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Annals  of  Library  and Information  Studies

 

 

ISSN : 0972-5423    
VOLUME  50 

 NUMBER  3

 SEPTEMBER 2003

 

 

 

C O N T E N T S

            

Digital Object Identifier (DOI): An ISBN for the 21st Century   

SUNIThA (t)  and  sreejaya (P)                                                                    101-109

 

Development of Libraries and Information Centres in the Electronic Age:

A Developing Country Perspective                                                                        

NYAMBOGA (C M)  and KEMPARAJU (T D)                                                    110-114

                                                                                                                                              

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Subscribing Indian Periodicals:
A Case Study  of BCKV Central Library, Kalyani, West Bengal                               

BISWAS (B C), CHATTERJEE  (K) and SEN (B K)                                             115-123

 

Social Sciences Resources on the Web: A Case Study of  SOSIG Website                                                                     

MAHARANA (B) and PANDA (K C)                                                                   124-129

 

Technology and Tips for Paper-to-CD/DVD-ROM Conversion of Selected

Collection in Academic Libraries                                                                                

RAWAT (K S)                                                                                                       130-133

BOOK REVIEW                                                                                                    134-135

             

           
Annals of Library and Information Studies

Vol.50, September 2003, pp 101-109

 

 
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): An ISBN for the 21st Century
Sunitha T and Sreejaya P

 

 

                The Internet  represents a totally new environment for the exchange of scholarly literature and it requires new enabling technologies to protect both customers and publishers. Systems will have to be developed to authenticate contents to ensure that what the customer is requesting is what is being delivered. At the same time, the creator of the information must be sure that copyright in the content is respected and protected. While considering the requirements of the new systems, publishers of books and journals internationally realized that a first step would be the development of a new identification system to be used for all digital content. The Digital Object Identifier (DOI) system not only provides a unique identification for contents, but also provides a way to link users of the material to the right holders to facilitate automated digital commerce in the digital environment. The DOI, an initiative taken by the Association of American Publishers, has grown into a prototype system, which supports URN to URL resolution and potential copyright management, document delivery and electronic commerce functions. In principle, the DOI system is fairly simple. It is based on the proposal that publishers should uniformly adopt formal or standard numbering schemes for their online products. The existing legacy systems such as ISBN, ISSN etc., should be used as the basis for this numbering. Such numbered products and their online addresses will be registered in an online directory or database which will automatically route queries about a product to the correct location of that product, where publisher’s response screens will automatically offer the enquirer a variety of commercial transaction options such as viewing, purchasing, licensing or further routing. (For example: from article abstract to full text article content). DOI is a tool for persistence, multiple resolution, stability, security and authentication, distributed administration and internationalization, with a lightweight resolution method and an open protocol. This paper emphasizes on the origin, structure, application and advantages of DOI and its implications in digital rights management.

 

 

 

Annals of Library and Information Studies

Vol.50, September 2003, pp 110-114

 

 

Development of Libraries and Information Centres in the Electronic Age: A Developing Country Perspective

Constantine M. Nyamboga  and T.D. Kemparaju

 

 

                Many libraries and information centres in the developing countries are still far behind the libraries in developed countries in the transition from traditional to electronic libraries. They are expected to continue acquiring print material, while simultaneously seeking out electronic sources. However, few developing countries such as India, Kenya and Thailand are competing with those in the developed world in the transition from traditional to electronic libraries. The libraries in these countries are seriously addressing the issue of electronic information resources acquisition keeping in view the meager economic resources. The paper discusses the challenges posed by the accelerating pace of change in the world of information especially in developing countries and stresses the importance of managing the change by focusing on collection development (inclusive of electronic resources), training and development skills of the information professionals and also library users. It also examines and provides general views on how libraries and information centres should approach the situation in order to accomplish and acquire at least simple electronic resources while taking into consideration the library and information policy.

 

 

Annals of Library and Information Studies

Vol.50, September 2003, pp 115-123

 

 

Cost - Benefit Analysis of Subscribing Indian Periodicals: A Case Study of BCKV Central Library, Kalyani, West Bengal

 Bidhan Chandra Biswas, Koushik Chatterjee and B K Sen
 

 

Presents the results of a study conducted with a sample of 700 users and 25 Indian periodicals subscribed continuously from 1992 to 2001 at Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalaya (BCKV), Kalyani, West Bengal. The meaning, importance and the method of implementing cost benefit analysis in a library set-up is discussed with special reference to BCKV Central Library. Here, cost is measured in terms of the money spent for subscribing Indian journals and benefits are measured in terms  of use frequency of the journals by different users and savings achieved through different methods of subscription. During the 10-year period, increase in the cost of the journals ranged from 20 per cent at the lowest to 1100 per cent at the highest. The 25 journals that were selected for the study were used by 30 per cent to 75 percent of the users. The study also reveals that the cost of a journal is not directly related with its use. For example, the journal in the sample that cost most, ranked only 8th in terms of use. It has also been seen that a saving around 25% can be achieved if the journals are subscribed for three years at a time. Of course, it involves some risks and also availability of funds. The benefit is evaluated against the cost structure of the system, which is represented graphically and statistically in this paper.

 

 

 

 Annals of Library and Information Studies

Vol.50, September 2003, pp124-129

 

Social Sciences Resources on the Web:
A Case Study of SOSIG Website

 Bulu Maharana and K.C. Panda

  

Provides an insight into the concept of ‘quality-controlled subject gateway’. Analyses 4,215 out of 19,765 records available in 19 major forms covering 17 broad subject headings in the field of social sciences on the Net through Social Science Information Gateway (SOSIG) Website.  Discusses the growth, salient features, search facilities, and subject-wise collections of SOSIG.

 

 

Annals of Library and Information Studies

Vol 50, September 2003, pp 130-133

 

Technology and Tips for Paper-to-CD/DVD-ROM Conversion of Selected Collection in Academic Libraries

K. S. Rawat

 

Academic libraries need to retain collection of age-old books, journals, etc., for longer period.  Preservation of select highly useful and valuable materials on optical discs has higher benefits than merely reducing space problem. The chaff can either be consigned to remote warehouses or weeded out with other unwanted editions.