect TK related information, etc. are illustrated in detail in the last chapter of the book for reading and improving the knowledge about traditional knowledge and its applications in research activities.

 

            An index of botanical names, pharmacological activities, common names, etc. is appended for the convenience of readers. The contact details of authors given separately are also useful for further consultancy. The book compiled and edited by eminent scientists of multidisciplinary research and teaching experiences will be immensely useful to students, teachers, scientists and pharmaceutical industries interested in plant based medicine and drug development. The hardbound size of the book is handy and printing and production of the book is excellent.

Dr (Mrs) Sunita Garg