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Indian Journal of Marine Sciences

 

ISSN: 0379-5136   

CODEN: IJMNBF

VOLUME 33

NUMBER 4

DECEMBER 2004

 

CONTENTS

Papers

 

CBR spatial similarity analysis on mesoscale ocean eddies with remote sensing data

Yunyan Du, Ce Li, Fenzen Su, Yianyu Zhang & Xiaomei Yang

319-328

 

 

Wave pressure reduction on vertical seawalls / caissons due to an offshore breakwater

M.G. Munireddy & S. Neelamani

329-337

 

 

Nitrogen and phosphorus in water and sediments at Ria Lagartos coastal lagoon, Yucatan, Gulf of Mexico

David S. Valdes & Elizabeth Real

 

338-345

 

 

Population dynamics of silver biddy Gerres setifer (Pisces: Perciformes) in the Parangipettai waters, south east coast of India

K. Sivashanthini & S  Ajmal Khan

 

346-354

 

 

Growth inhibition of human pro-myelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cells by lipid extracts of marine alga Sargassum marginatum (Fucales, Phaeophyta) harvested off Goa (west coast of India) with special refernce to fatty acid composition

N. Bhaskar, M. Hosakawa & K. Miyashita

 

 

355-360

 

 

Short Communications

 

Immune enhancement assessment of dietary incorporated marine alga Sargassum wightii (Phaeophyceae / Punctariales) in tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon (Crustacia / Penaeidae) through prophenoloxidase (proPO) systems

S. Felix, P. Herald Robins & A. Rajeev

 

 

361-364

 

 

 

Abundance and distribution of  cyanobacteria Synechococcus spp in the south-eastern Black Sea during 2001 summer 

A. Muzzaffer Feyzioglu, Ilknur Kurt, Muhammet Boran & Nuket Sivri

 

365-368

 

 

Antibacterial activity of the winged oyster, Pteria Chinensis (Pterioida:Pteridae)

C. Chellaram, K. Mary Elizabeth Gnanambal & J. K. Patterson Edward

369-372

 

 

Annual Author Index

373-374

 

 

Annual Key Word Index

375-378

 

 

Acknowledgement to Referees

379-380

 

 

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Marine Sciences

 Vol. 33(4), December 2004, pp. 319-328

 

CBR spatial similarity analysis on mesoscale ocean eddies with remote sensing data

*Yunyan Du, Ce Li, Fenzhen Su, Tianyu Zhang & Xiaomei Yang

 

Ocean eddy Case-Based Reasoning (CBR) is developed and extended to the spatial-tempo domain in this paper to extract ocean eddy spatial similarity information in a quantificational manner, which can be very difficult to acquire using current routine eddy feature recognition and analysis algorithms. Present work includes three basic steps. First, information about the eddy’s spatial structure and attributes is obtained from the original remote sensing data. Then a library of historical eddy cases is built using the cases’ expression models. Finally, a Radius Vector Serial Analysis Model Based on Barycentre (RVSAMB) is provided to analyse the spatial similarity between the historical cases for further forecasting and dynamic analysis. In this study, a new quantitative method to analyse and extract ocean mesoscale eddy information using Case-based Reasoning is presented. Firstly, a historical ocean eddy case library was constructed based on the specific expression model. Then, the sketch of this method is discussed in detail, especially the similarity assessment method—“Radius Vector Serial Analysis Model Based on Barycentre”. Finally, a mesoscale warm eddy example in the Gulf Stream of the North Atlantic indicated that this is a feasible way to analyse ocean eddies.

 

[Key words: Mesoscale eddy, Case-Based Reasoning (CBR), Spatial similarity, Radius Vector Serial Analysis Model Based  on Barycentre (RVSAMB) ]  

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Marine Sciences

Vol. 33(4), December 2004, pp. 329-337

 

Wave pressure reduction on vertical seawalls/caissons due to an offshore breakwater

M G Munireddy  and *S Neelamani

 

The technique to reduce the wave loads on seawalls/caissons is gaining momentum around the world. Placing an offshore structure in front of seawall/caisson is expected to reduce the loads on these structures. A series of physical model tests were carried out to examine the order of wave pressure reduction for different height of the breakwater related to the local water depth. One has to be careful, when the crest of the breakwater is immersed with about 17% of the water depth, during which, water jetting effect is found to increases the pressures. Modification factor in association with Goda`s formula is proposed to estimate the shoreward pressures on the seawall in the presence of the offshore breakwater. Statistical analysis is carried out on the measured pressure data and the wave pressures for 2% probability of exceedence for different breakwater heights w.r.t. the water depth are given in this paper.

 

[Key words: Dynamic pressures, seawalls, low-crested breakwater, pool length, piling-up of water]

 

[IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 E02B 3/06]

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Marine Sciences

Vol. 33(4), December 2004, pp. 338-345

 

Nitrogen and phosphorus in water and sediments at Ria Lagartos coastal lagoon, Yucatan, Gulf of Mexico

David S. Valdes* & Elizabeth Real

 

Ria Lagartos, a hypersaline coastal lagoon in the Gulf of Mexico on the Yucatan peninsula was sampled three times in a year at 30 locations, in order to quantify the nitrogen and phosphorus available in the water column and sediments. Undisturbed samples of sediment were analyzed and incubated in the laboratory to estimate ammonium and phosphate fluxes between water and sediment together with nitrification and denitrification rates. The results indicated higher ammonium liberation (250±149 mmol m-2 h-1) and nitrification (151±132 mmol m-2 h-1), than denitrification (47±33 mmol m-2 h-1). In contrast phosphate liberation from sediments was found to be low (0.67±1.31 mmol m-2 h-1). The high concentrations of organic matter (3.73±1.65 %), total nitrogen (99.14±62.73 mmol g-1), and phosphorus (4.42±1.82 mmol g-1) in the sediments of the lagoon, indicate that can be a sink for these elements.

 

[Key words: Sediment, Ria Lagartos Mexico, nitrogen, phosphorus, nitrification, denitrification]

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Marine Sciences

Vol. 33(4), December 2004, pp. 346-354

 

Population dynamics of silver biddy Gerres setifer (Pisces: Perciformes) in the Parangipettai waters, southeast coast of India

*K Sivashanthini & S Ajmal Khan

 

Growth parameters of Gerres setifer (Hamilton, 1822) in the Parangipettai waters were estimated using ELEFAN I programme. The asymptotic length (L) and growth coefficient (K) were found to be respectively 174.05 mm and  1.19 year-1 respectively in male and 170.5 mm and 1.26 year-1 in female. The ‘t0’ estimated by substituting the Land K in Pauly’s equation was -0.0817 in males and -0.0775 in females. Instantaneous rates of mortality (Z), natural mortality (M) and fishing mortality (F) in male were 2.53, 1.26 and 1.26 while in females the above values were 2.80, 1.32 and 1.48. The results of the present study showed that exploitation of G. setifer in the Parangipettai waters is below the optimum level indicating scope for slight increase in catch efforts.

 

[Key words: Asymptotic length, Gerres setifer, growth, mortality, Parangipettai]

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Marine Sciences

 Vol. 33(4), December 2004, pp. 355-360  

 

Growth inhibition of human pro-myelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cells by lipid extracts of marine alga Sargassum marginatum (Fucales, Phaeophyta) harvested off Goa (west coast of India)
with special reference to fatty acid composition

N Bhaskar,#* and M Hosakawa & K Miyashita

 

The present investigation deals with the fatty acid composition of total lipids and different lipid classes of brown seaweed Sargassum marginatum harvested off Goa. An effort was made to screen the growth inhibitiory/cytotoxic activity of lipid extracts on the human pro-melocytic leukemia (HL-60) cells. Phospholipids (PL) were found to be the most effective compared to the other lipid classes in terms of cytotoxic activity. PL exhibited cytotoxic activity at concentrations as low as 20 mg/ml. Phospholipids were found to be higher in poly unsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) among all the lipid classes analysed. This study indicates the possibility of seaweeds as potential sources of anticancer substances. Further works are needed to identify the active compound responsible for this anti-cancerous activity. The role of non-methylene interrupted (NMI) fatty acid specific to Sargassum spp, as anti-cancerous substance, also needs to be elucidated.

 

[Key words: Seaweed,  Sargassum marginatum,  cancer,  phospholipids,  PUFA,  NMI  fatty  acid,  fatty acid,  lipid, pro-myelocytic leukemia]

 

[IPC Code: Int. Cl.7 A61K 35/00, A61P 35/02]

 

 

 

Short Communications

 

Indian Journal of Marine Sciences

Vol. 33(4), December 2004, pp. 361-364

 

Immune enhancement assessment of dietry incorporated marine alga Sargassum wightii (Phaeophyceae/Punctariales) in tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon (Crustacia/Penaeidae) through prophenoloxidase (proPO) systems

S. Felix*, P. Herald Robins & A. Rajeev

 

An experiment of 30 days duration was conducted to test the efficacy of the seaweed Sargassum wightii, as immunostimulant in tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon. The shrimps were fed with the experimental diets coated with different concentrations of the brown algae S. wightii viz. 10, 20 and 30 g/kg. They were challenged with a marine pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus to assess the increase in survival rate if any due to immune enhancement. Another group of shrimp was used for drawing the haemolymph to estimate the increase in the level of prophenoloxidase activity. Samplings for the above said analysis were carried out at regular intervals of 3 days viz. 1st, 3rd, 6th, 9th and 12th days. The highest prophenoloxidase activity (0.62) and the highest survival rate (83%) were recorded on the 12th day with the experimental diet (10 g/kg) . Hence the 10 g/kg of S. wightii added to the diet could be an eco-friendly and economically viable immunostimulant for penaeid shrimps.

 

[Key words: Pro phenol oxidase activity, challenge, immunostimulant, marine alga, Sargassum wightii]

 

[IPC Code: Int. Cl7. A01K 61/00]

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Marine Sciences

Vol 33(4), December 2004, pp. 365-368

 

Abundance and distribution of cyanobacteria Synechococcus spp in the south-eastern Black Sea during 2001 summer

*A. Muzaffer Feyzioglu, Ilknur Kurt, Muhammet Boran, Nuket Sivri

 

Abundance and distribution of unicellular cyanobacteria Synechococcus spp were studied during July 2001. Samples were collected from four different depths covering above the thermocline. Nitrate concentrations ranged from 0,005 mg at-l-1 off Trabzon and Hopa to 1.284 mg at-l-1 off Giresun. The highest concentration of Synechococcus spp. was at off Giresun at 25 m (6000 cell ml-1) and off Rize (3700 cell ml-1) at suface. Cyanobacteria cell counts were low at 5 and 10 m depths. The picoplanktonic abundance varies with nutrients in the Black Sea and it is quite lower in July 2001 somewhat similar to those observed in the oligotrophic Atlantic waters.

 

[Key words: Cyanobacteria, Synechococcus, Black Sea]

 

 

 

Indian Journal of Marine Sciences

Vol. 33(4), December 2004, pp. 369-372

 

Antibacterial activity of the winged oyster Pteria chinensis (Pterioida: pteridae)

C. Chellaram*, K. Mary Elizabeth Gnanambal & J.K. Patterson Edward

 

The whole body extracts of the winged oyster, Pteria chinensis obtained with different solvents were assayed for antibacterial activity using agar well diffusion technique against human and fish pathogens. The acetone and chloroform crude extracts exhibited broad antibacterial activity. Highest activity was exhibited against Klebsiella pneumoniae (5 mm) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (5 mm) by the crude extract of acetone and against Salmonella paratyphi B (5 mm) by the chloroform extract. Similarly, the crude extract of chloroform was found to inhibit 8 out of 10 fish pathogens tested. The column-purified acetone fractions showed higher activity against Klebsiella pneumoniae (5 mm), Sreptococcus pneumoniae (4 mm), Serratia marcescens (4 mm) and Proteus mirabilis (4 mm). The MIC of the 100% acetone fraction was found to be lower for the pathogens, S. marcescens (100 µg) and P. mirabilis (150 µg) and hence 100% acetonated fraction of the extract of P. chinensis can be considered as potent antimicrobial compound against these pathogens.

 

[Key words: Marine natural products, antibacterial activity, Pteria chinensis, molluscs]

 

[IPC Code: Int.Cl7. A01N 63/02]

 

Acknowledgement  to  Referees 

The Publisher and Editor of the Indian Journal of Marine Sciences (IJMS) are most grateful to the experts given below, in assisting the peer-review process of the journal during 2003- 2004. The referees have spared some of their valued time on critically reviewing the research papers submitted to IJMS during the year 2003- 2004. Their kind cooperation in critical reviewing, at times re-reviewing, is highly appreciated, which has immensely helped in maintaining the quality of the papers published in IJMS. We are thankful to them for their continuing efforts .

 

 

A, Nemec, Galway, Ireland

Machado, Wilson, Niteroi, Brazil

Achuthankutty, C.T., Goa, India

Mann, Roger,Virginia, USA

Ali, Mohammad, New Delhi, India

Manson, Fiona, Cleveland, Australia

Annamalai, H., Univ. of Hawaii, USA

Marston, Mareie, Bristol, USA

Ansari, Z.A, Goa, India

Martinez, O. Perez, Canarias, Spain

Ardisson, P.L.Yucatan, Mexico

May, W., Copenhagen, Denmark

Arnosti, Carol, Falmouth, USA

Mayer, A.M., Jerusalam, Israel

Austin, Brian, Scotland, UK

Mishra, S.S., Barrackpore, India

Azeez, P.A., Coimbatore, India

Montenegro, I.B., Burgos, Spain

Bahuguna, Anjali, Ahemdabad, India

Montesinos, F.Gonzales, Madrid, Spain

Bahuliyan, N., Goa, India

Motlu, J.J.Cruz, Sydney, Australia

Banakar, V.K., Goa, India

Narayana, A.C., Cochin, India

Barbieri, Edison, Sao Paulo, Brazil

Nayar, S., West Beach,  Australia

Battaglene, S., Taroona, Australia

Nelson, D.J. Worcester, USA

Becker, P., Mens, Belgium

Nissim, Nadav, Tel Aviv, Israel

Belan, T., Vladivostok, Russia

Paropkari, A.L., Goa, India

Blackford, Jerry, Plymouth, UK

Pavoni, Bruno, Venezia, Itlay

Blunt, John W, Christchurch, New Zealand

Penven, Pierrick, Paris, France. 

Borse, B.D., Shindkheda , India

Pereia, R.C., Brazil

Bouillon, S., Brussels, Belgium

Peters, Hartmut, Miami, USA

Bradley, Peter, Worcester, USA

Pillai, N.G.K., Kochi, India

Cadrin, S.X., Woods Hole, USA

Pohl, C., Warnemunde, Germany

Calbet, Albert, Catalunya, Spain

Polonsky, Alexander, The Crimea, Ukraine

Carr, Emma, Australia

Prasanna Kumar, S., Goa, India

Chakraborty, S.K., Mumbai, India

Raghukumar, C., Goa, India

Chandra Sekhar K., Hyderabad, India

Rahman, P.K.S.M., Teesvalley, UK

Chen, Jiann-Chu, Keelung, Taiwan

Raible, Christoph C., Bern, Switzerland

Chu, Kim, Christchurch, New Zealand

Ramana, M.V., Goa, India

Cochard, Jean Claude, Taravao, France

Ramaswamy, V., Goa, India

Cooker, M.J., England, UK

Ramesh Singh, P., Virginia, USA

Craig, O’Neill, Sydney Australia

Reddanna, P., Hyderabad, India

Dalal, S.G., Goa, India

Rezai, H., Tehran, Iran

Debnay, Jean-Pierre, Angers Cedex, France

Rivonker, C.U., Goa, India

Dembitsky, V.M., Jerusalam, Israel

Roberto De Philippis, Firenze, Itlay

Dhargallkar, V.K., Goa, India

 Rodrigues, C.L., Goa, India

Dimiri, V.P., Hyderabad, India

Ronchetti, Fiamma, Milan, Itlay

Doglioli, Andrea M., France

Rorer, Greg, Corvallis, USA

Ducklow, Hugh, Virginia, USA

Roychoudary, A.N., Capetown, S. Africa

Fani, Renato, Florence, Itlay

Ryder, Alan, Galway, Ireland

Fileman, Elaine, Plymouth, U.K.

 

Fitt, W.K., Athens, Georgia,USA

Saenger, P., Lismore, Australia

Gajbhiye, S.N., Mumbai, India

Salam, M.A., Mymensingh, Bangladesh

Galil, Bella, Haifa, Israel

Sanil Kumar, V., Goa, India

Garvoine, R.W., Delawre, USA

Santos, M.N., Othao, Portugal

Gauns, Mangesh, Goa, India

Sardessai, S.S., Goa, India

Glibert, P.M., Cambridge, USA

Sarkar, Ritwik, Aachen, Germany

Gowing, M.M., Seattle, USA

Satsangi, S.K., Kharagpur, India

Gribble, G.W, Hanover, USA

Saucedo, Pedro E., Lapaz, Mexico

Gu, Ji-Dong, Hong Kong

Sawabe, T., Hakodate, Japan

Haus, B.K., Miami, USA

Selvin, Joseph, Kanyakumari, India

Hellio, Claire, Cedex, France

Siddhanta, A.K., Bhavnagar, India

Hochberg, Eric, Hawaii, USA

Singh, A.D., Cochin, India

Holland, Linda, La Jolla, USA

Singh, R.P., Kanpur, India

Huang, Ching-Jer, Tainan, Taiwan

Solidaro, C., Italy

Ingole, B., Goa, India

Somvanshi, V.S., Mumbai, India

Iorio, Daniela Di, Athens, USA

Sreenivas, N., Visakhapatnam, India

Jeng, Dong-Sheng, Griffth University, Australia

Sridhar, K.R., Mangalore, India

Jeyasekaran, G.,Tuticorin, India

Staden, J. Van, Scottsville, S.Africa

Jonathan, M.P., Chennai, India

Subba Raju, L.V., Goa, India

Joseph, M.M.,Cochin, India

Sundar, V., Madras, India   -142

Kaisrey, S., Goa, India

Suryanarayanan, T.S., Chennai, India

Kandasamy, S., Kaohsiung, Taiwan

Szefer, P., Gdansk, Poland

Katz, Chuck, San Diego, USA

Tappin, A., Plymouth, U.K.

Kelaher, Brendan, Sydney, Australia

Umamaheswara Rao, M., Visakhapatnam, India

Kirkgoz, M. Salih, Adana, Turkey

Uysal, Zahit, Mersin, Turkey

Kit, Eliezer, Tel-Aviv, Israel

Valecha, Neena, Delhi, India

Kodama, Masaaki, Iwate, Japan

Valle, Felipe Ascencio, Mexico

Kovacs, John, Nipissing, Canada

Vasconcelos, Maria, Lisbon, Portugal

Kryc, Kelly, Stanford, USA

Vinci, G.K., Barrackpore, India

Kunte, P.D., Goa, India

Vranes, Kevin Washington DC, USA

Labin, Ahura-Almogi, Jerusalam, Israel

Wafar, M.V.M., Goa, India

Lane, Robert R., Louisiana, U.K.

Wang, Zhendi, Ottawa, Canada

Larson, Magnus, Lund, Sweden

Wever, Ron, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Lartigue, J., Taxas, USA

Wiggert, J., Virginia, USA

Lee, Chan-Lin, Kaohsiung, Taiwan

Wiggert, Jerry, Norfolk, USA

Lee, S.K., Singapore

Winkelmann, G., Tuebingen, Germany

Lepoint, G., Liege, Belgium

Yoshida, Takahiro, Ibaraki, Japan

Liu, Hongbin, Taipei, Taiwan

Yu, Chun-fai, HongKong

Lokabharati, P.A., Goa, India

Zingde, M.D. Mumbai, India

Lough, J.M., Queensland, Australia