Indian Journal of Fibre & Textile Research

 


Total visitors:1,813 since 15-09-06

 

 ISSN : 0971-0426

 

CODEN : IJFRET

VOLUME 31

NUMBER 3

SEPTEMBER 2006

 

CONTENTS

 

Ionic crosslinking of cellulose

††††††† M Bilgen, P Hauser & B Smith

††††††† IPC Code: Int. Cl.8 D06B3/00

 

363

Effect of mass of kapas on quality of ginned lint

††††††† M Tamil Selvan & K Raghunathan

††††††† IPC Code: Int.Cl.8 D01B1/00

 

369

Tensile properties of various cotton and Dyneemaģ blend yarns

††††††† L B Kimmel, A P S Sawhney & C D Delhom

††††††† IPC Code: Int. Cl.8 D01D, D02G3/00

 

376

Fibre migration in compact-spun yarns: Part IóPneumatic compact yarn

††††††† S Ganesan & G Ramakrishnan

††††††† IPC Code: Int. Cl.8 D01F6/00, D02G3/00

 

381

Structural and functional characteristics of yarns manufactured by different pneumatic spinning systems

††††††† A Riva, L Coll & M Kasem

††††††† IPC Code: Int. Cl.8 D01H1/115

 

 

387

Effects of twisting methods on the plied yarn properties

††††††† ÷ ÷zdemir, S Şardağ & F Kalaoğlu

††††††† IPC Code: Int.Cl8 D01H1/00

 

394

Engineering design of polyester-viscose blended suiting fabrics using radial basis function network: Part I ó Prediction of fabric low-stress mechanical properties

††††††† B K Behera & S B Muttagi

††††† IPC Code: Int. Cl.8 G06N3/02

 

 

401

Influence of yarn torsional rigidity on dimensions of cotton knitted loops

††††††† P K Banerjee & P Bhat

††††††† IPC Code: Int. Cl.8 D04H

 

409

Heat and mass transfer properties of 2-yarn fleece knitted fabrics

††††††† Sinem Gunesoglu & Binnaz Meric

††††††† IPC Code: Int. Cl.8 D04B13/00, G01N33/36

415

 

Effect of lay-up angle and layers on mechanical properties of composites based on rib knit jute inlaid preforms

††††††† V R GiriDev, K Dhinesh, M B Raghulan & K Raghunathan

††††††† IPC Code: Int. Cl.8 D04B7/00

 

 

422

Subjective evaluation of hand knotted carpets

††††††† D B Shakyawar, N P Gupta & P C Patni

††††††† IPC Code: Int. Cl.8 D04G3/00

 

426

Atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge and its application to surface modification of blood-filtering nonwoven fabrics

††††††† Tang Xiaoliang, Qiu Gao & Feng Xianping

††††††† IPC Code: Int. Cl.8 A61F2/00, D06M10/00

 

 

432

Use of transformed reflectance functions for neural network color match prediction systems

††††††† F Ameri, S Moradian, M Amani Tehran & K Faez

††††††† IPC Code: Int. Cl.8 G06N3/02

 

439

Effects of silicone-based softener on the easy-care finished cotton fabric

††††††† F Talebpour & I Holme

††††††† IPC Code: Int. Cl.8 D06C29/00

 

444

Studies on pigment dyeing of cotton by exhaust method

††††††† A K Patra, S Bhaumik & Harmandeep Kaur

††††††† IPC Code: Int. Cl.8 D06P1/00

 

450

Short Communications

 

 

Characteristics of rotor-spun composite yarns

††††††† Haixia Zhang, Shanyuan Wang & Yuan Xue

††††††† IPC Code: Int. Cl.8 D02G3/00

 

460

Suitability of cycloidal cam in shedding mechanism

††††††† Salil Kumar Bhattacharya & Kisalay Das

††††††† IPC Code: Int. Cl.8 D03C5/00

 

465

A novel motion regulation of the heald frame on looms

††††††† Guo Hongliang & Ye Guoming

††††††† IPC Code: Int. Cl.8 D03D41/00

 

467

Effect of polyethylene glycol on physical properties of durable press finished cotton fabric

††††††† Mehdi Afshari, Mitra Tavakoli, Maryam Norouzifar & Zohreh Masoumi

††††††† IPC Code: Int. Cl.8 D06B3/00, D06C15/00

 

470

Dyeing of polyurethane fibre with Ocimum sanctum

††††††† B H Patel & P B Patel

††††††† IPC Code: Int. Cl.8 D06P3/24

 

474

 

 

Indian Journal of Fibre & Textile Research

Vol. 31, September 2006, pp. 363-368

 

Ionic crosslinking of cellulose

M Bilgen, P Hauser& B Smith

Received 3 May 2005; accepted 13 June 2005

Cellulosic fabric has been treated with anionic (chloroacetatic acid) and cationic (3-chloro-2 hydroxypropyl trimethylammonium chloride) materials followed by the application of a polycation (cationized glycerin) and a polyanion (1,2,3,4-butanetetracarboxylic acid) to improve the fabric durable press performance. It is observed that the ionic crosslinks stabilize the cellulose using ionic materials which do not release hazardous reactive chemicals but at the same time provide improved wrinkle recovery angle as well as complete strength retention in treated goods. The polyelectrolyte, the ionic content of the fabrics, and various features of the application procedure have been varied to optimize the results and to develop an in-depth fundamental physical and chemical understanding of the stabilization mechanism.

Keywords: Cellulose, Ionic crosslinking, Wrinkle recovery

IPC Code: Int. Cl.8 D06B3/00

 

Indian Journal of Fibre & Textile Research

Vol. 31, September 2006, pp. 369-375

 

Effect of mass of kapas on quality of ginned lint

M Tamil Selvan & K Raghunathan

Received 28 May 2005; revised received and accepted 14 September 2005

Impact of mass of kapas on quality of ginned lint has been studied using MCU-5 variety. It is found that with the increase in mass of kapas, the quantity of lint and its length increase. The other physical properties of lint are also found to be superior with the increase in mass of kapas. Irrespective of the mass of kapas, the ginning machine setting shows significant impact on fibre properties. The strength and elongation of fibre vary significantly with varying length of oscillation of beater knife from the edge of fixed knife. This is because the removal of fibres from the seed is accomplished by a fixed knife held tightly against a single ginning roller and a moving (reciprocating) knife that co-operates with the roller and fixed knife to separate the fibre from the seeds. The range of increase in short fibre content and nep (content/g) is found to be significantly higher in the sample below 100 mg. If feeding is done in the form of locule in the ginning machine, the fibre deterioration is significantly lesser as compared to feeding as kapas.

Keywords: Cotton, Ginning, Lint

IPC Code: Int.Cl.8D01B1/00

 

Indian Journal of Fibre & Textile Research

Vol. 31, September 2006, pp. 376-380

 

Tensile properties of various cotton and Dyneemaģ blend yarns

 

L B Kimmel, A P S Sawhney& C D Delhom

Received 17 February 2005; revised received and accepted 9 June 2005

A series of ring- and rotor-spun yarns has been produced from the low-level blends of Dyneema, a gel-spun ultra-high molecular weight, high-density polyethylene fiber (HDPE) of varied types, with selected white and naturally colored cottons and the tensile properties of blended yarns studied. The Dyneema fiber is commonly referred to as high performance polyethylene (HPPE) due to its exceptionally high strength. The addition of small quantities of certain HPPE fibers substantially increases the yarn tenacity and breaking elongation of certain cotton blended yarns, particularly those made from naturally colored cottons. The resultant yarn tenacity appears to be influenced by the fineness of the constituent fibers and the level of yarn twist. The effect is more pronounced for the colored cottons than for the HPPE blends with white cotton. Whereas the yarn strength tends to increase for the pure brown and white cottons as the twist increases, it decreases in the green cotton yarns with the increase in twist within the range studied. However, the addition of small quantities of HPPE fiber results in substantial increase in tenacity for all at a constant level of twist. Finer HPPE fibers provide a greater improvement in yarn strength as compared to coarser HPPE fibers. The different frictional properties and geometries of the constituent cottons and synthetic fibers play a role in their blending and associated resultant yarn strength. The use of small quantities of 1-denier HPPE fiber significantly increases the strength and elongation of cotton blended yarns, particularly those made from brown cotton, with the minimal change in observed color. Such cotton and Dyneema blends may find application in special purpose denims, where pure cotton yarns (whether white or naturally colored) or the traditional cotton-rich blends with conventional synthetics may not meet the performance requirements for fabric strength.

Keywords: Cotton, Dyneema, High performance polyethylene, Yarn strength

††††††† IPC Code: Int. Cl.8 D01D, D02G3/00

 

 

Indian Journal of Fibre & Textile Research

Vol. 31, September 2006, pp. 381-386

 

Fibre migration in compact-spun yarns: Part IóPneumatic compact yarn

 

S Ganesan & G Ramakrishnan

Received 27 January 2005; revised received and accepted 29 September 2005

Fibre migration of regular ring-spun vis-ŗ-vis compact-spun (pneumatic compact) combed cotton yarns has been studied using the tracer fibre technique for the different migration parameters. The yarn counts used were 40s and 52s Ne (14.8 tex and 11.4 tex). It is observed that the migration parameters for compact yarn are 10-25% lower than those of regular yarn in both 40s and 52s Ne counts. The degree of migration is found to be lower in compact-spun yarn than in ring-spun yarn due to the reduction in size of spinning triangle and its consequence in the tension gradient. Even though this causes significant change in degree of migration, its contribution is less in comparison to the tension gradient due to fibre occupying different radial positions. The diameter of compact yarn is found to be lower than that of regular yarn in both the cases and this indicates that the packing densities are different. Higher packing density coupled with better integration of fibres into the yarn body results in higher yarn strength.

Keywords: Cotton, Compact-spun yarn, Fibre migration, Mean fibre position, Mean migration intensity, R M S deviation, Tension mechanism

††††††† IPC Code: Int. Cl.8 D01F6/00, D02G3/00

 

 

Indian Journal of Fibre & Textile Research

Vol. 31, September 2006, pp. 387-393

 

Structural and functional characteristics of yarns manufactured by different pneumatic spinning systems

 

A Riva, L Coll & M Kasem

Revised received 21 April 2005; accepted 8 June 2005

The structural and functional properties of yarns manufactured by two pneumatic spinning systems, namely pneumatic wrapping spinning by false twist and pneumatic spinning by real wrapping twist, have been studied and compared to those of the yarns manufactured by conventional ring spinning. These properties are assessed by determining apparent diameter, yarn deformation, yarn evenness, hairiness, neps, average apparent twist, tenacity, elongation, twist vivacity, elongation due to untwist-backtwisting and residual shrinkage. The real wrapping twist pneumatic spinning system produces yarns that have a less pronounced corkscrew structure than those produced by false twist pneumatic spinning. However, the yarns produced by real twist spinning show some characteristics of irregularity and dynamometric characteristics that situate them in an inferior position to yarns produced by conventional ring spinning.

Keywords: Cotton, Corkscrew structure, Pneumatic spinning, Polyester, Ring spinning, Wrapping fibre, Yarn

††††††† IPC Code: Int. Cl.8 D01H1/115

 

Indian Journal of Fibre & Textile Research

Vol. 31, September 2006, pp. 394-400

 

 

Effects of twisting methods on the plied yarn properties

÷ ÷zdemir , S Şardağ&F Kalaoğlu

Received 24 May 2005; revised received and accepted 21 July 2005

The influence of twisting method on the properties of Ne 39/1 and Ne 26/1 combed cotton yarns, plied two and three times on ring, two-for-one and balloonless twisting machines, has been studied. The yarn tenacity, breaking extension, work of rupture, twisting variations, hairiness (S3) and hairiness index values of the resultant yarns have been evaluated. The results, evaluated statistically, show that the plying and twisting methods influence the physical properties of plied yarn. The yarns twisted on balloonless twisting machines have lower hairiness and tenacity values than those of the yarns twisted on other machines while the yarns twisted on two-for-one twisting machines attain higher hairiness and twisting variance values than those of the yarns twisted on other machines. In terms of tenacity, the highest improvement obtained after plying occurs in the yarns twisted on two-for-one twisting machines while the lowest improvement is observed in the yarns twisted on balloonless twisting machines. Contrarily, the yarns twisted on ring and balloonless twisting machines show the highest improvement in hairiness and twisting variance values.

Keywords: Balloonless twisting, Cotton, Plied yarn, Ring twisting, Twisting method, Two-for-one twisting, Yarn hairiness, Yarn tenacity

†††††† IPC Code: ††††††† Int.Cl.8 D01H1/00

 

Indian Journal of Fibre & Textile Research

Vol. 31, September 2006, pp. 401-408

 

Engineering design of polyester-viscose blended suiting fabrics using radial basis function network: Part I ó Prediction of fabric low-stress mechanical properties

 

B K Behera& S B Muttagi

Received 15 June 2005; revised received 9 September 2005; accepted 17 October 2005

A complete engineering design of polyester-viscose blended suiting fabrics has been presented using radial basis function neural network algorithm. Fabric low-stress mechanical properties, such as extension, bending rigidity, shear rigidity, breaking strength have been predicted from the structural parameters of the fabric such as weave, yarn tex, thread density, crimp, fabric mass and fabric cover. It is observed that the radial basis function neural network could successfully predict the trends in variation of fabric property with corresponding change in structural parameters.

Keywords: Engineering design, Neural network, Polyester-viscose blend, Prediction error, Radial basis function

IPC Code: Int. Cl.8 G06N3/02

 

Indian Journal of Fibre & Textile Research

Vol. 31, September 2006, pp. 409-414

 

Influence of yarn torsional rigidity on dimensions of cotton knitted loops

 

P K Banerjee & P Bhat

Received 27 February 2005; accepted 15 June 2005

An interlock machine has been suitably modified for knitting 1 ī 1 rib, half cardigan and interlock constructions employing commercial cotton hosiery yarns of seven different counts while maintaining the machine and process variables unchanged. Multiple regression equations were worked out relating the loop dimensions, namely loop length, course spacing and wale spacing of the fully relaxed samples, with the tensile, flexural and torsional rigidities as well as with the thickness and coefficient of friction values of the yarns. These equations were validated by additionally knitting three different types of hosiery yarn for the three constructions and comparing the predicted values with the experimental ones. It is observed that the mean torsional rigidity of yarn plays a very important role in determining loop dimensions of all the three constructions, necessitating the testing and standardization of this property for improvement in quality of knit goods. For constructions incorporating tuck loops, such as half cardigan, the yarn buckling rigidity may additionally play a decisive role.

Keywords: Cotton yarn, Course spacing, Half cardigan, Loop length, Mean torsional rigidity, Wale spacing

IPC Code: Int. Cl.8 D04H

Indian Journal of Fibre & Textile Research

Vol. 31, September 2006, pp. 415-421

 

Heat and mass transfer properties of 2-yarn fleece knitted fabrics

 

Sinem Gunesoglu & Binnaz Meric

 

Received 14 March 2005; revised received and accepted 12 September 2005

Heat and mass transfer properties of 2-yarn fleece fabrics of four different compositions have been studied by related measurements, such as thermal conductivity, water vapour permeability, air permeability and wicking ability. It is observed that the raising process, used to produce typical commercially available fleece fabrics, is very effective on heat transfer properties; the effect of fibre type is rather strong on mass transfer properties of fleece fabrics.

Keywords: Air permeability, Fleece fabric, Heat transfer property, Mass transfer property, Thermal conductivity, Water vapour permeability, Wicking

IPC Code: Int. Cl.8 D04B13/00, G01N33/36

 

Indian Journal of Fibre & Textile Research

Vol. 31, September 2006, pp. 422-425

 

Effect of lay-up angle and layers on mechanical properties of composites based on rib knit jute inlaid preforms

V R GiriDev, K Dhinesh, M B Raghulan & K Raghunathan

Received 9 May 2005; revised received and accepted 31 August 2005

The mechanical properties of knitted jute inlaid reinforced composites with different stacking sequences and number of layers have been studied. Flat rib knitted preforms have been produced in manual flatbed knitting machine followed by composite laminate preparation using simple hand lay-up technique. It is observed that the mechanical properties are dependant upon the stacking sequence and number of layers.

Keywords: Composite, Jute, Knitting, Mechanical properties, Textile preform

IPC Code: Int. Cl.8 D04B7/00

 

 

Indian Journal of Fibre & Textile Research

Vol. 31, September 2006, pp. 426-431

 

Subjective evaluation of hand knotted carpets

D B Shakyawar, N P Gupta & P C Patni

Revised received and accepted 1 June 2005

Sixty-two different carpet samples have been evaluated for Carpet Aesthetic Value (CAV) and Carpet Hand Value (CHV) subjectively by ten different judges. Each carpet sample was considered individually and an estimated score was awarded on an arbitrary scale between 0 and 5.The rank correlations were worked out among different judges for CAV and CHV. The correlation coefficients for all the samples are found to be 0.37, 0.49 and 0.34 for CAV and 0.55, 0.53 and 0.52 for CHV for all the judges, manufacturers and users groups respectively, which are highly significant (p<0.01). This indicates that all the judges are in close agreement. The analysis to examine the influence of fibre mix, carpet constructional parameters and finishing treatment reveals that the CHV is influenced by fibre mix and it increases with the increase in knot density and pile height upto some level, whereas antique and herbal wash treatments reduce the CHV value.

Keywords: Aesthetic value, Antique finish, Hand knotted carpet, Knottage, Pile height, Wool

IPC Code: Int. Cl.8 D04G3/00

 

Indian Journal of Fibre & Textile Research

Vol. 31, September 2006, pp. 432-438

 

Atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge and its application to surface modification of blood-filtering nonwoven fabrics

 

Tang Xiaoliang ,Qiu Gao & Feng Xianping

Received 11 March 2005; revised received and accepted 28 June 2005

Electricity parameters of discharge current and discharge power measured by the oscilloscope have been analyzed by using improved dielectric barrier discharge equipment. After carefully controlled discharge voltage, current, power and gap between the electrodes, an improved quasi-stable atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge plasma source is achieved. This plasma source has been used to modify the surface of melt-blown polybutylene terephthalate (PBT) nonwovens. It is observed that both the wettablity and permeation of treated melt-blown PBT nonwovens are greatly improved. The result is of great importance to dielectric barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure and its application to surface modification of textile materials.

Keywords: Dielectric barrier discharge, Melt-blown polybutylene terephthalate nonwovens, Nonwoven fabric, Plasma diagnostics, Surface modification

IPC Code: Int. Cl.8 A61F2/00, D06M10/00

 

 

Indian Journal of Fibre & Textile Research

Vol. 31, September 2006, pp. 439-443

 

Use of transformed reflectance functions for neural network color
match prediction systems

 

F Ameri , S Moradian , M Amani Tehran & K Faez

Received 19 April 2005; revised received 26 July 2005; accepted 29 August 2005

Attempts have been made to use different transformed reflectance functions as input for a fixed genetically optimized neural network match prediction system. Two different sets of data depicting dyed samples of known recipes but metameric to each other were used to train and test the network. All the transformed and untransformed reflectance functions gave good recipe predictions when trained and tested by the same data sets (PF/4 being less than 4). However, the transformation based on matrix R of the decomposition theory showed promising results, since it gave very good colorant concentration predictions when trained by the first set of data dyed with one set of colorants while being tested by a completely different second set of data dyed with a different set of colorants (PF/ 4 always being less than 10).

Keywords: Color match prediction, Matrix R, Neural networks, Transformed reflectance functions, Wool

IPC Code: Int. Cl.8 G06N3/02

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Fibre & Textile Research

Vol. 31, September 2006, pp. 444-449

 

Effects of silicone-based softener on the easy-care finished cotton fabric

 

F Talebpour &I Holme

Revised received and accepted 26 July 2005

The effects of an easy-care finish, namely DMeDHEU and DMeDHEU plus silicone softener, on physical properties of bleached cotton fabric have been studied. It is obvious that easy-care finish imparts marked increase in the fabric crease resistance along with the increase in static and kinetic frictions. The application of silicone softener on top of the easy-care finished fabric decreases the fabric friction and a further increase in the crease recovery angle is also observed. Easy-care finishing marginally changes the bending length, which is reduced to some extent by the application of silicone softener.

Keywords: Bending length, Cotton fabric, Crease recovery angle, Easy-care finish, Kinetic friction, Static friction, Silicone softener

IPC Code: Int. Cl.8 D06C29/00

Indian Journal of Fibre & Textile Research

Vol. 31, September 2006, pp. 450-459

 

Studies on pigment dyeing of cotton by exhaust method

 

A K Patra, S Bhaumik & Harmandeep Kaur

Received 1 January 2005; Revised received and accepted 2 June 2005

Exhaust dyeing with pigments was studied by varying different parameters, using different auxiliaries and carrying out studies on the physical chemistry of the coloration process. These pigments from Clariant, namely Printofix Yellow HEGR, Printofix Red HPBG and Printofix Turquoise Blue HRN, were used and various cationizing agents, leveling agents and lubricants were tried to get good and level dyeing. The cationization process, dyeing step, binder application and curing conditions were optimized for the three pigment colours. The results were mainly interpreted in terms of colour strength (K/S), visual assessment of evenness and fastness ratings. It was possible to get good colour depth and reasonable levelness by the exhaust dyeing. The wash fastness was quite good as expected while the crocking was not very encouraging. Spectral analysis along with kinetic and thermodynamic studies endorsed some of the trends observed during process optimization .

Keywords: Cationization, Cotton, Exhaust dyeing, Pigment dyeing

IPC Code: Int. Cl.8 D06P1/00

 

Indian Journal of Fibre & Textile Research

Vol. 31, September 2006, pp. 460-464

 

Characteristics of rotor-spun compositeyarns

 

Haixia Zhang , Shanyuan Wang& Yuan Xue

Received 17 January 2005; revised received 1 July 2005; accepted 1 August 2005

Various rotor-spun composite yarns have been produced by combining staple fibres with filament yarns under varying filament overfeed ratio on a modified open-end rotor spinning frame. The effects of filament overfeed ratio on the structure and properties of composite yarns have been studied. It is observed that the filament overfeed ratio has great influence on the filament geometric position and helix trajectory in composite yarns. As the filament tension increases with decreasing filament overfeed ratio, the filament moves from the surface into the center of the composite yarn. The tensile properties of composite yarns depend on the filament overfeed ratio, and the filament overfeed ratio alone does not explain the CV% and hairiness of composite yarns. Compared with the normal rotor-spun yarn, the appearance and properties of rotor-spun composite yarns are improved.

Keywords:†††††††††† Cotton, Composite yarn, Filament overfeed ratio, Rotor-spun yarn

IPC Code:††† Int. Cl.8 D02G3/00

 

Indian Journal of Fibre & Textile Research

Vol. 31, September 2006, pp. 465-466

 

Suitability of cycloidal cam in shedding mechanism

Salil Kumar Bhattacharya & Kisalay Das

Received 1 February 2005; revised received and accepted 21 July 2005

A suitable cycloidal cam has been designed and compared with the simple harmonic cam to study the behaviour of warp yarn tension and warp breakage rate. Electronic tensiometer was used to measure the tension of the warp yarn during weaving with and without shuttle for both types of cam to understand the effect of shuttle propulsion on warp yarn tension. It is observed that the warp breakage rate is comparatively less in case of cycloidal cam. The tension behaviour is also found to be smoother in case of cycloidal cam.

Keywords:†† Cam follower, Cycloidal cam, Simple harmonic cam, Shedding cam, Weaving

IPC Code: Int. Cl.8 D03C5/00

 

 

Indian Journal of Fibre & Textile Research

Vol. 31, September 2006, pp. 467-469

 

A novel motion regulation of the heald frame on looms

 

Guo Hongliang& Ye Guoming

Revised received and accepted 8 April 2005

An 8-order polynomial motion has been proposed which optimizes the heald frameís dynamical performances. Compared to the simple harmonic and 7-order polynomial motion regulations, this motion regulation is proved to be more advantageous. The motion regulation improves the dynamic performance of heald frame. It is found to be suitable for high speed looms.

Keywords: 7-order polynomial, 8-order polynomial, Heald frame, Simple harmonic motion, Weaving

IPC Code: Int. Cl.8 D03D41/00

Indian Journal of Fibre & Textile Research

Vol. 31, September 2006, pp. 470-473

 

Effect of polyethylene glycol on physical properties of durable press finished cotton fabric

Mehdi Afshari, Mitra Tavakoli, Maryam Norouzifar & Zohreh Masoumi

Revised received and accepted 24 June 2005

Effect of molecular weight (400, 1000, 1500) and concentration (5-30%) of polyethylene glycol (PEG) on physical properties of durable press finished cotton fabrics using dimethylol dihydroxyl ethylene urea (DMDHEU) by pad-dry-curing has been studied. The results show that the addition of PEG influences crease resistance, abrasion resistance, water absorbency and tensile strength of treated fabric. By increasing molecular weight and concentration of PEG, crease resistance of the processed cotton fabric increases. In the presence of PEG with increasing time and temperature of curing, the crease resistance and water absorbency increase. The best results have been obtained using 400 molecular weight of PEG, 5% concentration of PEG, 2 min curing time, and 200įC curing temperature.

Keywords:†††††††††††††††††††† Cotton, Durable press finishing, Dimethylol†††††††††††††††††††† dihydroxylethylene urea, Polyethylene glycol

IPC Code: Int. Cl.8 D06B3/00, D06C15/00

 

 

Indian Journal of Fibre & Textile Research

Vol. 31, September 2006, pp. 474-476

 

Dyeing of polyurethane fibre with Ocimum sanctum

B H Patel & P B Patel

Received 14 March 2005; revised received and accepted 31 May 2005

Polyurethane fibre has been dyed with a methanolic extract from the leaves of Ocimum sanctum containing ursolic acid as the major colourant with or without various metallic salts and different mordanting techniques. The improvement in depth of colour without altering the tone is observed. The colour of the samples has been evaluated on computer colour matching system in terms of K/S and L* a* b* colour coordinates. The dyeings show moderate to good fastness to washing, light and rubbing.

Keywords: Dyeing, Metallic salts, Natural dye, Ocimum sanctum, Polyurethane fibre

IPC Code: Int. Cl.8 D06P3/24